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Número de publicaciónUS1581657 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación20 Abr 1926
Fecha de presentación29 Dic 1923
Fecha de prioridad4 Mar 1922
Número de publicaciónUS 1581657 A, US 1581657A, US-A-1581657, US1581657 A, US1581657A
InventoresOkie Francis Gurney
Cesionario originalMinnesota Mining & Mfg
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Abrasive article
US 1581657 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

5&1-2481filed h ar. 4, 1922,-and associated" Patented Apr. 20, 1926.

UNITED STATES FRANCIS GURNEY OKIE. OF ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA, ASSIGNOR TO MINNESOTA MINING PATENT .oiirlca.

AND MANUFACTURING COMPANY, on ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA, A oonrbfl'rroN or MINNESOTA,

ABRASIVE ARTICLE.

Ne Drawing. Original application filed March 4, 1922, Serial No: 541,248. Dividedand till filed December 29, 1923.- Serifll No. 683,522.

sheet form, and more particularly the treat-,4

ment of material for the-purpose of forming or attaining composite structures, of which well known forms of abrasives such as what is commonly known as sand-paper is an. example. The present application is, in part, a continuation of my copending application, Serial No. 428,289 filedDecJ4, 1920', ahd a division of m 1 application, Serial No.

with my. applications, 7 Serial Nos. 488,287 filed Dec. 24, 1920 and 670,542 filed Oct, 2%, 1923. i I f Although I hereinafter disclose the practice of my invention in 1 connection with abrasives such as sand-paper itwill be understood that my invention, or certain features thereof, have a wider-field of utility.

Composite structures of theabrasive type such as sand-paper or emery cloth comprise generally (a) a base of sheet material, which may be felted as in the [case of paper or woven as in the case of cloth, (b) a more or less finely c'omminuted resistant material having abrading properties, such as garnet or corundum, and (c) a binder generally in the form of a glue which serves to bind the abrasive to the base.

T he abrasive products as produced at present have as incidents certain features among which are affinity for. moisture rendering them substantially inutile in the presence of water or moisture. and cracking, with consequent exposure of the base, when bent I The principal objects of my present invention are the provision. of a binder whichfunction more efliciently than any known to me, the provision of an abrasive articlehav ing a binder eharacterizedjb'y, fle'xibilit without cracking or other undesirable e fects; the provisionof such anarticle char acterized by extensibility and compressibili ty to..accommodate'itself to flexion of the.

base; tli'eproyi'sion of such an article having a bindei by means ofwwhichlthedesired adhesive action between it and the base is attained not only. efliciently but also with a desirable degree of acceleration, and more particularly the provision of such an article having a binder inwhich the drying action will be efiective from the contact surface betwee'nit and the base outwardly; the provision'of such an article having a binder in which the -drying action will be efiective from the outer surface inwardly; the provision therein of a binder characterizedby a. drying; action that permits of handling the pro uct with a minimum of delay and moreparticularly such handling without im- "0 pairment of the superficies ofthe material; the provislon therein of a binder characterized by an accelerated drying action; the

provision therein of a' binder characterized by a limitation of its drying action; the pro-. vision of an improved moisture-proof material and. especially material in a sheet form, and more particularly one having means for causing a moisture-proofing 'agentto penetrate into the material; the provision of a moisture-proof composite abrasive structure; the provision of a binder having moisture-proofing functlons, and the provision generally of an improved composite abrasive structure and of a method of producin'g the same, together with such other objects and additional benefits and advan-- tages as may hereinafter appear or be pointed out In the employment of my present in- I yention for the production of sand-paper and the like. suitable for employment in a water abrading operation (which I cite for purposes of example) I use as the base a sheet of material (which may be paper) V of the binder material.

as will conveniently serve the employment contemplated, and as the abrasive such comminuted material (which may be crushed garnet) similarly adapted to serve the function in view.

-.It is desirable that the binder utilized.-

haye the functions and characteristics not only of great mechanical strength and of great binding strength, but also that it be non-hygroscopic, permeative, moisture resistant, easily worked, readily obtainable, inexpensive and facilely applied. V

I have discovered that gums of such types as rosin are peculiarly adapted for the 'attainment of these ends, and ordinary turpentine rosin is preferred by me as best attaining the desired end, viewed from certain aspects. Other gumsand resins, natural or synthetic,havmg the desired characteristics may also be utilized.

