Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS20050252130 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 11/185,724
Fecha de publicación17 Nov 2005
Fecha de presentación21 Jul 2005
Fecha de prioridad6 Oct 1998
También publicado comoCA2346661A1, CN1109174C, CN1331774A, DE69926520D1, DE69926520T2, DE69943096D1, EP1119670A1, EP1119670B1, EP1394335A2, EP1394335A3, EP1394335B1, US6763643, US6920732, US9464443, US20040172904, US20140157700, WO2000020705A1
Número de publicación11185724, 185724, US 2005/0252130 A1, US 2005/252130 A1, US 20050252130 A1, US 20050252130A1, US 2005252130 A1, US 2005252130A1, US-A1-20050252130, US-A1-2005252130, US2005/0252130A1, US2005/252130A1, US20050252130 A1, US20050252130A1, US2005252130 A1, US2005252130A1
InventoresGoran Martensson
Cesionario originalPergo (Europe) Ab
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Flooring material comprising flooring elements which are assembled by means of separate flooring elements
US 20050252130 A1
Resumen
Flooring material comprising board shaped floor elements which are provided with edges, a lower side and a decorative upper surface. The floor elements are intended to be joined by means of separate joining profiles. All four edges are provided with one notch-like groove each. The grooves are arranged parallel to its respective edge. The joining profiles are provided with lips arranged in pairs. The lips are intended to each be received by one of the grooves so that the floor elements with the grooves at the adjacent edges will be guided or fixed vertically via the lips of a joining profile. The lips are joined by a middle section of the joining profile. The grooves are furthermore provided with an undercut while the lips are provided with hooks that matches the undercut whereby adjacent floor elements will be guided or fixed horizontally via the undercuts and the hooks.
Imágenes(6)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones(4)
1. Flooring material comprising board shaped floor elements (1) with a mainly square or rectangular shape, which floor elements (1) are provided with edges (2), a lower side (5) and a decorative upper surface (3), whereby the floor elements (1) are intended to be joined by means of separate joining profiles (10), characterized in that all four edges (2) of the floor elements (1) are provided with one notch-like groove (4) each, which grooves (4) are arranged parallel to its respective edge (2), that the joining profiles (10) are provided with lips (11) arranged in pairs, which lips (11) are intended to each be received by one of the grooves (4) so that the floor elements (1) with the grooves (4) at the adjacent edges (2) will be guided or fixed vertically via the lips (11) of a joining profile (10), which lips (11) are joined by a middle section (12) of the joining profile (10) and furthermore that the grooves (4) are provided with an undercut (46) while the lips (11) are provided with hooks (16) that matches the undercut (46) whereby adjacent floor elements (1) will be guided or fixed horizontally via the undercuts (46) and the hooks (16).
2. Flooring material according to claim 1, characterized in that the grooves (4) are provided with a support (42) for the middle section (12) of the joining profiles (10).
3. Flooring material according to claim 1, characterized in that the joining profiles (10) are shaped as extended units or rolls which may be cut to the desired length, and that the length of the joining profiles (10) has a length, that before cutting, considerably exceeds the length of a floor element (1).
4. Flooring material according to claim 1, characterized in that the joining profiles (10) and/or the floor elements (1) are coated with glue or double-faced adhesive tape.
Descripción
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to a flooring material comprising board shaped flooring elements which are assembled by means of separate joining profiles.
  • [0002]
    Prefabricated floor boards provided with tongue and groove at the edges are quite common nowadays. These can be installed by the average handy man as they are very easy to install. Such floors can, for example, be constituted of solid wood, fibre board or particle board. These are most often provided with a surface layer such as lacquer, or some kind of laminate. The boards are most often installed by being glued via tongue and groove. The most common types of tongue and groove are however burdened with the disadvantage to form gaps of varying width between the floor boards in cases where the installer hasn't been thorough enough. Dirt will easily collect in such gaps. Moisture will furthermore enter the gaps which will cause the core to expand in cases where it is made of wood, fibre board or particle board, which usually is the case. The expansion will cause the surface layer to rise closest to the edges of the joint which radically reduces the useful life of the floor since the surface layer will be exposed to an exceptional wear. Different types of tensioning devices, forcing the floor boards together during installation can be used to avoid such gaps. This operation is however more or less awkward. It is therefore desirable to achieve a joint which is self-guiding and thereby automatically finds the correct position. Such a joint would also be possible to utilise in floors where no glue is to be used.
  • [0003]
    Such a joint is known through WO 94/26999 which deals with a system to join two floor boards. The floor boards are provided with a locking device at the rear sides. It is, however, shown in the figures with accompanying description that the floor boards are provided with profiles on the lower side at a first long side and short side. These profiles, which extends outside the floor board itself, is provided with an upwards directed lip which fits into grooves on the lower side of a corresponding floor board. These grooves are arranged on the second short side and long side of this floor board. The floor boards are furthermore provided with a traditional tongue and groove on the edges. The intentions are that the profiles shall bend downwards and then to snap back into the groove when assembled. The profiles are integrated with the floor boards through folding or alternatively, through gluing.
