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Número de publicaciónUS20030051055 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 10/164,296
Fecha de publicación13 Mar 2003
Fecha de presentación4 Jun 2002
Fecha de prioridad4 Jun 2001
También publicado comoCA2447555A1, CA2447734A1, CA2447787A1, CN1513142A, CN1513144A, CN1561618A, EP1402388A1, EP1402388A4, EP1402391A2, EP1402391A4, EP1402692A2, EP1402692A4, US7260651, US20030078964, US20030079041, WO2002099591A2, WO2002099591A3, WO2002099677A1, WO2002099677A9, WO2002100117A2, WO2002100117A3
Número de publicación10164296, 164296, US 2003/0051055 A1, US 2003/051055 A1, US 20030051055 A1, US 20030051055A1, US 2003051055 A1, US 2003051055A1, US-A1-20030051055, US-A1-2003051055, US2003/0051055A1, US2003/051055A1, US20030051055 A1, US20030051055A1, US2003051055 A1, US2003051055A1
InventoresMichael Parrella, John Lash
Cesionario originalNct Group, Inc.
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
System and method for modifying a data stream using element parsing
US 20030051055 A1
Resumen
A system and method is provided for increasing the efficiency of information transfer in a network and for modifying application data in a data stream from a server to a user. In an exemplary embodiment application data, e.g., HTML, XML, SGML, scripts, or other software code, coming from a Web server at the request of a user, can be parsed into elements by an intermediary server located between the user's PC and the Web server. The intermediary server can modify, delete, add, search for, filter, or replace one or more of the elements based on a set of user defined rules and forward the changed application data to the user.
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Reclamaciones(8)
What is claimed is:
1. A method for changing application data sent by a first computer system to a second computer system via a communications network, wherein said second computer has a browser for displaying said application data, said method comprising:
parsing said application data into elements by said first computer;
if an element of said elements satisfies a predetermined user condition, changing said element according to a predetermined action, wherein said changing includes replacing, modifying, and adding; and
sending said changed element to said browser.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein changing further includes deleting and filtering.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein said predetermined user condition and predetermined action is based on content, advertising, intended audience, user, human resources, timing, context, law, geography, IP address, source, file size or type or political content.
4. A method for changing application data by an intermediary computer in a data stream from a first computer to a second computer, comprising:
extracting application data received from at least one IP packet;
determining if a part of said application data meets a predefined user condition;
responsive to said part meeting said predefined user condition, changing said part according to a predefined user rule;
combining said changed part with other application data and forming at least one new IP packet; and
sending said new IP packet.
5. The method of claim 4 wherein said application data is HTML information.
6. The method of claim 4 wherein said predefined user condition includes existence of HTML code for a banner ad, and said predefined user rule is selected from a group consisting of deleting said HTML code, substituting a banner ad for another product, and adding a public announcement.
7. A system for modifying application data elements in a data stream, comprising:
a first super module for receiving at least one application data elements in said data stream;
a decision module for analyzing said application data element according to a set of predetermined user rules and for modifying said application data element when predetermined conditions are met;
a repackaging module for creating a courier packet using said modified data element; and
a second super module for receiving said courier packet.
8. The system of claim 7 wherein said set of predetermined user rules is based on content, advertising, intended audience, user, human resources, timing, context, law, geography, IP address, source, file size or type or political content.
Descripción
CROSS REFERENCES

[0001] The following copending, commonly assigned applications are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety: U.S. Utility Application entitled, “System And Method For Increasing the Effective Bandwidth of a Communications Network”, by Michael J. Parrella, Sr., et al., filed Jun. 4, 2002, Attorney Docket No. 20275-0003; and U.S. Utility Application entitled, “System And Method For Reducing The Time to Deliver Information from a Communications Network To a User”, by Michael J. Parrella, Sr., et al., filed Jun. 4, 2002, Attorney Docket No. 20275-0004.

[0002] This application claims priority from and incorporates by reference in its entirety U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/295,721, titled “System and Method for Improving the Effective Bandwidth of a Communication Device”, by Michael J. Parrella et. al., filed Jun. 4, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/295,672, titled “Method and System Providing Compression/Decompression of Communication Data”, by Michael J. Parrella et al., filed Jun. 4, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60,295,676, titled “System and Method Providing Packaging of Parseable Data Elements in a Network Communication”, by Michael J. Parrella et al., filed Jun. 4, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/295,720, titled “Bi-Directional File Transfer Multiplier”, by Michael J. Parrella et al., filed Jun. 4, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/295,671, titled “Modification of a Data Stream Using Element Parsing”, by Michael J. Parrella et al., filed Jun. 4, 2001.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0003] The invention relates generally to the field of communications, and in particular to the efficient transfer of information over a computer network.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0004] The Internet has grown considerably in its scope of use over the past decades from a research network between governments and universities to a means of conducting both personal and commercial transactions by both businesses and individuals. The Internet was originally designed to be unstructured so that in the event of a breakdown the probability of completing a communication was high. The method of transferring information is based on a concept similar to sending letters through the mail. A message may be broken up into multiple TCP/IP packets (i.e., letters) and sent to an addressee. Like letters, each packet may take a different path to get to the addressee. While the many small packets over many paths approach provides relatively inexpensive access by a user to, for example, many Web sites, it is considerably slower than a point-to-point connection between a user and a Web site.

[0005]FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing a user connection to the Internet of the prior art. In general a user 110 connects to the Internet via a point-of-presence (PoP) 112 traditionally operated by an Internet Service Provider (ISP). The PoP is connected to the ISP's backbone network 114, e.g., ISP1. Multiple ISP backbone networks, e.g., ISP1 and ISP2, are connected together by Network Access Points, e.g., NAP 170, to form the Internet “cloud” 160.

[0006] More specifically, a single user at a personal computer (PC) 120 has several choices to connect to the PoP 112 such as a direct subscriber line (DSL) modem 122, a TV cable modem 124, a standard dial-up modem 126, or a wireless transceiver 128 on, for example, a fixed wireless PC or mobile telephone. The term personal computer or PC is used herein to describe any device with a processor and a memory and is not limited to a traditional desktop PC. At the PoP 112 there will be a corresponding access device for each type of modem (or transceiver) to receive/send the data from/to the user 10. For the DSL modem 122, the PoP 112 has a digital subscriber line access multiplexer (DSLAM) as its access device. For the cable modem 124, the PoP 112 has a cable modem termination system (CTMS) headend as its access device. DSL and cable modem connections allow hundreds of kilo bits per second (Kbps) and are considerably faster than the standard dial up modem 126 whose data is received at the PoP 112 by a dial-up remote access server (RAS) 134. The wireless transceiver 128 could be part of a personal digital assistant (PDA) or mobile telephone and is connected to a wireless transceiver 136, e.g., a base station, at the PoP 112.

[0007] A business user (or a person with a home office) may have a local area network (LAN), e.g., PCs' 140 and 142 connected to LAN server 144 by Ethernet links. The business user may have a T1 (1.544 Mbps), a fractional T1 connection or a faster connection to the PoP 112. The data from the LAN server 144 is sent via a router (not shown) to a digital connection device, e.g., a channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU) 146, which in turn sends the digital data via a T1 (or fractional T1) line 148 to a CSU/DSU at the PoP 112.

[0008] The PoP 112 may include an ISP server 152 to which the DSLAM 130, CTMS Headend 132, RAS 134, wireless transceiver 136, or CSU/DSU 150, is connected. The ISP server 152 may provide user services such as E-mail, Usenet, or Domain Name Service (DNS). Alternatively, the DSLAM 130, CTMS Headend 132, RAS 134, wireless transceiver 136, or CSU/DSU 150 may bypass the ISP server 152 and are connected directly to the router 154 (dashed lines). The server 152 is connected to a router 154 which connects the PoP 112 to ISP1's backbone having, e.g., routers 162, 164, 166, and 168. ISP1's backbone is connected to another ISP's backbone (ISP 2) having, e.g., routers 172, 174, and 176, via NAP 170. ISP2 has an ISP2 server 180 which offers competing user services, such as E-mail and user Web hosting. Connected to the Internet “cloud” 160 are Web servers 182 and 184, which provide on-line content to user 110.

[0009] While the Internet provides the basically functionality to perform commercial transactions for both businesses and individuals, the significant time delay in the transfer of information between, for example, a Web server and a business or individual user is a substantial problem. For example a user at PC 120 wants information from a Web site at Web server 182. There are many “hops” for the data to travel back from Web server 182 to user PC 120. Also because information is being “mailed” back in packets, the packets travel back typically through different paths. These different paths are shared with other users packets and some paths may be slow. Hence there is a significant time delay even if there were sufficient capacity in all the links between Web server 182 and user 120. However, because there are also choke points, i.e., where the traffic exceeds the capacity, there is even further delay.

[0010] Two major choke points are the last and second to last mile. The last mile is from the PoP 112 to the user 110. This is readily evident when the user 120 is using a dial up modem with a maximum speed of 56 Kbps. Even with a DSL modem of about 512 Kbps downloading graphics may be unpleasantly slow. The second to last mile is between the ISPs. An ISP with PoP 112 may connect via its backbone 114 to a higher level ISP (not shown) to get regional/national/global coverage. As an increase in bandwidth to the higher level ISP increases the local ISP's costs, the local ISP with, for example PoP 112, may instead reduce the amount of bandwidth available to user 110. The effect is that there is more traffic than link capacity between Web server 182 and PC 120 and hence a significant delay problem. In today's fast pace world this problem is greatly hindering the use of the Internet as a commercial vehicle.

[0011] In addition to the choke points and inefficiencies of traditional TCP/IP traffic, there is a lot of noise traffic. Like junk mail the traffic routes become clogged and the user is inundated with unwanted information. Since web sites and ISPs may receive funding from advertisers, their interests may diverge from the commercial user who is looking for targeted information and does not need nor want the distractions.

