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Número de publicaciónUS20050137694 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 10/893,151
Fecha de publicación23 Jun 2005
Fecha de presentación15 Jul 2004
Fecha de prioridad23 Dic 2003
También publicado comoUS9011521, US9585750, US20120089224, US20150223933
Número de publicación10893151, 893151, US 2005/0137694 A1, US 2005/137694 A1, US 20050137694 A1, US 20050137694A1, US 2005137694 A1, US 2005137694A1, US-A1-20050137694, US-A1-2005137694, US2005/0137694A1, US2005/137694A1, US20050137694 A1, US20050137694A1, US2005137694 A1, US2005137694A1
InventoresUlrich Haug, Hans Valencia, Robert Geshlider, Tom Saul, Amr Salahieh, Dwight Morejohn
Cesionario originalHaug Ulrich R., Valencia Hans F., Geshlider Robert A., Tom Saul, Amr Salahieh, Morejohn Dwight P.
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Methods and apparatus for endovascularly replacing a patient's heart valve
US 20050137694 A1
Resumen
The present invention provides methods and apparatus for endovascularly replacing a patient's heart valve. The apparatus includes a replacement valve and an anchor having an expandable braid. In some embodiments, the expandable braid is fabricated from a single strand of wire. In some embodiments, the expandable braid comprises at least one turn feature. The anchor and the valve preferably are configured for endovascular delivery and deployment.
Imágenes(24)
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Reclamaciones(30)
1. Apparatus for replacing a native aortic valve, the apparatus comprising:
an anchor comprising an expandable braid, the anchor being adapted to be endovascularly delivered and expanded via active foreshortening at an anchor site within the native aortic valve; and
a replacement valve configured to be secured within the anchor.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the anchor comprises a central axis, the anchor being further adapted to remain substantially undeformed in response to a pressure up to 0.5 atm directed substantially radially inward toward the central axis.
3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the anchor is further adapted to remain substantially undeformed in response to a pressure up to 2 atm directed substantially radially inward toward the central axis.
4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the braid comprises a first region and a second region having a diameter larger than a diameter of the first region when the anchor is expanded.
5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the braid defines a plurality of cells, at least a first set of the cells in the first region each being of a substantially different configuration than a second set of the cells in the second region.
6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the braid further comprises a third region having a diameter larger than the first region diameter when the anchor is expanded.
7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the braid defines a plurality of cells, at least a first set of the cells in the first region each being of a substantially different configuration than a second set of the cells in the second region and a third set of cells in the third region.
8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the anchor is further adapted to avoid interference with coronary ostia.
9. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the anchor is further adapted to avoid interference with a mitral valve.
10. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein the braid comprises a region adapted to prevent expansion of the anchor into the mitral valve.
11. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the braid is configured to have an expanded shape that is radially symmetrical.
12. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the braid is configured to have an expanded shape that is bilaterally symmetrical.
13. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the delivery length is between about 15 mm and about 150 mm and the deployed length is between 5 mm and about 40 mm.
14. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the braid is configured to have an expanded shape that is asymmetrical.
15. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the anchor comprises first and second wires, the first wire having a diameter smaller than a diameter of the second wire.
16. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the anchor comprises first and second wires formed from different materials.
17. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the anchor has a collapsed delivery configuration, an at-rest configuration and an expanded deployed configuration.
18. The apparatus of claim 17 wherein the braid comprises a shape memory material that is heat set in the at-rest configuration.
19. The apparatus of claim 17 wherein the at-rest configuration is between the collapsed delivery configuration and expanded deployed configuration.
20. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a lock configured to maintain expansion of the braid.
21. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a plurality of locks configured to maintain expansion of the braid.
22. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a valve support adapted to support the replacement valve within the anchor.
23. The apparatus of claim 22 further comprising a lock configured to maintain expansion of the braid.
24. The apparatus of claim 23 wherein the lock comprises an extension of the valve support.
25. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the anchor comprises a distal deployment system interface at a distal end of the anchor, the distal deployment system interface being adapted to permit a deployment system to apply a proximally directed force on the distal end of the anchor.
26. The apparatus of claim 25 wherein the distal deployment system interface is further adapted to expand radially during application of a proximally directed force on the distal end of the anchor.
27. The apparatus of claim 26 wherein the distal deployment system interface is further adapted to permit a deployment system to apply a proximally directed force on the distal end of the anchor without passing any portion of a deployment system through a center opening of the replacement valve.
28. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the anchor comprises a proximal deployment system interface at a proximal end of the anchor, the proximal deployment system interface being adapted to permit a deployment system to apply a distally directed force on the proximal end of the anchor.
29. The apparatus of claim 28 wherein the proximal deployment system interface is further adapted to expand radially during application of a distally directed force on the proximal end of the anchor.
30. The apparatus of claim 28 wherein the proximal deployment system interface is further adapted to permit a deployment system to apply a distally directed force on the proximal end of the anchor through a plurality of deployment system fingers.
Descripción
    CROSS REFERENCE
  • [0001]
    This application is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. Ser. No. 10/746,280, filed Dec. 23, 2003.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Heart valve surgery is used to repair or replace diseased heart valves. Valve surgery is an open-heart procedure conducted under general anesthesia. An incision is made through the patient's sternum (sternotomy), and the patient's heart is stopped while blood flow is rerouted through a heart-lung bypass machine.
  • [0003]
    Valve replacement may be indicated when there is a narrowing of the native heart valve, commonly referred to as stenosis, or when the native valve leaks or regurgitates. When replacing the valve, the native valve is excised and replaced with either a biologic or a mechanical valve. Mechanical valves require lifelong anticoagulant medication to prevent blood clot formation, and clicking of the valve often may be heard through the chest. Biologic tissue valves typically do not require such medication. Tissue valves may be obtained from cadavers or may be porcine or bovine, and are commonly attached to synthetic rings that are secured to the patient's heart.
  • [0004]
    Valve replacement surgery is a highly invasive operation with significant concomitant risk. Risks include bleeding, infection, stroke, heart attack, arrhythmia, renal failure, adverse reactions to the anesthesia medications, as well as sudden death. Two to five percent of patients die during surgery.
  • [0005]
    Post-surgery, patients temporarily may be confused due to emboli and other factors associated with the heart-lung machine. The first 2-3 days following surgery are spent in an intensive care unit where heart functions can be closely monitored. The average hospital stay is between 1 to 2 weeks, with several more weeks to months required for complete recovery.
