Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS20050224585 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 10/816,749
Fecha de publicación13 Oct 2005
Fecha de presentación2 Abr 2004
Fecha de prioridad2 Abr 2004
También publicado comoEP1733335A2, EP1733335A4, EP1733335B1, US7458517, US20050231325, US20050232636, WO2005099136A2, WO2005099136A3
Número de publicación10816749, 816749, US 2005/0224585 A1, US 2005/224585 A1, US 20050224585 A1, US 20050224585A1, US 2005224585 A1, US 2005224585A1, US-A1-20050224585, US-A1-2005224585, US2005/0224585A1, US2005/224585A1, US20050224585 A1, US20050224585A1, US2005224585 A1, US2005224585A1
InventoresRichard Durrant, Maurice Fitzgibbon
Cesionario originalDurrant Richard C E, Maurice Fitzgibbon
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Radio frequency identification of a connector by a patch panel or other similar structure
US 20050224585 A1
Resumen
The device includes a connector, a transponder, a panel, an antenna, and a transceiver. The transponder is attached to the connector. The antenna is positioned adjacent to the panel. The transceiver is electrically connected to the antenna. When the transponder is placed close enough to the antenna, the transceiver is able to activate the transponder thus enabling the transponder to read the information deposited with the transponder.
Imágenes(10)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones(11)
1-10. (canceled)
11: A device comprising:
a fiber optic cable having a fiber optic connector;
a transponder attached to the fiber optic connector;
a substrate adapted for attachment to a panel of a host device;
an antenna attached to the substrate; and
a transceiver electrically connected to the antenna so as to form a reader which is capable of activating and interrogating the transponder when the transponder is sufficiently close to the antenna, and wherein
the fiber optic cable has a length, and wherein
the transponder includes information related to the length of the fiber optic cable.
12. (canceled)
13: A device comprising:
a fiber optic cable having a fiber optic connector;
a transponder attached to the fiber optic connector;
a substrate adapted for attachment to a panel of a host device;
an antenna attached to the substrate; and
a transceiver electrically connected to the antenna so as to form a reader which is capable of activating and interrogating the transponder when the transponder is sufficiently close to the antenna and wherein
the fiber optic connector conforms to an industrial standard, and wherein
the transponder includes information related to the industrial standard to which the fiber optic connector conforms.
14. (canceled)
15: A device comprising:
a fiber optic cable having a fiber optic connector;
a transponder attached to the fiber optic connector;
a substrate adapted for attachment to a panel of a host device;
an antenna attached to the substrate; and
a transceiver electrically connected to the antenna so as to form a reader which is capable of activating and interrogating the transponder when the transponder is sufficiently close to the antenna, and wherein
the fiber optic cable includes an optical fiber and wherein the optical fiber conforms to a predetermined optical fiber grade, and wherein
the transponder includes information related to the predetermined optical fiber grade of the optical fiber of the fiber optic cable.
16. (canceled)
17: A device comprising:
a fiber optic cable having a fiber optic connector;
a transponder attached to the fiber optic connector;
a substrate adapted for attachment to a panel of a host device;
an antenna attached to the substrate; and
a transceiver electrically connected to the antenna so as to form a reader which is capable of activating and interrogating the transponder when the transponder is sufficiently close to the antenna, and wherein
the fiber optic cable was purchased on a specified date, and wherein
the transponder includes information related to the specific purchase date of the fiber optic cable.
18. (canceled)
19: A device comprising:
a fiber optic cable having a fiber optic connector;
a transponder attached to the fiber optic connector;
a substrate adapted for attachment to a panel of a host device;
an antenna attached to the substrate; and
a transceiver electrically connected to the antenna so as to form a reader which is capable of activating and interrogating the transponder when the transponder is sufficiently close to the antenna, and wherein
the fiber optic cable was purchased pursuant to a warranty and wherein
the transponder includes information related to the warranty.
20-29. (canceled)
Descripción
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    The present invention pertains to radio frequency identification devices. The invention more particularly concerns the radio frequency identification of a connector by a patch panel.
  • [0003]
    2. Discussion of the Background
  • [0004]
    Radio frequency identification devices (RFID) are known in the art. Typically, radio frequency identification systems incorporate an antenna or coil, a transceiver (with decoder), and a transponder (RF tag). Often times the antenna and the transceiver are packaged together so as to form a reader or interrogator. The transponder includes a transponder antenna and an integrated circuit chip attached to the transponder antenna. The antenna or coil emits a radio wave which induces an electrical current in the antenna of the transponder. The electrical current then activates the integrated circuit chip of the transponder. The integrated circuit chip can then transmit information through the antenna of the transponder via radio waves back to the antenna or coil. Information can be stored on the integrated circuit as either read only memory or read/write memory.