In preparing the binder for use, the

is used 1n connection with a. suitable. vehicle which I prefer is of a type such as linseed oil, China-wood oil, otherwise known as tung oil, perilla oil or fish oil, or even a semi-drying 011 such as soya-bean oil, for

reasons which I" will proceed to explain.

In applying a gum prepared with a ve'- hicle such as China-woodoil to one surface of a base of paper, for example I have found that the action of the vehicle involves a penetration of the base by'the vehicle,'f.or

example, China-wood oil or any similar drym 011 or semi-drying oil.

This results in a moisture-proofing of the material even against the absorption of moisture through the surface opposite to that to which the binder is applied, without at the same time defacing or otherwise'unv desirably affecting such-opposite surface.

The penetration by the vehicle, particularly when coupled with the use of the char'fl actor of gum pointed out above, carries with it in such penetration a certain amount offinely divided gum so that a coating and binding action is secured between the fibres v of elemental portions of the base which thus substantially'retards. if it does not entirely prevent, disintegration of the material of the base, in addition to preventing access of moisture through the-baseto the plane 'of contact between the base and the main mass The eflicient action of the binder maybe enhanced in the manufacture of sand-paper if the binder is applied to the base by the use of pressure and the more or less finelydivided abrasive is then applied in such a manner as to cause it to adhere tothe binder.

" In order to accelerate the adhesion be-w tween the binder and the base. I have dis covercd it desirable to use with the binder amodifying agent the action of which is to cause a desiccation of the binder initiated Due to the relatively .slow drying of binders enerally,difiiculties are encountered in hand the structure, within a convenient pe'ri because of the soft and sticky character-particularly of the exposed surfaces of the binder. This objection I mitigate by associating with'the improved binder a substance the action of-which isto produce .an. accelerated drying action eflectlve pri- ,marily at the exposed surface and working inwardly, andfor this 'urpose I Iincorporate in the binder a m ifymg element peculiarly effective in its actlon as an oxldlzmg agent onsuch vehicles as linseed, Chinawood or tung 011 and as a retarding agent with reference to the excess absorption of the vehicle by the base.

The substance I have discovered to be particularly adapted for this purpose is that well-known to the trade obtainable in the open market and formed by a new electrolytic process white lead and which in my experience is found .to be more satisfactory {hag any otherkuown form of carbonate of Whereas by itself the white lead adds but relatively little strength to -the binder, in, association in the binder with the bora-teof manganese it intensifies the action of the binder in holding the abrasive firinly' against the base.

For intensifying the-binding action of the binder and for intensifying the drying action of the dryers, and at the same time accomplishing such endsby-the employment of a material which is eflicacious in holding the mineral elements in suspension. without loss of siccative energy or reducing the relative vfluidity of the material, I have discovered that it is advantageous to employ as part of the binder a paste dryer. This may to. form the paste dryer so as to have the minerals contalncd therein in theform of acetate of lead and resmatc of manganese.

.I have found by experience that th paste dryer should be somewhat in the nature of cheesy butter, rather softer, and of a light brownish grey color. p

As'an auxiliary in (l) acccntuating the adhesion of the binder to the paper, ('2) facilitating to a certain extent the spread :comprise such mineral substances as sugar I ofvlead and borate of manganese suspended in a resinous vehicle but I, find it preferable ilig of the binder, and desired the consistency of the binder as is useful in. cases where it is desired to render it more fluid, I have discovered that the use of a japan dryer is desirable. dryer as that which is relatively free from resin is convenient. One .form of this contains shellac, red lead, litharge,.manganese oxid, burnt umber, gum, linseed oil and tur- (3) modifying as pentine q. s.