  • [0006]
    In recent years, advancements in minimally invasive surgery and interventional cardiology have encouraged some investigators to pursue percutaneous replacement of the aortic heart valve. See, e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 6,168,614. In many of these procedures, the replacement valve is deployed across the native diseased valve to permanently hold the valve open, thereby alleviating a need to excise the native valve and to position the replacement valve in place of the native valve.
  • [0007]
    In the endovascular aortic valve replacement procedure, accurate placement of aortic valves relative to coronary ostia and the mitral valve is critical. Some self-expanding valve anchors have had very poor accuracy in deployment, however. In a typical deployment procedure, the proximal end of the stent is not released from the delivery system until accurate placement is verified by fluoroscopy. The stent often jumps to another position once released, making it impossible to know where the ends of the stent will be after release with respect to the native valve, the coronary ostia and the mitral valve.
  • [0008]
    Also, visualization of the way the new valve is functioning prior to final deployment is very desirable. Due to the jumping action of some self-expanding anchors, and because the replacement valve is often not fully functional before final deployment, visualization of valve function and position prior to final and irreversible deployment is often impossible with these systems.
  • [0009]
    Another drawback of prior art self-expanding replacement heart valve systems is their relative lack of radial strength. In order for self-expanding systems to be easily delivered through a delivery sheath, the metal needs to flex and bend inside the delivery catheter without being plastically deformed. Expandable stent designs suitable for endovascular delivery for other purposes may not have sufficient radial strength to serve as replacement heart valve anchors. For example, there are many commercial arterial stent systems that apply adequate radial force against the artery wall to treat atherosclerosis and that can collapse to a small enough of a diameter to fit inside a delivery catheter without plastically deforming. However when the stent has a valve fastened inside it, and that valve must reside within the heart, as is the case in aortic valve replacement, the anchoring of the stent to vessel walls takes significantly more radial force, especially during diastole. The force to hold back arterial pressure and prevent blood from going back inside the ventricle during diastole will be directly transferred to the stent/vessel wall interface. Therefore, the amount of radial force required to keep the self-expanding stent/valve in contact with the vessel wall and not sliding is much higher than in stents that do not have valves inside of them. Moreover, a self-expanding stent without sufficient radial force will end up dilating and contracting with each heartbeat, thereby distorting the valve, affecting its function and possibly causing it to migrate and dislodge completely. Simply increasing strut thickness of the self-expanding stent is not a good solution as it increases profile and/or a risk of plastic deformation of the self-expanding stent.
  • [0010]
    In view of drawbacks associated with previously known techniques for endovascularly replacing a heart valve, it would be desirable to provide methods and apparatus that overcome those drawbacks.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    The present invention relates to an apparatus for replacing a patient's native heart valve. The apparatus comprises an anchor having an expandable braid adapted for endovascular delivery. The anchor is further adapted for expansion via active foreshortening at an anchor site within the native valve. The apparatus also includes a replacement valve adapted to be secured within the patient. In some embodiments, the anchor braid is further adapted to remain substantially undeformed in response to a pressure up to 0.5 atm or 2 atm directed substantially radially inward toward the central axis. In some embodiments, the anchor braid comprises a first region and a second region having a diameter larger than a diameter of the first region when the anchor is expanded. In some embodiments, the anchor braid is configured to have an expanded shape that is radially symmetrical, bilaterally symmetrical, or asymmetrical. In some embodiments, the anchor comprises first and second wires, the first wire having a diameter smaller than a diameter of the second wire. In some embodiments, the anchor comprises first and second wires formed from different materials. In some embodiments, the anchor has a collapsed delivery configuration, an at-rest configuration and an expanded deployed configuration.
  • [0012]
    In some embodiments, the apparatus herein further comprises a lock or a plurality of locks configured to maintain expansion of the braid. In some embodiments, the apparatus herein further comprises a valve support adapted to support the replacement valve within the anchor. In some embodiments, the anchor herein comprises a distal deployment system interface at a distal end of the anchor, the distal deployment system interface being adapted to permit a deployment system to apply a proximally directed force on the distal end of the anchor. In some embodiments, the anchor comprises a proximal deployment system interface at a proximal end of the anchor, the proximal deployment system interface being adapted to permit a deployment system to apply a distally directed force on the proximal end of the anchor.
  • INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE
  • [0013]
    All publications and patent applications mentioned in this specification are herein incorporated by reference to the same extent as if each individual publication or patent application was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0014]
    The novel features of the invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. A better understanding of the features and advantages of the present invention will be obtained by reference to the following detailed description that sets forth illustrative embodiments, in which the principles of the invention are utilized, and the accompanying drawings of which:
  • [0015]
    FIGS. 1A and 1B are schematic top views of an anchor and valve apparatus in accordance with the present invention. FIG. 1 illustrates the apparatus in a collapsed delivery configuration within a delivery system. FIG. 1B illustrates the apparatus in an expanded configuration partially deployed from the delivery system.
  • [0016]
    FIGS. 2A-2F are schematic isometric views detailing an anchor of the apparatus of FIG. 1 in the collapsed delivery configuration and the expanded deployed configuration, as well as the full apparatus in the deployed configuration.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 3 is a schematic top view of an apparatus for fabricating braided anchors in accordance with the present invention.
  • [0018]
    FIGS. 4A-4D are schematic top views illustrating a method of using the apparatus of FIG. 3 to fabricate a braided anchor of the present invention.
  • [0019]
    FIGS. 5A-5O are schematic detail views illustrating features of braid cells at an anchor edge.
  • [0020]
    FIGS. 6A-6E illustrate further features of braid cells at an anchor edge.
  • [0021]
    FIGS. 7A-7J are schematic detail views terminations for one or more wire strands forming anchors of the present invention.
  • [0022]
    FIGS. 8A and 8B are schematic side views of alternative embodiments of the anchor portion of the apparatus of the present invention.
  • [0023]
    FIGS. 9A-9E are schematic side views of further alternative embodiments of the of the anchor portion of the apparatus of the present invention.
  • [0024]
    FIGS. 10A-10D are schematic views of different weave configurations.
  • [0025]
    FIGS. 11A-11E are schematic side views of various braided anchor configurations.
  • [0026]
    FIGS. 12A-12E are schematic side views of a deployment process.
  • [0027]
    FIGS. 13A and 13B illustrate a braided anchor in the heart.
