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Número de publicaciónUS20080233563 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 10/590,891
Número de PCTPCT/US2005/006292
Fecha de publicación25 Sep 2008
Fecha de presentación25 Feb 2005
Fecha de prioridad27 Feb 2004
También publicado comoUS7981616, WO2005082041A2, WO2005082041A3, WO2005084254A2, WO2005084254A3
Número de publicación10590891, 590891, PCT/2005/6292, PCT/US/2005/006292, PCT/US/2005/06292, PCT/US/5/006292, PCT/US/5/06292, PCT/US2005/006292, PCT/US2005/06292, PCT/US2005006292, PCT/US200506292, PCT/US5/006292, PCT/US5/06292, PCT/US5006292, PCT/US506292, US 2008/0233563 A1, US 2008/233563 A1, US 20080233563 A1, US 20080233563A1, US 2008233563 A1, US 2008233563A1, US-A1-20080233563, US-A1-2008233563, US2008/0233563A1, US2008/233563A1, US20080233563 A1, US20080233563A1, US2008233563 A1, US2008233563A1
InventoresMichael Mitas, David J. Cole, William E. Gillanders, Kaidi Mikhitarian
Cesionario originalMusc Foundation For Research Development
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Enhanced Detection of Rna Using a Panel of Truncated Gene-Specific Primers for Reverse Transcription
US 20080233563 A1
Resumen
The present invention provides truncated gene-specific primers in panels that can be used during the reverse transcription step of RT-PCR to increase signal detection of cancer gene markers in a tissue sample. Also provided are forward and reverse primers for RT-PCR. Methods of using the primers are also provided.
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Reclamaciones(21)
1. A target-specific reverse transcription (RT) primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides.
2. The target-specific reverse transcription primer of claim 1, wherein the primer is a nucleic acid selected from the group consisting of CCAAATGCGGCA (SEQ ID NO: 1), CTGCAGTTCTGTGA (SEQ ID NO:2), GCAGTGACTTCGT (SEQ ID NO:3), TGAAGTACACTGG (SEQ ID NO:4), AGCCACTTCTGC (SEQ ID NO:5), TGTAGCTGTTGCA (SEQ ID NO:6), GCCACCATTACCT (SEQ ID NO:7), GAACCAACTCAGGC (SEQ ID NO:8) and ACCAATTGCAGAAGAC, ATCCCCTTGGCAA, AAAGCGCGTTGG and GTGTGAGGCCAT.
3. A target-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer comprising a nucleic acid selected from the group consisting of 5′-CCAAATGCGGCA-3′ (SEQ ID NO: 1), 5′-CTGCAGTTCTGTGA-3′ (SEQ ID NO:2), 5′-GCAGTGACTTCGT-3′ (SEQ ID NO:3), 5′-TGAAGTACACTGG-3′ (SEQ ID NO:4), 5′-AGCCACTTCTGC-3′ (SEQ ID NO:5), 5′-TGTAGCTGTTGCA3′ (SEQ ID NO:6), 5′-GCCACCATTACCT-3′ (SEQ ID NO:7) and 5′-GAACCAACTCAGGC-3′ (SEQ ID NO:8), 5′-ACCAATTGCAGAAGAC-3′, 5′-ATCCCCTTGGCAA-3′, 5′-AAAGCGCGTTGG-3′ and 5′-GTGTGAGGCCAT-3′, and further comprising at least 5 to about 20 additional 3′ target-specific nucleotides.
4. The target-specific PCR primer of claim 3, wherein the primer is a reverse primer.
5. The target-specific PCR primer of claim 4, wherein the primer is selected from the group consisting of 5′-CCAAATGCGGCATCTTCAAA (SEQ ID NO:9), 5′-CTGCAGTTCTGTGAGCCAAAG (SEQ ID NO:10), 5′-GCAGTGACTTCGTCATTTGGAC (SEQ ID NO:11), 5′-TGAAGTACACTGGCATTGACGA (SEQ ID NO:12), 5′-AGCCACTTCTGCACATTGCTG (SEQ ID NO: 13), 5′-TGTAGCTGTTGCAAATGCTTTAAGAAGAAGC (SEQ ID NO:14), 5′-GCCACCATTACCTGCAGAAAC (SEQ ID NO: 15), 5′-GAACCAACTCAGGCAGGACTTT (SEQ ID NO:16), 5′-ACCAATTGCAGAAGACTCAGC, 5′-ATCCCCTTGGCAATCTGCA, 5′-AAAGCGCGTTGGCGATCT and 5′-GTGTGAGGCCATGCTTGTTTG.
6. A target-specific PCR primer, wherein the primer is selected from the group consisting of 5′-GCCGTGTGAACCATGTGACTTT (SEQ ID NO: 17), 5′-CGGATGAAACTCTGAGCAATGT (SEQ ID NO: 18), 5′-GCCAACAAAGCTCAGGACAAC (SEQ ID NO:19), 5′-CGCAGCTCAGGAAGAATGTG (SEQ ID NO:20), 5′-AGTGCTCAAGGACATCGAGACG (SEQ ID NO:21), 5′-GGGCCACTGTCGCATCATGATTGG (SEQ ID NO:22), 5′-ACCATCCTATGAGCGAGTACCC (SEQ ID NO:23), 5′-CCCTGGAAGCCTGCAAATT (SEQ ID NO:24) and 5′-CCACTGCTCGTAAAGACATTCC, 5′-CTGGTGACACAGCTTATGCCCT, 5′-CCTGGATGCAGCGAATGAA and 5′-TTGCTGGAACATGCGACTGAT.
7. An RT-PCR method comprising:
a) reverse transcribing RNA using a target-specific RT primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides to produce a target-specific DNA product; and
b) amplifying the DNA product using a target-specific forward PCR primer and a target-specific reverse PCR primer, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer.
8. The RT-PCR method of claim 7, wherein the method is applied to formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue.
9. The RT-PCR method of claim 7, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer on its 5′ end, and further comprises at least 5 additional target-specific nucleotides on its 3′ end.
10. The RT-PCR method of claim 7, wherein the reverse transcription step utilizes an annealing temperature from about 40° C. to about 42° C.
11. The RT-PCR method of claim 7, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises a nucleic acid selected from the group consisting of CCAAATGCGGCA (SEQ ID NO:1), CTGCAGTTCTGTGA (SEQ ID NO:2), GCAGTGACTTCGT (SEQ ID NO:3), TGAAGTACACTGG (SEQ ID NO:4), AGCCACTTCTGC (SEQ ID NO:5), TGTAGCTGTTGCA (SEQ ID NO:6), GCCACCATTACCT (SEQ ID NO:7), GAACCAACTCAGGC (SEQ ID NO:8), and ACCAATTGCAGAAGAC, ATCCCCTTGGCAA, AAAGCGCGTTGG and GTGTGAGGCCAT on its 5′ end, and further comprises at least 5 additional target-specific nucleotides on its 3′ end.
12. The RT-PCR method of claim 7, wherein the reverse transcription step results in -fold increases in signal detection of 1.3 for CK19, 5 for CEA, 9 for PSE, 17 to 41 for β2m, mam, PIP and KS1/4, and 66 for muc1 compared to priming with random hexamers.
13. The RT-PCR method of claim 7, wherein the reverse transcription step results in a mean 16 (+/−5.2)-fold increase in signal detection compared to priming with random hexamers.
14. The method of claim 7, wherein target-specific RT primers and target-specific PCR primers for more than one target are used in a single reaction.
15. A method of detecting a cancer marker in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, comprising,
a) reverse transcribing RNA from the tissue using a marker-specific RT primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides to produce a target-specific DNA product; and
b) amplifying the DNA product using a marker-specific forward PCR primer and a marker-specific reverse PCR primer, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer, the presence of an amplification product indicating the presence of the cancer marker in the tissue.
16. A method of detecting cancer in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, comprising,
a) reverse transcribing RNA from the tissue using an RT primer specific for a marker for the cancer, wherein the primer comprises 10-16 nucleotides, to produce a marker-specific DNA product;
b) amplifying the marker-specific DNA product using a marker-specific forward PCR primer and a marker-specific reverse PCR primer, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer, the presence of a the marker-specific amplification product indicating the presence of the cancer in the tissue.
17. The method of claim 15, wherein the marker is selected from the group consisting of CK19, CEA, PSE, β2m, mam, PIP, muc1, SBEM, ErbB2, EpCam, PDEF, HoxC6 and POTE.
18. The RT-PCR method of claim 15, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer on its 5′ end, and further comprises at least 5 additional target-specific nucleotides on its 3′ end.
19. The RT-PCR method of claim 15, wherein the reverse transcription step utilizes an annealing temperature from about 40° C. to about 42° C.
20. The method of claim 15, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises a nucleic acid selected from the group consisting of CCAAATGCGGCA (SEQ ID NO:1), CTGCAGTTCTGTGA (SEQ ID NO:2), GCAGTGACTTCGT (SEQ ID NO:3), TGAAGTACACTGG (SEQ ID NO:4), AGCCACTTCTGC (SEQ ID NO:5), TGTAGCTGTTGCA (SEQ ID NO:6), GCCACCATTACCT (SEQ ID NO:7), GAACCAACTCAGGC (SEQ ID NO:8), ACCAATTGCAGAAGAC, ATCCCCTTGGCAA, AAAGCGCGTTGG and GTGTGAGGCCAT on its 5′ end, and further comprises at least 5 additional target-specific nucleotides on its 3′ end.
21. The method of claim 15, wherein marker-specific RT primers and marker-specific PCR primers for more than one marker are used in a single reaction.
Descripción
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates generally to the field of diagnosing a disease by detecting gene-specific markers in a tissue sample, using RT-PCR. Specifically, the invention relates to a panel of truncated gene-specific reverse transcription primers that can enhance detection of a cancer gene in a tissue sample.

