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Número de publicaciónUS1634492 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación5 Jul 1927
Fecha de presentación31 Mar 1926
Fecha de prioridad31 Mar 1926
Número de publicaciónUS 1634492 A, US 1634492A, US-A-1634492, US1634492 A, US1634492A
InventoresCharles K Dunlap
Cesionario originalSonoco Products Co
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Paper tube
US 1634492 A
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

'1,634,492 July 45 19.27 c. K. DUNLAP PAPER TUBE Filed 'March 31, 1926 lll till) nalaten .ne s, ieri.

OFFICE.

@EAMES DE. DUNLP, 0F HARTSVJLLE, SOUTH CAROLINA, ASSIGNOR TO SONOCO JPRQDUCTS COMPANY, @F HARTSVILJDE, SOUTH CAROLINA, A. CORPORATION F SU'UTH CARQLENA.

PAPER TUBE. i

application alecL irma ai, ieee. serial in. cassa rllhis invention relates to paper tubes and to a method of surfacing such tubes for use on knitting machines, creeling machines and similar devices.

'llhe principal objects of this invention are: to provide a paper tube having a thread or yarn receiving surface which has an increased ability to resist slippage of thread or yarn wound upon it, to provide a paper tube having a surface truly cylindrical in cross section, or a true surface of revolution; and to accomplish these aforesaid results in a `satisfactory andq inexpensive manner by' means of a novel method. @ther objects of this invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

l41 ig. l shows the essential elements of a machine which may be used to carry out the process of treating paper tubes in accordance with the present invention; p

l41 ig. 2 is 'an end elevation of a tube before surfacing;

Fig. 3 is an end elevation of a tube after surfacing to show the manner in which part of the outer layers of paper are ground away to produce a velvety surface and a circular periphery; y

lFig. el is a side View of a conicaltube surfaced as shown in Fig. 3; and

Fig. 5 is a side view of a cylindrical tube surfaced as shown in Fig. 3.

ln the manufacture of tubes to hold yarn or'thread for knitting and creeling machines, paper has proven toebe the cheapest and most satisfactory `material. But in the use of paper tubes various diticulties Yare encountered and some of these difficulties will now -be considered in order that a clearer understanding may be obtained of the merits of the present invention. I i

@ne of the principal diculties encountered in the use of paper tubes is the slippage of thread or arn along the surface of the tube.; This slippage is. particularly likely to occur when hard bered yarn or thread such as silk or linen is wound on the tubes. When the tube is cone shaped the slippage is more common but. when it is cylindrical slippage will still occur if the tube is ta ped endwise o-r the thread is pulled towar .one end of the tube in feeding., Heretofore,

slippage on' both conical and cylindrical types of tubes has been prevented by covering the tube with a layer of cotton yarn or by gluing a thin sheet of chamois skin or other suitable material on the surface of the tube. Both expedients, and particularly the latter, have proven eective for preventing slippage but have been found to be too eX- pensive for general use. Another expedient has been that of making the tube of a softer paper so that when the paper was wound upon itself in forming the tube the outer surface was of the desired roughened velvety texture. '.lhis expedient also has been found unsatisfactory because soft paper does not produce va tube of requisite strength, a hard paper being needed for this.

Another 4difficulty encountered in the use of paper tubes is the jumping eect given the thread while it is being wound or unwound from the tube due to the eccentricity of the tubes. This ecccntricity is caused by the method of making the tube which consists of winding the paper upon itself in layers. 'llhe end of the paper as thus wound forms a bump on the outer surface of the tube. An expedient adopted to lessen this diiculty has been that of feathering the outer edge of the paper Ybut this was not entirely effective for some eccentricity still remained after feathering.

And yet another difficulty encountered is the unequal yardage of .thread in a given number of turns on various tubes due to variations in outer circumferences. rllhis is caused by a lack of uniformity in the gauge of the paper stock used inv forming the tubes. For instance, 8 pointppaper will vary between 7 and 9 p oints in the grades of paper used in tube making so one tube made of a certain number of turns of so called 8 point paper which ran 7 point would be considerably smaller than one made of the same number of turns which ran 9 point.