  • [0028]
    FIGS. 14A and 14B illustrate a bilaterally symmetrical anchor and an asymmetric anchor, respectively.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0029]
    The present invention relates to a delivery system, apparatus and methods for endovascularly delivering and deploying an aortic prosthesis within a patient's native heart valve, referred to here out as replacing a patients heart valve. The delivery system includes a sheath assembly and a guide wire for placing the apparatus endovascularly within a patient and a user control allowing manipulation of the aortic prosthesis. The apparatus includes an anchor and a replacement valve. The anchor includes an expandable braid. In preferred embodiments, the expandable braid includes closed edges. The replacement valve is adapted to be secured within the anchor, and as such, be delivered endovascularly to patient's heart to replace the patient's native heart valve. More preferably, the apparatus and methods of the present invention contemplate the replacement of a patient's aortic valve.
  • [0030]
    FIGS. 1A and 1B illustrate one embodiment of a delivery system and apparatus in accordance with the present invention is described. As illustrated by FIG. 1A, apparatus 10 may be collapsed for delivery within a delivery system 100. Delivery system 100 includes a guidewire 102, a nosecone 104, control tubes 106 coupled to a multi-lumen shaft 108, an external sheath 110 having a proximal handle 111, and a control handle 120. Delivery system 100 further comprises distal region control wires (not shown), which pass through one or more lumens of shaft 108 and are reversibly coupled to posts 32 of anchor 30 for manipulating a distal region of apparatus 10. The delivery system also comprises proximal region control wires 112 that pass through one or more lumens of shaft 108 and control tubes 106 (also known as fingers) to reversibly couple the control tubes to a proximal region of anchor 30. The control wires may comprise, for example, strands of suture, or metal or polymer wires.
  • [0031]
    Control handle 120 is coupled to multi-lumen shaft 108. A knob 122 disposed in slot 123 is coupled to the distal region control wires for controlling movement of the distal region of apparatus 10. Likewise, a knob 124 disposed in slot 125 is coupled to proximal region control wires 112 for control of the proximal region of apparatus 10. Handle 120 may also have a knob 126 for, e.g., decoupling the proximal and/or distal region control wires from apparatus 10, or for performing other control functions.
  • [0032]
    Apparatus 10 has an anchor 30 and a replacement valve 20. Anchor 30 preferably comprises a braid. Such braid can have closed ends at either or both its ends. Replacement valve 20 is preferably coupled to the anchor along posts 32. Post 32 therefore, may function as valve support and may be adapted to support the replacement valve within the anchor. In the embodiment shown, there are three posts, corresponding to the valve's three commissure points. The posts can be attached to braid portion of anchor 30. The posts can be attached to the braid's distal end, as shown in FIG. 2A, central region, or proximal end. Replacement valve 20 can be composed of a synthetic material and/or may be derived from animal tissue. Replacement valve 20 is preferably configured to be secured within anchor 30.
  • [0033]
    Anchor 30 has also a plurality of buckles 34 attached to its proximal region, one for each post 32. Posts 32 and buckles 34 form a two-part locking mechanism for maintaining anchor 30 in a deployed or expanded configuration (e.g., as illustrated in FIGS. 1B, 2B and 2C).
  • [0034]
    In this embodiment, anchor 30 is formed from collapsible and expandable wire braid. Anchor braid 30 is preferably self-expanding and is preferably formed from a material such as Nitinol, cobalt-chromium steel or stainless steel wire using one or more strands of wire. While the illustrated embodiment is formed from a single strand of wire, in other embodiments may benefit from a wire braid formed of 2-20 wires, more preferably 3-15 wires, or more preferably 4-10 wires.
  • [0035]
    Delivery and deployment of braided anchor 30 is similar to the delivery and deployment of the anchors described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/746,280 filed Dec. 23, 2003, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. Specifically, in one embodiment described below, during deployment braided anchor 30 is actively foreshortened by proximally retracting the distal region control wires relative to control tubes 106 to expand and lock the anchor in place. In some embodiments, foreshortening expands anchor 30 to a radially symmetrical, bilaterally symmetrical, or asymmetrical expanded shape (as further described below). The foreshortening step can include expanding a first region of the anchor to a first diameter and a second region of the anchor to a second diameter larger than the first diameter. A third region may also be expanded to a diameter larger than the first diameter. The expansion of various regions of the anchor (e.g., the distal region) can be especially useful in locating the aortic valve and centering the anchor within it. Preferably, the secured anchor does not interfere with the mitral valve or the ostias. In some embodiments, the anchor is allowed to self expand prior to the foreshortening step.
  • [0036]
    As seen in FIG. 1, after endovascular delivery through sheath 110 to the vicinity of the patient's native valve (such as the aortic valve), apparatus 10 may be expanded from the collapsed delivery configuration of FIG. 1A to the expanded deployed configuration of FIG. 1B using delivery system 100. To deploy apparatus 10, external sheath 110 may be retracted relative to apparatus 10 by proximally retracting sheath handle 111 relative to control handle 120. Sheath 110 is thereby removed from the exterior of apparatus 10, permitting the anchor 30 to self-expand. In preferred embodiments, anchor 30 includes sheathing features as depicted in FIGS. 5B thru 5M or FIGS. 6, 7A, or 7D adapted to reduce sheathing force. Sheathing force is defined as the force required to push the sheath distally over the anchor or the force required to pull the anchor proximally into the sheath (as for purposes of retrieving the anchor). For example, if anchor braid 30 is composed of a shape memory material, it may self-expand to or toward its “at-rest” configuration. This “at rest” configuration of the braid can be, for example its expanded configuration, a collapsed configuration, or a partially expanded configuration between the collapsed configuration and the expanded configuration. In preferred embodiments, the anchor's at-rest configuration is between the collapsed configuration and the expanded configuration. Depending on the “at rest” diameter of the braid and the diameter of the patient's anatomy at the chosen deployment location, the anchor may or may not self-expand to come into contact with the diameter of the patient's anatomy at that location.
  • [0037]
    In its collapsed configuration, anchor 30 preferably has a collapsed delivery diameter between about 3 to 30 Fr, or more preferably 6 to 28 Fr, or more preferably 12 to 24 Fr. In some embodiments, anchor 30 in its collapsed configuration will have a length ranging from about 5 to about 170, more preferably from about 10 to about 160, more preferably from about 15 to about 150, more preferably from about 20 to about 140 mm, or more preferably from about 25 mm to about 130.