  • [0004]
    The invention according to WO 94/26999 is however burdened with the disadvantage that the profiles are located in a very exposed position and will easily be damaged during handling. According to WO 94/26999, the floor boards may be joined without the lip having to touch the contact surface of the groove at tolerances as small as ±0.2 mm. The profiles are easily deformed during manufacturing, transport and installation of the relatively heavy floor boards since the profiles are located in a very exposed position. Further deformation of the delicate joining profiles is probable since the intentions are that it should be possible to disassemble and reinstall the floor boards according to WO 94/26999. Such deformation will obstruct, and in serious cases even make assembly of the floor boards impossible.
  • [0005]
    It seems, from WO 94/26999 to be desired to have a clearance between the contact surfaces of the lip and the groove. A tolerance of ±0.2 mm is mentioned in the application. The clearance seems to be marked Δ in the figures. Such a clearance will naturally cause undesired gaps between the floor boards. Dirt and moisture can penetrate into these gaps.
  • [0006]
    Another disadvantage is that the tongue, located on two of the edges, must be tooled from the base material which will loss of the surface layer. Such a surface layer will most often be constituted of thermosetting laminate and is normally the most costly part of a laminate floor. A surface layer of thermosetting laminate will furthermore cause an extensive wear on the tools used for milling.
  • [0007]
    Another disadvantage becomes clear when performing a life-cycle analysis on the floor boards according to WO 94/26999. According to one preferred embodiment of WO 94/26999, the joining profile is constituted of aluminium. Since it constitutes a part integrated with the floor board it will be practically impossible to recycle the floor board without a very labour-intensive process. The inevitable cutting of the floor board will also be very difficult, utilising common tools, as both aluminium, thermosetting laminate and core will have to be cut at the same time.
  • [0008]
    It is also known through WO 97/47834 to manufacture a joint where the floor boards are joined so that they are locked together in the horizontal direction. According to this invention a traditional tongue has been provided with heel on the lower side. The heel has a counterpart in a recess in the groove of the opposite side of the floor board. The lower cheek of the groove will be bent away during the assembly and will then snap back when the floor board is in the correct position. The snap-joining parts, in.e. the tongue and groove, is in opposite to the invention according to WO 94/26999 above, where they are constituted by separate parts, seems to be manufactured monolithically from the core of the floor board. WO 97/47834 does also show how the tongue and groove with heels and recesses according to the invention is tooled by means of cutting machining. This invention does also have the disadvantage that the tongue, and particularly, the lower cheek of the groove will easily be damaged during normal handling even though they protrudes less than in the invention according to WO 94/26999 above.
  • [0009]
    Also WO 97/47834 does have the disadvantage that both tongue and groove will have to be tooled in a way that causes loss of the costly top surface. This tooling will also cause an extensive wear on tools used.
  • [0010]
    The invention according to WO 97/47834 presumes a certain amount of resilient properties in the core material. The material normally used is not very suitable if a resilient property is desired. MDF (medium density fibre board) or HDF (high density fibre board) should according to WO 97/47834 be suitable as core material. The resilient properties of these materials are however, rather poor, whereby the risk for crack formation, parallel to the top surface, ought to be great.
  • [0011]
    The invention according to WO 93/13280 deals with a form of clip intended to be used for holding floor boards together. The floor boards are, besides being provided with a traditional tongue and groove, with known disadvantages, also provided with a single groove on the lower side of the floor board. The floor boards rests on the clip whereby a great number of clips will have to be used as the floor otherwise will be resilient. The distance formed between the floor boards and the surface beneath will furthermore cause acoustic resonance. This will give the floor a noisy character and a higher sound level. This is not desired.
  • [0012]
    The above mentioned problems are solved through the present invention, whereby a floor that endures handling, demands a minimum of machining of the decorative top surface and is easy to install has been achieved. Accordingly, the invention relates to a flooring material comprising board shaped floor elements with a mainly square or rectangular shape. The floor elements are provided with edges, a lower side and a decorative upper surface. The floor elements are intended to be joined by means of separate joining profiles. The invention is characterised in that all four edges of the floor elements are provided with one notch-like groove each. The grooves are arranged parallel to its respective edge. The joining profiles are provided with lips arranged in pairs. The lips are intended to each be received by one of the grooves so that the floor element, with the grooves at the adjacent edges will be guided or fixed vertically via the lips of a joining profile. The lips are joined by a middle section of the joining profile. The grooves are furthermore provided with an undercut while the lips are provided with hooks that matches the undercut. Adjacent floor elements will hereby be guided or fixed horisontally via the undercuts and the hooks. According to one alternative the lips are provided with gripping hooks. Such gripping hooks can be used in grooves without undercut by making them sharp edged.
  • [0013]
    The grooves are suitably provided with a support for the middle section of the joining profiles. It will thereby be possible to make this embodiment dismountable where it is chosen to install the floor without using glue.
  • [0014]
    The joining profiles are suitably shaped as extended profiles which suitably are manufactured through extrusion which is a well known and rational method. The joining profiles are suitably shaped as extended lengths or rolls which can be cut to the desired length. The length of the joining profiles considerably exceeds the length of a floor element, before being cut. An advantage with such long profiles is that they can be laid over the whole width of the floor and will thereby reduce the risk for deviations and gaps in the floor since it bridges the lateral joints of the floor. Such bridging of the lateral joints can of course be used even if the joining profiles have the same length as, or is shorter than the floor elements. Shorter pieces of joining profiles is suitably used when it comes to the lateral joints of the floor. The floor elements may alternatively be provided with traditional tongue and groove in the lateral joint edges.