[0012] Filtering or “ad blocking” by a user's web browser of, for example, pop-up windows, banner ads, and other annoying advertisements, is well known in the arts. And while a corporate server may block selected URL's or IP addresses, the burden is still on the user's browser to do the filtering.

[0013] Therefore not only is there is a need for improving the efficiency of the transfer of information over a communications network, e.g., the Internet, but there needs to a way of reducing the undesirable data traffic to a user.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0014] The present invention provides a system and method for increasing the efficiency of information transfer in a network and for modifying application data in a data stream from a server to a user. In an exemplary embodiment application data, e.g., HTML, XML, SGML, scripts, or other software code, coming from a Web server at the request of a user, can be parsed into elements by an intermediary server located between the user's PC and the Web server. The intermediary server can modify, delete, add, search for, filter, or replace one or more of the elements based on a set of user defined rules and forward the changed application data to the user. When the intermediary server is close to the Web server and filters out much of the user specific undesirable data, e.g., banner ads, the overall effective network bandwidth is also increased.

[0015] One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for changing application data sent by a first computer system to a second computer system via a communications network, wherein the second computer has a browser for displaying the application data. The method includes: parsing the application data into elements by the first computer; if an element of the elements satisfies a predetermined user condition, changing the element according to a predetermined action, wherein the changing includes replacing, modifying, and adding; and sending the changed element to the browser.

[0016] Another embodiment of the present invention includes a method for changing application data by an intermediary computer in a data stream from a first computer to a second computer. The method includes: extracting application data received from at least one IP packet; determining if a part of the application data meets a predefined user condition; responsive to the part meeting the predefined user condition, changing the part according to a predefined user rule; combining the changed part with other application data and forming at least one new IP packet; and sending the new IP packet.

[0017] Yet another embodiment of the present invention includes a system for modifying application data elements in a data stream. The system includes: a first super module for receiving at least one application data elements in the data stream; a decision module for analyzing the application data element according to a set of predetermined user rules and for modifying the application data element when predetermined conditions are met; a repackaging module for creating a courier packet using the modified data element; and a second super module for receiving the courier packet.

[0018] These and other embodiments, features, aspects and advantages of the invention will become better understood with regard to the following description, appended claims and accompanying drawings.

CROSS REFERENCES

[0001] The following copending, commonly assigned applications are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety: U.S. Utility Application entitled, “System And Method For Increasing the Effective Bandwidth of a Communications Network”, by Michael J. Parrella, Sr., et al., filed Jun. 4, 2002, Attorney Docket No. 20275-0003; and U.S. Utility Application entitled, “System And Method For Reducing The Time to Deliver Information from a Communications Network To a User”, by Michael J. Parrella, Sr., et al., filed Jun. 4, 2002, Attorney Docket No. 20275-0004.

[0002] This application claims priority from and incorporates by reference in its entirety U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/295,721, titled “System and Method for Improving the Effective Bandwidth of a Communication Device”, by Michael J. Parrella et. al., filed Jun. 4, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/295,672, titled “Method and System Providing Compression/Decompression of Communication Data”, by Michael J. Parrella et al., filed Jun. 4, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60,295,676, titled “System and Method Providing Packaging of Parseable Data Elements in a Network Communication”, by Michael J. Parrella et al., filed Jun. 4, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/295,720, titled “Bi-Directional File Transfer Multiplier”, by Michael J. Parrella et al., filed Jun. 4, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/295,671, titled “Modification of a Data Stream Using Element Parsing”, by Michael J. Parrella et al., filed Jun. 4, 2001.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0003] The invention relates generally to the field of communications, and in particular to the efficient transfer of information over a computer network.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0004] The Internet has grown considerably in its scope of use over the past decades from a research network between governments and universities to a means of conducting both personal and commercial transactions by both businesses and individuals. The Internet was originally designed to be unstructured so that in the event of a breakdown the probability of completing a communication was high. The method of transferring information is based on a concept similar to sending letters through the mail. A message may be broken up into multiple TCP/IP packets (i.e., letters) and sent to an addressee. Like letters, each packet may take a different path to get to the addressee. While the many small packets over many paths approach provides relatively inexpensive access by a user to, for example, many Web sites, it is considerably slower than a point-to-point connection between a user and a Web site.

[0005]FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing a user connection to the Internet of the prior art. In general a user 110 connects to the Internet via a point-of-presence (PoP) 112 traditionally operated by an Internet Service Provider (ISP). The PoP is connected to the ISP's backbone network 114, e.g., ISP1. Multiple ISP backbone networks, e.g., ISP1 and ISP2, are connected together by Network Access Points, e.g., NAP 170, to form the Internet “cloud” 160.

[0006] More specifically, a single user at a personal computer (PC) 120 has several choices to connect to the PoP 112 such as a direct subscriber line (DSL) modem 122, a TV cable modem 124, a standard dial-up modem 126, or a wireless transceiver 128 on, for example, a fixed wireless PC or mobile telephone. The term personal computer or PC is used herein to describe any device with a processor and a memory and is not limited to a traditional desktop PC. At the PoP 112 there will be a corresponding access device for each type of modem (or transceiver) to receive/send the data from/to the user 10. For the DSL modem 122, the PoP 112 has a digital subscriber line access multiplexer (DSLAM) as its access device. For the cable modem 124, the PoP 112 has a cable modem termination system (CTMS) headend as its access device. DSL and cable modem connections allow hundreds of kilo bits per second (Kbps) and are considerably faster than the standard dial up modem 126 whose data is received at the PoP 112 by a dial-up remote access server (RAS) 134. The wireless transceiver 128 could be part of a personal digital assistant (PDA) or mobile telephone and is connected to a wireless transceiver 136, e.g., a base station, at the PoP 112.

[0007] A business user (or a person with a home office) may have a local area network (LAN), e.g., PCs' 140 and 142 connected to LAN server 144 by Ethernet links. The business user may have a T1 (1.544 Mbps), a fractional T1 connection or a faster connection to the PoP 112. The data from the LAN server 144 is sent via a router (not shown) to a digital connection device, e.g., a channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU) 146, which in turn sends the digital data via a T1 (or fractional T1) line 148 to a CSU/DSU at the PoP 112.

[0008] The PoP 112 may include an ISP server 152 to which the DSLAM 130, CTMS Headend 132, RAS 134, wireless transceiver 136, or CSU/DSU 150, is connected. The ISP server 152 may provide user services such as E-mail, Usenet, or Domain Name Service (DNS). Alternatively, the DSLAM 130, CTMS Headend 132, RAS 134, wireless transceiver 136, or CSU/DSU 150 may bypass the ISP server 152 and are connected directly to the router 154 (dashed lines). The server 152 is connected to a router 154 which connects the PoP 112 to ISP1's backbone having, e.g., routers 162, 164, 166, and 168. ISP1's backbone is connected to another ISP's backbone (ISP 2) having, e.g., routers 172, 174, and 176, via NAP 170. ISP2 has an ISP2 server 180 which offers competing user services, such as E-mail and user Web hosting. Connected to the Internet “cloud” 160 are Web servers 182 and 184, which provide on-line content to user 110.

[0009] While the Internet provides the basically functionality to perform commercial transactions for both businesses and individuals, the significant time delay in the transfer of information between, for example, a Web server and a business or individual user is a substantial problem. For example a user at PC 120 wants information from a Web site at Web server 182. There are many “hops” for the data to travel back from Web server 182 to user PC 120. Also because information is being “mailed” back in packets, the packets travel back typically through different paths. These different paths are shared with other users packets and some paths may be slow. Hence there is a significant time delay even if there were sufficient capacity in all the links between Web server 182 and user 120. However, because there are also choke points, i.e., where the traffic exceeds the capacity, there is even further delay.

[0010] Two major choke points are the last and second to last mile. The last mile is from the PoP 112 to the user 110. This is readily evident when the user 120 is using a dial up modem with a maximum speed of 56 Kbps. Even with a DSL modem of about 512 Kbps downloading graphics may be unpleasantly slow. The second to last mile is between the ISPs. An ISP with PoP 112 may connect via its backbone 114 to a higher level ISP (not shown) to get regional/national/global coverage. As an increase in bandwidth to the higher level ISP increases the local ISP's costs, the local ISP with, for example PoP 112, may instead reduce the amount of bandwidth available to user 110. The effect is that there is more traffic than link capacity between Web server 182 and PC 120 and hence a significant delay problem. In today's fast pace world this problem is greatly hindering the use of the Internet as a commercial vehicle.

[0011] In addition to the choke points and inefficiencies of traditional TCP/IP traffic, there is a lot of noise traffic. Like junk mail the traffic routes become clogged and the user is inundated with unwanted information. Since web sites and ISPs may receive funding from advertisers, their interests may diverge from the commercial user who is looking for targeted information and does not need nor want the distractions.

[0012] Filtering or “ad blocking” by a user's web browser of, for example, pop-up windows, banner ads, and other annoying advertisements, is well known in the arts. And while a corporate server may block selected URL's or IP addresses, the burden is still on the user's browser to do the filtering.

[0013] Therefore not only is there is a need for improving the efficiency of the transfer of information over a communications network, e.g., the Internet, but there needs to a way of reducing the undesirable data traffic to a user.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0014] The present invention provides a system and method for increasing the efficiency of information transfer in a network and for modifying application data in a data stream from a server to a user. In an exemplary embodiment application data, e.g., HTML, XML, SGML, scripts, or other software code, coming from a Web server at the request of a user, can be parsed into elements by an intermediary server located between the user's PC and the Web server. The intermediary server can modify, delete, add, search for, filter, or replace one or more of the elements based on a set of user defined rules and forward the changed application data to the user. When the intermediary server is close to the Web server and filters out much of the user specific undesirable data, e.g., banner ads, the overall effective network bandwidth is also increased.

[0015] One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for changing application data sent by a first computer system to a second computer system via a communications network, wherein the second computer has a browser for displaying the application data. The method includes: parsing the application data into elements by the first computer; if an element of the elements satisfies a predetermined user condition, changing the element according to a predetermined action, wherein the changing includes replacing, modifying, and adding; and sending the changed element to the browser.