2. Background Art

Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues (PET) are a unique source of research material with the potential of providing biological information in conjunction with known clinical outcome. Specifically, these tissues could be an ideal resource for validating newly discovered genes as diagnostic and/or prognostic molecular markers in retrospective studies. Unfortunately, RNA isolated from PET samples is considered to be a poor material for molecular analyses, since RNA is frequently degraded to 100-200 bp fragments by endogenous and exogenous ribonucleases (RNase) (1). In addition, Masuda et al have shown that RNA, and in particular the poly(A) tail of mRNA, is chemically modified, making it a poor template for cDNA synthesis (2).

Despite the technical obstacles in the analysis of PET samples, significant improvements have been made in recent years, and various studies have shown that PET samples can be used for RT-PCR analysis. The introduction of real-time RT-PCR has helped to overcome some of the difficulties of analyzing degraded RNA due to the fact that this technology has been optimized for the sensitive amplification and detection of short gene fragments (3,1,4). The results obtained from PET sample analysis are highly dependent on the efficiency of reverse transcription. Depending on the quality of RNA, two priming methods are commonly used in cDNA synthesis: oligo(dT) primers and random hexamers. Oligo(dT) primers anneal to the poly(A) tail of mRNA. Although this method is preferred with high quality RNA, some studies have also used it for PET analysis (5,2). In the case of degraded mRNA, where the poly(A) tail is often fragmented and/or chemically modified (PET samples), the use of random hexamers is preferred (1,4,6). The major limitation of priming with random hexamers is that any RNA template, not just mRNA, can be primed.

There is a third less frequently used priming method that relies on gene-specific primers. Gene-specific reverse transcription is used to increase the specificity of the cDNA synthesis and/or enhance the detection level of low abundance RNA transcripts. Although studies have shown that gene-specific reverse transcription can increase the signal detection for a single gene (7,8), the use of multiple gene-specific primers in a single reaction has been problematic due to the presumed formation of primer-dimers that interfere with the reverse transcription and/or subsequent PCR (9).

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with the purposes of this invention, as embodied and broadly described herein, this invention, in one aspect, relates to a target-specific reverse transcription (RT) primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides.

In another aspect, the invention relates to a target-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer comprising a nucleic acid selected from the group consisting of 5′-CCAAATGCGGCA-3′ (SEQ ID NO:1), 5′-CTGCAGTTCTGTGA-3′ (SEQ ID NO:2), 5′-GCAGTGACTTCGT-3′ (SEQ ID NO:3), 5′-TGAAGTACACTGG-3′ (SEQ ID NO:4), 5′-AGCCACTTCTGC-3′ (SEQ ID NO:5), 5′-TGTAGCTGTTGCA3′ (SEQ ID NO:6), 5′-GCCACCATTACCT-3′ (SEQ ID NO:7) and 5′-GAACCAACTCAGGC-3′ (SEQ ID NO:8), and further comprising at least 5 additional 3′ target-specific nucleotides.

In yet another aspect, the invention relates to a target-specific PCR primer, wherein the primer is selected from the group consisting of 5′-GCCGTGTGAACCATGTGACTTT ((SEQ ID NO:17), 5′-CGGATGAAACTCTGAGCAATGT (SEQ ID NO:18), 5′-GCCAACAAAGCTCAGGACAAC (SEQ ID NO:19), 5′-CGCAGCTCAGGAAGAATGTG (SEQ ID NO:20), 5′-AGTGCTCAAGGACATCGAGACG (SEQ ID NO:21), 5′-GGGCCACTGTCGCATCATGATTGG (SEQ ID NO:22), 5′-ACCATCCTATGAGCGAGTACCC (SEQ ID NO:23) and 5′-CCCTGGAAGCCTGCAAATT (SEQ ID NO:24).