  • [0015]
    The flooring material comprising the floor elements and joining profiles above is very suited for installations of floors where no glue is needed. It is, of course possible to use glue or double-faced adhesive tape in order to make the installation completely permanent. The glue or tape is then suitably placed on the surfaces of the joining profile located between the lips and/or on the edges of the floor element.
  • [0016]
    The joining profiles are in the present invention a separate part in opposite to earlier known and cited flooring materials where the joining is made through tongue and groove, profiles or heels. This will give great advantages when handling the floors in connection to manufacturing, transport and installation as traditional joining parts normally are very delicate and sensitive to blows. These parts must, of manufacturing technological reasons, be made of fibre board, particle board or thin aluminium sheets which all are easy to either break or deform. This will normally lead to that the floor elements has to be rejected. Joining profiles according to the present invention can be made of a multitude of materials and by means of many different manufacturing methods. Among the most suitable methods can, however, be mentioned injection moulding for the plus-shaped embodiment of a joining profile and extrusion for the extended embodiment of joining profile. Suitable materials are thermoplastic materials such as poly olefins, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride or acrylnitril-butadiene-styrene-copolymer. These can suitably be filled with for example wood powder or lime in order to increase the dimension stability as well as increasing the adhesion when being glued.
  • [0017]
    The invention may also relate to a flooring material comprising board shaped floor elements with a mainly square or rectangular shape. The floor elements are provided with edges, a lower side and a decorative upper surface. The floor elements are joined by means of separate joining profiles. The characterising features in this embodiment are that the floor elements are provided with grooves on at least two opposite sides. The grooves are arranged parallel to its respective edge on the lower side of the floor element. The joining profiles are provided with lips arranged in pairs, which lips are intended to each be received by one of the grooves of the floor elements so that two adjacent floor elements with the grooves at the adjacent edges are guided or fixed horizontally via the lips of a joining profile. The lips are joined by a middle section of the joining profile.
  • [0018]
    The grooves are placed on a distance from the closest edge of less than half, preferably less than one quarter of the width of the floor element.
  • [0019]
    The floor elements are suitably provided with grooves on all four edges. The distance between each groove and the closest edge is mainly the same.
  • [0020]
    The section located between the edges and its closest groove is preferably of thickness which is thinner than the largest thickness of the floor through a recess located on the lower side.
  • [0021]
    The edges are suitably provided with a vertical guiding by providing a first edge with a preferably V-shaped longitudinal groove with a depth less than 1.8 times, preferably 0.9 times the greatest thickness of the floor. An opposite edge, as related to the first edge, is provided with a matching protruding profile.
  • [0022]
    The edges are alternatively provided with a vertical guiding by providing two adjacent edges with each a preferably V-shaped longitudinal groove with a depth of less than 1.8 times, preferably less than 0.9 times the greatest thickness of the floor element. The two remaining edges are provided with a protruding profile that matches the longitudinal groove.
  • [0023]
    The distance between the, in pairs, arranged lips of the joining profile is preferably somewhat smaller than the distance between the grooves placed on each side, and closest to, the joint between two adjacent floor elements. The joining profile will hereby exert a tensioning force on the joint.
  • [0024]
    The joining profiles are suitably manufactured as extended lengths, through extrusion which is a well-known and rational manufacturing method. The joining profiles are shaped as extended lengths or rolls which can be cut to the desired length. The length of the joining profiles considerably exceeds the length of a floor element. One advantage with such long joining profiles is that they can be laid over the whole width of a floor and will thereby reduce the risk for deviations and gaps in the floor as it bridges the lateral joints in the floor. Such bridging of the lateral joints can of course be used even if the joining profiles have the same length as, or is shorter than the floor elements. Shorter pieces of joining profiles is suitably used when it comes to the lateral joints of the floor. These are suitably installed gradually as every new floor element is added to a row. The floor elements may alternatively be provided with traditional tongue and groove in the lateral joint edges.
  • [0025]
    According to one variation of the embodiment above, the joining profiles are intended to be placed in corner where four floor elements meets. The joining profiles is shaped as a plus with four cheeks, as seen from above. The first three cheeks, which together with the fourth forms the plus-shaped joining profile, are provided two lips, arranged in pairs, each. The lips are intended to be placed on each one side of a joint. The fourth cheek is provided with only one lip placed on one side of the joint.
  • [0026]
    The plus-shaped joining profiles are best suited for installation of square floor elements and will automatically give an excellent guiding of both the lateral and longitudinal joints. These are suitably provided with cheeks that are only somewhat shorter than the half the short side of the floor element. The cheek length is calculated as, from the centre of the joining profile to its outer edge. The plus-shaped joining profiles are also suited for installation of rectangular floor elements in cases where the lateral joints are to coincide. The length of the cheeks are hereby somewhat shorter than half the width of the floor element. Extended profiles can be cut and installed in the intermediate space on the long side between two plus-shaped joining profiles to reinforce the long side joint. In cases where the lateral joints are to be displaced from row to row it is possible to use a T-shaped joining profile which has three cheeks instead of four. This profile is suitably also provided with cheeks of length somewhat shorter than the half the width of the floor element. Flooring materials comprising the floor elements and joining profiles above are very suited where it is desired to install floors without having to use glue. It is of course possible to use glue or double-faced adhesive tape in order to make the installation irreversibly permanent. The glue or the tape is then suitably applied to the surfaces located between the lips, and on the edges.