  • [0005]
    Radio frequency identification devices can be either active or passive. An active system includes a transponder which contains its own power source. In contrast, in a passive system the transponder obtains the energy from the radio waves emanating from the antenna or coil so as to enable the transponder to operate and transmit information. A transponder operating in accordance with the active system is able to transmit information to the antenna or coil over a greater distance than is a transponder operating in accordance. with the passive system. However, the transponder operating in accordance with the active system is larger than the transponder operating in accordance with the passive system. Furthermore, typically transponders operating in accordance with the passive system contain integrated circuit chips that have read only memory. Examples of radio frequency identification components are presented in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,206,626; 5,448,110; 6,118,379; 6,147,655; 6,424,263; 6,429,831; 6,445,297; 6,451,154; and 6,677,917. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,206,626; 5,448,110; 6,118,379; 6,147,655; 6,424,263; 6,429,831; 6,445,297; 6,451,154; and 6,677,917 are hereby incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0006]
    Connectors and panels or patch panels are also known in the art. Known connectors include fiber optic connectors and electrically conductive connectors. An electrically conductive connector can be attached to electrically conductive cable such as copper based cable, or the electrical conductive connector can be integrated into a device such as an optoelectronic device. U.S. Pat. No. 6,350,063 discloses electrical connectors and cables, and an optoelectronic device. U.S. Pat. No. 6,350,063 is hereby incorporated herein by reference. FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an electrical connector 120 attached to an electrically conductive cable 122. Also shown is a complementary receptacle 130 into which the electrical connector 120 mates. FIG. 2 is a perspective view of another version of an electrical connector 140. The connector 140 is shown from a first perspective and a second perspective. FIG. 2 also discloses another version of a complementary receptacle 150. FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an optoelectronic device 160 which includes a fiber optic connector 170 and an electrical connector 180. The background material provided below concentrates on fiber optic connectors.
  • [0007]
    The front panel of a host device has many receptacles. Each receptacle accepts at least an individual fiber optic cable. The other end of the fiber optic cable connects to another device. The fiber optic cable can have a length of a few meters or of a few kilometers. A host device can accommodate a few hundred fiber optic cables. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,233,674, and 5,481,634 disclose a fiber optic cable having a fiber optic connector. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,233,674, and 5,481,634 are hereby incorporated herein by reference. FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a fiber optic cable 30 having a fiber optic connector 10. Attached to the fiber optic connector 10 is a strain relief boot 20. Formed as part of the optic connector is a release lever 40. FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the fiber optic cable 30 of FIG. 4 taken from another angle where a ferrule 50 is exposed. The fiber optic connector 10 conforms to the LC style of fiber optic connectors.
  • [0008]
    Experience has shown that a fiber optic cable can be inadvertently detached from the host device, or that the optical fiber within the fiber optic cable breaks and the fiber optic cable no longer transmits light energy to the host device. In such instances, a worker must go and look at the panel of the host device and determine which cable is no longer transmitting light signals to the host device either because the optical fiber is broken or the fiber optic cable is detached from the host device. When two or more fiber optic cables are malfunctioning, the worker's job becomes very burdensome and time consuming since there are hundreds of fiber optic cables to examine. Furthermore, a device or person is not receiving information conveyed by the malfunctioning fiber optic cable. Thus, organization of the cables, including the fiber optic cables and the copper based cables, in the vicinity of the panel is of great interest to the operators of the host devices.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0009]
    It is an object of the invention to provide a device which facilitates the identification of a specific connector or cable relative to a specific location on a panel.
  • [0010]
    In one form of the invention the device includes a cable, a transponder, a panel, an antenna, and a transceiver. The transponder is attached to the cable. The antenna is positioned adjacent to the panel. The transceiver is electrically connected to the antenna. In operation, when the transponder is placed close enough to the antenna, the transceiver is able to activate the transponder thus enabling the transponder to read the information deposited with the transponder. The cable can be a fiber optic cable or cable based on an electrically conductive material such as copper.
  • [0011]
    In another form of the invention, the device includes a cable, a transponder, a substrate, an antenna, and a transceiver. The transponder is attached to the cable. The antenna is attached to the substrate. The substrate is adapted for attachment to a panel of a host device. The transceiver is electrically connected to the antenna so as to form a reader or interrogator. The cable can be a fiber optic cable or cable based on an electrically conductive material such as copper.
  • [0012]
    In still yet another form of the invention, the device includes a cable, a transponder, a substrate, an antenna, and a transceiver. The cable includes a connector. The transponder is attached to the connector. The antenna is attached to the substrate. The substrate is adapted for attachment to a panel of a host device. The transceiver is electrically connected to the antenna so as to form a reader or interrogator which is capable of activating and interrogating the transponder when the transponder is sufficiently close to the antenna. The cable can be a fiber optic cable or a cable based on an electrically conductive material such as copper. Likewise, the connector is a fiber optic connector when a fiber optic cable is used, and the connector is an electrically conductive connector when an electrically conductive cable is used.
