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Número de publicaciónUS1393712 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación11 Oct 1921
Fecha de presentación4 Nov 1918
Fecha de prioridad4 Nov 1918
Número de publicaciónUS 1393712 A, US 1393712A, US-A-1393712, US1393712 A, US1393712A
InventoresFrank W Steere, William C Woodland
Cesionario originalFrank W Steere, William C Woodland
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Process and means for removing suspended matter from gas
US 1393712 A
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

F. W. STEERE AND W. C. WOODIIAND.

PROCESS AND MEANS FOR REMOVING SUSPENDED MATTER FROM GAS. APPLICATION FILED NOV-4, 191s.

93 712 Patented Oct. 11, 1921.

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f 3] anmzvltoz i3 fizcuql SEE-n Wibn e09 l 52 5 @111 OEQQTKR UNITE STATES PATENT FRANK 7'e STEERE AND WILLIAM C. WOODLAND, 0F DETROIT, MICEIQAN.

rnocnss AND MEANS ron nnmovme susrnnnnn MATTER neon ens.

Application filed November 4, 1918.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, FRANK W. Srnnun and WILLIAM C. WOODLAND, citizens of the United States of America, residing at Detroit, in the county of Wayne and State of Michigan, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in the Process and Means for Removing Suspended Matter from. Gas, of which the following is a specification, reference being had therein to the accompanying drawings.

This invention relates to improvements in and means for carrying out the processes disclosed in Letters Patent of the United States, issued to Frank W Steere and num bered 1,130,212, 1,130,213 and 1,130,214., and its object is to increase the efiiciency of the process and apparatus by providing suitable and efficient means for controlling the temperature of the gas as it passes through the electrical discharge, and at the same time, for insuring the maximum efiiciency in the operation of the electrodes.

With these and other ends in view, the invention consists in the matters hereinafter set forth and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawing in wh1ch Figure 1 is a longitudinal vertical sectlon through a combined heating and electrical discharge unit embodied in a system illustrative of means for carrying out the invention; and

Fig. 2 is a transverse vertical section through thecombined heating and electrlcal discharge unit illustrated in Fig. 1.

As illustrated in the drawing, A indicates a combined heating and electrical dlscharge unitor ionizer comprising a casing or shell 1 provided with transverse headers 2 and 3 spaced from the upper and lower heads or ends 1 and 5 of the shell, respectively. These heads are provided with holes to receive the ends of a series of tubes 6 welded or otherwise secured in the headers and opening at their upper ends into the discharge chamber 7 above the header 2, and at their lower ends into the inlet chamber 8 below the lower header 3. The space be-- ber. Gas is admitted into the lower end Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 11, 1921.

Serial No. 261,122.

bolted thereover and 'a similar manhole 1'? closed by a cover l8 is provided in the shell opposite the outlet 14.

Suspended within the tubes 6 is a series of discharging electrodes 19, one electrode in the axis of each tube, and these electrodes each comprise a flexible member of any suit able construction, such as a chain or wire adapted to give a brush discharge under suitable current conditions. Each tube 6 forms a receiving electrode, it being of a diameter to rovide the proper gap between it and the discharging electrode throughout the length thereof. The several electrodes 19 are suspended from a suitable spider or hanger 20, adjustably attached to the lower end of a rod 21 which passes upward through a suitable insulating tube 22 mounted in a cap on the upper end of a chamber 24 forming an upward tubular extension of the head 4. The lower ends of the several electrodes 19 are attached to a similar spider -30 is carried by the insulator and its lower end made fast to the outer end of the arm 26. The electrodes are thus firmly supported and held coincident with the axes of the tubes 6.

Small tubes 81 open through the header 2 and extend downward through the header 3 to near the bottom of the inlet chamber 8 so that any condensation or other matter accumulating on the upper header within the chamber '7 may pass downward into the bottom of the lower or inlet chamber and escape from this chamber with the tarry matter falling from the tubes 6, through an olil titet connection 32 on the bottom of the s e The secondary coil. of the step-up trans former B is connected to the leading-on rod 21 or the ionizer, the other terminal thereof being connected to the shell 1 of the ionizer which shell is grounded. The primary coil of the transformer receives current from an alternating current generator C. The coils of the transformer are so proportioned and current of such potential is delivered from lecting: mains (not shown) of a gas producer, and dividing into a number of separate streams passes upward through the several tubes 6 which are heated or cooled by the fluid surrounding them within the chamber 9. In passing through the electrical discharges, the tarry particles contained in the gas are caused to coalesce and are deposited. The walls of the tube are heated to keep the tarry matter in a fluid state so that it will not collect unevenly therein but will flow downwardly into the chamber 8 and find its way out through the outlet 32.

The cleaned gas issuing from the upper ends of the tubes 6, enters the chamber 7 and from thence passes out through the outlet 14.