  • [0027]
    The joining profiles are, unlike earlier known and herein mentioned flooring materials where the joining is achieved through tongue and groove, profiles or heels, a separate part. This will give great advantages when handling the floors in connection to manufacturing, transport and assembly as the traditional joining parts are very delicate and sensitive to blows. These parts must, of manufacturing technological reasons, be made of fibre board, particle board or thin aluminium sheets which all are easy to either break or deform. This will normally lead to that the floor elements has to be rejected. Joining profiles according to the present invention can be made of a multitude of materials and by means of many different manufacturing methods. Among the most suitable methods can, however, be mentioned injection moulding for the plus-shaped embodiment of a joining profile and extrusion for the extended embodiment of joining profile. Suitable materials are thermoplastic materials such as poly olefins, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride or acrylnitril-butadiene-styrene-copolymer. These can suitably be filled with for example wood powder or lime in order to increase the dimension stability as well as increasing the adhesion when being glued.
  • [0028]
    The invention is described further together with enclosed figures showing different embodiments of the invention whereby,
  • [0029]
    FIG. 1 shows, in perspective view, seen from below, an embodiment of a floor element 1 to a flooring-material.
  • [0030]
    FIGS. 2 a-2 c shows in exploded view and in cross-section different embodiments of a flooring material.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 3 shows an embodiment of a joining profile 10 to a flooring material.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 4 shows another embodiment of a joining profile 10 to a flooring material.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 5 shows a flooring material according to the invention where square floor elements 1 and plus-shaped joining profiles 10 shown in FIG. 3 is shown. The floor is only partly installed in order to facilitate understanding of the function.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 6 shows a flooring material according to the invention where rectangular floor elements 1 and T-shaped joining profiles 10, as shown in FIG. 4 and extended joining profiles 10 are used. The floor is only partly installed in order to facilitate understanding of the function.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 7 a-d shows different preferred embodiments of joints with floor elements 1 which are joined by means of joining profiles 10 via notch-shaped grooves 4 in the edges 2 of the floor boards 1.
  • [0036]
    Accordingly, FIG. 1 shows, in perspective seen aslant from below, an embodiment of a floor element 1 to a flooring material. The floor element 1 has rectangular shape and is provided with edges 2, a lower side 5 and a decorative upper surface 3. The floor elements 1 are joined by means of separate joining profiles 10 (FIG. 2-6). The floor element 1 is provided with a groove 4 at each of the edges 2. The grooves 4 are arranged parallel to its respective edge 2. The joining profiles 10 (FIG. 2-6) are provided with lips 11 (FIG. 2-6), arranged in pairs, which each are intended to be received by one of the grooves 4 of the floor element 1. Two adjacent floor elements 1 with the grooves 4 at the adjacent edges 2 are guided or locked horizontally by means of the lips 11 of the joining profile 10. The floor elements 1 most often comprises a core to which an upper decorative layer has been applied. The core most often consists of wood particle or fibre bonded together by glue or resin. It might be advantageous to treat the surface closest to the joint in cases where the floor will be exposed to moisture, since the wood in the core is sensitive to moisture. This surface treatment may suitably include resin, wax or some kind of lacquer. It is not necessary to coat the joint if it is to be glued since the glue itself will protect the core from moisture penetration. The decorative upper surface 3 is constituted by a decorative paper impregnated with melamine-formaldehyde resin. One or more layers of so-called overlay papers made of α-cellulose, impregnated with melamine-formaldehyde resin are possibly placed on top of this. The abrasion resistance can be improved further by sprinkling one or more of the layers with hard particles of for example α-aluminium oxide, silicon carbide or silicon oxide in connection to the impregnation. The lower side 5 may suitably be coated with lacquer or a layer of paper and resin.