In another aspect, the invention relates to a RT-PCR method comprising a) reverse transcribing RNA using a target-specific RT primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides to produce a target-specific DNA product; and b) amplifying the DNA product using a target-specific forward PCR primer and a target-specific reverse PCR primer, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer.

In another aspect, the invention relates to a method of detecting a cancer marker in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, comprising a) reverse transcribing RNA from the tissue using a marker-specific RT primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides to produce a target-specific DNA product and b) amplifying the DNA product using a marker-specific forward PCR primer and a marker-specific reverse PCR primer, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer, the presence of an amplification product indicating the presence of the cancer marker in the tissue.

In yet another aspect, the invention relates to a method of detecting a cancer in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, comprising a) reverse transcribing RNA from the tissue using an RT primer specific for a marker for the cancer, wherein the primer comprises 10-16 nucleotides, to produce a marker-specific DNA product and b) amplifying the marker-specific DNA product using a marker-specific forward PCR primer and a marker-specific reverse PCR primer, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer, the presence of a the marker-specific amplification product indicating the presence of the cancer in the tissue.

The present invention overcomes the problems in the art by preserving the enhanced nature of signal detection of gene-specific priming and preventing primer-dimer formation. The present invention provides novel short primers (10-16 nucleotides in length) that corresponded to the 5′-end of the reverse primer used for PCR. The use of a panel of truncated gene-specific primers during reverse transcription is superior to the use of random hexamers, ultimately resulting in significant and unexpected enhancement of gene fragment detection from PET samples containing highly degraded RNA.

Additional advantages of the invention will be set forth in part in the description which follows, and in part will be obvious from the description, or may be learned by practice of the invention. The advantages of the invention will be realized and attained by means of the elements and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims. It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory only and are not restrictive of the invention, as claimed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate several embodiments of the invention and together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

FIG. 1 shows that a panel of truncated gene-specific primers used in reverse transcription enhances gene detection in PET samples. RNA from 80 micron sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast (A and B), lung (C) and colon (D) cancer tissues was isolated and reverse transcribed using either random hexamers (open bars), a single gene-specific primer (β2m, mam, pip, KS1/4, PSE, CEA; filled bars; A), or a panel of truncated gene-specific primers (striped bars). PCR was performed using primers for genes indicated in the figure. Gene detection signals are expressed as cycle threshold (Ct) values.

FIG. 2 shows reliable detection of 20 gene copies in a single round of PCR. Real-time RT-PCR reactions were performed in triplicate as described in Example 3 using the lunx primer pair and the lunx synthetic sequence. Gene copy number was determined by UV absorbance measurements at 260 nm. The line through the data points was obtained by linear regression analysis using Microsoft Excel® software.

FIG. 3 shows multi-marker real-time RT-PCR analysis of NSCLC in peripheral blood. Real-time PCR analyses of peripheral blood specimens from 15 healthy volunteers (open triangles) and 24 NSCLC patients (open diamonds) were performed using primer pairs for the indicated genes. Threshold levels of marker positivity for each gene were calculated as described herein and are depicted by the horizontal line on the left side of each data set. Expression levels of each gene were calculated with Q-gene® software and are expressed as the ratio of the target gene relative to β2-microglobin.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The present invention may be understood more readily by reference to the following detailed description of preferred embodiments of the invention and the Examples included therein and to the Figures and their previous and following description.

Before the present compounds, compositions, articles, devices, and/or methods are disclosed and described, it is to be understood that this invention is not limited to specific synthetic methods, specific nucleic acids, as such may, of course, vary. It is also to be understood that the terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting.

As used in the specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a,” “an” and “the” include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Thus, for example, reference to a nucleic acid includes mixtures of nucleic acids.

Ranges may be expressed herein as from “about” one particular value, and/or to “about” another particular value. When such a range is expressed, another embodiment includes from the one particular value and/or to the other particular value. Similarly, when values are expressed as approximations, by use of the antecedent “about,” it will be understood that the particular value forms another embodiment. It will be further understood that the endpoints of each of the ranges are significant both in relation to the other endpoint, and independently of the other endpoint.

In this specification and in the claims which follow, reference will be made to a number of terms which shall be defined to have the following meanings:

“Optional” or “optionally” means that the subsequently described event or circumstance may or may not occur, and that the description includes instances where said event or circumstance occurs and instances where it does not. For example, the phrase “optionally substituted nucleic acid” means that the nucleic acid may or may not be substituted and that the description includes both unsubstituted nucleic acid and nucleic acid where there is substitution.

The present invention provides a target-specific reverse transcription (RT) primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides. By “target-specific” or “gene-specific” is meant that the primer amplifies only a nucleic acid from a particular target nucleic acid sequence or a particular gene sequence. The RT primer of the invention can be used not only to reverse transcribe RNA in the transcription step of a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), but it can also be contained in a target-specific reverse PCR primer for amplification of a DNA product in a RT-PCR.

The truncated, gene-specific RT primer of this invention is the 5′-portion of a reverse PCR primer sequence, wherein the melting temperature of the RT primer is about 5° C. to about 20° C. lower than the melting temperature of the corresponding reverse PCR primer. Thus, the melting temperature of an RT primer of the invention can be 5° C., 6° C., 7° C., 8° C., 9° C., 10° C., 11° C., 12° C., 13° C., 14° C., 15° C., 16° C., 17° C., 18° C., 19° C. or 20° C. lower than the melting temperature of a corresponding PCR primer. For example, the melting temperature of an RT primer of the invention is from about 40° C. to about 42° C., and the melting temperature of a PCR primer is the typical melting temperature for a PCR primer, i.e. about 60° C. It is contemplated that the 5′-10 to 16 nucleotides of any reverse PCR primer can be identified as a functional truncated, gene-specific RT primer if the melting temperature of the 5′-10 to 16 nucleotide sequence is about 5° C. to about 20° C. lower than the melting temperature of the corresponding reverse PCR primer. Thus, for example, a person of skill can design and screen RT primers of the invention for use in the RT-PCR methods of the invention by determining that a 5′-10 to 16 nucleotides of a PCR reverse primer has a melting point from about 40° C. to about 42° C., and the melting temperature of the corresponding PCR reverse primer is about 60° C. To calculate the melting temperature of various primers, there are well-known computer programs available that take into account salt concentrations, % GC content and nucleotide length. An example of a computer program is Primer Express® software, available through ABI (Foster City, Calif.). A further routine option is to empirically calculate the melting temperature of the putative RT primer that consists of the 5′ nucleotides of the reverse PCR primer to be used in the RT-PCR protocol.