  • [0013]
    In yet still another form of the invention the device includes an optoelectronic device, a transponder, a panel, an antenna, and a transceiver. The optoelectronic device includes a connector which conveys energy along electrically conductive materials housed within the connector. The transponder is attached to the optoelectronic device. The antenna is positioned adjacent to the panel. The transceiver is electrically connected to the antenna. In operation, when the transponder is placed close enough to the antenna, the transceiver is able to activate the transponder thus enabling the transponder to read the information deposited with the transponder.
  • [0014]
    Thus, the invention achieves the objectives set forth above. The invention provides a device which is able to determine the association between a specific location on a panel and a specific connector or cable whether it be fiber optic or electrically conductive.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0015]
    A more complete appreciation of the invention and many of the attendant advantages thereof will be readily obtained as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • [0016]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a copper based electrical connector and a complementary receptacle, the electrical connector is attached to a copper based electrical cable;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 2 is a perspective view of another version of the electrical connector and complementary receptacle of FIG. 1;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an optoelectronic transceiver which has an optical connector end and an electrical connector end;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a known fiber optic cable and connector assembly;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the fiber optic cable and connector assembly of FIG. 4 taken from another angle;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the combination of the fiber optic cable and the transponder;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the combination of the fiber optic cable and the transponder of FIG. 6 taken from another angle;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 8 is a front view of a panel of a patch panel or of a host device;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 9 is a side view of the panel of FIG. 8;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 10 is a partial front view of a substrate having apertures and coils or antennas;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 11 is a partial side view of the combination of the fiber optic cable having the transponder of FIGS. 6 and 7 connected to the panel of FIGS. 8 and 9 of a host device where the panel includes the substrate of FIG. 10;
  • [0027]
    FIG. 12 is an electrical schematic of the electromagnetic interaction between the transponder and the reader or interrogator;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the combination of the electrically conductive, copper based cable of FIG. 1 and the transponder;
  • [0029]
    FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the combination of the electrically conductive, copper based cable of FIG. 2 and the transponder; and
  • [0030]
    FIG. 15 is a perspective view of the combination of the optoelectronic device of FIG. 3 and the transponder.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENTLY PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0031]
    Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals designate identical or corresponding parts throughout the several views, and more particularly to FIGS. 6-15 thereof, embodiments of the present invention are displayed therein.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a fiber optic cable 30 having a fiber optic connector 10. The fiber optic connector 10 includes a release lever 40. Attached to the fiber optic connector 10 is a strain relief boot 20. Also attached to, or mounted on or in, the fiber optic connector 10 is a transponder 70. The transponder 70 can be affixed to the fiber optic connector 10 with an adhesive material or a clip (not shown). The clip physically squeezes or clamps the transponder 70 to the fiber optic connector 10. Alternatively, the transponder 70 can be insert molded into the body of the fiber optic connector 10. Furthermore, the transponder 70 can be attached to fiber optic connectors which are already in-service.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a fiber optic cable 30 of FIG. 6 taken from another angle. The view of the fiber optic cable 30 of FIG. 7 exposes the ferrule 50. The fiber optic connector 10 generally conforms to the LC standard, however, the fiber optic connector can also be constructed to conform to any other standard such as SC, and ST. The ferrule 50 is a single fiber ferrule, however multi-fiber ferrules and connectors can also be employed. Additionally, the fiber optic connector can be of its own unique design. Furthermore, the optical fiber terminated at the ferrule 50 can be any one of a single mode fiber, a multimode fiber, a polarization maintaining fiber, or any other type of optical fiber.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 8 is a front view of a panel 80. The panel 80 can belong to a patch panel device, a host device, or some other similar structure. The panel 80 has a front surface or face 84. The panel 80 includes many apertures 82, 83, 87, 88, and 89. FIG. 9 is a side view of the panel 80 which exposes the rear edge 86. By way of example, the aperture 82 allows the fiber optic connector 10 to pass beyond the front surface 84 of the panel 80 so as to gain access to the host device. The release latch 40 of the fiber optical connector 10 is used to secure the fiber optic connector 10 to the host device. Upon depressing the release lever 40 the fiber optic connector 10 can be removed from the hot device.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 10 is a partial front view of a substrate 90 having apertures 92, 94, 96, 98, and coils or antennas 93, 95, 97, 99. Each coil or antenna 93, 95, 97, 99 surrounds a respective aperture 92, 94, 96, 98. The coils or antennas 93, 95, 97, 99 are made of a suitable electrically conductive material such as copper. The coils or antennas 93, 95, 97, 99 are adhered or attached to a substrate or are sandwiched between two substrates. Typically, the coils or antennas 93, 95, 97, 99 are attached to the substrate with an adhesive material. The substrates are typically made of non-conductive or insulative materials such as mylar or other suitable polymer materials. Any number of apertures may be used. However, in this application the number of apertures 92, 94, 96, 98 of the substrate 90 should be of approximately the same size and have the same orientation and spacing as the apertures 87, 88, 89, 83 of the panel 80. U.S. Pat. No. 4,972,050 discloses a method of constructing a substrate, where the substrate includes conductive paths such as coils or antennas. U.S. Pat. No. 4,972,050 is hereby incorporated herein by reference. The antennas can be affixed originally to the panel 80, or in an alternative, as explained above, the antennas are part of the substrate 90 which can be mounted to a panel 80 of a host device which is already in-service.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 11 is a partial side view of the substrate 90 being located adjacent to the front surface 84 of the panel 80 of the host device 110 where the fiber optic connector 10 is plugged into the host device 110. During assembly, the substrate 90 can be placed adjacent to the front surface 84 of the panel 80 by an adhesive material or clips or other methods of attachment well known in the art.