[0016] Another embodiment of the present invention includes a method for changing application data by an intermediary computer in a data stream from a first computer to a second computer. The method includes: extracting application data received from at least one IP packet; determining if a part of the application data meets a predefined user condition; responsive to the part meeting the predefined user condition, changing the part according to a predefined user rule; combining the changed part with other application data and forming at least one new IP packet; and sending the new IP packet.

[0017] Yet another embodiment of the present invention includes a system for modifying application data elements in a data stream. The system includes: a first super module for receiving at least one application data elements in the data stream; a decision module for analyzing the application data element according to a set of predetermined user rules and for modifying the application data element when predetermined conditions are met; a repackaging module for creating a courier packet using the modified data element; and a second super module for receiving the courier packet.

[0018] These and other embodiments, features, aspects and advantages of the invention will become better understood with regard to the following description, appended claims and accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0019]FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing a user connection to the Internet of the prior art;

[0020]FIG. 2 is a simplified, but expanded, block diagram of FIG. 1 and is used to help explain the present invention.

[0021]FIG. 3 shows the TCP/IP protocol stack and the associated data units for each layer.

[0022]FIG. 4 is a block diagram of the communication path between a browser and a web server of an embodiment of the present invention.

[0023]FIG. 5 is a block diagram of the super modules inserted in the conventional system of FIG. 2 of an embodiment of the present invention.

[0024]FIG. 6 is a flowchart for repackaging a plurality of application data units at a Super User of an embodiment of the present invention.

[0025]FIG. 7 is a flowchart for repackaging a plurality of received IP packets at a super module of another embodiment of the present invention.

[0026]FIG. 8 explains in more detail steps 922 and 924 of FIG. 7. At step 932 the application data units are extracted from the IP packets.

[0027]FIG. 9 shows an example of courier packets from a Super User to a Super Host of an aspect of the present invention.

[0028]FIG. 10 is a flow chart for changing the application data units at a super module of one embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0029] In the following description, numerous specific details are set forth to provide a more thorough description of the specific embodiments of the invention. It is apparent, however, to one skilled in the art, that the invention may be practiced without all the specific details given below. In other instances, well known features have not been described in detail so as not to obscure the invention.

[0030] In order for individuals and businesses to use the Internet as an effective commercial vehicle, the time for a user to request and receive information must be significantly reduced compared to the typical times that occur today. The present invention provides both a “super” system that may be overlaid on parts of the Internet infrastructure and techniques to increase information flow in the network, which, either separately or in combination, significantly reduce the user's wait time for information from, for example, Web sites or other users.

[0031]FIG. 2 is a simplified, but expanded, block diagram of FIG. 1 and is used to help explain the present invention. Where applicable the same labels are used in FIG. 2 as in FIG. 1. The modem 210 includes the DSL modem 122, cable modem 124, dial-up modem 126, and wireless transceiver 128 of FIG. 1. Likewise the access device 220 includes the corresponding DSLAM 130, CMTS Headend 132, RAS 134, and wireless transceiver 136 of FIG. 1. The digital connection devices 212 and 222 include the CSU/DSU devices 146 and 150, and in addition include, satellite, ISDN or ATM connection devices. FIG. 2 has an additional connection between LAN server 144 and modem 210, to illustrate another option for a LAN to connect to the PoP 112 besides the digital connection device 212. Most of the computer and network systems shown in FIG. 2, communicate using the standardized Transport Communication Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) protocol.

[0032]FIG. 3 shows the TCP/IP protocol stack and the associated data units for each layer. The TCP/IP protocol stack 310 includes an application layer 312, transport layer 314, Internet layer 316, and network access layer 318. The application layer receives the application or user data 320, one block or unit of data, which we will call an application data unit. For example, a user request for a Web page would be one application data unit. There are numerous application level protocols in TCP/IP, including Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) and Post Office Protocol (POP) used for e-mail, Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) used for the World-Wide-Web, and File Transfer Protocol (FTP).

[0033] The transport layer 314 includes the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP). TCP is a connection oriented protocol that provides a reliable virtual circuit between the source and destination. TCP guarantees to the applications that use it to deliver the stream of bytes in the order they were sent without duplication or data loss even if the IP package delivery service is unreliable. The transport layer adds control information via a TCP header 322 to the data 320 and this called a TCP data unit. UDP does not guarantee packet delivery and applications which use UDP must provide their own means of verifying delivery.

[0034] The Internet layer 316 is named because of the inter-networking emphasis of TCP/IP. This is a connectionless layer that sends and receives the Internet Protocol (IP) packets. While the IP packet has the original source address and ultimate destination address of the IP packet, the IP layer at a particular node routes the IP packet to the next node without any knowledge, if the packet reaches its ultimate destination. The IP packet includes an IP Header 324 added to the TCP data unit (TCP header 322 and data 320).

[0035] The network access layer 318 is the bottom layer that deals with the physical transfer of the IP packets. The network access layer 318 groups together the existing Data Link and Physical Layer standards rather than defining its own. This layer defines the network hardware and device drivers. A header 326 and a trailer (not shown) are added to the IP packet to allow for the physical transfer of the IP packet over a communications line.

[0036] An example of the use of the TCP/IP protocol in FIG. 2 is a user at the PC 140 requesting a web page from web server 182. The user through his browser creates a user request for a Web page, i.e., application data unit 320 (FIG. 3), at the application layer 312. The TCP/IP stack 310 creates one or more TCP data units where each TCP data unit has part of the application data unit 320 with a TCP header 322 appended to it. The transport layer 314 at PC 140 establishes a peer-to-peer connection, i.e., a virtual circuit, with the TCP the transport layer 314 at web server 182. Each TCP data unit is divided into one or more IP packets. The IP packets are sent to LAN server 144 and then to PoP server 152, where they are then sent out to the Internet 154 via PoP router 154. The IP packets proceed through multiple paths on Internet 160 and arrive at web server 182. The transport layer 314 at web server 182 then reassembles the TCP data units from the IP packets and passes the TCP data units to application layer 312 to reassemble the user request. The user request to get the web page is then executed. To send the web page back to the user, the same TCP virtual circuit may be used between the transport layers of the Web server 182 and PC 140. The web page then is broken up into TCP data units, which are in turn broken up into IP packets and sent via Internet 160, PoP router 154, PoP server 152, LAN server 144, to PC 140.

[0037]FIG. 4 is a block diagram of the communication path between a browser and a web server of an embodiment of the present invention. The conventional exchange between browser 512 and web server 182, when a user using browser 512 requests a Web page 514 from web server 182, was described above. An embodiment of the present invention creates a plurality of “super” modules, including Super User 540, Super Appliance 532, super Central Office (CO) server 534, Super CO Concentrator 536, and Super Host 538, that provides an alternative super freeway path to exchange data between browser 512 and web server 182. The user request for Web page 514 is sent by browser 512, executing on PC 140, to Super User software 530 also running on PC 140. Super User 530 then sends the user request to Super Appliance software 532 running on LAN server 144 (or in an alternative embodiment executing on its own server). Super Appliance 532 then sends the user request to Super CO Server 534, which sends the request to Super CO Concentrator 536. The Super CO Server 534 and Super CO Concentrator 536 may be standalone servers or may be software that runs on PoP server 152. Super CO Concentrator 536 sends the user request via Internet 160 to Super Host 538 which may have its own server (or in an alternative embodiment Super Host 538 is software that runs on web server 182). The user request proceeds from Super Host 548 to web server 182, which retrieves web page 154 from a web site running on web server 182 (the web server 182 may include a Web farm of servers and multiple Web sites). The web page 514 then proceeds back to browser 512 via Super Host 538, Super CO Concentrator 536, Super CO Server 534, Super Appliance 532, and Super User 530.

[0038] In other embodiments, one or more of the super modules may be missing, for example, the Super Appliance 532. In the case of a missing Super Appliance 532, Super CO Server 534 exchanges information with Super User 530 through LAN server 144. Another example is if Super Host 548 was not present, then web server 182 exchanges information with Super CO Concentrator 536. Thus if a super module is missing, the corresponding normal module, e.g., PC 140, LAN server 144, PoP server 150, PoP router 154, and web server 182, is used instead. All or some of the super modules can be used and as long as there is at least one communication link between at least two different super modules, the information flow across the link improves significantly. Additionally, more super modules can deployed to extend the granularity of the super layer over the network.

[0039]FIG. 5 is a block diagram of the super modules inserted in the conventional system of FIG. 2 of an embodiment of the present invention. The same labels are used in FIG. 4 as in FIG. 2 where the devices are the same or similar. Super User 540 is connected through modem 210 is connected to PoP Server 152 via access device 220. A local area network having Super User 530, Super User 542, and Super Appliance 532 is connected to modem 210 or digital connection device 212, where digital connection device 212 is connected to PoP server 152 by digital connection device 222. Super Appliance 532 includes software executing on LAN server 144. Server 152 is connected to router 154 via switch 420, which detours the packet traffic to Super CO Server 534 and Super CO Concentrator 536. Router 154 is connected to the Internet cloud 160. From Internet 160, traffic can go to Super Host 538 connected to web server 182 or to Super Host 550 connected to web server 184 or to Super Host 552 connected to ISP Server 180.

[0040] Super System Components

[0041] Described below is one embodiment of each of the components of the super system of FIG. 5, including Super User 540, Super Appliance 532, Super CO Server 534, Super CO Concentrator 536, and Super Host 538.