  • [0038]
    Similarly, in its expanded configuration, anchor 30 preferable has a diameter ranging between about 10 to about 36 mm, or more preferably from about 24 to about 33 mm, or more preferably from about 24 to about 30 mm. In some embodiments, anchor 30 in its expanded configuration will have a length ranging from about 1 to about 50, more preferably from about 2 to about 40, more preferably from about 5 to about 30, or more preferably from about 7 to about 20 mm.
  • [0039]
    Overall, the ratio of deployed to collapsed/sheathed lengths is preferably between about 0.05 and 0.5, more preferably about 0.1 to 0.35, or more preferably about 0.15 to 0.25. In any of the embodiments herein, anchor 30 in its expanded configuration preferably has a radial crush strength that maintains the anchor substantially undeformed in response to a pressure of up to 0.5 atm directed substantially radially inward toward the central axis, or more preferably up to 2 atm directed substantially radially inward toward the central axis. In addition, in any of the embodiments herein, the anchor has an axial spring constant of between about 10 to 250 g/cm, more preferably between about 20 to 200 g/cm, or more preferably between about 40 to 160 g/cm. In addition, in any of the embodiments herein, the anchor is preferably adapted to support the replacement valve at the anchor site in response to a differential pressure of up to 120 mm Hg, more preferably up to 240 mm Hg, or more preferably up to 320 mm Hg.
  • [0040]
    These parameters are not intended to be limiting. Additional parameters within the scope of the present invention will be apparent to those of skill in the art.
  • [0041]
    As seen in FIG. 1B, anchor 30 may be expanded to a fully deployed configuration from a partial deployed configuration (e.g., self-expanded configuration) by actively foreshortening anchor 30 during endovascular deployment. As described in more detail in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/746,280, the distal region of anchor 30 may be pulled proximally via a proximally directed force applied to posts 32 via a distal deployment system interface. The distal deployment system interface is adapted to expand radially during application of a proximally directed force on the distal end of the anchor. In some embodiments, foreshortening of the apparatus involves applying a proximally directed force on a deployment system interface at the distal end of the anchor. In other embodiments, foreshortening of the apparatus involves applying a distally directed force on a deployment system interface at the proximal end of the anchor. More preferably, proximally or distally directed forces on the deployment system interface do not diametrically constrain the opposite end of the anchor distal or proximal end, respectively. When a proximally directed force is applied on the deployment system interface, it is preferably applied without passing any portion of a deployment system through a center opening of the replacement valve.
  • [0042]
    The distal deployment system interface may include control wires that are controlled, e.g., by control knob 122 of control handle 120. Similarly, the proximal regions of anchor 30 may be pushed distally via a proximal deployment system interface at the proximal end of the anchor. The proximal deployment system interface is adapted to permit deployment system to apply a distally directed force to the proximal end of anchor 30 through, e.g., fingers 106, which are controlled by, e.g., Control knob 124 of control handle 120. The proximal deployment system interface may be further adapted to expand radially during application of a distally directed force on the proximal end of the anchor. Preferably, the proximal deployment system interface is adapted to permit deployment system to apply a distally directed force on the proximal end of the anchor system through a plurality of deployment system fingers or tubes 160. Such expansion optionally may be assisted via inflation of a balloon catheter (not shown) reversibly disposed within apparatus 10, as described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/746,280.
  • [0043]
    Once anchor 30 is fully deployed, posts 32 and buckles 34 of anchor 30 may be used to lock and maintain the anchor in the deployed configuration. In one embodiment, the control wires attached to posts 32 are threaded through buckles 34 so that the proximally directed force exerted on posts 32 by the control wires during deployment pulls the proximal locking end of posts 32 toward and through buckles 34. Such lock optionally may be selectively reversible to allow for repositioning and/or retrieval of apparatus 10 during or post-deployment. Apparatus 10 may be repositioned or retrieved from the patient until the two-part locking mechanism of posts 32 and buckles 34 of anchor 30 have been actuated. When the lock is selectively reversible, the apparatus may be repositioned and/or retrieved as desired, e.g., even after actuation of the two-part locking mechanism. Once again, further details of this and other anchor locking structures may be found in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/746,280. Locking mechanisms used herein may also include a plurality of levels of locking wherein each level of locking results in a different amount of expansion. For example, the proximal end of the post can have multiple configurations for locking within the buckle wherein each configuration results in a different amount of anchor expansion.
  • [0044]
    When apparatus 10 is placed across a patient's diseased heart valve, anchor 30 may be used to displace the patient's native valve leaflets, and replacement valve 20 will thereafter serve in place of the native valve. After final positioning and expansion, apparatus 10 may be decoupled from delivery system 100 by decoupling the proximal and distal region control wires from anchor 30. Decoupling may be actuated using knob 126 of handle 120. After decoupling, delivery system 100 then may be removed from the patient, thereby completing endovascular replacement of a patient's heart valve.
  • [0045]
    Prior to implantation of replacement valve apparatus described herein, it may be desirable to perform a valvuloplasty on the patient's diseased valve by inserting a balloon into the valve and expanding it using, e.g., saline mixed with a contrast agent. In addition to preparing the valve site for implant, fluoroscopic viewing of the valvuloplasty will help determine the appropriate size of replacement valve implant to use.
  • [0046]
    FIGS. 2A-F show further details of anchor 30 of apparatus 10. FIG. 2A shows the apparatus in a collapsed configuration, such as for delivery within a sheath or other lumen or for retrieval and recapture into a sheath or other lumen. FIGS. 2B and 2C show the anchor and valve in an expanded and locked configuration.
  • [0047]
    As shown in FIG. 2C, anchor 30 has three posts and three buckles. As seen in FIG. 2C, the three leaflets of replacement valve 20 may be coupled to the three posts 32 also known as valve supports. The posts, unlike the braid, do not collapse or expand. In some embodiments a post 32 has one or more proximal slots 33, at least one proximal hole 36 a and at least one distal hole 36 b. Leaflet tissue may be passed through slot 33 and sutured in place via suture routed through one or more proximal holes 36 a. Other means known in the art for fixing valve leaflets to posts may also be employed.
  • [0048]
    Posts 32 may be coupled to anchor braid 30 via one or more distal holes 36 b. For example, anchor braid 30 may be woven through holes 36 b, or a suture may be routed through holes 36 b and tied to the braid. Buckles 34 may likewise be attached to anchor braid 30 via weaving or suturing.
