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Patentes

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Número de publicaciónUS2002726 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación28 May 1935
Fecha de presentación6 Jul 1932
Fecha de prioridad6 Jul 1932
Número de publicaciónUS 2002726 A, US 2002726A, US-A-2002726, US2002726 A, US2002726A
InventoresLeonard A Young
Cesionario originalLeonard A Young
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Golf ball
US 2002726 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

L. A. YOUNG May 28, 1935.

GOLF BALL Filed July 6, 1932 ATTO RN EYS Patented May 28, 1935 UNITED STATES rooms PATENT OFFICE GOLF BALL Leonard A. Young, Detroit, Mich.

Application July 6, 1932, Serial No. 621,068

1 Claim.

The present invention pertains to a novel golf ball and is directed particularly to the markings on the surface thereof. At present, there are two conventional types of markings, namely the mesh or square depression and the dimple or recess which is a round concave marking. The object of the mesh or square depression is to define straight-line circular bands around the ball, so that the ball rolls in a straight line after falling to the ground. This marking is believed to split the wind in flight or, in other words, to resist the tendency to deviate from a straight course. These depressions are of a box-like formation, and are subject to the objection that the lateral walls constitute surfaces which are exposed to wind resistance which slows down the ball.

The dimple mark is intended to minimize the wind resistance inasmuch as it has no straight walls, but this marking lacks the straight rolling and straight flight feature of the square mesh because the round concave depressions do not form the straight-line circular bands which are characteristic of the square mesh.

The object of the present invention is to provide a marking which combines the advantageous properties of both conventional markings and yet overcomes their objections as above described.

This object is accomplished, generally, by incorporating the important structural characteristics of the mesh and dimple markings in a single marking or, in other words, retaining the circular band formation for true rolling and flight and forming the walls of the depressions in a manner to minimize the wind resistance thereto. Accordingly, the outline of each depression is rectangular on the surface of the ball to provide straight-line bands, and the walls are sloped or concaved toward a central bottom point for the purpose of minimizing wind resistance.

The invention is fully disclosed by way of example in the following description and in the accompanying drawing, in which- Figure 1 is a projection of a surface marking of a golf ball marked in accord with this invention;

Figs. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 are sectional views along the curved lines 2-2, 33, 4-4, 5-5 and 6-6 In Fig. 7 is illustrated a golf ball I having spaced indentations 2 in its surface located in the same manner as the markings of the conventional mesh ball. The depressions appear square in plan, having surface edges 3 which are straight except for the curvature of the ball. These edges will hereinafter be described as straight, by which it is meant that corresponding edges of adjacent depressions are aligned to form circles around the ball. The depressions are aligned in parallel and perpendicular circles and are spaced apart, preferably equally on all sides, whereby the spaces therebetween constitute two sets of parallel bands 4 and 5 intersecting each other at right angles. These bands cause the ball to roll straight on striking the ground and also split the wind in flight so that the tendency toward deflection is opposed. The surface area of the depressions and the width of the bands are determined by the surface area of cover to be contacted by the head of the golf club in striking, for proper stroke and delivery of power to the ball.

The wall of each depression is concave from any point on any edge through the point of greatest depth to any point on any other edge. This condition is illustrated in Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6 which show concave curves 6, 6a, 6b transversely across the bottom of the depression and also a concave curve 1' diagonally of the bottom. Since each of the sections illustrated in Figs. 2 to 6 inclusive are taken through the center of the depression the depth d is the same in each instance. The distance from the point of greatest depth to the sides of the enclosing rectangle is known or can be ascertained from Figs. 1 and 7,-three points are thus found. An arc of a circle may be drawn through any three points not in a straight line and hence the construction of the entire surface depression is one of simple geometry. The sections of Figs. 2 and 6 are the shortest and longest arcs respectively and hence involve the shortest and longest radii respectively. The sections of Figs. 3, 4 and. 5 are any other sections.

Another objectionto the dimple marking is that in a dimple marked ball the area of the smooth, flat, undepressed surface is about sixteen times the corresponding area of a square mesh ball. This smooth flat surface is an area of resistance which is subject to wind resistance of the ball during flight. The mesh ball has a smaller ratio of smooth surface to depressed surface and is less subject to wind resistance than the dimple marked ball. As already indicated, the mesh marking has the disadvantage of causing compression or congestion of air at the radial walls, whereby the flight of the ball is retarded.

The marking according to the present invention removes also the aforementioned disadvantage of the dimple marking with respect to wind resistance without, however, introducing the air compression effect of the usual mesh marking. Either marking of this invention described above has no radial wall and no flat bottom to cause compression or congestion of air. In either case the wall slopes gradually inward to a center bottom point so that there is an unimpeded flow of air into and out of the depressions Without producing wind resistance or retardation of the ball.-

It will now be evident that the novel markings described herein provide the straight circular bands on the surface which are desired for true flight and straight rolling. On the other hand,

the objectionable lateral walls of the ordinary square mesh marking are replaced by a wall which slopes or merges toward a central bottom point, so that the minimized Wind resistance of the dimple marking is retained. Either of the novel markings described herein combines the advantages of the usual mesh and dimple markings and eliminates their objectionable features.

Although specific embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, it will be apparent that various alterations in the details of construction may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as indicated by the appended claim. I l i What I claim is:

A golf ball having a series of spaced'surface depressions, said depressions each having a rounded bottom and curved sidewalls, said side- Walls continuing on an unbroken curve from said base to the surface of said ball and terminating in a polygonal configuration at said surface.

LEONARD A. YOUNG.

Citada por
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.473/383, 184/15.2
Clasificación internacionalA63B37/00
Clasificación cooperativaA63B37/0012, A63B37/0004, A63B37/0009, A63B37/0019
Clasificación europeaA63B37/00G2