[0042] The Super User 530 includes software which resides on the user's PC, e.g., PC 140. A browser, e.g., Microsoft's Internet Explorer, is set to proxy to the Super User 530, so that all browser requests for data are supplied from the Super User 530. In addition, all user requests via the browser are sent to the Super User 530. Hence the browser is isolated from the rest of the network by the Super User. The Super User caches all the data the user has requested in a local cache on the user's PC, so that when the user requests the data again, it may be retrieved locally, if available, from the local cache. If the data that is cached exceeds a predetermined file size, then the Super User analyzes all the data in the local cache and deletes the data that is least likely to be used. For example, a conventional least recently used algorithm may be used to discard old data. Some of the software function of Super User 540 are:

[0043] 1. Caching: If the browser requests data that exists in the local cache and the data meets the cache life requirements, then the data is supplied from the local cache. Otherwise the data is retrieved from the nearest super module cache, e.g., the Super Appliance 532 or Super CO Server 534, Super CO Concentrator 536, or Super Host 538, where the updated data is available or if not available from any super cache then from the Web server. Each data element has a cache life, that is how long it can be used from a cache before it needs to be refreshed.

[0044] 2. Refreshing the Cache: When the Super User PC is idle (not actively retrieving data from the Internet), the Super User checks the local cache and automatically refreshes data that is reaching its cache life. The Super User, using Artificial Intelligence (AI) or other techniques, prioritizes the refreshing based on what it determines the user is most likely to request. For example, the Super User can keep a count on how often a user accesses a web page. A higher count would indicate that the user is more likely to request that web page in the future, and the Super User would automatically refresh that page.

[0045] 3. Pre-fetching: Using AI or other techniques the Super User, during idle times, pre-fetches web pages (i.e., retrieves web pages that the user has not yet asked for) that have a high probability of being needed by the user. For example, if a user is viewing some pages on a catalog site, then there is a high probability that the user will view other pages on the site in the same category. The Super User would pre-fetch these pages. The pre-fetching increases the probability that the user will get the data from the local cache.

[0046] 4. Courier packets (described later) are packaged and the packaged data compressed by the Super User before being sent to the Super Appliance or Super CO Server. Courier packets are un-packaged and the un-packaged data uncompressed by the Super User before being sent to the browser.

[0047] The Super Appliance 532 includes software executing on LAN server 144. Some of the functions performed by the Super Appliance 532 includes, firewall security, global caching, teaming, smart hosting, and email management. Further function performed by the Super Appliance software include:

[0048] 1. If the Super Appliance is attached to a Super CO Server, then all the data transmitted between them is compressed and packaged into courier packets, otherwise standard Internet requests are used and the responses are packaged into courier packets before the responses are sent to the Super User.

[0049] 2. The Super Appliance also automatically copies and maintains web sites that are used frequently by its users.

[0050] 3. If the Super Appliance is attached to a Super CO Server, then it updates its copy of the web sites only when notified of changes from the Super CO Server. If the Super Appliance is not attached to a Super CO Server then it checks for updates of the web sites during idle times and/or during periodically predetermined intervals.

[0051] 4. If Super Users are attached to the Super Appliance then all data responses are transmitted in compressed format to the Super Users. If regular users are attached to the Super Appliance, then the data responses are decompressed in the Super Appliance and sent to the users. If the Super User is maintaining web sites, then anytime a web page is updated on the Super Appliance a notification is sent to the Super User so that the Super User may request the change.

[0052] 5. The Super User will also notify the Super Appliance of information about the user's PC monitor density so that adjustments can be made to the graphics transmitted over the local area network. Sending high density graphics to a monitor that can not display the graphics is a waste of network resources. The software in the Super Appliance adjusts the graphics density before transmitting the data.

[0053] 6. If more than one Super User requests the same data, then the Super Appliance implodes the request and sends only one request to the next super module, e.g., the Super CO Server. If there is not another super module between the Super Appliance and the Web site, then the request is still imploded and a standard TCP/IP request is made. When the response to the imploded request is received then the data is exploded by the Super Appliance and the data is sent to the appropriate Super Users.

[0054] The more web sites that are maintained at the Super Appliance the more the access speed for web pages approaches the local area network speed. The more web pages maintained at the Super User the more the web access speed approaches hard disk access speed. The more web pages that can be copied and maintained on the Super Appliance and the Super User, the less the last mile becomes a bottleneck for response time.

[0055] The Super CO Server 534 is the bridge between the Internet backbone 114 and the user 110. One objective of the Super CO Server 534 is to minimize the traffic between the user and the Internet. The Super CO Server accomplishes this by copying the web sites accessed by the super or normal users via the Super CO Server. The more web sites that are hosted on the Super CO Server, the more the network is optimized by reducing the movement of data across the network. If the web sites that are hosted at Super CO Server come from web sites stored on a Super CO Concentrator 536, the Super CO Server 534 requests updated web pages whenever notified by the Super CO Concentrator 536 that the web pages have changed. Web pages from the Super CO Concentrator 536 are stored in compressed and repackaged format. If the web sites that are hosted on the Super CO Server are not stored in the Super CO Concentrator, then the Super CO Server checks at predetermined intervals for changes in the web site at the hosting web server. The Super CO Server keeps a log of the web sites that are hosted on every Super Appliance 532 cache. As changes occur to web sites that exist on a Super Appliance cache, a notification is sent to that Super Appliance that changes have occurred and that the Super Appliance should request updated copies of the changed web pages. As data is received from a non Super CO Concentrator site it is compressed, packaged and stored on the Super CO Server. The Super CO Server determines from its request logs the web sites that are being accessed by its users and determines which web sites to copy and maintain at the Super CO Server 534 cache. The Super CO Server will also delete sites that are not being used. If a web site is not being stored and maintained, the web page is maintained in a separate global cache so that if it is requested again it can be supplied from the global cache. A correct balance needs to be maintained between the global cache and the web hosting. The global cache and Super CO Server can be implemented as one cache and managed separately or implemented as two separate caches. If a web page is requested from a Super Appliance then the web page is sent in super compressed and repackaged format, otherwise the web page is decompressed and sent to the requesting user. The super module closest to the user unpackages any repackaged formats and decompresses the data so that it is sent to the user in native form. The super module closest to the user also caches the information in non-compressed and non-packaged format. The optimizations used are related to the amount of compression applied to the variable data (usually text) and the amount of variable data on the web page. The more Rich Data formats are used on the Internet the more optimization is achieved. Flash software, files, java programs, java scripts etc. are all stored at the Super CO Server.

[0056] The data requests from the Super Appliances that are not satisfied by the Super CO Server cache are sent to the Super CO Concentrator 536 that is responsible for servicing the URL (web site) requested. The requests are packaged compressed and imploded according to the optimization schemes. In one embodiment, the first level of data implosion occurs at the Super CO Server. In an alternative embodiment implosion is done by the Super Appliance. The Super CO Server is organized by ISP geography so that duplicate usage characteristics that are regionally oriented can be imploded on request and exploded on response. All requests and imploded requests that cannot be responded to by data in the Super CO Server's cache are passed to the Super CO Concentrator.

[0057] The Super CO Concentrator 536 is organized by Web sites (URL's). This increases the probability that Web site data that users need will be in the CO concentrator's cache. It also increase the probability that requests can be imploded and network traffic can be reduced. Each Super CO Concentrator is responsible for caching and interfacing with the Super Hosts, e.g. 538, and other non Super Host web sites. For non Super Host web sites, Super CO Concentrator 536 is the first super module encountered and the initial repackaging, first compression, final implosion, first explosion, the conversion of all graphics to an optimized compression format, such as PNG or proprietary compression algorithms, and the first level of super caching occurs. This is also where all the checking and refreshing occurs for the other super modules. As data from the Web sites is refreshed and updated the Super CO Servers are notified so that all caches can be updated and refreshed.

[0058] The Web server hosts one or more web sites that are attached to the Internet. The Super Host, i.e., Super Host 538, replies to requests made from the Super CO Concentrators, e.g., 536. Each time a request is made for a down load of any web site hosted on the Web server, the Super Host 538 retrieves the web pages from the Web server and compresses and packages the contents before sending it to the requesting Super CO Concentrator. This improves the efficiency of the web transport by the effective compression rate and by sending a single data block for all the requested web page data. Each piece of information is analyzed and compressed using techniques that best perform for the specific type of data. As each Super CO Concentrator request is received, the Super Host records the IP address of the Super CO Concentrator. The Super Host checks the web sites contained on the Web server and sends notifications of any changed web pages to any Super CO Concentrator that has requested data from the web sites historically. This allows the Super CO Concentrator to know when it needs to refresh its version of the Web site and minimizes Web traffic by allowing the Super CO Concentrator to service user requests for web pages directly from its version of the web page in the Super CO Concentrator's cache. The only time the Super CO Concentrator version of the web page needs to be refreshed is when it has changed. This allows for minimized traffic from the web hosting sites to the ISP sites. There are many ISP sites accessing data at each web site. This is a step in moving web sites to the outer fringe of the Internet and bringing compression and packaging to the inner workings of the Internet. The challenge of moving web sites to the outer fringes of the Internet is to make sure data is current, the interlocking of the super module caches insures this.

[0059] Repackaging

[0060] Typical web pages today contain a HyperText Markup Language (HTML) document, and many embedded images. The conventional behavior for a browser is to fetch the base HTML document, and then, after receipt of the base HTML document, the browser does a second fetch of the many embedded objects, which are typically located on the same web server. Each embedded object, i.e., application data unit, is put into a TCP data unit and each TCP data unit is divided into one or more IP packets. Sending many TCP/IP packets for the many embedded objects rather than, e.g., one large TCP/IP packet, means that the network spends more time than is necessary in sending the control data, in other words, the control data/time to application data/time ratio is too large. It is more efficient to combine the many embedded objects into one large application data unit and then create one (or at least a minimum number of) large TCP data unit. For the one large TCP data unit the maximum transmission unit (MTU) for the link between this sender super module and the next receiver super module is used for the IP packet(s). The sender super module will try to minimize the number of IP packets sent by trying to make each IP packet as close to the MTU as practical. For each link between a super module sender and a super module receiver the MTU is determined for that link and the size of the IP packets may change. Unlike the prior art where the lowest common denominator MTU among all the MTUs of communication links between the user and Web server is normally used, in this embodiment, the MTU of each link is used.