  • [0037]
    In practice, for example, a fiber optic connector 10 is inserted into and through aperture 92 of the substrate 90 and through aperture 87 of the panel 80 so as to engage the fiber optic connector 10 with the host device 110. Once installed, the antenna or coil 93 encircles a portion of the fiber optic connector 10 in the plane of the substrate 90. The transponder 70 is close enough to the antenna or coil 93 so that the radio waves, or electromagnetic power 104, emanating from antenna or coil 93 induce an electrical current in the transponder antenna 72 (see FIG. 12) of the transponder 70. The energy and frequency of the electrical signal running though the antenna or coil 93 is provided by a transceiver 102 (see FIG. 12) which is electrically connected to antennas or coils 93, 95, 97, and 99. The combination of an antenna and a transceiver is known as a reader or interrogator.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 12 is an electrical schematic of the electromagnetic interaction between the transponder 70 and the reader or interrogator (93, 102). Once the transponder 70 is energized by the power from the transceiver 102, the transponder sends information, which was previously stored on its integrated circuit chip, to the transceiver 102 via radio waves. The radio waves leave the transponder antenna 72 and are received by the antenna or coil 92. The induced electrical signal is then carried to the transceiver 102 for storage or manipulation of the data supplied by the transponder 70.
  • [0039]
    Examples of information which can be stored in the transponder 70 include the following information: the length of the fiber optic cable to which the transponder is attached; the date of purchase of the fiber optic cable to which the transponder is attached; the type or style of fiber optic connector to which the transponder is attached; the type of warranty associated with the fiber optic cable to which the transponder is attached; the type, style, or grade of optic fiber housed within the fiber optic cable to which the transponder; and/or a unique identification number or serialization number or code which uniquely identifies a specific fiber optic cable.
  • [0040]
    Thus, if the fiber optic cable goes dark because the optical fiber housed within the fiber optic cable is broken, then the host device 110, through the transceiver 102, can pinpoint the location of the malfunctioning fiber optic cable. The malfunctioning fiber optic cable can then be repaired or replaced. Additionally, the device provides a system operator with the ability to monitor the number and location of the fiber optic connectors attached to the host device.
  • [0041]
    A second embodiment of the invention is disclosed in FIGS. 13 and 14. FIG. 13 is a perspective view of an electrical connector 120 to which is attached a transponder 70. The electrical connector 120 mates with a receptacle 130 which is mounted behind a panel (not shown). The panel and, if necessary, the associated substrate are constructed and operate as discussed above in regard to the first embodiment of the invention. Thus, when the electrical connector 120 which is associated with the electrical cable 122 is plugged into the host device, the antenna or coil associated with the host device will receive information from the transponder 70 mounted to the electrical connector 120. The transponder 70 can be attached to the electrical connector 120 by way of an adhesive material, a clip, or the transponder 70 can be insert molded into the body of the electrical connector 120. The transponder 70 can be attached to electrical connectors out in the field.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 14 is a perspective view of another version of the electric connector shown in FIG. 13. FIG. 14 provides two perspective views of electric connector 140 to which is attached transponder 70. Also shown is receptacle 150 which accepts electrical connector 140. Again, the panel of the host device is not shown for reasons of clarity. Note that the disclosed electrical connectors 120, 140 are used for illustration purposes only. The embodiment of the invention encompasses the attachment or mounting of a transponder to any type or style of electrical connector.
  • [0043]
    A third embodiment of the invention is disclosed in FIG. 15. FIG. 15 is a perspective view of an optoelectronic device 160 to which is attached a transponder 70. The optoelectronic device 160 includes a fiber optic connector 170 and an electrical connector 180. In use, the optoelectronic device 160 has its electrical connector 180 attached to host device through a panel of the host device similar to the attachment of the optical fibers to the host device as discussed above in the explanation of the first embodiment of the invention. Thus, the antenna associated with the panel activates the transponder 70 of the optoelectronic device 160. The transponder 70 can be attached to optoelectronic devices 160 which are in use, or the transponder 70 can be insert molded or mounted within the housing of the optoelectronic device 160. Note that the disclosed optoelectronic device 160 is used for illustration purposes only. The embodiment of the invention encompasses the attachment or mounting of a transponder to any type or style of optoelectronic device.