As used herein, the term “nucleic acid” refers to single or multiple stranded molecules which may be DNA or RNA, or any combination thereof, including modifications to those nucleic acids. The nucleic acid may represent a coding strand or its complement, or any combination thereof. Nucleic acids may be identical in sequence to the sequences which are naturally occurring for any of the moieties discussed herein or may include alternative codons which encode the same amino acid as that which is found in the naturally occurring sequence. These nucleic acids can also be modified from their typical structure. Such modifications include, but are not limited to, methylated nucleic acids, the substitution of a non-bridging oxygen on the phosphate residue with either a sulfur (yielding phosphorothioate deoxynucleotides), selenium (yielding phosphorselenoate deoxynucleotides), or methyl groups (yielding methylphosphonate deoxynucleotides), a reduction in the AT content of AT rich regions, or replacement of non-preferred codon usage of the expression system to preferred codon usage of the expression system.

The primers of the present invention are capable of interacting with various cancer genes as disclosed herein. Representative cancer genes that can be detected by the primers of the invention include, but are not limited to, cancer genes related to breast, esophagus, lung, colon, skin, brain, bone, salivary gland, liver, stomach, pancreas, gall bladder, kidney, bladder, prostate, lymphoma, leukemia and sarcoma. The cancer genes can be detected in a primary cancerous tumor and in a secondary (metastatic) cancerous tumor.

The target-specific primers of the present invention are capable of interacting with any target nucleic acid based on the present teaching. Nucleic acids capable of detection with the present primers or methods include viral RNA or DNA (e.g., HIV, retroviruses, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, Hepatitis A virus, Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus, Hepatitis E virus, Herpes I virus, Herpes II virus, influenza virus, polio virus, vaccinia and smallpox virus), genes upregulated in response to infection by pathogens and genes whose expression patterns are of interest. One of skill will recognize the innumerable additional targets for the present primers and methods.

In certain embodiments, the primers are used to support DNA amplification reactions. Typically the primers will be capable of being extended in a sequence-specific manner. Extension of a primer in a sequence-specific manner includes any methods wherein the sequence and/or composition of the nucleic acid molecule to which the primer is hybridized or otherwise associated directs or influences the composition or sequence of the product produced by the extension of the primer. Extension of the primer in a sequence-specific manner, therefore, includes, but is not limited to, PCR, DNA sequencing, DNA extension, DNA polymerization, RNA transcription or reverse transcription. Techniques and conditions that amplify the primer in a sequence-specific manner are preferred. In certain embodiments the primers are used for the DNA amplification reactions, such as PCR or direct sequencing. It is understood that in certain embodiments the primers can also be extended using non-enzymatic techniques where, for example, the nucleotides or oligonucleotides used to extend the primer are modified such that they will chemically react to extend the primer in a sequence specific manner. Typically, the disclosed primers hybridize with a gene or region of a gene or they hybridize with the complement of a gene or complement of a region of a gene.

The present invention provides a panel of truncated gene-specific RT primers that can be used to increase the likelihood of detecting a cancer gene in a tissue, compared to using random hexamers. To detect breast cancer, for example, a panel of primers directed to breast cancer genes β2m, mam, PIP, KS1/4, PSE and CEA can be used. To detect lung and colon cancer, for example, a panel of primers directed to β2m, CEA, CK19, muc1, and lunx can be used. Thus, a primer of the invention is a nucleotide sequence that is specific for a cancer gene. Such a primer that is “specific,” for example, for a breast cancer gene, a lung cancer gene or a colon cancer gene is a nucleic acid that contains a sufficient number of contiguous nucleotides to be unique. To be unique, a primer of the invention must be of sufficient size to distinguish it from other known sequences, most readily determined by comparing any nucleic acid primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides to the nucleotide sequences of nucleic acids in computer databases, such as GenBank. Such comparative searches are standard in the art. The present RT primers can be at least about 10 to about 16 nucleotides in length. That is, a primer can be 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 or 16 nucleotides in length. Further, the RT primers of the invention can be 12, 13 or 14 nucleotides in length. Representative examples of RT primers of the invention include, but are not limited to, CCAAATGCGGCA (SEQ ID NO:1), CTGCAGTTCTGTGA (SEQ ID NO:2), GCAGTGACTTCGT (SEQ ID NO:3), TGAAGTACACTGG (SEQ ID NO:4), AGCCACTTCTGC (SEQ ID NO:5), TGTAGCTGTTGCA (SEQ ID NO:6), GCCACCATTACCT (SEQ ID NO:7) and GAACCAACTCAGGC (SEQ ID NO:8) ACCAATTGCAGAAGAC (SEQ ID NO:25), ATCCCCTTGGCAA (SEQ ID NO:26), AAAGCGCGTTGG (SEQ ID NO:27) and GTGTGAGGCCAT (SEQ ID NO:28).

The present invention provides a reverse PCR primer comprising at its 5′-end 10 to 16 target-specific nucleotides that correspond to an RT primer to be used in conjunction with the reverse PCR primer in an RT-PCR protocol. At its 3′-end the reverse PCR primer can have about 5 to about 9 additional target-specific nucleotides. Thus, a reverse PCR primer can have 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 additional target-specific nucleotides at its 3′-end. A nucleic acid useful as a PCR primer will be at least about 15 to about 25 nucleotides in length, depending upon the specific nucleotide content of the sequence. Thus, based on the teaching herein, a person of skill would be able to routinely design the RT and PCR primers to be used in conjunction in the present RT-PCR method. It is the relationship between the RT primer and the reverse PCR primer as described herein that provides a key advantage to the RT and PCR primers.

The present invention also provides examples of target-specific PCR primers comprising a nucleic acid selected from the group consisting of 5′-CCAAATGCGGCA-3′ (SEQ ID NO:1), 5′-CTGCAGTTCTGTGA-3′ (SEQ ID NO:2), 5′-GCAGTGACTTCGT-3′ (SEQ ID NO:3), 5′-TGAAGTACACTGG-3′ (SEQ ID NO:4), 5′-AGCCACTTCTGC-3′ (SEQ ID NO:5), 5′-TGTAGCTGTTGCA3′ (SEQ ID NO:6), 5′-GCCACCATTACCT-3′ (SEQ ID NO:7), 5′-GAACCAACTCAGGC-3′ (SEQ ID NO:8), 5′-ACCAATTGCAGAAGAC-3′ (SEQ ID NO:25), 5′-ATCCCCTTGGCAA-3′ (SEQ ID NO:26), 5′-AAAGCGCGTTGG-3′ (SEQ ID NO:27) and 5′-GTGTGAGGCCAT-3′ (SEQ ID NO:28) and further comprising at least 5 additional 3′ target-specific nucleotides.