  • [0037]
    FIGS. 2 a-2 c shows in exploded view and in cross-section, different embodiments of a flooring material. The floor elements 1 are provided with edges 2, a lower side 5 and a decorative upper surface 3. The floor elements 1 are joined by means of separate joining profiles 10. The floor elements 1 are at two opposite edges 2 provided with one groove 4 each. The grooves 4 are arranged parallel to its respective edge 2. The grooves 4 are arranged on the lower side 4 at a distance from the closest edge 2 of the less than one fourth of the width of the floor element 1. The section located between the edges 2 and their respective closest groove 4 has a thickness which is smaller than the greatest thickness of the floor board 1 through a recess 6 located on the lower side 5. The thickness of the floor is normally between 5 and 15 mm whereby a suitable difference in thickness at the recess 6 and the main floor thickness is 1-5 mm. The edges 2 are provided with a vertical guiding by a providing a first edge with a V-shaped longitudinal groove 21 (FIG. 2 a) with a depth less 0.9 times the greatest floor thickness. The opposite edge 2 is provided with a matching profile 22 (FIG. 2 a). The joining profiles 10 are provided with lips 11 arranged in pairs, which lips each are intended to be received by each one groove 4 of the floor elements 1 so that to adjacent floor elements 1 with the grooves 4 at the adjacent edges 2 are guided or fixed horizontally via the lips 11 of a joining profile 10. The floor elements 1 may, instead of being provided with V-shaped grooves 21 with matching profile 22, alternatively be provided with a notch-like groove 4′ (FIGS. 2 b-2 c) in all four edges 2, which grooves 4′ (FIGS. 2 b-2 c) are intended to receive each one of the lips 11 of a second joining profile 10′. The second joining profile 10′ may either be a separate part (FIG. 2 b) or be joined with the joining profile 10 via a rib 12′ (FIG. 2 c). The lips 11 are connected by a middle section 1′ of the joining profile 10. The distance between the, in pairs, arranged lips 11 of the joining profile 10 is somewhat smaller than the distance between the grooves 4 arranged on each one side of, and closest to, the joint between two adjacent floor elements 1. The floor elements 1 will thereby be forced together whereby gaps are avoided. The joining profiles 10 and 10′ are manufactured as extended lengths or rolls which may be cut into the desired length during installation. These lengths considerably exceeds the length of the floor elements 1. The embodiments shown in the FIGS. 2 a-c all gives a minimum of machining a minimum of material loss during manufacturing.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 3 shows, in perspective view seen from above, an embodiment of a joining profile 10 to a flooring material. The floor elements 1 are, as shown in FIG. 1, provided with edges 2, a lower side 5 and a decorative upper surface 3. The floor elements 1 are joined by means of separate joining profiles 10. The floor elements 1 are, as shown in FIG. 1, provided with one groove 4 each, at two opposite edges 2. The grooves 4 are arranged parallel to its respective edge 2. The grooves 4 are placed on the lower side 5 at a distance from the closest edge 2 of less than one fourth of the width of the floor element 1. The section located between the edges 2 and their respective closest groove 4 has a thickness which is smaller than the greatest thickness of the floor board 1 through a recess 6 located on the lower side 5. The thickness of the floor is normally between 5 and 15 mm whereby a suitable difference in thickness at the recess 6 and the main floor thickness is 1-5 mm. The edges 2 may, as shown in the FIGS. 2 a-c, be provided with a vertical guiding through a V-shaped groove 21 (FIG. 2 a) with matching profile 22 (FIG. 2 a) or by a notch-like grooves 4′ (FIG. 2 b-c) in all four edges 2 with a matching second joining profile 10′ (FIG. 2 b-c). The plus-shaped joining profile 10 (FIG. 3) is provided with lips 11 arranged in pairs, which lips 11 each are intended to be received by one of the grooves 4 of the floor element 1 so that adjacent floor element 1, with the grooves at the adjacent edges 2 are guided or fixed horizontally via the lips 11 of a joining profile 10. The joining profile is intended to be placed in the corner where four floor elements 1 meet. The joining profile 10 is, as seen from above shaped as a plus with four cheeks, where the first three cheeks, which together with the fourth one forms the plus-shaped joining profile 10, is provided with two lips 11 arranged in pairs each, which are intended to be placed at either side of a joint. The fourth cheek is provided with only one lip 11 arranged on one side of the joint. The reason why the fourth cheek is provided with only one lip 11 is that the last floor element 1 joined with such a joining profile 10 must be slided in from the side in cases where the floor elements 1 are provided with a vertical guiding as shown in the FIGS. 2 a-c. The joining profile 10 as shown in FIG. 3 is used on floors where both longitudinal and lateral joints is to coincide.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 4 shows in perspective another embodiment of a joining profile 10 to a flooring material. The joining profile 10 corresponds in the main to the one described in connection to FIG. 3. The joining profile 10 showed in FIG. 4 is however provided with only three cheeks and can thereby be described as T-shaped. The joining profile 10 as shown in FIG. 3 is used in floors where only the longitudinal or lateral joints is to coincide.
  • [0040]
    FIGS. 5 and 6 shows a flooring material according to the invention where square and rectangular floor elements 1 respectively and plus-shaped and T-shaped joining profiles 10 respectively as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 are used. The flooring material is only partly installed in order to facilitate understanding of the function. The plus-shaped profiles are best suited when installing square floor elements 1 and will automatically an excellent guiding of the joints in both longitudinal and lateral direction. These are suitably provided with cheeks being somewhat shorter than half the side of a floor element 1. The length of a cheek is calculated as, from the centre of the joining profile 10 to its outer edge. The plus-shaped joining profiles are also suited for installation of rectangular floor elements 1 in cases where coinciding lateral joints is desired. The length of the cheeks is here somewhat shorter than the short side edge of the floor element 1. Extended profiles 10 can be cut and mounted in the intermediate space between two plus-shaped profiles 10 in order to reinforce the long side joint of the floor board 1.
  • [0041]
    It is possible to use a T-shaped joining profile which has three cheeks instead of four in cases where a position of the lateral joints shifting from row to row (FIG. 6) is desired. This installation pattern is most often used when installing rectangular floor elements 1. The length of the cheeks is also here, somewhat smaller than half the short side of the floor elements 1. The flooring material comprising the above floor elements 1 and joining profiles 10 are very suited for installations where it is desired to avoid use of glue. It is, of course, possible to use glue or double faced adhesive tape in order to make the installation completely permanent. The glue or tape is then suitably applied to the surfaces of the joining profile 10 that are located between the lips 11 and on the edges 2 (FIG. 2).