  • [0044]
    Obviously, numerous modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described herein.
Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US5066091 *12 Mar 199019 Nov 1991Kingston Technologies, Inc.Amorphous memory polymer alignment device with access means
US5161988 *12 Feb 199210 Nov 1992Rit Technologies Ltd.Patching panel
US5206626 *24 Dic 199127 Abr 1993Knogo CorporationStabilized article surveillance responder
US5233674 *21 Nov 19913 Ago 1993Methode Electronics, Inc.Fiber optic connector with sliding tab release
US5448110 *14 Sep 19935 Sep 1995Micron Communications, Inc.Enclosed transceiver
US5473715 *3 May 19945 Dic 1995Methode Electronics, Inc.Hybrid fiber optic/electrical connector
US5481634 *24 Jun 19942 Ene 1996At&T Corp.Connector for optical fiber
US5854824 *30 Ago 199529 Dic 1998Rit Technologies Ltd.Connectivity scanner
US6118379 *13 Nov 199812 Sep 2000Intermec Ip Corp.Radio frequency identification transponder having a spiral antenna
US6147655 *5 Nov 199814 Nov 2000Single Chip Systems CorporationFlat loop antenna in a single plane for use in radio frequency identification tags
US6238235 *9 Mar 200029 May 2001Rit Technologies Ltd.Cable organizer
US6350063 *13 Dic 199926 Feb 2002Stratos Lightwave, Inc.Pluggable optical transceiver module having a high speed serial data connector (HSSDC)
US6424263 *1 Dic 200023 Jul 2002Microchip Technology IncorporatedRadio frequency identification tag on a single layer substrate
US6429831 *11 Jul 20016 Ago 2002Brady Worldwide, Inc.Laminate RFID label and method of manufacture
US6445297 *8 Ago 20013 Sep 2002Escort Memory SystemsModular RFID antenna system
US6451154 *18 Feb 200017 Sep 2002Moore North America, Inc.RFID manufacturing concepts
US6574586 *5 Abr 20003 Jun 2003Itracs CorporationSystem for monitoring connection pattern of data ports
US6677917 *25 Feb 200213 Ene 2004Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Fabric antenna for tags
US6684179 *14 Mar 200027 Ene 2004Itracs CorporationSystem for monitoring connection pattern of data ports
US6725177 *13 May 200320 Abr 2004Itracs CorporationSystem for monitoring connection pattern of data ports
US6745971 *20 Sep 20018 Jun 2004Toby K. RenzoniSpooling device for an optical fiber jumper cable
US6784802 *6 Nov 200031 Ago 2004Nordx/Cdt, Inc.Real time monitoring of cable patch panel
US6847856 *29 Ago 200325 Ene 2005Lucent Technologies Inc.Method for determining juxtaposition of physical components with use of RFID tags
US6857897 *29 Abr 200322 Feb 2005Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Remote cable assist
US20040184747 *28 Ene 200423 Sep 2004Fujikura Ltd.Cable
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US7080787 *3 Jul 200325 Jul 2006Symbol Technologies, Inc.Insert molded antenna
US7197214 *22 Abr 200527 Mar 2007Corning Cable Systems LlcMethods and apparatus for facilitating cable locating
US7226217 *18 Nov 20055 Jun 2007Stratos International, Inc.Transceiver/fiber optic connector adaptor with patch cord ID reading capability
US72970182 Nov 200520 Nov 2007Panduit Corp.Method and apparatus for patch panel patch cord documentation and revision
US735400126 Jun 20068 Abr 2008Symbol Technologies, Inc.Insert molded antenna
US748624326 Jun 20063 Feb 2009Symbol Technologies, Inc.Insert molded antenna
US765690329 Ene 20032 Feb 2010Panduit Corp.System and methods for documenting networks with electronic modules
US766757414 Dic 200623 Feb 2010Corning Cable Systems, LlcSignal-processing systems and methods for RFID-tag signals
US775604726 Oct 200713 Jul 2010Panduit Corp.Method and apparatus for documenting network paths
US776009414 Dic 200620 Jul 2010Corning Cable Systems LlcRFID systems and methods for optical fiber network deployment and maintenance
US776841829 Nov 20063 Ago 2010Panduit Corp.Power patch panel with guided MAC capability
US777297531 Oct 200610 Ago 2010Corning Cable Systems, LlcSystem for mapping connections using RFID function
US778220231 Oct 200624 Ago 2010Corning Cable Systems, LlcRadio frequency identification of component connections
US778782315 Sep 200631 Ago 2010Corning Cable Systems LlcRadio-over-fiber (RoF) optical fiber cable system with transponder diversity and RoF wireless picocellular system using same
US781111915 Nov 200612 Oct 2010Panduit Corp.Smart cable provisioning for a patch cord management system
US784865428 Sep 20067 Dic 2010Corning Cable Systems LlcRadio-over-fiber (RoF) wireless picocellular system with combined picocells
US785569713 Ago 200721 Dic 2010Corning Cable Systems, LlcAntenna systems for passive RFID tags
US793870020 Feb 200910 May 2011Panduit Corp.Intelligent inter-connect and cross-connect patching system
US79651869 Mar 200721 Jun 2011Corning Cable Systems, LlcPassive RFID elements having visual indicators
US796932022 Dic 200928 Jun 2011Panduit Corp.Systems and methods for detecting a patch cord end connection
US797884527 Sep 200612 Jul 2011Panduit Corp.Powered patch panel
US81119986 Feb 20077 Feb 2012Corning Cable Systems LlcTransponder systems and methods for radio-over-fiber (RoF) wireless picocellular systems
US812842818 Feb 20106 Mar 2012Panduit Corp.Cross connect patch guidance system
US81724686 May 20108 May 2012Corning IncorporatedRadio frequency identification (RFID) in communication connections, including fiber optic components
US817545912 Oct 20078 May 2012Corning Cable Systems LlcHybrid wireless/wired RoF transponder and hybrid RoF communication system using same