In order body volulnetrlcally considered I prefer- I ably employ a varnish. consisting largely of that the siccative as castor oil or the like,

China-wood oil, .linseed oil, perilla oil, or iish oil, boiled until it approaches a solid state. As far as feasible this should be as free as possible from glycerides and fatty acids. L

Though I have hereinabove disclosed certain forms of useful dryers having various characteristics, and likewise intensifiers, I have discovered that where it is advisable action thereof be limited, or at least retarded, under certain conditions, or when producing material for 'cer.- tain purposes, that it is desirable to incorporate in the binder a non-drying oil such Sand-paper madein accordance with the disclosure of my present invention is characterized by great fflexibility without any adverse effects, suchas cracking of hinder or base, or loosening of one from the other.

The materialsused by me as hereinabove described may be varied in character so as hygroscopy,

to vary the characteristics of the binder from the standpoint of adhesiveness, nonand flexibility. -Wher'e such variation in the use of materials is employed to produce, for instance, increased adhesion between the binder and theabrasive, such increase may be attained though'possibly at a certain expense in its characteristic. of

flexibility. Due, however, to this very same increased adhesiveness, one or more of the outer layers of the base may by the employment of a base which involves. the use of a built lip-structure having BBILUIIb" e re-,

ber of plies, certain of which may moved, or by shaving off partof the thickness of the base, or by splitting an ordinary sheet of paper. This is made possible. in the case of my improved binder since I am able to'regulate the degree of its penetration of the paper, as" desired, and so, after soaking, I am able to split an ordinary sheet.

By this process I am enabled to obtain sand-paper characterized by extraordinary thinness and flexibility, to form sand-paper and the like with a base so thin that such product ceuld not be manufactured. if the base originally used were of the. thinness mummy-asses.

Such ato give the hinder the desired for such purposes.

the

opinion the ppt-imum, V a humidity being maintained in the drying ing too" crisp or brittle. A be removed as; y Y

noteworthy in that it not only: penetrates.

various oils,

fabric, and this without wea in that I am able' In my preferred practice with Chinawood oil and rosin, the adhesive applied is of approximately the following proportions by weight and percentages v 7 Per cent. China-wood oil (tung oil) 106 lbs. 53 Hardened rosin j 24 lbs. 12 Linseed oil 20lbs. 10 Dryer 2 lbs; 1 Thiuner ;say 18 lbs. 24

One of the virtues of a waterproof binder of. the present composition is that it not only penetrates the supporting base, rendering it waterproof, but also is of great utility as contrasted with organic glue (prepare from gelatinous matter) inasmuch as it may be used with oiled or waxed paper whichtreatment with binder to facilitate its application to the back, but also to increase its powers of penetration of the base, it maybe used cold. After the adhesive andv abrasive materials are applied, the paper is, suitably force dried (or partially baked as it is said), to the desired extent. by subjecting it in the usual manner to a temperature which I prefer to. control between 130 depending upon the degree sired, an average of say a suitable degree of of hardness dechamber to prevent the paper from becom- Th'e binder of mypresent invention is thepaper etc. ofthe backing or base, but

penetrates. mixes with,"or combines with greases'and waxes that are commonly used as water-proofing agents for ening, breaking down, or other deleterious mechanical or chemical effects.

In cases where the surface: of the fabric is not suitable* for the application of a smooth coating of thebinder I have found filler to the base' it convenient to apply a to facilitate such' application. This may consist of any one of the known fillers hav likehase.

mg a clayey, silicon. or v v v In cases where it IS desirable or necesthou'gh in. some cases 140.F. being in my F. and 150- F.,

sary to employ. a sizing coat, that is, ail

ing coat, which liminary auxiliary or additional coat or one 'of a plurality of finishing coats, I find that a. Ihinned composition similar to that disclosed herein as forming the binder itself, is satisfactory. As an example of the sizalso may be employed as a moisture-proof backing, I submit the following formula by weight:

I Treated rosin 0r resin 2700 China woo'd oil 13962 Mineral dryers 7 9 Thinuers 12611 An alternative formula for the same purpose ma include the following ingredients by Weig t:

Treated rosin or resin 2700 China-wood oil 8100 Mineral dryers 83 Thinners 8850 Linseed oil 2125 Any one of the formulae above set forth may be employed depending upon the results desired or the conditions under which the sizing coat isto be applied. The sizing pends the degree of penetration, if any, of

the material of the sizing coat into the binder carrying the abrasive. For example, it the sizing coat is applied substantially immediately after a preliminary setting of the abrasive carrying binder has taken ,place, there will result a penetration of the abra sive carrying binder bythe sizing coat, or a homogenizing of the binder coatand the sizing coat, but regardless of the length of time of set of the binder, when the sizing coatis applied it adheres very tenaciously to the binder.