[0061] In one embodiment of the present invention application data units, e.g., users requests and Web server responses, are repackaged (or unpackaged) into a larger (or multiple smaller) modified application data unit(s), when necessary, at each super module, e.g., Super User, Super Appliance, super Central Office (CO) server, Super CO Concentrator, and Super Host. For example, let's combine two IP packets into one IP packet, which is one example of a “courier” packet. The first IP packet has a first IP header, a first TCP header, and a first application data unit. The second IP packet has a second IP header, a second TCP header, and a second application data unit. A first modified application data unit is created which has the first application data unit and a first pseudo header having control data from the first IP Header and first TCP header, such as source address, source and destination ports and other control information needed to reconstruct the first IP packet. A second modified application data unit is created which has the second application data unit and a second pseudo header having control data from the second IP Header and second TCP header, such as source address, source and destination ports and other control information needed to reconstruct the second IP packet. A combined application data unit is made having the first modified application data unit concatenated to the second modified application data unit. A new TCP header and IP header are added to the combined application data unit and the courier packet is formed. Thus necessary control information is embedded in the combined application data unit and the TCP/IP protocol is used to move the combined application data unit between a super module sender and a super module receiver. When the receiver is not a super module the combined application data unit is unbundled and the first IP packet and second IP packet are recreated and sent to the normal receiver by the super module sender.

[0062]FIG. 6 is a flowchart for repackaging a plurality of application data units at a Super User of an embodiment of the present invention. At step 910 a Super User combines a plurality of application data units with the same destination into one application data unit. For example, multiple user requests to a web server, are combined. At step 912 one TCP data unit (or a minimum number of TCP data units) is formed from the one application data unit. At step 914 one IP packet (or the minimum number of IP packets), i.e., courier packet(s), are created, where each IP packet is filled to be as close as possible to the MTU number of bytes for the link or until a forwarding timer T has expired. At step 916 the courier packet(s) are sent to the next super module, e.g., the Super Appliance or Super CO Server, in the destination path.

[0063]FIG. 7 is a flowchart for repackaging a plurality of received IP packets at a super module of another embodiment of the present invention. At step 920 the super module receives a plurality of IP packets with the same destination. At step 922 the application information is extracted from the plurality of IP packets. At step 924 the extracted application is used to form a repackaged packet(s) (i.e., a courier packet(s)). At step 924 the repackaged packet(s) is sent on its way to the next super module in the path to the common destination.

[0064]FIG. 8 explains in more detail steps 922 and 924 of FIG. 7. At step 932 the application data units are extracted from the IP packets. For each application data unit the related TCP header and IP header control information is examined. And the applicable control information, e.g., the source, source and destination ports, and data length, are added to the corresponding application data unit to form a modified application data unit (step 934). At step 936 the modified application data units are aggregated to form one TCP data unit (or a minimum number of TCP data units). At step 938 new repackaged IP packet(s) is formed from the TCP data unit using the MTU of the link between the sender and receiver super modules.

[0065] The decision on whether to form at step 936 one large TCP data unit or multiple small TCP data units is dynamically determined depending on the traffic load on the link leaving the sender super module. For example, if the link is near capacity then it is more efficient to send multiple small TCP data units, and hence small IP packets, then one (or several) large IP packets, which would have to wait.

[0066]FIG. 9 shows an example of courier packets from a Super User to a Super Host of an aspect of the present invention. Super User 530 combines user requests 1020 and 1022, i.e., application data units D1 and D2, into a courier packet 1024 according to the flowchart in FIG. 6. Super User 1010 has its user request D3 in IP packet 1026 and Super User 1012 has a user request D5 in IP packet 1028. Both of these single Super User requests are repackaged to courier packets and sent to the appropriate Super Appliance. At the first Super Appliance 530, courier packet 1024 and IP packet 1026 are received and repackaged according to the flowchart in FIG. 7 to form larger appliance courier packet 1030. Appliance courier packet 1030 has, for example, application data unit D1 which has been modified (D1A) to include control information from TCP and IP header Hi of IP packet 1024. The second Super Appliance 1014 receives courier packet 1028-1, does not change it (1028-2) and forwards it to Super CO Server 534. The Super CO Server 534 receives appliance courier packet 1030 from Super Appliance 532 and courier packet 1028-2 from Super Appliance 1014. Courier packets 1030 and 1028-2 are repackaged according to the flowchart in FIG. 7 to form CO courier packet 1034, which is sent to Super CO Concentrator 536. Super CO Server 1036 has CO courier packet 1038 which is also sent to Super CO Concentrator 536. Super CO Concentrator 536 repackages CO courier packets 1034 and 1038 to CO concentrator courier packet 1040, which is sent to Super Host 538. The Super Host unpacks CO concentrator courier packet 1040 to get user requests D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6, and D7 (e.g., HTTP or FTP requests) and the requests are sent to the Web server. The repackaging according to FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 also occurs for the data responses from the web server to the Super Host 538 back to Super User 530 via Super CO Concentrator 536, Super CO Server 534, and Super Appliance 532.

[0067] Changing the Application Data

[0068] As can be seen from the above discussion of repackaging, the application data units are examined many times as they proceed back as courier packets from the Super Host 533 to the Super User, e.g., 530. Since between any two super modules courier packets are used the flowcharts given in FIGS. 7 and 8 are used to receive courier packets and, if necessary, to repackage them as new courier packets. In each case the application data is extracted. If the application data is HTML, then the application data can be parsed into programming elements and IF-THEN rules applied (i.e., if a condition holds then performs a predetermined action). Another embodiment may use a scripting language such as Perl (Practical Extraction and Reporting Language) which would look for patterns in the application data and perform certain actions such as deletion, modification, replacement, or addition to the data that fit the pattern. The rules to delete, add, modify, or replace elements may be based on any desirable user criteria including content, advertising, intended audience, user, human resources, timing, context, law, geography, IP address, source, file size or type or political content.

[0069] For illustration purposes, the HTML code for a banner ad rotating through several pictures is used as an example of application data that may be returned as a response to a user request for a web page. There is code for an event handler to trigger the banner display based on some event, such as going to the Web page:

[0070] <body on Load=“rotate Banner” (‘images/Banner1.jpg’)”>

[0071] Next there is code to display the first banner image (i.e., Banner1.jpg):

[0072] <table>

[0073] <tr><td><img name=“banner” src=“images/Banner1.jpg></td>

[0074] </tr>

[0075] </table>

[0076] Lastly there is a function rotateBanner( ) which recursively calls itself every 5 seconds and changes the “src” property above, thus displaying a new banner image:

function rotateBanner (BannerSrc)
{ var Timer ID
// swap the picture
 document.banner.src = BannerSrc;
// wait for timeout and call self to swap next picture
 if (BannerSrc = = images/Banner1.jpg”)
TimerID = setTimeout (“rotateBanner (‘images/Banner2.jpg’)”,
5000);
 else if (BannerSrc = = images/Banner2.jpg”)
TimerID = setTimeout (“rotateBanner (‘images/Banner3.jpg’)”,
5000);
. . . . .
}

[0077] The above example shows standard programming constructs and can be parsed by numerous software programs available to one of ordinary skill in the arts. Once the programming constructs and variables are parsed, these elements can be manipulated by user defined rules. Thus the user has an ability to filter or modify the data he/she has requested using any super module in the path from Web server to browser.

[0078] While the application data stream modification software may be part of any super module, in a preferred embodiment it is located on the Super CO Server 534, Super CO Concentrator 536, or Super Host 538 (FIG. 4), i.e., on the Internet side of the last mile (between POP Server 152 and LAN Server 144). By removing the banner ads and superfluous graphics, traffic over the last mile is reduced. By removing the banner ads at the Super Host 538, for example, would save the unnecessary data traffic over the Internet 160. In addition there is the ability at the Super CO server 534 to use other change rules besides the user. For example, a government entity may want to replace the banner ads with public service announcements.

[0079]FIG. 10 is a flow chart for changing the application data units at a super module of one embodiment of the present invention. At step 1010, the application data units are extracted from the incoming IP packets (see step 932 of FIG. 8), which could be normal IP packets coming from a normal module or courier packets coming from another super module. At step 1012 one application data unit is analyzed and the user's set of IF-THEN rules are checked. When the application data unit meets the “IF” condition of the user's rules “THEN” the data may be deleted, modified, or replaced (step 1016). If there are more application data units in the courier packet, then step 1012 is repeated. Otherwise, at step 1022, the previously extracted pseudo TCP and IP header information is added to each application data unit. These application data units are then aggregated, and a new TCP and IP header added to form a new courier packet (Step 1024). The new courier packet is sent to the next super module.

[0080] Therefore, as the application data in the courier packets pass through each super module, they are dynamically evaluated and changed according to user defined rules. In another embodiment the application data is examined and changed according to the user defined rules in one or more of the super module's super cache.

CONCLUSION

[0081] Although specific embodiments of the invention have been described, various modifications, alterations, alternative constructions, and equivalents are also encompassed within the scope of the invention. The described invention is not restricted to operation within certain specific data processing environments, but is free to operate within a plurality of data processing environments. Additionally, although the invention has been described using a particular series of transactions and steps, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that the scope of the invention is not limited to the described series of transactions and steps.

[0082] Further, while the invention has been described using a particular combination of hardware and software, it should be recognized that other combinations of hardware and software are also within the scope of the invention. The invention may be implemented only in hardware or only in software or using combinations thereof.

[0083] The specification and drawings are, accordingly, to be regarded in an illustrative rather than a restrictive sense. It will, however, be evident that additions, subtractions, deletions, and other modifications and changes may be made thereunto without departing from the broader spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the claims.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0029] In the following description, numerous specific details are set forth to provide a more thorough description of the specific embodiments of the invention. It is apparent, however, to one skilled in the art, that the invention may be practiced without all the specific details given below. In other instances, well known features have not been described in detail so as not to obscure the invention.