While in general we have found that it is best to maintain the walls of the tubes at a temperature higher than that of the entering gas yet in the case of a gas containing tar in a very fluid or oily state it might be advisable to cool the gas instead of heating it. lit is evident that the same apparatus will serve for either heating or cooling the g By dividing the gas into a number of separate streams and raising the temperature of these streams as they pass through the electrical field, to a point above the temperature at which the gas will carry condensed vapor, and to such a temperature that the tarry particles contained therein will. be softened, all

- tarry matter is rapidly precipitated from a large volume of gas with a minimum consumption of current and retardation of flow. This dividing of the gas into comparatively small streams, permits of changing its temperature quickly and also of the use of a plurality of discharging electrodes, one in each gas stream, so that it may be simultaneously heated or cooled and acted upon by the electrical discharge, giving the desired volume of flow without danger of any tarry particles being carried over.

The heating of the walls of the receiving electrodes or tubes 6, prevents the tarry matter from accumulating unevenly upon the surfaces thereof to such an extent as to impairthe effect of the electrical discharges or restrict the gas passages. The heating step in theprocess therefore not only raises the temperature of the gas at a time when it is required for the eficient carrying on of the process, but also performs the function of preventing the accumulation of tarry matter and consequent impairment of the effect of the electrical discharges. The process may therefore be carried on continuously without its becoming necessary to remove accumulated matter from the electrodes. The simultaneous heating and electrical treatment of the gas also permits of the use of a single device having a construction like or similar to that illustrated, which construction, it will be understood, may be varied within the scope of the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. A method of removing tarry matter from gas which consists in passing the gas through an electrical field and simultaneously heating the as.

2. A method 0 removing tarry matter from gas, which consists in passing the gas through an electrical field and simultaneously heating the gas sufficiently to liquefy the tarry matter contained therein and raise the temperature of the gas above its water vapor saturation temperature.

3. A method of removing tarry matter from gas, which consists in dividing the gas into separate streams subjecting each gas stream to the action of electrical discharges by passing each stream through an electrical field and heating each stream while passing through said field to liquify the tarry matter contained in the gas and to raise the temperature of the gas to a point above its water vapor saturation temperature.

4. A method of removing tarry matter from gas, which consists in passing the gas flow through a plurality of separate comparatively small gas passages, subjecting the gas as it passes through each passage to the action of electrical discharges to cause the tarry particles to coalesce, and heating the walls of the passages to prevent the accumu lation of tarry matter thereon.

5. A method of removing tarry matter from gas, which consists in passing the gas flow through a plurality of separate parallel and comparatively small gas passages, maintaimng in each passage an electrical field between a discharging electrode within each passage and the wall of the passage forming the receivingelectrode, and heating the walls of the several passages to keep the tarry matter deposited thereon in a fluid state and to raise the temperature of the gas streams in said passages to liquefy the tarry matter contained in the gas and to raise the temperature of the gas to a point above its water vapor saturation temperature.

6. An apparatus for removing tarry matter from gas consisting of a plurality of separate, parallel gas passages for theflow of gas therethrough, a central electrode in each passage spaced from the wall of the passage which wall forms a receivin electrode, and a chamber for a heating fluid surrounding said passages to re ulate the temperature of the walls thereoE 7. An apparatus for use in the process of removing tarry matter from gas, comprising a shell, headers in the shell forming a cen tral and end chambers, a plurality of tubes secured in spaced relation in the headers and opening into the end chambers, said central chamber having an inlet and an outlet for a heating fluid and said end chambers having a gas inlet and outlet, an electrode supported axially of each tube in spaced relation to the wall thereof, and means for supplying an electrical current to said electrodes.

8. An apparatus for use in the process of removing tarry matter from gas comprising a shell, headers in the shell forming a central and end chambers, a plurality of tubes secured in spaced relation in the headers and opening into the end chambers, said central chamber having an inlet and an outlet for a heating fiuid and said end chambers having a gas inlet and outlet, an electrode suspended in each tube at the axis thereof, spiders in the end chambers insulated from the shell and to which spiders the ends of the electrodes are connected to hold said electrodes centrally of the tubes, and means for supplying current to the electrodes to maintain an electrical field between each electrode and the surrounding tube wall.

9. An apparatus for removing tar from gas, comprising a tubular collecting electrode, a discharge electrode, a jacket surrounding the collecting electrode, and means for circulating a heating fluid through said jacket.

10. A method of removing tar from gas, which consists in passing the gas holding the tar in suspension through an electric field so as to precipitate the tar against a surface and warming the surface to a temperature which is in excess of the temperature of the gas.

11. An apparatus for removing tar from gas, comprisin a discharge electrode, a collecting electro e and means independent of the said electrode for heating the collecting electrode.

12. An apparatus for removing tar from gas, comprising a tubular collecting electrode, a discharge electrode and means surrounding the collecting electrode for applyin heat thereto.

11 testimony whereof we afiix our signatures in presence of two witnesses. FRANK W. STEERE. WILLIAM C. WOODLAND. Witnesses:

LEWIS E. FLANDERS, J. MGPHAIL, Jr.

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.95/73, 96/89, 96/74, 208/340, 55/DIG.380
Clasificación internacionalB03C3/017
Clasificación cooperativaB03C3/017, Y10S55/38
Clasificación europeaB03C3/017