Alternately, if a considerable time-inter- .val is permitted to elapse bet-ween the presetting of the binder and the application of the sizing coat, and sufficient suitable solvents are included in the sizing coat composition a partial solving of the binder wlllfresult, and thus bring about As an example of one of my practices, I apply the binder or adhesive coat and substantially immediately thereafter I apply the abrasive. About an hour after the adhesive coat and abrasive material are applied the sheet enters the drying room and remains therefor approximately forty-eight hours preferably in a temperature varying'from 100 t0-150 degrees F., partially cooling during the night when the heat supply is reduced or shut ofl. The paper or cloth abrasive sheet isthen removed from the drying room and if it is convenient to apply the sizing coat, this is done so immediately. If not convenient to size at that time the abrasive sheets are left on the rolls until it is so convenient to apply the sizing coat.- The time which the abrasive sheet is left on the roll is, generally speaking, immaterial, though Imay apply the sizing coat at a particular phase of the hardening of the abrasive carrying binder in order to enhance adhesivenes's. Consequently, the sizing coat may be applied at a convenient time, which may be as long as a week ortwo after the adhesive and abrasive have been applied, or at other times, depending on circumstances.

'hen the sizing is supported, and a moisture-proofing layer is )plied to the back of the sheet, if desire as for example, if'the paper has not previously been watcr-proofed. This backmg layer may beof the same composition asthat of the sizing layer applied to the abrasive. The sizing for the abrasive side is then carried out, or. maybe done sub stantially simultaneously wlth the application of the backing sizing. After the sizing or sizings have been applied the sheet sive by the sizing coat or whether there is any actual penetration, may not always be a vital factor in the production of a satisfactory moisture-proof abrasive sheet, because, as I have pointed out above, the sizingadheres quite tenaciously to the binder and abrasive, and while penetration and consequent homogenization of the binder with the sizing coat gives a more intimate joint, a purely surface junction between the binder 0 is to be applied, the sheet is unrolled fronrthe rack on which it and the sizing coat is all that is essential to the production of a satisfactory article, for some purposes, if the sizing coat is emplo ed.

ith further reference to. the junction ob-' tained between the adhesive and the "sizing coat, I might explain that as the sizing coat is warm when applied to the abrasive and binder, there is produced a softening of the binder, pending upon the factors pointed out. p

The following formulae by weight comprise additional materials which I find suitable for my purposes, and result each in the roduction of a highly moisture-proof, flex- 1ble and tenacious binder and sizing coat for abrasive devices U-binder. Treated rosin or resin; 2700 Linseed oil -1. 1 044 China-wood oil 7584 Mineral dryers 135 Thinners 2040 (Raising usually employed with O -biqwler. Treated-rosin or resin 2700 Linseed oil -1 104A China-wood oil 7 584 Mineral dryers -.i.. 135 Thinners .i 22255 It will be observed that the formula designated C-sizing is similar in all respects to the composition of the C binder with the exception'that an increased proportion of thinher is employed. p

The following formulae by weight have also been tried but I have obtainedmarkedly less satisfactory results with their use, and not only do not consider them practicable but quite inferior:

D-bz'nder.

Venetian red or white lead Dissolved rubber Venice turpentine 900 Treated rosin or resin (proportions-- shellac 000, copal 1800) 2700 Linseed oil i716 Mineral dryers 90 D-sz'sing coat .us-ually employed with D- binder.

Venetian red or white lead 900 Dissolved rubber 900 Venice turpentine l 900 Treated rosin or resin (proportionsshellac 900, copal 1800) i 2700 Thiuners 2000 Linseed oil- H16 Mineral dryers 90 I An alternative form of binder similar to that designated D-binder is as follows:

I tinder. Venetian red or white lead 1350 Venice: 'ientine 900 which may result in penetratlon, de-

the O and D binders, that the sizing coat 1s E sieving usually employed with E-binder.