[0030] In order for individuals and businesses to use the Internet as an effective commercial vehicle, the time for a user to request and receive information must be significantly reduced compared to the typical times that occur today. The present invention provides both a “super” system that may be overlaid on parts of the Internet infrastructure and techniques to increase information flow in the network, which, either separately or in combination, significantly reduce the user's wait time for information from, for example, Web sites or other users.

[0031]FIG. 2 is a simplified, but expanded, block diagram of FIG. 1 and is used to help explain the present invention. Where applicable the same labels are used in FIG. 2 as in FIG. 1. The modem 210 includes the DSL modem 122, cable modem 124, dial-up modem 126, and wireless transceiver 128 of FIG. 1. Likewise the access device 220 includes the corresponding DSLAM 130, CMTS Headend 132, RAS 134, and wireless transceiver 136 of FIG. 1. The digital connection devices 212 and 222 include the CSU/DSU devices 146 and 150, and in addition include, satellite, ISDN or ATM connection devices. FIG. 2 has an additional connection between LAN server 144 and modem 210, to illustrate another option for a LAN to connect to the PoP 112 besides the digital connection device 212. Most of the computer and network systems shown in FIG. 2, communicate using the standardized Transport Communication Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) protocol.

[0032]FIG. 3 shows the TCP/IP protocol stack and the associated data units for each layer. The TCP/IP protocol stack 310 includes an application layer 312, transport layer 314, Internet layer 316, and network access layer 318. The application layer receives the application or user data 320, one block or unit of data, which we will call an application data unit. For example, a user request for a Web page would be one application data unit. There are numerous application level protocols in TCP/IP, including Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) and Post Office Protocol (POP) used for e-mail, Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) used for the World-Wide-Web, and File Transfer Protocol (FTP).

[0033] The transport layer 314 includes the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP). TCP is a connection oriented protocol that provides a reliable virtual circuit between the source and destination. TCP guarantees to the applications that use it to deliver the stream of bytes in the order they were sent without duplication or data loss even if the IP package delivery service is unreliable. The transport layer adds control information via a TCP header 322 to the data 320 and this called a TCP data unit. UDP does not guarantee packet delivery and applications which use UDP must provide their own means of verifying delivery.

[0034] The Internet layer 316 is named because of the inter-networking emphasis of TCP/IP. This is a connectionless layer that sends and receives the Internet Protocol (IP) packets. While the IP packet has the original source address and ultimate destination address of the IP packet, the IP layer at a particular node routes the IP packet to the next node without any knowledge, if the packet reaches its ultimate destination. The IP packet includes an IP Header 324 added to the TCP data unit (TCP header 322 and data 320).

[0035] The network access layer 318 is the bottom layer that deals with the physical transfer of the IP packets. The network access layer 318 groups together the existing Data Link and Physical Layer standards rather than defining its own. This layer defines the network hardware and device drivers. A header 326 and a trailer (not shown) are added to the IP packet to allow for the physical transfer of the IP packet over a communications line.

[0036] An example of the use of the TCP/IP protocol in FIG. 2 is a user at the PC 140 requesting a web page from web server 182. The user through his browser creates a user request for a Web page, i.e., application data unit 320 (FIG. 3), at the application layer 312. The TCP/IP stack 310 creates one or more TCP data units where each TCP data unit has part of the application data unit 320 with a TCP header 322 appended to it. The transport layer 314 at PC 140 establishes a peer-to-peer connection, i.e., a virtual circuit, with the TCP the transport layer 314 at web server 182. Each TCP data unit is divided into one or more IP packets. The IP packets are sent to LAN server 144 and then to PoP server 152, where they are then sent out to the Internet 154 via PoP router 154. The IP packets proceed through multiple paths on Internet 160 and arrive at web server 182. The transport layer 314 at web server 182 then reassembles the TCP data units from the IP packets and passes the TCP data units to application layer 312 to reassemble the user request. The user request to get the web page is then executed. To send the web page back to the user, the same TCP virtual circuit may be used between the transport layers of the Web server 182 and PC 140. The web page then is broken up into TCP data units, which are in turn broken up into IP packets and sent via Internet 160, PoP router 154, PoP server 152, LAN server 144, to PC 140.

[0037]FIG. 4 is a block diagram of the communication path between a browser and a web server of an embodiment of the present invention. The conventional exchange between browser 512 and web server 182, when a user using browser 512 requests a Web page 514 from web server 182, was described above. An embodiment of the present invention creates a plurality of “super” modules, including Super User 540, Super Appliance 532, super Central Office (CO) server 534, Super CO Concentrator 536, and Super Host 538, that provides an alternative super freeway path to exchange data between browser 512 and web server 182. The user request for Web page 514 is sent by browser 512, executing on PC 140, to Super User software 530 also running on PC 140. Super User 530 then sends the user request to Super Appliance software 532 running on LAN server 144 (or in an alternative embodiment executing on its own server). Super Appliance 532 then sends the user request to Super CO Server 534, which sends the request to Super CO Concentrator 536. The Super CO Server 534 and Super CO Concentrator 536 may be standalone servers or may be software that runs on PoP server 152. Super CO Concentrator 536 sends the user request via Internet 160 to Super Host 538 which may have its own server (or in an alternative embodiment Super Host 538 is software that runs on web server 182). The user request proceeds from Super Host 548 to web server 182, which retrieves web page 154 from a web site running on web server 182 (the web server 182 may include a Web farm of servers and multiple Web sites). The web page 514 then proceeds back to browser 512 via Super Host 538, Super CO Concentrator 536, Super CO Server 534, Super Appliance 532, and Super User 530.

[0038] In other embodiments, one or more of the super modules may be missing, for example, the Super Appliance 532. In the case of a missing Super Appliance 532, Super CO Server 534 exchanges information with Super User 530 through LAN server 144. Another example is if Super Host 548 was not present, then web server 182 exchanges information with Super CO Concentrator 536. Thus if a super module is missing, the corresponding normal module, e.g., PC 140, LAN server 144, PoP server 150, PoP router 154, and web server 182, is used instead. All or some of the super modules can be used and as long as there is at least one communication link between at least two different super modules, the information flow across the link improves significantly. Additionally, more super modules can deployed to extend the granularity of the super layer over the network.

[0039]FIG. 5 is a block diagram of the super modules inserted in the conventional system of FIG. 2 of an embodiment of the present invention. The same labels are used in FIG. 4 as in FIG. 2 where the devices are the same or similar. Super User 540 is connected through modem 210 is connected to PoP Server 152 via access device 220. A local area network having Super User 530, Super User 542, and Super Appliance 532 is connected to modem 210 or digital connection device 212, where digital connection device 212 is connected to PoP server 152 by digital connection device 222. Super Appliance 532 includes software executing on LAN server 144. Server 152 is connected to router 154 via switch 420, which detours the packet traffic to Super CO Server 534 and Super CO Concentrator 536. Router 154 is connected to the Internet cloud 160. From Internet 160, traffic can go to Super Host 538 connected to web server 182 or to Super Host 550 connected to web server 184 or to Super Host 552 connected to ISP Server 180.

[0040] Super System Components

[0041] Described below is one embodiment of each of the components of the super system of FIG. 5, including Super User 540, Super Appliance 532, Super CO Server 534, Super CO Concentrator 536, and Super Host 538.

[0042] The Super User 530 includes software which resides on the user's PC, e.g., PC 140. A browser, e.g., Microsoft's Internet Explorer, is set to proxy to the Super User 530, so that all browser requests for data are supplied from the Super User 530. In addition, all user requests via the browser are sent to the Super User 530. Hence the browser is isolated from the rest of the network by the Super User. The Super User caches all the data the user has requested in a local cache on the user's PC, so that when the user requests the data again, it may be retrieved locally, if available, from the local cache. If the data that is cached exceeds a predetermined file size, then the Super User analyzes all the data in the local cache and deletes the data that is least likely to be used. For example, a conventional least recently used algorithm may be used to discard old data. Some of the software function of Super User 540 are:

[0043] 1. Caching: If the browser requests data that exists in the local cache and the data meets the cache life requirements, then the data is supplied from the local cache. Otherwise the data is retrieved from the nearest super module cache, e.g., the Super Appliance 532 or Super CO Server 534, Super CO Concentrator 536, or Super Host 538, where the updated data is available or if not available from any super cache then from the Web server. Each data element has a cache life, that is how long it can be used from a cache before it needs to be refreshed.

[0044] 2. Refreshing the Cache: When the Super User PC is idle (not actively retrieving data from the Internet), the Super User checks the local cache and automatically refreshes data that is reaching its cache life. The Super User, using Artificial Intelligence (AI) or other techniques, prioritizes the refreshing based on what it determines the user is most likely to request. For example, the Super User can keep a count on how often a user accesses a web page. A higher count would indicate that the user is more likely to request that web page in the future, and the Super User would automatically refresh that page.

[0045] 3. Pre-fetching: Using AI or other techniques the Super User, during idle times, pre-fetches web pages (i.e., retrieves web pages that the user has not yet asked for) that have a high probability of being needed by the user. For example, if a user is viewing some pages on a catalog site, then there is a high probability that the user will view other pages on the site in the same category. The Super User would pre-fetch these pages. The pre-fetching increases the probability that the user will get the data from the local cache.

[0046] 4. Courier packets (described later) are packaged and the packaged data compressed by the Super User before being sent to the Super Appliance or Super CO Server. Courier packets are un-packaged and the un-packaged data uncompressed by the Super User before being sent to the browser.

[0047] The Super Appliance 532 includes software executing on LAN server 144. Some of the functions performed by the Super Appliance 532 includes, firewall security, global caching, teaming, smart hosting, and email management. Further function performed by the Super Appliance software include:

[0048] 1. If the Super Appliance is attached to a Super CO Server, then all the data transmitted between them is compressed and packaged into courier packets, otherwise standard Internet requests are used and the responses are packaged into courier packets before the responses are sent to the Super User.