US8210755 *29 Dic 20063 Jul 2012Alcatel LucentIdentifiable fiber optics
US82463979 May 201121 Ago 2012Panduit Corp.Intelligent inter-connect and cross-connect patching system
US824820815 Jul 200821 Ago 2012Corning Cable Systems, Llc.RFID-based active labeling system for telecommunication systems
US82643559 Oct 200811 Sep 2012Corning Cable Systems LlcRFID systems and methods for optical fiber network deployment and maintenance
US826436631 Mar 200911 Sep 2012Corning IncorporatedComponents, systems, and methods for associating sensor data with component location
US826770618 Dic 200918 Sep 2012Panduit Corp.Patch cord with insertion detection and light illumination capabilities
US827526515 Feb 201025 Sep 2012Corning Cable Systems LlcDynamic cell bonding (DCB) for radio-over-fiber (RoF)-based networks and communication systems and related methods
US830693517 Dic 20096 Nov 2012Panduit Corp.Physical infrastructure management system
US832577030 Oct 20074 Dic 2012Panduit Corp.Network managed device installation and provisioning technique
US833351813 Mar 201218 Dic 2012Corning IncorporatedRadio frequency identification (RFID) in communication connections, including fiber optic components
US838251129 Feb 201226 Feb 2013Panduit Corp.Cross connect patch guidance system
US841431914 Sep 20129 Abr 2013Panduit Corp.Patch cord with insertion detection and light illumination capabilities
US841946517 Ago 201216 Abr 2013Panduit Corp.Intelligent inter-connect and cross-connect patching system
US842162631 Oct 200616 Abr 2013Corning Cable Systems, LlcRadio frequency identification transponder for communicating condition of a component
US847703117 Oct 20082 Jul 2013Panduit Corp.Communication port identification system
US84824219 Jun 20119 Jul 2013Panduit Corp.Systems and methods for detecting a patch cord end connection
US854833028 Oct 20101 Oct 2013Corning Cable Systems LlcSectorization in distributed antenna systems, and related components and methods
US864484421 Dic 20084 Feb 2014Corning Mobileaccess Ltd.Extending outdoor location based services and applications into enclosed areas
US87087248 Abr 201329 Abr 2014Panduit Corp.Patch cord insertion detection and light illumination capabilities
US871500110 Abr 20136 May 2014Panduit Corp.Intelligent inter-connect and cross-connect patching system
US87184785 Abr 20126 May 2014Corning Cable Systems LlcHybrid wireless/wired RoF transponder and hybrid RoF communication system using same
US87192051 Nov 20126 May 2014Panduit Corp.Physical infrastructure management system
US872136025 Feb 201313 May 2014Panduit Corp.Methods for patch cord guidance
US873140528 Ago 200820 May 2014Corning Cable Systems LlcRFID-based systems and methods for collecting telecommunications network information
US883142823 Ago 20129 Sep 2014Corning Optical Communications LLCDynamic cell bonding (DCB) for radio-over-fiber (RoF)-based networks and communication systems and related methods
US886791927 Ene 201221 Oct 2014Corning Cable Systems LlcMulti-port accumulator for radio-over-fiber (RoF) wireless picocellular systems
US887358517 Dic 200728 Oct 2014Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdDistributed antenna system for MIMO technologies
US891389210 Sep 201316 Dic 2014Coring Optical Communications LLCSectorization in distributed antenna systems, and related components and methods
US90264865 May 20145 May 2015Panduit Corp.Physical infrastructure management system
US90371438 Feb 201319 May 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCRemote antenna clusters and related systems, components, and methods supporting digital data signal propagation between remote antenna units
US90427325 Mar 201326 May 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCProviding digital data services in optical fiber-based distributed radio frequency (RF) communication systems, and related components and methods
US904949917 Jul 20092 Jun 2015Panduit Corp.Patch field documentation and revision systems
US905852913 Ago 201316 Jun 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCRFID-based systems and methods for collecting telecommunications network information
US911261112 Jun 201318 Ago 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCOptical fiber-based distributed antenna systems, components, and related methods for calibration thereof
US913061329 Ago 20128 Sep 2015Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdDistributed antenna system for MIMO technologies
US915901230 Nov 201013 Oct 2015Corning IncorporatedRFID condition latching
US916523214 May 201220 Oct 2015Corning IncorporatedRadio-frequency identification (RFID) tag-to-tag autoconnect discovery, and related methods, circuits, and systems
US91786353 Ene 20143 Nov 2015Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdSeparation of communication signal sub-bands in distributed antenna systems (DASs) to reduce interference
US918484324 Oct 201310 Nov 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCDetermining propagation delay of communications in distributed antenna systems, and related components, systems, and methods
US9196975 *27 Abr 201124 Nov 2015Mertek Industries, LlcNetworking cable tracer system
US92198793 Ene 201422 Dic 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCRadio-over-fiber (ROF) system for protocol-independent wired and/or wireless communication
US924083525 Oct 201319 Ene 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCSystems, methods, and devices for increasing radio frequency (RF) power in distributed antenna systems