  • [0049]
    Alternative locks may be used to lock the anchor of the present invention in the foreshortened configuration. Preferably, a locking mechanism of the present invention can have multiple locking options such that locking can confer a plurality of amounts of expansion. Furthermore, the locking option can be employed asymmetrically to confer non-cylindrical shapes to the anchor. In FIG. 2D, lock 40′ comprises male interlocking element 44 as described previously. However, female interlocking element 42′ illustratively comprises a triangular shape, as compared to the round shape of interlocking element 42 described previously. The triangular shape of female interlocking element 42′ may facilitate mating of male interlocking element 44 with the female interlocking element without necessitating deformation of the male interlocking element.
  • [0050]
    In FIG. 2E, lock 40″ comprises alternative male interlocking element 44′ having multiple in-line arrowheads 46 along posts 32. Each arrowhead comprises resiliently deformable appendages 48 to facilitate passage through female interlocking element 42. Appendages 48 optionally comprise eyelets 49, such that control wire 50 or a secondary wire may pass therethrough to constrain the appendages in the deformed configuration. To actuate lock 40″, one or more arrowheads 46 of male interlocking element 44′ are drawn through female interlocking element 42, and the wire is removed from eyelets 49, thereby causing appendages 48 to resiliently expand and actuate lock 40″.
  • [0051]
    Advantageously, providing multiple arrowheads 46 along posts 32 yields a ratchet that facilitates in-vivo determination of a degree of foreshortening imposed upon apparatus of the present invention. Furthermore, optionally constraining appendages 48 of arrowheads 46 via eyelets 49 prevents actuation of lock 40″ (and thus deployment of apparatus of the present invention) even after male element 44′ has been advanced through female element 42. Only after a medical practitioner has removed the wire constraining appendages 48 is lock 40″ fully engaged and deployment no longer reversible.
  • [0052]
    Lock 40′″ of FIG. 1C is similar to lock 40″ of FIG. 2E, except that optional eyelets 49 on appendages 48 have been replaced by optional overtube 47. Overtube 47 serves a similar function to eyelets 49 by constraining appendages 48 to prevent locking until a medical practitioner has determined that apparatus of the present invention has been foreshortened and positioned adequately at a treatment site. Overtube 47 is then removed, which causes the appendages to resiliently expand, thereby fully actuating lock 40′″.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 3 illustrates an exemplary apparatus for fabricating braided anchors. Such apparatus includes a cylindrical braiding fixture 200. The cylindrical braiding fixture 200 comprises proximal circumference of inner posts 202 a separated by a distance x from distal circumference of inner posts 202 b. x can be, for example, 10 to 60 mm, more preferably 20 to 50 mm, or more preferably 30 to 40 mm. Optionally, the fixture may also comprise proximal and distal circumferences of outer posts 204 a and 204 b, respectively. 204 a and 204 b can be situated about 2-10 mm from 202 a and 202 b, respectively. Posts 202 a/b and 204 a/b project from fixture 200 and may be used to route wire, e.g., for forming anchor braid 30. Inner posts 202 a and 202 b generally facilitate formation of a braid, while outer posts 204 a and 204 b generally facilitate formation of desired features at the ends of the braid, as described hereinafter with respect to FIGS. 5-8.
  • [0054]
    In some embodiments, fixture 200 comprises approximately 6-20 posts, more preferably 8-18 posts, or more preferably 10-16 posts around its circumference, though any alternative number of posts may be provided. Likewise, fixture 200 preferably has a diameter of about 2-40 mm, more preferably 4-30 mm, or more preferably 6-20 mm, though any alternative diameter may be provided. The diameter of fixture 200 preferably is the diameter of the braid in its “at rest” configuration.
  • [0055]
    Fixture 200 can optionally further comprise circumferential grooves 206 to facilitate interweaving of a first section of wire underneath an adjacent section of wire. The fixture optionally also may comprise localized depressions or holes 208 in addition, or as an alternative, to grooves 206. Depressions 208 may be provided at locations where wire segments cross to act as a visual guide for formation of anchor braid 30, as well as to facilitate the interweaving of a first section of wire beneath an adjacent section of wire.
  • [0056]
    Referring now to FIGS. 4A-D, an illustrative method of using fixture 200 to fabricate braided anchors in accordance with the present invention is described. FIG. 4A provides a detail view of a proximal front side region of fixture 200 during formation of a braided anchor. FIG. 4B shows a detail backside view of a central section of the fixture. FIG. 4C shows a full-length frontside view of the fixture and FIG. 4D shows the completed braid. In FIG. 4, anchor braid 30 is formed from a single strand of wrapped and interwoven wire W. However, it should be understood that anchor braid 30 alternatively may be formed from multiple strands of wire.
  • [0057]
    As seen in FIG. 4A, formation of anchor braid 30 begins with wire W being routed from starting position P near the proximal end of fixture 200 past outer proximal posts 204 a and inner proximal posts 202 a. Wire W preferably is formed from a superelastic and/or shape-memory material, such as Nitinol. However, alternative wire materials may be utilized, including Cobalt-Chromium, Steel and combinations thereof, as well as additional materials that will be apparent to those of skill in the art.
  • [0058]
    After passing inner proximal posts 202 a, wire W encircles fixture 200 in a helical spiral while extending towards the distal posts, as seen in FIGS. 4B and 4C. The wire illustratively encircles fixture 200 a full 360° revolution plus one additional post. However, any alternative degree of winding may be provided (e.g., a full 360° plus 2 additional posts, a full 360° plus 3 additional posts, or a number of posts less than a full 360°). As will be apparent to those of skill in the art, altering the degree of winding will alter the expansion characteristics of the resultant braid in ways per se known.
  • [0059]
    At distal inner posts 202 b, wire W forms turn Tu and is rerouted back towards proximal inner posts 202 a. It should be noted that wire W can form turn Tu in either inner posts 202 or outer posts 204. Turn Tu forms a closed end of the braid. Additional sets of inner and outer posts are also contemplated. The wire once again encircles fixture 200 in a full 360° helical revolution plus one additional post before reaching the proximal inner posts and being rerouted back towards the distal inner posts. This process is repeated with the wire repetitively interwoven at crossing locations between the proximal and distal posts, e.g., via grooves 206 and/or depressions 208, to define the cells of the braid that will provide anchor 30 with desired characteristics. As seen in FIG. 4D, wire W turns both proximally and distally in order to complete formation of the braid. In this embodiment, wire W terminates in the central portion of the braid at T. Termination T may be formed, for example, by welding the wires together, applying a shrink tube about the overlap, using a crimp, braising the wires, etc. Additional techniques will be apparent to those of skill in the art.