A target-specific PCR primer of the invention can be a reverse primer. Representative examples of a reverse PCR primer include, but are not limited to, 5′-CCAAATGCGGCATCTTCAAA (SEQ ID NO:9), 5′-CTGCAGTTCTGTGAGCCAAAG (SEQ ID NO:10), 5′-GCAGTGACTTCGTCATTTGGAC (SEQ ID NO:11), 5′-TGAAGTACACTGGCATTGACGA (SEQ ID NO:12), 5′-AGCCACTTCTGCACATTGCTG (SEQ ID NO:13), 5′-TGTAGCTGTTGCAAATGCTTTAAGAAGAAGC (SEQ ID NO:14), 5′-GCCACCATTACCTGCAGAAAC (SEQ ID NO:15) and 5′-GAACCAACTCAGGCAGGACTTT (SEQ ID NO:16), 5′-ACCAATTGCAGAAGACTCAGC (SEQ ID NO:31), 5′-ATCCCCTTGGCAATCTGCA (SEQ ID NO:32),5′-AAAGCGCGTTGGCGATCT (SEQ ID NO:29) and 5′-GTGTGAGGCCATGCTTGTTTG (SEQ ID NO:30).

A target-specific forward PCR primer of the invention can be selected from the group consisting of 5′-GCCGTGTGAACCATGTGACTTT (SEQ ID NO:17), 5′-CGGATGAAACTCTGAGCAATGT (SEQ ID NO:18), 5′-GCCAACAAAGCTCAGGACAAC (SEQ ID NO:19), 5′-CGCAGCTCAGGAAGAATGTG (SEQ ID NO:20), 5′-AGTGCTCAAGGACATCGAGACG (SEQ ID NO:21), 5′-GGGCCACTGTCGCATCATGATTGG (SEQ ID NO:22), 5′-ACCATCCTATGAGCGAGTACCC (SEQ ID NO:23) and 5′-CCCTGGAAGCCTGCAAATT (SEQ ID NO:24), 5′-CCACTGCTCGTAAAGACATTCC (SEQ ID NO:33), 5′-CTGGTGACACAGCTTATGCCCT (SEQ ID NO:34), 5′-CCTGGATGCAGCGAATGAA (SEQ ID NO:35) and 5′-TTGCTGGAACATGCGACTGAT (SEQ ID NO:36).

The present invention further provides pairs of PCR primers, comprising a forward primer and a reverse primer, that can be used in the PCR step of the RT-PCR method of the invention. Examples of the primer pairs include, but are not limited to, nucleic acids having the sequences identified as SEQ ID NO:17 and SEQ ID NO:9; SEQ ID NO:18 and SEQ ID NO:10; SEQ ID NO:19 and SEQ ID NO:11; SEQ ID NO:20 and SEQ ID NO:12; SEQ ID NO:21 and SEQ ID NO:13; SEQ ID NO:22 and SEQ ID NO:14; SEQ ID NO:23 and SEQ ID NO:15 and SEQ ID NO:24 and SEQ ID NO:16. As shown in Table 2, below, other pairs of PCR primers can be used to identify the following markers: SBEM, ErbB2, EpCam, PDEF, HoxC6 and POTE. These primer pairs can be matched with the RT primers taught herein to provide exemplary primer sets for a highly sensitive and specific RT-PCR method that can be used in a variety of tissues, but is particularly advantageous in preserved, embedded tissues.

Further provided by the present invention is an RT-PCR method comprising a) reverse transcribing RNA using a target-specific RT primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides to produce a target-specific DNA product and b) amplifying the DNA product using a target-specific forward PCR primer and a target-specific reverse PCR primer, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer.

The RT-PCR method can be used to detect a gene in any type of tissue whether it is preserved or non-preserved. An advantage of the present primers and RT-PCR methods is that they can be used to identify specific nucleic acids in tissue that has low levels of RNA or DNA. Tissues with low levels of nucleic acids include body fluids (e.g., peripheral blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, pulmonary lavage, gastric lavage, bile, vaginal secretions, seminal fluid, aqueous humor and vitreous humor). Another advantage of the present primers and RT-PCR methods is that they can be used to identify specific nucleic acids in tissues in which the nucleic acids are often highly degraded or otherwise modified from their native state. Examples of these tissues include fixed (e.g., formalin-fixed) tissues, and embedded (e.g., paraffin-embedded) tissues. Thus, the method can be used on fixed, embedded tissue, fresh tissue and fresh-frozen tissue and body fluids.

The method of the present invention can be used to amplify any specific nucleic acid target and has the same advantages over oligo(dT) primers and random hexamers in a RT-PCR, regardless of the target gene. Examples of gene targets include, but are not limited to, a breast cancer gene, for example, β2m, mam, PIP, KS1/4, PSE, CEA, lung and colon cancer genes, for example, β2m, CEA, CK19, muc1, and lunx and esophageal cancer, for example, β2m, SBEM, ErbB2, EpCam, PDEF, CEA, HoxC6 and POTE. Examples of other targets include viral or other pathogens' RNA/DNA, which may be present at low levels in many tissues.

In one aspect of the RT-PCR method of the invention, the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer on its 5′ end, and further comprises at least 5 additional target-specific nucleotides on its 3′ end.

Representative examples of the reverse PCR primers comprise a nucleic acid selected from the group consisting of CCAAATGCGGCA (SEQ ID NO:1), CTGCAGTTCTGTGA (SEQ ID NO:2), GCAGTGACTTCGT (SEQ ID NO:3), TGAAGTACACTGG (SEQ ID NO:4), AGCCACTTCTGC (SEQ ID NO:5), TGTAGCTGTTGCA (SEQ ID NO:6), GCCACCATTACCT (SEQ ID NO:7), GAACCAACTCAGGC (SEQ ID NO:8), ACCAATTGCAGAAGAC (SEQ ID NO:25), ATCCCCTTGGCAA (SEQ ID NO:26), AAAGCGCGTTGG (SEQ ID NO:27) and GTGTGAGGCCAT (SEQ ID NO:28) on its 5′ end, and further comprises at least 5 additional target-specific nucleotides on its 3′ end. Thus, according to the method of the invention, a reverse PCR primer can be selected from the group of nucleic acids identified as, for example, SEQ ID NO:9, SEQ ID NO:10, SEQ ID NO:11, SEQ ID NO:12, SEQ ID NO:13, SEQ ID NO:14, SEQ ID NO:15 and SEQ ID NO:16, and the following nucleotide sequences: 5′-ACCAATTGCAGAAGACTCAGC (SEQ ID NO:31), 5′-ATCCCCTTGGCAATCTGCA (SEQ ID NO:32), 5′-AAAGCGCGTTGGCGATCT (SEQ ID NO:29) and 5′-GTGTGAGGCCATGCTTGTTTG (SEQ ID NO:30).