  • [0042]
    It is also possible to use only extended profiles 10 when installing floor elements 1. These are then suitably cut to cover the full width of the floor. The joining profiles 10 will then extend in the same direction as the rectangular floor elements 1. Small pieces are cut from joining profiles 10. These small pieces are placed in the lateral joints as every new floor element 1 is installed. It is suitable to bring these small pieces from below into the joint between two assembled floor boards 1.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 7 a-d shows different embodiments of joints with floor elements 1 which are joined by means of joining profiles 10 via notch-shaped grooves 4 in the edges 2 of the floor boards 1. The floor boards 1 are provided with notch-shaped grooves 4 in all four edges 2. The grooves 4 are each intended to receive one of the lips 11 of the joining profile 10. The lips 11 are provided with gripping hooks 16. The floor can be made snap-joinable by providing the grooves 4 with a undercut 46 (FIG. 7 b-c) and by providing the lips with matching hooks 16 (FIG. 7 b-c). In order to make the joint dismountable, which can be advantageous even if the floor elements are to be glued, the grooves 4 are provided with a support 42 (FIG. 7 b) for the middle section 12 of the joining profile 10. The middle section 12 can alternatively be provided with a support 42′ (FIG. 7 c). Such a floor element 1 is then dismounted by lifting it slightly along the free edge 2, whereby the hook will be disengaged from the undercut 46. The simplest way to achieve such undercuts 46 are through broaching or laser cutting. The floor elements 1 may alternatively be joined through a more shallow undercut 47 (FIG. 7 d) which can be achieved with traditional methods such as milling. The embodiments shown in FIG. 7 a-d does all give a minimum of cutting and lost material during manufacturing. The joining profiles 10 used in the embodiments shown in FIG. 7 a-d are also manufactured in extended lengths or rolls which are cut to the desired length in connection to the installation of the floor. The joining profiles 10 and/or the floor elements 1 may, of course, be coated with glue or adhesive double-faced tape.
  • [0044]
    The invention is not limited by the embodiments shown since they can be varied in different ways within the scope of the invention.
Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US2282559 *6 Ago 194012 May 1942H J Baldwin & Company LtdProtective tile
US2863185 *16 Feb 19549 Dic 1958Arnold T RiediJoint construction including a fastener for securing two structural members together in edge-to-edge closely abutting relation
US3045294 *22 Mar 195624 Jul 1962Livezey Jr William FMethod and apparatus for laying floors
US3174411 *18 Abr 196123 Mar 1965SnecmaFloorings for taking-off and landing
US3363383 *8 Mar 196516 Ene 1968Aluminum Co Of AmericaJoint structures
US3627362 *13 Ago 196914 Dic 1971Brenneman John HSpline and seat connector assemblies
US3676971 *14 Nov 196918 Jul 1972Dombroski Edward LTile structure with cruciform shaped foundation supporting tiles
US3731445 *3 Ago 19708 May 1973Freudenberg CJoinder of floor tiles
US4169688 *9 Nov 19772 Oct 1979Sato ToshioArtificial skating-rink floor
US4304083 *23 Oct 19798 Dic 1981H. H. Robertson CompanyAnchor element for panel joint
US4426820 *17 Feb 198124 Ene 1984Heinz TerbrackPanel for a composite surface and a method of assembling same
US4461131 *21 May 198224 Jul 1984Aar CorporationPanel interconnection system
US4599841 *6 Abr 198415 Jul 1986Inter-Ikea AgPanel structure comprising boards and for instance serving as a floor or a panel
US4599842 *20 Ago 198415 Jul 1986James CounihanPlanar section fastening system
US4819932 *28 Feb 198611 Abr 1989Trotter Jr PhilAerobic exercise floor system
US4998395 *19 May 198912 Mar 1991Bezner Baruch JLight-transmitting wall panels
US5148850 *4 Ene 199122 Sep 1992Paneltech Ltd.Weatherproof continuous hinge connector for articulated vehicular overhead doors
US5390457 *5 May 199321 Feb 1995Sjoelander; OliverMounting member for face tiles
US5950389 *2 Jul 199614 Sep 1999Porter; William H.Splines for joining panels
US5996301 *26 Nov 19977 Dic 1999Estruseone Materie PlastischeWall panel assembly
US6021646 *26 Jun 19988 Feb 2000Burley's Rink Supply, Inc.Floor system for a rink
US6094882 *2 Jun 19991 Ago 2000Valinge Aluminium AbMethod and equipment for making a building board
US6134854 *18 Dic 199824 Oct 2000Perstorp AbGlider bar for flooring system
US6763643 *27 Sep 199920 Jul 2004Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring material comprising flooring elements which are assembled by means of separate joining elements
US6920732 *18 Mar 200426 Jul 2005Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring material comprising flooring elements which are assembled by means of separate joining elements
US8146318 *29 Sep 20083 Abr 2012Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US20130067840 *13 Nov 201221 Mar 2013Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US7637068 *2 Feb 200429 Dic 2009Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floorboards
US7677005 *5 Mar 200816 Mar 2010Valinge Innovation Belgium BvbaMechanical locking system for floorboards
US77215039 Jul 200725 May 2010Valinge Innovation AbLocking system comprising a combination lock for panels
US775745231 Mar 200320 Jul 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floorboards
US784114430 Mar 200530 Nov 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US784114510 Ago 200730 Nov 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US78411509 Jul 200730 Nov 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floorboards
US786148229 Jun 20074 Ene 2011Valinge Innovation AbLocking system comprising a combination lock for panels