Venetian redcr white lead 1350 Venice turpentine 900 Gopal 2700 Thinner-s 2000 Linseed oil r 6407 Mineral dryers 135 It will be observed here, as in the case of ofsubstantially' the same materials as that of the binder or abrasive carrying coating, with the exception that thinners are added, or if already present, increased sufficiently to permit the top sizing coatto flow readily between the grains of abrasive and amalgamate with the binder or adhesive coat. lVithin my experience, all formulae containing both rubber and an oil are open; to grave objections, in that these two substances areantipathetic, and under the action of the oil, any abrasive containing rub-' ber known to me tends to premature disintegration.

I have also employed as a sizing coat both natural and so-called imitation or synthetic shellac cut in alcohol, and, alternately melted orotherwise made fluid with oil and gum compositions, or so-called treated cellulose (cellulose nitrate, cellulose acetate,

- cellulose contagenate), or synthetic resins such as condensation products of so-called bakelite is a type.

Having thus described my invention and illustrated its use, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. The new article of manufacture in the nature of sandpaper comprising a flexible sheet of fabric, a grit or layer of abrasive particles, a waterproof stable penetrative adhesive bond interposed between said grit and said sheet, and a compensatory auxiliary bonding coat applied to the article, said bond and auxiliary coat being of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when employed in a water abrading' operation and not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry.

2. The new article of manufacture in the nature of sandpaper comprising 'a flexible sheet of fabric, a grit or layer ofabrasive particles, a waterproof stable adhesive bond interposed between said grit and said sheet, and. an auxiliary coat applied to the article, said bond and auxiliary coat cooperating-to prevent disin egration .of the sheet when used in a water abrading operation, and being of a nature to maintain the bonding effer-t throughout the effective abrading li-fe of the abrasive article when employed in a which the water abrading operation and not deleterisheet of fabric,

. effect throughout the effective and prevent disintegration of jarticle when operation.

6. The new article of manufacture in the not deleteriously affecting the exibility of dry said sheetwhen dry.

4. Thenew'article of manufacture in the nature of .sandpaper comprisinga flexible a grit or layer of abrasive particles, a waterproof stable adhesive bond interposed between said grit and said sheet, and an auxiliary coat applied to the article, said auxiliary coat being of a character to act as a solvent of and coalesce with said bond, and said bond and auxiliary coat being of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when employed in a water abrading operation and not deleterioiilsly affecting the flexibility of said sheet w e 5. Th e new article of manufacture in the nature of sandpaper comprising a flexible sheet of tpaper or material similarly. susceptible to uid penetration, a grit or layer of abrasive particles, a waterproof stable adhesive bond interposed between said grit and said sheet, said bond penetrating said sheet to protect it against water, an auxiliary coat of analogous character applied to the article and penetrating said bond, said auxiliar coat cooperating with said bond and the two being of a nature to maintain the bonding abrading life the abrasive employed in a water abrading nature of sandpaper comprising a flexible sheet of aper or material similarly susceptible to aid penetration a grit or layer of abrasive particles, hesive bond in the nature of a varnish, interosed between said grit and said sheet, said ondpenetrating said sheet' to protect it an auxiliary coat of the nature of a less viscous varnish, applied to-the article and penetrating said bond, said auxiliary coat and'bond being of a nature to maintain the bonding efl'eet throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when employed in water abrading operation.

7 The article of manufacture in the nature of sandpaper, comprising a flexible sheet of fabric, a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and a plurality of coats of waterproof material applied to said article, one of said coats servin-g'as a stable waterproof coat applied to the article,

y grit and said sheet of a abrasive a waterproof stable ad adhesive bond interposed between said grit and said sheet and of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when used in a water abrading operation, and another of said coats serving as an auxiliary waterproofing agent which coacts with the adhesive bond to prevent disintegration of the article when used in such water abrading operation, and said coat not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of the article when 8. The new article of manufacture in the nature of sandpaper, comprising a flexible sheet of fabric, a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and a plurality of coats of waterproof material applied to said article, one of said coats being applied to one surface of the sheet and serving as a stable waterproof adhesive bond interposed between said grit and said sheet and of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective -.a bradinglife of the abrasive article when sheet of waterproof fabric, a grit or layer of abrasive particles,

and a waterproof stable adhesive bond interposed between said nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive articles when used'in a water abrading o eration and not deleteriously affecting the exibility of said sheet when dry.