The present invention further provides an RT-PCR method that utilizes pairs of PCR primers, comprising a forward primer and a reverse primer. Examples of the primer pairs include, but are not limited to, nucleic acids having the sequences identified as SEQ ID NO:17 and SEQ ID NO:9; SEQ ID NO:18 and SEQ ID NO:10; SEQ ID NO:19 and SEQ ID NO:11; SEQ ID NO:20 and SEQ ID NO:12; SEQ ID NO:21 and SEQ ID NO:13; SEQ ID NO:22 and SEQ ID NO:14; SEQ ID NO:23 and SEQ ID NO:15 and SEQ ID NO:24 and SEQ ID NO:16. Additional pairs of PCR primers of the invention include the following nucleotide sequences: F 5′-CCACTGCTCGTAAAGACATTCC (SEQ ID NO:33), R 5′-ACCAATTGCAGAAGACTCAGC (SEQ ID NO:31); F 5′-CTGGTGACACAGCTTATGCCCT (SEQ ID NO:34), R 5′-ATCCCCTTGGCAATCTGCA (SEQ ID NO:32); F 5′-CCTGGATGCAGCGAATGAA (SEQ ID NO:35), R 5′-AAAGCGCGTTGGCGATCT (SEQ ID NO:29); and F 5′-TTGCTGGAACATGCGACTGAT (SEQ ID NO:36), R 5′-GTGTGAGGCCATGCTTGTTTG (SEQ ID NO:30).

The RT-PCR method of the invention can utilize the PCR primer pairs, matched with the RT primers taught herein, to provide examples of a highly sensitive and specific RT-PCR method that can be used for a variety of tissues and targets, but is particularly advantageous in preserved, embedded tissues or for targets that are expected to be present at low levels.

The RT-PCR method of the invention provides a reverse transcription step that results in a mean 16 (+/−5.2) -fold increase in signal detection compared to priming with random hexamers. The reverse transcription step results in fold increases in signal detection of 1.3 for CK19, 5 for CEA, 9 for PSE, 17 to 41 for β2m, mam, PIP and KS1/4, and 66 for muc1 compared to priming with random hexamers. That is, the mean-fold increase in signal detection compared to priming with random hexamers is from about 10.8-fold to about 21.2-fold.

Because the annealing temperatures used for the target-specific RT primers during reverse transcription are from about 40° C. to about 42° C., target-specific RT primers and target-specific PCR primers for more than one target can be used in a single reaction. The temperature range used during the RT step allows the primers to hybridize to their specific RNA template in the reverse transcription reaction, but not during the PCR step. Thus, the primers of the invention can be used as a panel of primers while preserving the enhanced nature of signal detection of gene-specific priming and preventing primer-dimer formation.

Another aspect of the invention is a method of detecting a cancer marker in a formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, comprising a) reverse transcribing RNA from the tissue using a marker-specific RT primer comprising 10-16 nucleotides to produce a target-specific DNA product and b) amplifying the DNA product using a marker-specific forward PCR primer and a marker-specific reverse PCR primer, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer, the presence of an amplification product indicating the presence of the cancer marker in the tissue.

Another aspect of the invention is a method of detecting cancer in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, comprising a) reverse transcribing RNA from the tissue using an RT primer specific for a marker for the cancer, wherein the primer comprises 10-16 nucleotides, to produce a marker-specific DNA product and b) amplifying the marker-specific DNA product using a marker-specific forward PCR primer and a marker-specific reverse PCR primer, wherein the reverse PCR primer comprises the RT primer, the presence of a marker-specific amplification product indicating the presence of the cancer in the tissue.

A marker for a cancer, for example, breast, lung, colon and esophageal cancer, can be CK19, CEA, PSE, β2m, mam, PIP, mucl, SBEM, ErbB2, EpCam, PDEF, HoxC6 and/or POTE.

Representative examples of forward PCR primers that can be used according to the methods of the invention include, but are not limited to, nucleic acids having the sequence identified as SEQ ID NO:17, SEQ ID NO:18, SEQ ID NO:19, SEQ ID NO:20, SEQ ID NO:21, SEQ ID NO:22, SEQ ID NO:23, SEQ ID NO:24 and the following nucleotide sequences: 5′-CCACTGCTCGTAAAGACATTCC (SEQ ID NO:33), 5′-CTGGTGACACAGCTTATGCCCT (SEQ ID NO:34), 5′-CCTGGATGCAGCGAATGAA (SEQ ID NO:35) and 5′-TTGCTGGAACATGCGACTGAT (SEQ ID NO:36).

A reverse PCR primer comprises a nucleic acid selected from the group consisting of CCAAATGCGGCA (SEQ ID NO:1), CTGCAGTTCTGTGA (SEQ ID NO:2), GCAGTGACTTCGT (SEQ ID NO:3), TGAAGTACACTGG (SEQ ID NO:4), AGCCACTTCTGC (SEQ ID NO:5), TGTAGCTGTTGCA (SEQ ID NO:6), GCCACCATTACCT (SEQ ID NO:7) and GAACCAACTCAGGC (SEQ ID NO:8), ACCAATTGCAGAAGAC (SEQ ID NO:25), ATCCCCTTGGCAA (SEQ ID NO:26), AAAGCGCGTTGG (SEQ ID NO:27) and GTGTGAGGCCAT (SEQ ID NO:28) on its 5′ end, and further comprises at least about 5 to about 20 additional target-specific nucleotides on its 3′ end. Thus, there can be 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 or 20 additional target-specific nucleotides on its 3′-end. The marker-specific RT primers and marker-specific PCR primers for more than one marker can be used in a single reaction. Representative examples of reverse PCR primers that can be used according to the methods of the invention include, but are not limited to, nucleic acids identified as SEQ ID NO:9, SEQ ID NO:10, SEQ ID NO:11, SEQ ID NO:12, SEQ ID NO:13, SEQ ID NO:14, SEQ ID NO:15, SEQ ID NO:16 and the following nucleotide sequences: 5′-ACCAATTGCAGAAGACTCAGC (SEQ ID NO:31), 5′-ATCCCCTTGGCAATCTGCA (SEQ ID NO:32), 5′-AAAGCGCGTTGGCGATCT (SEQ ID NO:29) and 5′-GTGTGAGGCCATGCTTGTTTG (SEQ ID NO:30).