According to the present invention all of these difliculties are eliminated very effectively and very cheaply by the simple method of rinding or abrading and brushin the sur ace of the tubes. ylhis'produces tu es that are of uniform diameter, which insures that all'tubes will receive' the same 'f yardage of thread for a given number of turns; that have true surfaces of revolution, which insures that there will be no jumping or jerking to break or kink the thread as it is wound onor 0E the tubes at high Speed; and that have a thread receiving surface similar in texture to chamois skin, which insures that smooth hard thread wound on the tubes will not slip olf easily.

Referring to the drawings in which an embodiment of this invention is illustrated, Figure 1 shows the essential elements of one form of mechanism for carrying out the operations according to this invention, it being understood that the machine itselfforms no part of the present invention. Here reference character 12 designates a base or stand having a pedestal 13. This pedesta'l has a bearing ring 14; in which a head 15 is mounted for` intermittent rotation. Spaced at equal points about the circumference of this rotatable head are planetary rotatable spindles 16 which are adapted to carry tubes 17 to be ground. Beyond the periphery of the head and with the same circumferential spacing as the spindles 16 are fixed rotatable spindles 18, 19 and 20 carrying a grinding wheel 21, a sti brush 22, and a cut olf disc 23, respectively. The head 15 and shafts 16, 18, 19 and 20 are given their proper movement in any suitable manner. The mechanism for imparting this movement is not shown as any suitable mechanism may be used. The device shown has four spindles 16 mounted in the head so one spindle will be in idle position for feeding and removing tubes therefrom. A tube is inserted at position marked A, ground at position marked B, brushed at position marked C, cut 0E at position D and removed at position A.

Figure 2 shows in end view a tube as manufactured by winding and gluing a strip` of paper upon itself. This leaves an outer end M upstanding to cause jumping of the thread and an inner end N to cause an eccentric bulge in the tube when it is pushed tightly upon a circular shaft. Figure 3 shows the same tube after Ihaving its outer surface ground and brushed to a true circular shape in cross section whi'le the tube was mounted upon a circularA shaft similar to the shaft upon which thetube is mounted for winding and unwinding thread.

Figure 4 shows a winding tube, in this case a cone, which has been surfaced according to the present invention. This illustrates as well as may be illustrated in a drawing the velvety surface given the spool.

Figure 5 illustrates a cylindrical tube having a true cylindrical velvety surface produced according to the present lnvention.

While the description has been directed to some extent to tubes for winding yarn it is to be understood that the invention is not thus limited but includes tubes for other purposes; and the manner of surfacing the tubes is not limited to the exact method described but may be accomplished in other* ways; all such variations to fall within the scope of the appended claims.

It will also be understood that the tubes or cores may have widely different shapes and dimensions. 4

In the appended claims the tubes are said to be subjected to an abrading action and to have velvety surfaces or surfacesoferving increased resistance to yarn or thread ing in subjecting a surface of the same to an abrading action, whereby the ability of such surface to retain thread or yarn thereon without slippage is increased.

2. The method of treating a paper tube preparatory to its use in the textile industry as a core for a thread cop or winding, consisting in subjecting a surface of the same to an abrading action whereby a nap is raised thereon which increases the ability of such surface to retain 'yarn or thread thereon without slippage.

3. The method of treating a paper tube '.21

preparatory to its use in the textile industry as a core for a thread cop orwinding, consisting in subjecting a surface of the same to an abrading action, and in subsequently brushing the same whereby a thread retaining surface having increased ability to retain thread or yarn without`slippage is provided, which surface is free of loose paper particles.

4. The method of preparing a paper tube for use as a core for thread cops or windings in the textile industry, having increased ability to retain yarn .without slippage, which consists in subjecting the outer surface of the tube to an abrading action and thereby raising a thread retaining nap on such surface, and brushing the surface after the grindin operation to remove loose particles an comb out the nap.