US924754323 Jul 201326 Ene 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdMonitoring non-supported wireless spectrum within coverage areas of distributed antenna systems (DASs)
US925805216 Sep 20149 Feb 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCReducing location-dependent interference in distributed antenna systems operating in multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) configuration, and related components, systems, and methods
US927037413 May 201523 Feb 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCProviding digital data services in optical fiber-based distributed radio frequency (RF) communications systems, and related components and methods
US931913821 Ago 201419 Abr 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCDynamic cell bonding (DCB) for radio-over-fiber (RoF)-based networks and communication systems and related methods
US932542915 Ago 201326 Abr 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCProviding digital data services as electrical signals and radio-frequency (RF) communications over optical fiber in distributed communications systems, and related components and methods
US935755130 May 201431 May 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdSystems and methods for simultaneous sampling of serial digital data streams from multiple analog-to-digital converters (ADCS), including in distributed antenna systems
US93692229 Nov 201514 Jun 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCDetermining propagation delay of communications in distributed antenna systems, and related components, systems, and methods
US938581023 Sep 20145 Jul 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdConnection mapping in distributed communication systems
US942054225 Sep 201416 Ago 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdSystem-wide uplink band gain control in a distributed antenna system (DAS), based on per band gain control of remote uplink paths in remote units
US945578425 Oct 201327 Sep 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdDeployable wireless infrastructures and methods of deploying wireless infrastructures
US948502211 Dic 20151 Nov 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCRadio-over-fiber (ROF) system for protocol-independent wired and/or wireless communication
US952547230 Jul 201420 Dic 2016Corning IncorporatedReducing location-dependent destructive interference in distributed antenna systems (DASS) operating in multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) configuration, and related components, systems, and methods
US952548811 Feb 201120 Dic 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCDigital data services and/or power distribution in optical fiber-based distributed communications systems providing digital data and radio frequency (RF) communications services, and related components and methods
US952602017 Dic 201520 Dic 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdMonitoring non-supported wireless spectrum within coverage areas of distributed antenna systems (DASs)
US953145226 May 201527 Dic 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCHybrid intra-cell / inter-cell remote unit antenna bonding in multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) distributed antenna systems (DASs)
US956383215 Mar 20137 Feb 2017Corning IncorporatedExcess radio-frequency (RF) power storage and power sharing RF identification (RFID) tags, and related connection systems and methods
US957790429 Sep 201521 Feb 2017Mertek Industries, LlcNetworking cable tracer system
US960221016 Sep 201521 Mar 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdFlexible head-end chassis supporting automatic identification and interconnection of radio interface modules and optical interface modules in an optical fiber-based distributed antenna system (DAS)
US962129319 Ene 201511 Abr 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdDistribution of time-division multiplexed (TDM) management services in a distributed antenna system, and related components, systems, and methods
US964775821 Nov 20139 May 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdCabling connectivity monitoring and verification
US96527071 Feb 201216 May 2017Fiber Mountain, Inc.Radio frequency identification (RFID) connected tag communications protocol and related systems and methods
US96527081 Feb 201216 May 2017Fiber Mountain, Inc.Protocol for communications between a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag and a connected device, and related systems and methods
US96527091 Feb 201216 May 2017Fiber Mountain, Inc.Communications between multiple radio frequency identification (RFID) connected tags and one or more devices, and related systems and methods
US966178128 Jul 201423 May 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdRemote units for distributed communication systems and related installation methods and apparatuses
US967390411 Ago 20156 Jun 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCOptical fiber-based distributed antenna systems, components, and related methods for calibration thereof
US968131315 Abr 201513 Jun 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdOptimizing remote antenna unit performance using an alternative data channel
US97151578 Dic 201525 Jul 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdVoltage controlled optical directional coupler