[0049] 2. The Super Appliance also automatically copies and maintains web sites that are used frequently by its users.

[0050] 3. If the Super Appliance is attached to a Super CO Server, then it updates its copy of the web sites only when notified of changes from the Super CO Server. If the Super Appliance is not attached to a Super CO Server then it checks for updates of the web sites during idle times and/or during periodically predetermined intervals.

[0051] 4. If Super Users are attached to the Super Appliance then all data responses are transmitted in compressed format to the Super Users. If regular users are attached to the Super Appliance, then the data responses are decompressed in the Super Appliance and sent to the users. If the Super User is maintaining web sites, then anytime a web page is updated on the Super Appliance a notification is sent to the Super User so that the Super User may request the change.

[0052] 5. The Super User will also notify the Super Appliance of information about the user's PC monitor density so that adjustments can be made to the graphics transmitted over the local area network. Sending high density graphics to a monitor that can not display the graphics is a waste of network resources. The software in the Super Appliance adjusts the graphics density before transmitting the data.

[0053] 6. If more than one Super User requests the same data, then the Super Appliance implodes the request and sends only one request to the next super module, e.g., the Super CO Server. If there is not another super module between the Super Appliance and the Web site, then the request is still imploded and a standard TCP/IP request is made. When the response to the imploded request is received then the data is exploded by the Super Appliance and the data is sent to the appropriate Super Users.

[0054] The more web sites that are maintained at the Super Appliance the more the access speed for web pages approaches the local area network speed. The more web pages maintained at the Super User the more the web access speed approaches hard disk access speed. The more web pages that can be copied and maintained on the Super Appliance and the Super User, the less the last mile becomes a bottleneck for response time.

[0055] The Super CO Server 534 is the bridge between the Internet backbone 114 and the user 110. One objective of the Super CO Server 534 is to minimize the traffic between the user and the Internet. The Super CO Server accomplishes this by copying the web sites accessed by the super or normal users via the Super CO Server. The more web sites that are hosted on the Super CO Server, the more the network is optimized by reducing the movement of data across the network. If the web sites that are hosted at Super CO Server come from web sites stored on a Super CO Concentrator 536, the Super CO Server 534 requests updated web pages whenever notified by the Super CO Concentrator 536 that the web pages have changed. Web pages from the Super CO Concentrator 536 are stored in compressed and repackaged format. If the web sites that are hosted on the Super CO Server are not stored in the Super CO Concentrator, then the Super CO Server checks at predetermined intervals for changes in the web site at the hosting web server. The Super CO Server keeps a log of the web sites that are hosted on every Super Appliance 532 cache. As changes occur to web sites that exist on a Super Appliance cache, a notification is sent to that Super Appliance that changes have occurred and that the Super Appliance should request updated copies of the changed web pages. As data is received from a non Super CO Concentrator site it is compressed, packaged and stored on the Super CO Server. The Super CO Server determines from its request logs the web sites that are being accessed by its users and determines which web sites to copy and maintain at the Super CO Server 534 cache. The Super CO Server will also delete sites that are not being used. If a web site is not being stored and maintained, the web page is maintained in a separate global cache so that if it is requested again it can be supplied from the global cache. A correct balance needs to be maintained between the global cache and the web hosting. The global cache and Super CO Server can be implemented as one cache and managed separately or implemented as two separate caches. If a web page is requested from a Super Appliance then the web page is sent in super compressed and repackaged format, otherwise the web page is decompressed and sent to the requesting user. The super module closest to the user unpackages any repackaged formats and decompresses the data so that it is sent to the user in native form. The super module closest to the user also caches the information in non-compressed and non-packaged format. The optimizations used are related to the amount of compression applied to the variable data (usually text) and the amount of variable data on the web page. The more Rich Data formats are used on the Internet the more optimization is achieved. Flash software, files, java programs, java scripts etc. are all stored at the Super CO Server.

[0056] The data requests from the Super Appliances that are not satisfied by the Super CO Server cache are sent to the Super CO Concentrator 536 that is responsible for servicing the URL (web site) requested. The requests are packaged compressed and imploded according to the optimization schemes. In one embodiment, the first level of data implosion occurs at the Super CO Server. In an alternative embodiment implosion is done by the Super Appliance. The Super CO Server is organized by ISP geography so that duplicate usage characteristics that are regionally oriented can be imploded on request and exploded on response. All requests and imploded requests that cannot be responded to by data in the Super CO Server's cache are passed to the Super CO Concentrator.

[0057] The Super CO Concentrator 536 is organized by Web sites (URL's). This increases the probability that Web site data that users need will be in the CO concentrator's cache. It also increase the probability that requests can be imploded and network traffic can be reduced. Each Super CO Concentrator is responsible for caching and interfacing with the Super Hosts, e.g. 538, and other non Super Host web sites. For non Super Host web sites, Super CO Concentrator 536 is the first super module encountered and the initial repackaging, first compression, final implosion, first explosion, the conversion of all graphics to an optimized compression format, such as PNG or proprietary compression algorithms, and the first level of super caching occurs. This is also where all the checking and refreshing occurs for the other super modules. As data from the Web sites is refreshed and updated the Super CO Servers are notified so that all caches can be updated and refreshed.

[0058] The Web server hosts one or more web sites that are attached to the Internet. The Super Host, i.e., Super Host 538, replies to requests made from the Super CO Concentrators, e.g., 536. Each time a request is made for a down load of any web site hosted on the Web server, the Super Host 538 retrieves the web pages from the Web server and compresses and packages the contents before sending it to the requesting Super CO Concentrator. This improves the efficiency of the web transport by the effective compression rate and by sending a single data block for all the requested web page data. Each piece of information is analyzed and compressed using techniques that best perform for the specific type of data. As each Super CO Concentrator request is received, the Super Host records the IP address of the Super CO Concentrator. The Super Host checks the web sites contained on the Web server and sends notifications of any changed web pages to any Super CO Concentrator that has requested data from the web sites historically. This allows the Super CO Concentrator to know when it needs to refresh its version of the Web site and minimizes Web traffic by allowing the Super CO Concentrator to service user requests for web pages directly from its version of the web page in the Super CO Concentrator's cache. The only time the Super CO Concentrator version of the web page needs to be refreshed is when it has changed. This allows for minimized traffic from the web hosting sites to the ISP sites. There are many ISP sites accessing data at each web site. This is a step in moving web sites to the outer fringe of the Internet and bringing compression and packaging to the inner workings of the Internet. The challenge of moving web sites to the outer fringes of the Internet is to make sure data is current, the interlocking of the super module caches insures this.

[0059] Repackaging

[0060] Typical web pages today contain a HyperText Markup Language (HTML) document, and many embedded images. The conventional behavior for a browser is to fetch the base HTML document, and then, after receipt of the base HTML document, the browser does a second fetch of the many embedded objects, which are typically located on the same web server. Each embedded object, i.e., application data unit, is put into a TCP data unit and each TCP data unit is divided into one or more IP packets. Sending many TCP/IP packets for the many embedded objects rather than, e.g., one large TCP/IP packet, means that the network spends more time than is necessary in sending the control data, in other words, the control data/time to application data/time ratio is too large. It is more efficient to combine the many embedded objects into one large application data unit and then create one (or at least a minimum number of) large TCP data unit. For the one large TCP data unit the maximum transmission unit (MTU) for the link between this sender super module and the next receiver super module is used for the IP packet(s). The sender super module will try to minimize the number of IP packets sent by trying to make each IP packet as close to the MTU as practical. For each link between a super module sender and a super module receiver the MTU is determined for that link and the size of the IP packets may change. Unlike the prior art where the lowest common denominator MTU among all the MTUs of communication links between the user and Web server is normally used, in this embodiment, the MTU of each link is used.

[0061] In one embodiment of the present invention application data units, e.g., users requests and Web server responses, are repackaged (or unpackaged) into a larger (or multiple smaller) modified application data unit(s), when necessary, at each super module, e.g., Super User, Super Appliance, super Central Office (CO) server, Super CO Concentrator, and Super Host. For example, let's combine two IP packets into one IP packet, which is one example of a “courier” packet. The first IP packet has a first IP header, a first TCP header, and a first application data unit. The second IP packet has a second IP header, a second TCP header, and a second application data unit. A first modified application data unit is created which has the first application data unit and a first pseudo header having control data from the first IP Header and first TCP header, such as source address, source and destination ports and other control information needed to reconstruct the first IP packet. A second modified application data unit is created which has the second application data unit and a second pseudo header having control data from the second IP Header and second TCP header, such as source address, source and destination ports and other control information needed to reconstruct the second IP packet. A combined application data unit is made having the first modified application data unit concatenated to the second modified application data unit. A new TCP header and IP header are added to the combined application data unit and the courier packet is formed. Thus necessary control information is embedded in the combined application data unit and the TCP/IP protocol is used to move the combined application data unit between a super module sender and a super module receiver. When the receiver is not a super module the combined application data unit is unbundled and the first IP packet and second IP packet are recreated and sent to the normal receiver by the super module sender.

[0062]FIG. 6 is a flowchart for repackaging a plurality of application data units at a Super User of an embodiment of the present invention. At step 910 a Super User combines a plurality of application data units with the same destination into one application data unit. For example, multiple user requests to a web server, are combined. At step 912 one TCP data unit (or a minimum number of TCP data units) is formed from the one application data unit. At step 914 one IP packet (or the minimum number of IP packets), i.e., courier packet(s), are created, where each IP packet is filled to be as close as possible to the MTU number of bytes for the link or until a forwarding timer T has expired. At step 916 the courier packet(s) are sent to the next super module, e.g., the Super Appliance or Super CO Server, in the destination path.