5. The method of fabricating paper tubes for use as cores for thread cops or windings inthe textile industry consisting in winding sheet paper stock into the form of a tube, securing the convolutions together by an adhesive, and abrading the outer surface of the tube whereb the ability of such surface to retain threa or yarn wlthout slippage is increased. I Y

- 6. The method of fabricating aper articles for use as cores for threa co s or windings inthe textile industry, conslsting neeaeea in windingro paper sheet stock upon itself to form a tu e, securing the convolutions together with an adhesive, subjecting the outer surface of the tube to an abradin action to produce a surface having increase ability to retain yar-n without slippage, and brushing the surface after the grinding operation to remove loose particles and comb out the nap.,

7., The method of fabricating paper tubes for use as coresk for thread cops or Windings in the textile industry, consisting in subjecting the outer surface of such tube to the action of an abrading device, to raise a nap thereon which tends to prevent yarn slippage and at the same time to make such surface a true surface of revolutiono 8, The method of fabricating paper tubes vfor use as cores for thread cops or windings in the textile industry, consisting in winding sheet paper stock into the form of a tube, securing the convolutions together by means of an adhesive, abrading the surface of the tube to produce an improved slip resisting surface which is a'. true surface of revolution centered on the axis of the tube, and brushing the surface of the -tube, as set forth ings in the textile industry which consists in abrading the outer surface of the tube and brushing the same, the grinding being effected while the tube is rotating about a fixed axis, with the active surface of the grinding device remaining in fixed position relative to said axis during the grinding operation, whereby the tube is given 'a surface truly circular in cross section and centered on said axis and is given at the sae time an improved surface which has in creased abilit to retain thread or yarn thereon without s ip agea ll. As an article of manufacture, a paper core of the class described characterized by a thread receiving surface of the form of a true surface of revolution without surface irregularities, and of 'a soft yvelvety texture ue to projecting bers of the material of the core.,

12, As an article of manufacture, a paper core of the class described having a portion treated by abrading means to provide an improved thread receivin surface of unis form character thruout w ich ofers increased resistance to thread slippage.

13.. As an article of manufacture, a aper core of the class described having a t read retaining nap consisting of projecting fibers of the material of the tube.

le. As an article of manufacture, a core comprising sheet paper stock Wound upon itself to form a tube, said tube having a thread retaining nap on its outer surface consisting of projecting fibers of the material of the tube.

l5. As an article of manufacture, a tube for use as a core for thread cops or windings in the textile industry, said tube comn prising a spira'lly wound sheet of paper, the surface of which is a true surface of revolution and which surface has a thread retaining nap consisting of projecting bers of the material of the tube.

16. A paper tube for use as a core for thread cops or windings in the textile in dustry comprising a hollow core of hard aper fiber, the outer surface of the core being truly circular in cross Asection and having a thread retaining nap consisting of filaments of paper fiber extending outwardly,

17. A paper core for use in the textile industry havlng a surface truly circular in cross section and a thread retaining nap, the

material of the core being homogeneous throughout and the nap comprising outwardly extending filaments of the same material,

In testimony whereof I hereunto affix my signature.,

CLES K. DUZNLAP.1

Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US2895511 *14 Oct 195521 Jul 1959Crescent Paper Tube Company InGround surfaced laminated paper tubes
US3157972 *26 Nov 196224 Nov 1964Sonoco Products CoMethod of treating plastic surfaces
US3263942 *3 Oct 19612 Ago 1966Deering Milliken Res CorpPlastic articles
US3300159 *24 Jul 196324 Ene 1967Textile Paper Products IncSmooth-surfaced paper body and method of forming same
US4795652 *15 Dic 19863 Ene 1989Cooper Concepts, Inc.Method for forming an edible food container
US5211354 *3 Jun 199218 May 1993Sonoco Products CompanyTextile core having improved start up groove
US5328121 *28 Ene 199312 Jul 1994Sonoco Products CompanyTextile core having improved start-up groove
US5441208 *20 May 199315 Ago 1995Sonoco Products CompanyTextile core having transfer tail engagement
US5495087 *28 Mar 199427 Feb 1996Sonoco Products CompanyGrooving blade for textile core
WO1993024403A1 *3 Jun 19939 Dic 1993Sonoco Products CoTextile core having improved start-up groove and grooving blade thereof
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.242/118.32, 493/954, 138/170, 493/291, 451/59
Clasificación internacionalB31C11/02
Clasificación cooperativaY10S493/954, B31C11/02
Clasificación europeaB31C11/02