US78661109 Jul 200711 Ene 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US790881511 Jul 200722 Mar 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US79308625 Ene 200726 Abr 2011Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards having a resilent surface layer with a decorative groove
US803307427 May 201011 Oct 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US80423114 Dic 200725 Oct 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US806110420 May 200522 Nov 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US80791967 Dic 201020 Dic 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels
US81716929 Jul 20078 May 2012Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US824547811 Mar 201121 Ago 2012Välinge Innovation ABSet of floorboards with sealing arrangement
US8336272 *8 Ene 200925 Dic 2012Flooring Technologies Ltd.Device and method for locking two building boards
US834191422 Oct 20101 Ene 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US834191521 Oct 20051 Ene 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible tongue
US834923422 Dic 20108 Ene 2013Ceraloc Innovation Belgium BvbaFibre based panels with a decorative wear resistance surface
US834923513 Nov 20088 Ene 2013Ceraloc Innovation Belgium BvbaRecycling of laminate floorings
US83531407 Nov 200815 Ene 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical snap folding
US83598051 Ago 201129 Ene 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US838147711 Jul 200826 Feb 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible tongue
US83873275 Oct 20115 Mar 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US84198776 Abr 200916 Abr 2013Ceraloc Innovation Belgium BvbaWood fibre based panels with a thin surface layer
US843105413 Nov 200830 Abr 2013Ceraloc Innovation Belgium BvbaFibre based panels with a wear resistance surface
US848084112 Abr 20119 Jul 2013Ceralog Innovation Belgium BVBAPowder overlay
US848111122 Dic 20109 Jul 2013Ceraloc Innovation Belgium BvbaBright coloured surface layer
US84995217 Nov 20086 Ago 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical snap folding and an installation method to connect such panels
US851103118 Jul 201220 Ago 2013Valinge Innovation AbSet F floorboards with overlapping edges
US85442332 Abr 20121 Oct 2013Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US854423425 Oct 20121 Oct 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical snap folding
US857867528 Ene 200812 Nov 2013Pergo (Europe) AbProcess for sealing of a joint
US861595213 Dic 201031 Dic 2013Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US86174394 Dic 201231 Dic 2013Valinge Innovation AbRecycling of laminate floorings
US863162326 Jul 201221 Ene 2014Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US866176213 Nov 20124 Mar 2014Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US86637855 Dic 20124 Mar 2014Valinge Innovation AbFibre based panels with a decorative wear resistance surface
US86777144 Feb 201325 Mar 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US868951225 Oct 20078 Abr 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical folding
US870765014 Sep 201129 Abr 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US872856411 Abr 201220 May 2014Valinge Innovation AbPowder mix and a method for producing a building panel
US873306521 Mar 201227 May 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US87334105 Mar 200827 May 2014Valinge Innovation AbMethod of separating a floorboard material
US876334014 Ago 20121 Jul 2014Valinge Flooring Technology AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US876334114 Nov 20131 Jul 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical folding
US878458722 Dic 201022 Jul 2014Valinge Innovation AbFibre based panels with a decorative wear resistance surface
US880683230 Ago 201319 Ago 2014Inotec Global LimitedVertical joint system and associated surface covering system
US882662229 Ene 20139 Sep 2014Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor panel having coupling parts allowing assembly with vertical motion
US8833028 *10 Ene 201116 Sep 2014Valinge Innovation AbFloor covering with interlocking design
US884423627 Dic 201230 Sep 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US88694857 Dic 200728 Oct 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels
US887546514 Sep 20124 Nov 2014Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US89208747 Jun 201330 Dic 2014Valinge Innovation AbMethod of manufacturing a surface layer of building panels
US892087614 Mar 201330 Dic 2014Valinge Innovation AbMethod for producing a building panel
US89311748 Jul 201013 Ene 2015Valinge Innovation AbMethods and arrangements relating to edge machining of building panels
US897833424 Mar 201417 Mar 2015Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels
US899105522 Mar 200731 Mar 2015Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering, floor element and method for manufacturing floor elements
US89930498 Ago 201331 Mar 2015Valinge Flooring Technology AbSingle layer scattering of powder surfaces
US9016020 *15 Abr 201428 Abr 2015Jisong YangThin brick panel assembly system
US90273066 May 201412 May 2015Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US90326853 May 201219 May 2015Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US905173811 Sep 20149 Jun 2015Valinge Flooring Technology AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US906836023 Dic 201330 Jun 2015Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US908590511 Abr 201221 Jul 2015Valinge Innovation AbPowder based balancing layer
US910312610 Mar 201411 Ago 2015Inotec Global LimitedVertical joint system and associated surface covering system
US911550021 Nov 201325 Ago 2015Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US91456913 Oct 201329 Sep 2015Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering of floor elements