  • [0060]
    When anchor braid 30 is formed from a shape-memory material, the braid may be heat set such that it maintains a desired degree of expansion in an at-rest configuration. The heat set at-rest configuration may comprise, for example, the delivery configuration (e.g., collapsed configuration) of FIG. 2A, the deployed configuration (e.g., expanded configuration) of FIGS. 2B and 2C, or any desired configuration therebetween. In preferred embodiments, the anchor is heat-set in a configuration between the delivery configuration and the deployed configuration. Anchor braid 30 may be heat set while still disposed on fixture 200 to maintain an at-rest configuration as formed on the fixture, which preferably is a configuration between the delivery and deployed configurations. Alternatively, the braid may be heat set after complete or partial removal from the fixture. As yet another alternative, the braid may be initially heat set while still disposed on the fixture, but thereafter may be additionally heat set in a different shape, for example, a more expanded configuration. It is expected that heat setting anchor braid 30 will provide the braid with desired delivery and/or deployment characteristics.
  • [0061]
    Referring now to FIGS. 5A-5O, in conjunction with FIGS. 2C and 4, an anchor braid 30 may be defined by a set of cells that is different than other cells. Such cells may be formed to provide anchor braid 30 with one or more edge features (for either or both the distal and proximal ends). These edge features can, for example, reduce or relieve stress within the braid during delivery and deployment, which in turn may reduce the incidence of anchor material fatigue caused by the pulsatile anchor motion of the anchor site. As will be apparent to those of skill in the art, forming braid 31 from a single strand of wire W (or from multiple strands of wire W that form turns or that are joined together) may lead to stress concentration at turns Tu in the wire where the wire changes direction and extends back towards the opposite end of the braid. Such stress concentration may be most pronounced while the braid is disposed in its extreme configurations, i.e. when the braid is disposed in the collapsed delivery configuration of FIG. 2A or the expanded deployed configuration of FIGS. 2B and 2C.
  • [0062]
    Stress concentration may increase the rigidity of an anchor braid and/or may impede delivery and deployment, as well as sheathing, of the braid. Thus, in preferred embodiments, a group of cells can be configured to reduce the sheathing force as described herein. Furthermore, to enhance deliverability, stress concentration may require that anchor braid 30 be fabricated from a relatively thin wire W. However, thin wire may not provide anchor braid 30 with adequate radial strength to displace a patient's diseased native heart valve leaflets and/or to anchor apparatus 10 against a patient's anatomy. Conversely, use of a relatively thick wire W may increase stiffness, thereby precluding retrograde delivery of apparatus 10, as well as a risk of kinking at turns in the braid. Thus, in some embodiments, wires varying in thickness may be used, or multiple wires having different thickness may be woven together. Also, wires made from different materials may be used to form an anchor braid.
  • [0063]
    It may be desirable to reduce stress concentration at the edges of anchor 30 where wire W changes direction and/or to reduce the circumferential stiffness of the anchor braid. The edge characteristics of the anchor may be altered by altering the shape of substantially all anchor braid cells at the anchor's edge (e.g., distal edge and/or proximal edge). Wire turns that control the shape of the edge cells may be formed within anchor braid 30 by routing wire W around optional outer posts 204 of fixture 200 during formation of the braid. FIG. 5A illustrates a detail view of a standard end turn Tu in an anchor braid resulting in a braid with substantially uniform cell size and shape. FIG. 5B illustrates a turn that has been elongated to lengthen the distance over which forces concentrated in the turn may be distributed, resulting in an anchor braid having edge cells that are longer along the anchor axis than the other cells defined by the braid. This elongated turn feature may be formed by routing the wire of braid about outer posts 204 of fixture 200, and then heat setting the wire.
  • [0064]
    FIG. 5C illustrates an alternative anchor edge cell configuration, wherein the tip of the elongated wire turn has been bent out of a cylindrical shape defined by the braid of anchor braid 30. This may be achieved, for example, via a combination of routing of wire W within fixture 200 and heat setting. The out-of-plane bend of turn Tu in the anchor edge cells in FIG. 5C may reduce stress in some configurations, and may also provide a lip for engaging the patient's native valve leaflets to facilitate proper positioning of apparatus 10 during deployment.
  • [0065]
    In FIG. 5D, a W-shaped turn feature has been formed at the wire turn, e.g., by routing the wire of anchor braid 30 about a central inner post 202 and two flanking outer posts 204 of fixture 200. As with the elongated braid cells of FIGS. 5B and 5C, the W-shape may better distribute stress about turn Tu. The anchor edge cell configuration in FIG. 5E includes a loop formed in braid 31 at the turn, which may be formed by looping wire W around an inner or outer post of fixture 200. FIG. 5F provides another alternative anchor edge cell configuration having a figure-eight shape. Such a shape may be formed, for example, by wrapping wire W about an inner post 202 and an aligned outer post 204 in a figure-eight fashion, and then heat setting the wire in the resultant shape.
  • [0066]
    In FIG. 5G, the edge cells of braid 31 include a heart-shaped configuration, which may be formed by wrapping the wire about an aligned inner and outer post of fixture 200 in the desired manner. In FIG. 5H, the edge cells of braid 31 have an asymmetric loop at turn Tu. The asymmetric loop will affect twisting of braid 31 during expansion and collapse of the braid, in addition to affecting stress concentration. In FIG. 5I, the anchor edge cells have a double-looped turn configuration, e.g. via wrapping about two adjacent inner or outer posts of fixture 200. Additional loops may also be employed. The double loop turn feature may be formed with a smooth transition between the loops, as in FIG. 5I, or may be heat set with a more discontinuous shape, as in FIG. 5J.
  • [0067]
    FIG. 5K illustrates that the edge cells of braid 31 may have multiple different configurations about the anchor's circumference. For example, the anchor edge cells shown in FIG. 5K have extended length cells as in FIG. 5B disposed adjacent to standard size edge cells, as in FIG. 5A. The anchor edge cells of FIG. 5L have an extended turn configuration having an extended loop. The anchor edge cells shown in FIG. 5M have an alternative extended configuration with a specified heat set profile. Finally, the anchor edge cells shown in FIG. 5N that overlap or are interwoven to be coupled to one another.
  • [0068]
    In preferred embodiments, the edge cells may be wrapped using wire, string, or sutures, at a location where the wire overlaps after an end turn as is illustrated in FIG. 5O. This tied-end turn feature prevents cells from interlocking with each other during deployment.