[0063]FIG. 7 is a flowchart for repackaging a plurality of received IP packets at a super module of another embodiment of the present invention. At step 920 the super module receives a plurality of IP packets with the same destination. At step 922 the application information is extracted from the plurality of IP packets. At step 924 the extracted application is used to form a repackaged packet(s) (i.e., a courier packet(s)). At step 924 the repackaged packet(s) is sent on its way to the next super module in the path to the common destination.

[0064]FIG. 8 explains in more detail steps 922 and 924 of FIG. 7. At step 932 the application data units are extracted from the IP packets. For each application data unit the related TCP header and IP header control information is examined. And the applicable control information, e.g., the source, source and destination ports, and data length, are added to the corresponding application data unit to form a modified application data unit (step 934). At step 936 the modified application data units are aggregated to form one TCP data unit (or a minimum number of TCP data units). At step 938 new repackaged IP packet(s) is formed from the TCP data unit using the MTU of the link between the sender and receiver super modules.

[0065] The decision on whether to form at step 936 one large TCP data unit or multiple small TCP data units is dynamically determined depending on the traffic load on the link leaving the sender super module. For example, if the link is near capacity then it is more efficient to send multiple small TCP data units, and hence small IP packets, then one (or several) large IP packets, which would have to wait.

[0066]FIG. 9 shows an example of courier packets from a Super User to a Super Host of an aspect of the present invention. Super User 530 combines user requests 1020 and 1022, i.e., application data units D1 and D2, into a courier packet 1024 according to the flowchart in FIG. 6. Super User 1010 has its user request D3 in IP packet 1026 and Super User 1012 has a user request D5 in IP packet 1028. Both of these single Super User requests are repackaged to courier packets and sent to the appropriate Super Appliance. At the first Super Appliance 530, courier packet 1024 and IP packet 1026 are received and repackaged according to the flowchart in FIG. 7 to form larger appliance courier packet 1030. Appliance courier packet 1030 has, for example, application data unit D1 which has been modified (D1A) to include control information from TCP and IP header Hi of IP packet 1024. The second Super Appliance 1014 receives courier packet 1028-1, does not change it (1028-2) and forwards it to Super CO Server 534. The Super CO Server 534 receives appliance courier packet 1030 from Super Appliance 532 and courier packet 1028-2 from Super Appliance 1014. Courier packets 1030 and 1028-2 are repackaged according to the flowchart in FIG. 7 to form CO courier packet 1034, which is sent to Super CO Concentrator 536. Super CO Server 1036 has CO courier packet 1038 which is also sent to Super CO Concentrator 536. Super CO Concentrator 536 repackages CO courier packets 1034 and 1038 to CO concentrator courier packet 1040, which is sent to Super Host 538. The Super Host unpacks CO concentrator courier packet 1040 to get user requests D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6, and D7 (e.g., HTTP or FTP requests) and the requests are sent to the Web server. The repackaging according to FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 also occurs for the data responses from the web server to the Super Host 538 back to Super User 530 via Super CO Concentrator 536, Super CO Server 534, and Super Appliance 532.

[0067] Changing the Application Data

[0068] As can be seen from the above discussion of repackaging, the application data units are examined many times as they proceed back as courier packets from the Super Host 533 to the Super User, e.g., 530. Since between any two super modules courier packets are used the flowcharts given in FIGS. 7 and 8 are used to receive courier packets and, if necessary, to repackage them as new courier packets. In each case the application data is extracted. If the application data is HTML, then the application data can be parsed into programming elements and IF-THEN rules applied (i.e., if a condition holds then performs a predetermined action). Another embodiment may use a scripting language such as Perl (Practical Extraction and Reporting Language) which would look for patterns in the application data and perform certain actions such as deletion, modification, replacement, or addition to the data that fit the pattern. The rules to delete, add, modify, or replace elements may be based on any desirable user criteria including content, advertising, intended audience, user, human resources, timing, context, law, geography, IP address, source, file size or type or political content.

[0069] For illustration purposes, the HTML code for a banner ad rotating through several pictures is used as an example of application data that may be returned as a response to a user request for a web page. There is code for an event handler to trigger the banner display based on some event, such as going to the Web page:

[0070] <body on Load=“rotate Banner” (‘images/Banner1.jpg’)”>

[0071] Next there is code to display the first banner image (i.e., Banner1.jpg):

[0072] <table>

[0073] <tr><td><img name=“banner” src=“images/Banner1.jpg></td>

[0074] </tr>

[0075] </table>

[0076] Lastly there is a function rotateBanner( ) which recursively calls itself every 5 seconds and changes the “src” property above, thus displaying a new banner image:

function rotateBanner (BannerSrc)
{ var Timer ID
// swap the picture
 document.banner.src = BannerSrc;
// wait for timeout and call self to swap next picture
 if (BannerSrc = = images/Banner1.jpg”)
TimerID = setTimeout (“rotateBanner (‘images/Banner2.jpg’)”,
5000);
 else if (BannerSrc = = images/Banner2.jpg”)
TimerID = setTimeout (“rotateBanner (‘images/Banner3.jpg’)”,
5000);
. . . . .
}

[0077] The above example shows standard programming constructs and can be parsed by numerous software programs available to one of ordinary skill in the arts. Once the programming constructs and variables are parsed, these elements can be manipulated by user defined rules. Thus the user has an ability to filter or modify the data he/she has requested using any super module in the path from Web server to browser.

[0078] While the application data stream modification software may be part of any super module, in a preferred embodiment it is located on the Super CO Server 534, Super CO Concentrator 536, or Super Host 538 (FIG. 4), i.e., on the Internet side of the last mile (between POP Server 152 and LAN Server 144). By removing the banner ads and superfluous graphics, traffic over the last mile is reduced. By removing the banner ads at the Super Host 538, for example, would save the unnecessary data traffic over the Internet 160. In addition there is the ability at the Super CO server 534 to use other change rules besides the user. For example, a government entity may want to replace the banner ads with public service announcements.

[0079]FIG. 10 is a flow chart for changing the application data units at a super module of one embodiment of the present invention. At step 1010, the application data units are extracted from the incoming IP packets (see step 932 of FIG. 8), which could be normal IP packets coming from a normal module or courier packets coming from another super module. At step 1012 one application data unit is analyzed and the user's set of IF-THEN rules are checked. When the application data unit meets the “IF” condition of the user's rules “THEN” the data may be deleted, modified, or replaced (step 1016). If there are more application data units in the courier packet, then step 1012 is repeated. Otherwise, at step 1022, the previously extracted pseudo TCP and IP header information is added to each application data unit. These application data units are then aggregated, and a new TCP and IP header added to form a new courier packet (Step 1024). The new courier packet is sent to the next super module.

[0080] Therefore, as the application data in the courier packets pass through each super module, they are dynamically evaluated and changed according to user defined rules. In another embodiment the application data is examined and changed according to the user defined rules in one or more of the super module's super cache.

CONCLUSION

[0081] Although specific embodiments of the invention have been described, various modifications, alterations, alternative constructions, and equivalents are also encompassed within the scope of the invention. The described invention is not restricted to operation within certain specific data processing environments, but is free to operate within a plurality of data processing environments. Additionally, although the invention has been described using a particular series of transactions and steps, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that the scope of the invention is not limited to the described series of transactions and steps.

[0082] Further, while the invention has been described using a particular combination of hardware and software, it should be recognized that other combinations of hardware and software are also within the scope of the invention. The invention may be implemented only in hardware or only in software or using combinations thereof.

[0083] The specification and drawings are, accordingly, to be regarded in an illustrative rather than a restrictive sense. It will, however, be evident that additions, subtractions, deletions, and other modifications and changes may be made thereunto without departing from the broader spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0019]FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing a user connection to the Internet of the prior art;

[0020]FIG. 2 is a simplified, but expanded, block diagram of FIG. 1 and is used to help explain the present invention.

[0021]FIG. 3 shows the TCP/IP protocol stack and the associated data units for each layer.

[0022]FIG. 4 is a block diagram of the communication path between a browser and a web server of an embodiment of the present invention.

[0023]FIG. 5 is a block diagram of the super modules inserted in the conventional system of FIG. 2 of an embodiment of the present invention.

[0024]FIG. 6 is a flowchart for repackaging a plurality of application data units at a Super User of an embodiment of the present invention.

[0025]FIG. 7 is a flowchart for repackaging a plurality of received IP packets at a super module of another embodiment of the present invention.

[0026]FIG. 8 explains in more detail steps 922 and 924 of FIG. 7. At step 932 the application data units are extracted from the IP packets.

[0027]FIG. 9 shows an example of courier packets from a Super User to a Super Host of an aspect of the present invention.

[0028]FIG. 10 is a flow chart for changing the application data units at a super module of one embodiment of the present invention.

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.709/246, 709/203, 707/E17.12
Clasificación internacionalH03M7/30, H04L29/08, G06F13/00, G06F12/00, G06F17/30, H04L29/06
Clasificación cooperativaH04L69/10, H04L67/289, H04L69/14, H04L69/16, H04L67/288, H04L69/04, H04L67/306, H04L67/02, H04L67/2847, H04L67/303, H04L69/163, H04L69/161, H04L69/329, H04L67/2828, H04L67/2823, H04L67/2852, H04L29/06, H03M7/30, G06F17/30902
Clasificación europeaH04L29/08N29T, H04L29/06C5, H04L29/06J3, H04L29/06, H03M7/30, H04L29/08N1, H04L29/08N27X4, H04L29/06J7, H04L29/08N27X8, H04L29/08N27L, H04L29/08N29U, G06F17/30W9C, H04L29/08A7, H04L29/06F, H04L29/08N27S2, H04L29/08N27S4
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
20 Ago 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: ARTERA GROUP, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NCT GROUP, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019794/0306
Effective date: 20070802
Owner name: BARBARA R. MITTMAN. COLLATERAL AGENT, NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:ARTERA GROUP, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019794/0354
4 Jun 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: NCT GROUP, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:PARRELLA, MICHAEL J., SR.;LASH, JOHN;REEL/FRAME:012982/0499
Effective date: 20020604