US918169810 Ene 201410 Nov 2015Valinge Innovation AbMethod of producing a building panel and a building panel
US920046030 Mar 20151 Dic 2015Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering, floor element and method for manufacturing floor elements
US921249323 May 201415 Dic 2015Flooring Industries Limited, SarlMethods for manufacturing and packaging floor panels, devices used thereby, as well as floor panel and packed set of floor panels
US923891723 Dic 201319 Ene 2016Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US92434113 Jun 201426 Ene 2016Valinge Flooring Technology AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US925540511 Mar 20139 Feb 2016Valinge Innovation AbWood fibre based panels with a thin surface layer
US92554144 Dic 20139 Feb 2016Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US92608695 Dic 201316 Feb 2016Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US92961917 Jun 201329 Mar 2016Valinge Innovation AbPowder overlay
US931488811 Dic 201419 Abr 2016Valinge Innovation AbMethods and arrangements relating to edge machining of building panels
US931493628 Ago 201219 Abr 2016Valinge Flooring Technology AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US931600610 Abr 201319 Abr 2016Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US93221625 Ago 201126 Abr 2016Pergo (Europe) AbGuiding means at a joint
US93474698 Dic 201524 May 2016Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US935249912 Abr 201231 May 2016Valinge Innovation AbMethod of manufacturing a layer
US93597744 Jun 20157 Jun 2016Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US936603621 Nov 201314 Jun 2016Ceraloc Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US936603730 Mar 201514 Jun 2016Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering, floor element and method for manufacturing floor elements
US937682112 Mar 201428 Jun 2016Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US938271620 Ago 20145 Jul 2016Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US93885841 May 201512 Jul 2016Ceraloc Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US940328625 Nov 20142 Ago 2016Valinge Innovation AbMethod for producing a building panel
US941031919 Feb 20149 Ago 2016Valinge Innovation AbHeat and pressure generated design
US94289193 Jun 201430 Ago 2016Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US945334711 Nov 201427 Sep 2016Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US945863412 May 20154 Oct 2016Valinge Innovation AbBuilding panel with a mechanical locking system
US946444321 Nov 201311 Oct 2016Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring material comprising flooring elements which are assembled by means of separate flooring elements
US94644447 Ago 201511 Oct 2016Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US948795710 May 20168 Nov 2016Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering, floor element and method for manufacturing floor elements
US953439711 Nov 20133 Ene 2017Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring material
US955662227 Feb 201431 Ene 2017Valinge Innovation AbFibre based panels with a wear resistance surface
US957334330 Mar 201521 Feb 2017Ceraloc Innovation AbComposite boards and panels
US959349116 Mar 201514 Mar 2017Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels
US961165618 Abr 20164 Abr 2017Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US9657483 *5 Ene 201623 May 2017Ceraloc Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US967728512 Feb 201613 Jun 2017Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US96955993 Nov 20164 Jul 2017Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering, floor element and method for manufacturing floor elements
US969560119 Ago 20144 Jul 2017Valinge Innovation AbFloor covering with interlocking design
US971451511 Mar 201625 Jul 2017Ceraloc Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US97259129 Jul 20128 Ago 2017Ceraloc Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US975897225 May 201612 Sep 2017Ceraloc Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US977172320 May 201626 Sep 2017Ceraloc Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US9783996 *13 Nov 200810 Oct 2017Valinge Innovation AbFibre based panels with a wear resistance surface
US98033756 May 201631 Oct 2017Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US981627018 Jun 201314 Nov 2017Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floorboards
US20080216434 *5 Mar 200811 Sep 2008Valinge Innovation Belgium BvbaMechanical locking system for floorboards
US20090155612 *13 Nov 200818 Jun 2009Valinge Innovation Belgium BvbaFibre based panels with a wear resistance surface
US20090173032 *8 Ene 20099 Jul 2009Flooring Technologies Ltd.Device and method for locking two building boards
US20100092731 *6 Abr 200915 Abr 2010Valinge Innovation Belgium BvbaWood fibre based panels with a thin surface layer
US20100300030 *13 Nov 20082 Dic 2010Valinge Innovation Belgium BvbaFibre based panels with a wear resistance surface
US20110023302 *8 Jul 20103 Feb 2011Valinge Innovation AbMethods and arrangements relating to edge machining of building panels
US20110167744 *10 Ene 201114 Jul 2011Mannington Mills, Inc.Floor Covering With Interlocking Design
US20110175251 *22 Dic 201021 Jul 2011Välinge Innovation Belgium BVBAFibre based panels with a decorative wear resistance surface
US20110177319 *22 Dic 201021 Jul 2011Valinge Innovation Belgium BvbaHeat and pressure generated design
US20110177354 *22 Dic 201021 Jul 2011Valinge Innovation Belgium BvbaBright coloured surface layer
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.52/384
Clasificación internacionalE04F13/08, E04F15/04, E04F15/02
Clasificación cooperativaE04F2201/0517, E04F2201/028, E04F2201/0138, E04F2201/0115, E04F2201/0529, E04F15/04, E04F15/02, E04F15/102, E04F15/02038
Clasificación europeaE04F15/04, E04F15/02