  • [0069]
    The edge cell configuration of FIG. 5 may be heat set independently of the rest of the braid. The anchor edge cell configurations of FIG. 5 are provided only for the sake of illustration and should in no way be construed as limiting. Additional turn features within the scope of the present invention will apparent to those of skill in the art in view of FIG. 5. Furthermore, combinations of any such turn features may be provided to achieve desired characteristics of anchor braid 30.
  • [0070]
    Referring now to FIGS. 6A-E, additional configurations for reducing stress concentration and/or circumferential stiffness of anchor braid 30 are illustrated. Such configurations can be used independently or in conjunction with other configurations disclosed herein. Such configurations are preferably used at the anchor's edges to locally reduce the cross-sectional area of substantially all cells or all cells in the anchor braid's edge (e.g., proximal and/or distal). As seen in FIGS. 6A and 6B, turns Tu in wire W typically may have a substantially continuous (e.g., round) cross-sectional profile. As seen in FIG. 6C, modifying the edge cell configuration by locally reducing the thickness or cross-sectional area of wire W at turn(s) Tu will reduce stress concentration within the wire at the turns and facilitate collapse and/or expansion of anchor braid 30 from the delivery to the deployed configurations. Furthermore, it is expected that such localized reduction in thickness or cross-sectional area will reduce a risk of kinking, fatigue or other failure at turns Tu.
  • [0071]
    Localized reduction may be achieved via a localized etching and/or electropolishing process. Alternatively or additionally, localized grinding of the turns may be utilized. Additional processing techniques will be apparent to those of skill in the art. As seen in FIGS. 6D-6E, wire W may, for example, comprise an oval or rectangular cross-sectional profile, respectively, after localized reduction. The wire alternatively may comprise a round profile of reduced cross-sectional area (not shown). Additional profiles will be apparent. Localized reduction can take place at any time (e.g., before or after a braid is woven). Preferably, localized reduction occurs after weaving. However, in some embodiments, a wire of a given length may be etched or ground at preset segments and subsequently woven.
  • [0072]
    Referring now to FIGS. 7A-J, instead of terminating the beginning and end of wire W of braid 31 at an overlap within the braid, as discussed previously, the two ends of the wire may be terminated at the anchor's edge. Likewise, when braid 31 is fabricated from multiple wires W, the wires (or a subset of the wires) optionally may be joined together or terminated at turn(s) of the braid. In FIG. 7A, wire termination T at the ends of wire(s) W comprises a hinged termination with hinge post 38. In FIG. 7B termination T comprises a clipped or crimped termination with end cap 39. In FIG. 7C, cap 39 is wrapped about the ends of wire W to form wrapped termination T.
  • [0073]
    In FIG. 7D, cap 39 is placed over the wire ends, which are then bent to provide a swivel termination. In FIG. 7E, the wire ends are potted within cap 39 at termination T. In FIG. 7F, cap 39 is swaged about the wire ends. In FIG. 7G, the wire ends are welded or glued together. In FIG. 7G, the wire ends are spot welded together. Alternatively, the wire ends may be braised to form termination T, as in FIG. 7H. As yet another alternative, cap 39 may be placed about the wire ends, and kinks K may be formed in wire W to provide the ends of the wire with an ‘over-center’ bias that maintains termination T, e.g., swivel termination T. Additional terminations will be apparent to those of skill in the art.
  • [0074]
    With reference now to FIGS. 8A-B, alternative anchors of the present invention are described having anchor edge features that facilitate sheathing of the apparatus and reduce the sheathing force. In FIG. 8A, the edge cells of anchor 30 have inwardly canted configurations at the wire turns Tu about a proximal circumference of the anchor. These edge cell configurations provide the proximal circumference with a conical profile that facilitates sheathing of the apparatus within a delivery system, e.g., previously described delivery system 100, by allowing collapse of anchor 30 to proceed in a more gradual and/or continuous manner, and funneling the anchor into the sheath.
  • [0075]
    FIG. 8B illustrates another alternative anchor 30 having edge cell configurations formed by wire turns Tu about its proximal circumference that first cant outward, and then cant inward. The inward cant provides the proximal circumference with a conical profile and may facilitate sheathing, while the outward cant may facilitate anchoring at a treatment site, e.g., may engage a patient's native valve leaflets. As will be apparent, the edge cell configurations of FIG. 8, as well as those of FIGS. 5-7, optionally may be provided at either the proximal or distal ends of the anchor, or both. The edge cell configurations of FIG. 8, as well as those of FIGS. 5 and 7, may, for example, be formed by heat setting braid 31 in the desired configuration.
  • [0076]
    Referring now to FIG. 9, further alternative anchors are described having edge cell configurations adapted to lock the anchor in the deployed configuration to maintain expansion. In FIG. 9A, anchor 30 comprises elongated, hooked edge cells formed from wire turns Tu that are configured to snag braid 31 and maintain the anchor in the deployed configuration, as shown. In FIG. 9B, the hooked turn features have been elongated, such that the hooks are configured to snag the opposing end of anchor 30 to maintain expansion.
  • [0077]
    In FIG. 9C, anchor edge cells defined by wire turns TuP and distal turn features TuD are configured to interlock between the ends of anchor braid 30 in order to maintain the deployed configuration of anchor 30. The proximal edge cells form a hook adapted to engage elongated turns of the distal turn features. As will be apparent, the disposition of all or a portion of the proximal and distal edge cell configurations optionally may be reversed, i.e. the proximal edge cells may form hooks and the distal edge cells may be configured as elongated turns. FIG. 9D illustrates interlocking proximal and distal edge cell configurations of more complex geometry. FIG. 9E illustrates interlocking proximal and distal edge cell configurations while anchor 30 is disposed in the collapsed delivery configuration. The locking turn features of FIG. 9 may, for example, be formed by heat setting anchor braid 30 (or locking features only) in the desired configuration. Additional locking turn features will be apparent to those of skill in the art. In preferred embodiments, the anchor locking mechanism can be set to have alternative locking options that allow for various amounts of expansion.