Examples of PCR primer pairs of the invention that can be used to detect a cancer marker, for example, CK19, CEA, PSE, β2m, mam, PIP, and/or muc1 include nucleic acids having the sequences identified as SEQ ID NO:17 and SEQ ID NO:9; SEQ ID NO:18 and SEQ ID NO:10; SEQ ID NO:19 and SEQ ID NO:11; SEQ ID NO:20 and SEQ ID NO:12; SEQ ID NO:21 and SEQ ID NO:13; SEQ ID NO:22 and SEQ ID NO:14; SEQ ID NO:23 and SEQ ID NO:15 and SEQ ID NO:24, SEQ ID NO:16 and the following pairs of nucleotide sequences F 5′-CCACTGCTCGTAAAGACATTCC (SEQ ID NO:33), R 5′-ACCAATTGCAGAAGACTCAGC (SEQ ID NO:31); F 5′-CTGGTGACACAGCTTATGCCCT (SEQ ID NO:34), R 5′-ATCCCCTTGGCAATCTGCA (SEQ ID NO:32); F 5′-CCTGGATGCAGCGAATGAA (SEQ ID NO:35), R 5′-AAAGCGCGTTGGCGATCT (SEQ ID NO:29); and F 5′-TTGCTGGAACATGCGACTGAT (SEQ ID NO:36), R 5′-GTGTGAGGCCATGCTTGTTTG (SEQ ID NO:30).

EXAMPLES

The following examples are put forth so as to provide those of ordinary skill in the art with a complete disclosure and description of how the compounds, compositions, articles, devices and/or methods claimed herein are made and evaluated, and are intended to be purely exemplary of the invention and are not intended to limit the scope of what the inventors regard as their invention. Efforts have been made to ensure accuracy with respect to numbers (e.g., amounts, temperature, etc.), but some errors and deviations should be accounted for. Unless indicated otherwise, parts are parts by weight, temperature is in ° C. or is at ambient temperature, and pressure is at or near atmospheric.

Example 1

In an effort to preserve the enhanced nature of signal detection of gene-specific priming and prevent primer-dimer formation, short primers (12-14 nucleotides in length) that corresponded to the 5′-end of the reverse primer used for PCR were designed (Table 1). The annealing temperatures for the resulting primers are 40° to 42° C., a range that allows the primers to hybridize to their specific template in the reverse transcription reaction, but not during PCR.

It was hypothesized that the use of a panel of truncated gene-specific primers during reverse transcription would be superior to the use of random hexamers, ultimately resulting in significant enhancement of gene fragment detection from PET samples containing highly degraded RNA. To test this hypothesis, RNA from 20, 40, 60, and 80 micron sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast (n=2), colon (n=1) and lung (n=1) cancer tissues was first isolated following the method of Stanta and Schneider (7) with some modifications. PET sections were deparaffinized twice with 1 ml of xylene at 37° C. for 20 min. The pellet was washed with 0.5 mL of 100% ethanol (at 4° C.) and air-dried at room temperature. The pellet was resuspended in 140 μL of pre-chilled RNA lysis/isolation buffer and 60 μL of 20 mg/mL proteinase K, and incubated at 45° C. for one hour. RNA was extracted using an equal volume of phenol:chloroform:isoamyl (125:24:1) solution (Sigma). The aqueous layer containing RNA was transferred to a new 1.5 mL tube. After adding 2 μg of glycogen and one volume of isopropanol, precipitation was performed at −80° C. for 1-2 hours. After centrifugation at 12,000 rpm for 30 minutes (4° C.), the RNA pellet was washed with 70% of ethanol and air-dried at room temperature. Finally, the pellet was dissolved in 50 μL of DEPC-water and stored at −20° C. RNA was quantified by spectrophotometry at 260 nm.

In reverse transcription reactions, CDNA was made from 5 μg of total RNA using either 150 ng of random hexamers or 500 ng of a panel of truncated gene-specific primers (breast cancer panel: β2m, mam, PIP, KS1/4, PSE, CEA; lung and colon cancer panel: β2m, CEA, CK19, muc1, lunx, KS1/4; see Table 1). RNA was reverse transcribed with 200 U of M-MLV reverse transcriptase (Promega, Madison, Wis.) in a reaction volume of 20 μL (10 min at 70° C., 50 min at 42° C., 15 min at 70° C.).

Real-time RT-PCR analyses were performed on a PE Biosystems Gene Ampg 5700 Sequence Detection System (Foster City, Calif.). The standard reaction volume was 10 μL and contained 1× QuantiTect SYBR Green PCR Master Mix (Qiagen), 0.1 U AmpErase® UNG enzyme (PE Biosystems); 0.7 μL cDNA template; and 0.25 μM of both forward and reverse primer (Table 1). The initial step of PCR was 2 min at 50° C. for AmpErase® UNG activation, followed by a 15 min hold at 95° C. Cycles (n=40) consisted of a 15 sec denaturation step at 95° C., followed by a 1 min annealing/extension step at 60° C. The final step was a 60° C. incubation for 1 min. All reactions were performed in triplicate. Real-time RT-PCR data were quantified in terms of cycle threshold (Ct) values. Ct values are inversely related to the amount of starting template; high Ct values correlate with low levels of gene expression, whereas low Ct values correlate with high levels of gene expression. The threshold for cycle of threshold (Ct) analysis was set at 0.1 relative fluorescence units. The fold difference in signal detection was calculated using the formula AEΔCt, where AE is amplification efficiency and ΔCt=Ctrandom hexamers−Ctgene-specific primers.

A representative experiment with 80 micron sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast, colon and lung cancer tissues is shown in FIG. 1. Overall, gene-specific priming for all samples analyzed (20, 40, 60 and 80 micron sections of four cancer tissues) resulted in an average of 16- (+/−5.2) fold increase compared to priming with random hexamers. On a per gene basis, the most significant increase was seen in muc1, where the gene expression signal increased on an average of 6 Ct units (66-fold). β2m, mam, PIP and KS1/4 signals increased an average of 4.4 to 5.4 Ct units (17- to 41-fold). The smallest increase was seen in PSE, CEA, and CK19 signals with an average of 3.2, 2.3 and 0.6 Ct units (9-, 5- and 1.3-fold) increase, respectively. Of note, some of the gene expression signals that were undetectable (Ct=40) using random hexamers were detected using a panel of truncated gene-specific primers. For example, CEA and KS1/4 in the paraffin-embedded lung tumor (FIG. 1C), and muc1 in colon tumor (FIG. 1D) were not detected using reverse transcription with random hexamers, while priming with a panel of truncated gene-specific primers resulted in a detectable signal. Also, muc1 in lung cancer (FIG. 1.C) and PIP in one of the breast cancer specimens (FIG. 1.B) were easily detected when a panel of truncated gene-specific primers was used, whereas priming with hexamers did not always result in signal detection. The lunx gene was not detected with either random hexamers or gene-specific primers. It was also observed that using RNA from fresh frozen tissues, a panel of truncated gene-specific primers worked as well as oligo(dT) primers but better than random hexamers (an average of 4.2 (+/−1.1) Ct units increase in signal detection).