10. The new article of manufacture in the nature of sandpaper, comprising a flexible sheet of waterproof fabric,-a grit or layer of articles, and a waterproof stable adhesive 0nd interposed between said rit and said sheet and an auxiliay coat applied to the article, said bond and auxiliary coat cooperatin to prevent disintegration of the art1clei=,.and being of a nature to maintain thebondin effect thrgughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when used in a water abrading operation and not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry.

11. The new article of manufacture in the nature of sandpaper, comprising a flexible sheet offabric one surface of which is treated to prevent disintegration when used in a water abrading operation, a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and a water'p'roofi stableadhesive bond interposed between said grit and the opposite surface of said sheet which coacts with t e ad- I of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when used in a water 'abrad ing operation and not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry.

12. The new article of manufacture in the nature of sandpaper, comprising a flexible sheet of fabric one surface of which is treated to prevent disintegration when used in a water abrading operation, a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and a waterproof stable adhesive bond interposed between said grit and the opposite surface of said sheet and an auxiliary coat applied to the article, said bond and auxiliary coat being of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of ,the abrasive article when used in a water abrading operation and not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry.

13. The new article of manufacture in the nature of sandpaper, comprising a flexible sheet of fabric, a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and a plurality of coats of waterproofing material applied to said article, one

of said coats serving as a rimary stable water-proof adhesive bond mterposed between said grit and said sheet and of a nature to maintain the bonding eflect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article, and another of said coats applied thereover serving as a secondary bond, and a third coat applied to the opposite surface serving as an auxiliary agent for preventing disintegration of the article and starving of the bond, said several coats not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of the article when dry.

14. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which includes applying to a flexible sheet of fabric a grit or layer of. abrasive particles, and a plurality of coats of waterproof material, by interposing as one of said coats a stable water-proof penetrative adhesive bond between said grit and said sheet the said adhesive bond being of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article, allowing said adhesive bond to penetrate the sheet, and compensating for penetration of said sheet by the bond by applying another of said coats as an auxiliarybonding and waterproofing agent, and said coats not deleteriously affecting the flexi bility of the article when dry.

15. The process of making a stable water= proof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which'includes applying to a flexible sheet of fabric a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and a plurality of coats of waterproof material, interposing one of said coats as a stable waterproof adhesive bond between said grit and one surface of said sheet the said adhesive bond being of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article, and applying another of said coats to the opposite surface of the sheet to serve as an auxiliary agent, and allowing said latter coat to engage the sheet so as to cooperate with the' adhesive bond to prevent disintegration of the article when used in awater abrading operation, and said coats not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of the article when dry. 1

16. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sanda paper or the like which includes employing a flexible sheet of fabric which has been so f treated to prevent disintegration when used to prevent disintegration when used in a water aib-rading operation, applying thereto a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and a waterproof stable adhesive bond and an auxiliary coat, 'said bond and auxiliary coat cooperating with each other and being of a natureto maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when used in a water-"abrading operation and not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when. dry.

18. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which includes employing a flexible sheet of fabric, one surface of which istreated to prevent disintegration when used in a water abrading o )eration, applying to the opposite surface thereof a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and a waterproof stable adhesive bond of a nature to maintain the bonding efl'ect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when used in a water abrading operation and not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry, I

19. The process of making a stablewaterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which includes employing a flexible sheet of fabric one surface of which is ture to maintain the bonding'feifect throughout the. effective abrading life of the abra said sheet when dry, and

sive article when used in a water abrading operation and not 'deleteriouslv affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry.

20. The process of making a stable waterproof axb-rasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which includes applying to a flexible sheet of fabric a grit or layerof abrasive particles, and'a plurality of coats of waterproof material, interposing one of said coats as a primary waterproof stable adhesive bond between said grit and said sheet and of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when used in a waterabrading operation, applyin one of the other coats to the op osite si e of the fabric to serve as an auxiliary waterprpofing agent and applyin the other'of said coats over the interposed coat toserve' as a secondary bond.

21. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which includes applying to a flexible sheet "of fabric agrit or layer of abrasive particles, and a waterproof bond of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading-life of the abrasive article when employed in a water abrading operation and not dele- .teriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry, and applyin a. waterproof auxilliary coat of analogous c aracter to the artic e.

22. The of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sand-' paper or the like which includes applying to a flexible sheet of fabric a grit or layer.

of abrasive particles, and interposing a waterproof bond of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when employed in a water abrading o ration and not deleteriously aifectirw the exibility of uniting a waterproof auxiliary bonding coat of analogous character to the article.

23.- The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which includes applying to a flexible sheet of fabric a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and interposin a waterproof bond of a nature to maintam the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when employed in a water abrading operation and not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry, applying a waterproof auxiliary bonding coat of analogous character to the artic e, and applying heat after one of said steps.

24. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article inthe nature of sand-' paper or the like which includes applying to --a flexible sheet of fabric a grit or layer of abrasive particles,-and interposinga waterproof bond of a nature to maintain the bonding efi'ect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when employed in a water abrading operation and not dcleteriously afl'ectin the flexibility of said sheet when dry, an uniting a waterproof auxiliary bonding coat of analogous character to the article by the application of heat.

25. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which includes applying to a flexible sheet of fabric a grit or ayer of abrasive particles, and interposing a waterproof ,bond of a nature to maintain the bonding efi'ect throughout the effective abrading life. of the abrasive article when employed in a water abrading operation and not deleteriously afiectin the flexibility of said sheet when dry, app ying a waterproof auxiliary bonding coat of analogous character to t e article, and applying heat after each of said steps.

26. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which in'cludes a plying to a flexible sheet of fabric, a grit or ayer of abrasive particles and inter ing a waterproof bond of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when employed in a water abrading operation and not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry, which includes allowing the bond to penetrate the sheet,-and applying a waterproof auxiliary coat of analogous character to the artic1e.--

27. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper or the like which includes applying to a flexible sheet of fabricj -a grit or layer of abrasive particles and -interposing a waterproof bond of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of .the abrasive article when employed in a .water abrading operation and not deleteriously afiectin the flexibil1ty of said sheet when dry, whic includes allowing the bond to penetrate the sheet, applying a.

waterproof auxiliary coat of am 0 ous character to the article, and applying eat afterone of said steps.

28. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpager or the like which includes applying to a exible sheet of fabric, a grit or layer of abrasive particles and' interposing a waterproof bond of-a nature to'inaintain the bondeteriously affecting the flexibility ofsaid sheet when dry, which includes allowing the .efl'ect throughout the effective abrading bond topenetrate the sheet, applying a waterproof auxiliary coat of analogous :haracter to the article, and applying heat tfter each of said steps.

29. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper, wl 'ch includes employing a flexible sheet of fabric, treating said sheet to prevent disintegration when used in a Water abrading operation, applying thereto a grit or layer of abrasive particles, and interposing a waterproof stable adhesive bond of a nature to maintain the bonding effect throughout the effective abrading life of the abrasive article when used in a water ,abrading operation and not deleteriously affecting the flexibility of said sheet when dry.

30. The process of making a stable waterproof abrasive article in the nature of sandpaper, which includes employing a flexible sheet of fabric, treating one surface of said sheet to prevent disintegration when used in a Water abrading operation, applying to the signed my name.

. FRANCIS GURNEY OKIE.

bond of a nature to

Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US621743219 May 199817 Abr 20013M Innovative Properties CompanyAbrasive article comprising a barrier coating
US643254927 Ago 199813 Ago 2002Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Curl-resistant, antislip abrasive backing and paper
US749788430 Dic 20043 Mar 2009Neenah Paper, Inc.Fine abrasive paper backing material and method of making thereof
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.51/295, 101/401
Clasificación internacionalB24D11/00, C04B14/32
Clasificación cooperativaB24D11/00, C04B14/32
Clasificación europeaB24D11/00, C04B14/32