US97292383 Oct 20168 Ago 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCRadio-over-fiber (ROF) system for protocol-independent wired and/or wireless communication
US97292678 Dic 20158 Ago 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdMultiplexing two separate optical links with the same wavelength using asymmetric combining and splitting
US973022829 Ago 20148 Ago 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdIndividualized gain control of remote uplink band paths in a remote unit in a distributed antenna system (DAS), based on combined uplink power level in the remote unit
US977512325 Mar 201526 Sep 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless Ltd.Individualized gain control of uplink paths in remote units in a distributed antenna system (DAS) based on individual remote unit contribution to combined uplink power
US978827916 Ago 201610 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdSystem-wide uplink band gain control in a distributed antenna system (DAS), based on per-band gain control of remote uplink paths in remote units
US980679723 Sep 201531 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCSystems, methods, and devices for increasing radio frequency (RF) power in distributed antenna systems
US980770012 Feb 201631 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdOffsetting unwanted downlink interference signals in an uplink path in a distributed antenna system (DAS)
US980772210 Jun 201631 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCDetermining propagation delay of communications in distributed antenna systems, and related components, systems, and methods
US980777229 Abr 201631 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless Ltd.Systems and methods for simultaneous sampling of serial digital data streams from multiple analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), including in distributed antenna systems
US981085921 Ago 20147 Nov 2017Mertek Industries, LlcTraceable networking cables with remote-released connectors
US981312718 Ene 20167 Nov 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCReducing location-dependent interference in distributed antenna systems operating in multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) configuration, and related components, systems, and methods
US981316424 Oct 20167 Nov 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCProviding digital data services as electrical signals and radio-frequency (RF) communications over optical fiber in distributed communications systems, and related components and methods
US20050001767 *3 Jul 20036 Ene 2005Thomas WulffInsert molded antenna
US20050259930 *22 Abr 200524 Nov 2005Elkins Robert B IiMethods and apparatus for facilitating cable locating
US20060094291 *2 Nov 20054 May 2006Caveney Jack EMethod and apparatus for patch panel patch cord documentation and revision
US20060262727 *19 May 200623 Nov 2006Panduit Corp.Method and apparatus for documenting network paths
US20070116411 *18 Nov 200524 May 2007Mark BentonTransceiver/fiber optic connector adaptor with patch cord id reading capability
US20070207666 *12 Feb 20076 Sep 2007Panduit Corp.Method and Apparatus for Patch Panel Patch Cord Documentation and Revision
US20070221730 *27 Mar 200627 Sep 2007Mcreynolds AlanRFID enabled cable tracking
US20080049627 *30 Oct 200728 Feb 2008Panduit Corp.Method and Apparatus for Monitoring Physical Network Topology Information
US20080100440 *31 Oct 20061 May 2008Downie John DRadio frequency identification transponder for communicating condition of a component
US20080143486 *14 Dic 200619 Jun 2008Downie John DSignal-processing systems and methods for RFID-tag signals
US20080159738 *29 Dic 20063 Jul 2008Lavranchuk James SIdentifiable fibers optics
US20080220721 *9 Mar 200711 Sep 2008Downie John DPassive RFID elements having visual indicators
US20090137152 *6 Oct 200628 May 2009Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd.Memory card socket
US20100245057 *31 Mar 200930 Sep 2010Aravind ChamartiComponents, systems, and methods for associating sensor data with component location
US20110140856 *30 Nov 201016 Jun 2011John David DownieRFID Condition Latching
US20120274452 *26 Abr 20111 Nov 2012Aravind ChamartiRadio frequency (rf)-enabled latches and related components, assemblies, systems, and methods
US20130039624 *27 Abr 201114 Feb 2013Christopher Briand SchererNetworking Cable Tracer System
EP3147828A4 *17 Oct 20145 Jul 2017Zte CorpPassive radio frequency identification tag, optical radio frequency read/write head and radio frequency identification system
WO2007011493A3 *22 Jun 200624 May 2007Stratos Int IncDigital certificate on connectors and other products using rfid tags and/or labels as well as rfid reader/interrogator
WO2014199136A1 *10 Jun 201418 Dic 2014Tyco Electronics Uk Ltd.Flexible rfid tag assembly
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.235/492, 340/10.1, 398/141, 439/488, 385/100
Clasificación internacionalG01S13/08, G02B6/38, G08B21/00, H04B10/00, H04Q5/22, G06K19/06, G02B6/36, H04B7/00, H04B10/12
Clasificación cooperativaG02B6/385, G02B6/381, G02B6/3895, G02B6/3807, H04B10/25758
Clasificación europeaG02B6/38D15, H04B10/25758, G02B6/38D6I, G02B6/38D, G02B6/38D2
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
9 Jul 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: STRATOS INTERNATIONAL, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:DURRANT, RICHARD C. E.;FITZGIBBON, MAURICE;REEL/FRAME:015555/0642;SIGNING DATES FROM 20040628 TO 20040702