  • [0078]
    FIGS. 10A-10D illustrate various embodiments of anchor braids. An anchor braid can be made of one or more wire and can be used to form various density braids. The density of the braid can be assessed by the size of cells formed by the weave. In some embodiments, two or more different density braids may be woven together. For example, FIG. 10A illustrates two groups of cells or two braids interwoven in the center. The top group of cells forms a more open weave than the bottom group of cells, which forms a denser weave. FIG. 10B illustrates another embodiment of an anchor braid having three groups of cells. The top and bottom (proximal and distal) edges of the anchor braid have denser cells than the central portion of the anchor. Also, the edges of the anchor are woven from a thinner filament than the central portion. In another embodiment illustrated by FIG. 10C, all three sections of an anchor valve are woven by more than one wire. The wires of each section are made of a different material and/or thickness. Wires at the sectional boundaries may or may not interconnect with wires from a different section. Each of the sections of the braid anchor may be composed of a different number of wires. FIG. 10D illustrates another embodiment of a braided anchor having three sections. In this embodiment, all sections are composed of a single wire. The proximal and distal sections/edges of the braided anchor have the same pitch. The central region of the braided anchor has a different pitch than the edge sections.
  • [0079]
    FIGS. 11A-11E illustrate side views of braided anchor having more than one braid pitch. Varying pitch within the anchor allows localized variations in foreshortening across the anchor, as greater foreshortening is achieved by higher pitch of the braid. Moreover, the localized foreshortening features allow for the design of a braid which incorporates various diameters depending upon the amount of foreshortening. (The greater the foreshortening, the greater the diameter increase upon deployment.)
  • [0080]
    FIG. 11A, for example, is a side view representation of braided anchor of FIG. 10D. On the left side of the figure, the expanded anchor is illustrated having a denser weave (shorter pitch) at the distal and proximal ends; hence the dots are located closer to each other. The middle section of the anchor is composed of a looser weave that is generated by a higher pitch braid and is represented by dots that are farther away from each other. On the right side of the figure, the braided anchor is foreshortened and the dots are collapsed closer to each other. In this case, the central portion of the anchor foreshortened more than the proximal and distal edges. FIG. 11B illustrates a side view of a foreshortened braided anchor that is created by low pitch at the edges and high pitch in the middle. FIG. 11C illustrates a side view of a foreshortened braided anchor that is created by high pitch edges and low pitch middle section. FIG. 11D illustrates a side view of a foreshortened braided anchor that includes a sealing feature or space filling feature at both ends. This type of anchor can be created by a high pitch braid at edges, low pitch braid in the middle and heat setting the edges to curl upon unsheathing. This end feature is useful in facilitating anchoring by functioning as a locator and sealing. FIG. 11E illustrates a side view of a foreshortened braided anchor that is associated with an everting valve or locational features.
  • [0081]
    In preferred embodiments, the middle section of the anchor may be composed of thicker wire(s) than edge section(s)
  • [0082]
    FIGS. 12A-12C illustrate an example of the process of deploying the anchor, such as the one illustrated in FIG. 11B above. FIG. 12A illustrates a braided anchor 30 in its expanded configuration. The anchor is composed of three sections. The distal and proximal sections of the anchor are made of a fine weave (low pitch) braid. The middle section of the anchor is made of a higher pitch braid and are preferably heat set to roll upon unsheathing. Furthermore, in preferred embodiments, the filaments of the distal and proximal sections may be thinner (e.g. 0.005 in thickness) than the filaments of the middle section (e.g., 0.010 in thickness). Posts 32 are coupled to the middle section of the anchor. For deployment, tubes 106 are coupled to the anchor's middle section. FIG. 12B illustrates the process of deployment. As the anchor is pushed distally by the tubes and pulled proximally by wires, it is unsheathed and begins foreshortening. The distal section rolls up and can act as a locator, assisting the operator in locating the aortic valve. It then functions as a seal preventing leakage. The proximal section may optionally also roll up. In FIG. 12C, the device may be configured such that the middle section of the valve may form an hour glass shape or a round shape. The tubes may subsequently be removed as described before. FIG. 12D is another illustration of the braided anchor in its elongated configuration. FIG. 12E is another illustration of the braided anchor in its foreshortened configuration.
  • [0083]
    FIGS. 13A-13B illustrate another embodiment of a braided anchor. In this embodiment, the anchor includes two sections—a distal section made of a fine weave and a higher pitch braid than the proximal section. In FIG. 13A the device is deployed such that the distal section made of the fine weave is distal to the aortic valve. In FIG. 13B, the distal section is foreshortened, either by heat set memory or actively. The foreshortening of the distal section allows the operator to locate the valve and situate the anchor prior to release.
  • [0084]
    The anchors described herein can be, for example, radially symmetrical, bilaterally symmetrical, or asymmetrical. A radially symmetrical anchor is one for which symmetry exists across any diameter. A bilaterally symmetrical anchor is one for which symmetry exists across a finite number if diameters). An asymmetrical anchor is one for which there exists no diameter across which a symmetry may be found. FIG. 2B illustrates one embodiment of a radially symmetrical anchor. FIG. 14A illustrates one embodiment of a bilaterally symmetrical anchor. FIG. 14B illustrates two embodiments (side and top views) of asymmetrical anchors. The benefits of bilaterally symmetrical an asymmetrical anchors is their ability to avoid interfering with anatomical features, such as, for example the coronary ostial and/or mitral valve. Thus, in preferred embodiments, a braided anchor includes a region adapted to prevent expansion of the anchor into the mitral valve, as is illustrated in FIG. 14A.
  • [0085]
    While preferred embodiments of the present invention are shown and described herein, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that such embodiments are provided by way of example only. Numerous variations, changes, and substitutions will occur to those skilled in the art without departing from the invention. It should be understood that various alternatives to the embodiments of the invention described herein may be employed in practicing the invention. It is intended that the following claims define the scope of the invention and that methods and structures within the scope of these claims and their equivalents be covered thereby.
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.623/2.11, 623/2.38
Clasificación internacionalA61F2/24, A61F2/01, A61F2/00, A61F2/90
Clasificación cooperativaA61F2/24, A61F2/2439, A61F2250/0039, A61F2220/0075, A61F2/2415, A61F2230/0078, A61F2230/0054, A61F2/2418, A61F2/2436
Clasificación europeaA61F2/24H4, A61F2/24D6, A61F2/01D
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
5 Nov 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: SADRA MEDICAL, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HAUG, ULRICH R.;VALENCIA, HANS F.;GESHILDER, ROBERT A.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015346/0978;SIGNING DATES FROM 20040929 TO 20041008
Owner name: SADRA MEDICAL INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HAUG, ULRICH R.;VALENCIA, HANS F.;GESHLIDER, ROBERT A.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:015974/0639;SIGNING DATES FROM 20040929 TO 20041008
2 Jul 2015ASAssignment
Owner name: BOSTON SCIENTIFIC SCIMED, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SADRA MEDICAL, INC.;REEL/FRAME:036049/0194
Effective date: 20150701