Interestingly, in cases of frozen RNA samples where results with oligo(dT) primers were poor (suggesting RNA degradation), gene-specific priming was superior to oligo(dT) and random hexamer priming. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that truncated gene-specific primers used in reverse transcription enhance the detection of gene fragments in degraded RNA samples.

To determine whether a panel of truncated gene-specific primers is as effective as a single truncated gene-specific primer, RNA from a 80 micron section of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue was isolated and reverse transcribed in separate reactions using: either single truncated gene-specific primers (β2m, mam, pip, KS1/4, PSE, or CEA), or a panel of truncated gene-specific primers containing all six primers. A reaction without reverse transcriptase was included as a negative control. For each reverse transcription reaction, real-time PCR was performed using specific forward and reverse primers. In this experiment (FIG. 1A), it was observed that reverse transcription with a panel of truncated gene-specific primers was comparable in efficiency to reverse transcription with single truncated gene-specific primers, supporting the approach of simultaneous reverse transcription for multiple genes.

As demonstrated by quantitative real-time PCR, the signal detection from PET samples is significantly enhanced when a panel of truncated gene-specific primers is used, making this approach suitable for high throughput multi-marker molecular analysis. This modification facilitates the use of stored PET samples with known clinical outcome, opening an enormous resource for retrospective clinical studies to validate the use of diagnostic and/or prognostic genetic markers, and to define the genetic pathogenesis of different diseases.

TABLE 1
Primers for gene-specific reverse
transcription and real-time PCR
Gene Sequence of selected primer pair Reference
β32m F 5′-GCCGTGTGAACCATGTGACTTT (SEQ ID NO:17) (10)
R 5′-CCAAATGCGGCATCTTCAAA (SEQ ID NO:9)
mam F 5′-CGGATGAAACTCTGAGCAATGT (SEQ ID NO:18) (11)
R 5′-CTGCAGTTCTGTGAGCCAAAG (SEQ ID NO:10)
PIP F 5′-GCCAACAAAGCTCAGGACAAC (SEQ ID NO:19) (11)
R 5′-GCAGTGACTTCGTCATTTGGAC (SEQ ID NO:11)
KS1/4 F 5′-CGCAGCTCAGGAAGAATGTG (SEQ ID NO:20) (12)
R 5′-TGAAGTACACTGGCATTGACGA (SEQ ID NO:12)
PSE F 5′-AGTGCTCAAGGACATCGAGACG (SEQ ID NO:21) (13)
R 5′-AGCCACTTCTGCACATTGCTG (SEQ ID NO:13)
CEA F 5′-GGGCCACTGTCGCATCATGATTGG (SEQ ID NO:22) (12)
R 5′-TGTAGCTGTTGCAAATGCTTTAAGAAGAAGC (SEQ ID NO:14)
muc1 F 5′-ACCATCCTATGAGCGAGTACCC (SEQ ID NO:23) (11, 12)
R 5′-GCCACCATTACCTGCAGAAAC (SEQ ID NO:15)
lunx F 5′-CCCTGGAAGCCTGCAAATT (SEQ ID NO:24) (14, 12)
R 5′-GAACCAACTCAGGCAGGACTTT (SEQ ID NO:16)
*Truncated gene-specific primers for reverse transcription (underlined sequences) correspond to 5′-end of reverse primers designed for PCR.

Example 2

According to the methods of the present invention as taught above, RT-PCR was performed to detect markers found in esophageal cancer. Table 2 provides examples of the RT and PCR primers used.

Esophageal Cancer Analysis

TABLE 2
Primers for real-time PCR and gene-specific reverse transcription
Size of the
Gene1 Sequences of primer pairs2 Ref. Acc. # intron (s)
β2m F 5′-GCCGTGTGAACCATGTGACTTT (SEQ ID NO:17) (10) NM_004048 626 bp
R 5′-CCAAATGCGGCATCTTCAAA (SEQ ID NO:9) 1,246 bp
SBEM F 5′-CCACTGCTCGTAAAGACATTCC (SEQ ID NO:33) AF414087 1,300bp
R 5′-ACCAATTGCAGAAGACTCAGC (SEQ ID NO:31)
ErbB2 F 5′-CTGGTGACACAGCTTATGCCCT (SEQ ID NO:340 NM_004448 135
R 5′-ATCCCCTTGGCAATCTGCA (SEQ ID NO:32)
EpCam F 5′-CGCAGCTCAGGAAGAATGTG (SEQ ID NO:20) (12) NM_002354 3,879 bp
R 5′-TGAAGTACACTGGCATTGACGA (SEQ ID NO:12)
PDEF F 5′-AGTGCTCAAGGACATCGAGACG (SEQ ID NO:21) (13) NM_012391 2,835 bp
R 5′-AGCCACTTCTGCACATTGCTG (SEQ ID NO:13)
CEA F 5′-GGGCCACTGTCGCATCATGATTGG (SEQ ID NO:22) (12) NM_004363 1,831 bp
R 5′-TGTAGCTGTTGCAAATGCTTTAAGAAGAAGC (SEQ ID NO:14)
HoxC6 F 5′-CCTGGATGCAGCGAATGAA (SEQ ID NO:35) NM_004503 732 bp
R 5′-AAAGCGCGTTGGCGATCT (SEQ ID NO:29)
POTE F 5′-TTGCTGGAACATGCGACTGAT (SEQ ID NO:36) NM_174981 1,300 bp
R 5′-GTGTGAGGCCATGCTTGTTTG (SEQ ID NO:30)
1β2m, β2-microglobin; mam, mammaglobin; PIP; prolactin-inducible protein; KS1/4, epithelial cell adhesion molecule; PSE, prostate-specific Ets factor; CEA, carcinoembryonic antigen; muc1, mucin 1; CK19, cytokeratin 19; lunx, lung and nasal epithelium carcinoma associated gene.
2Truncated gene-specific primers for reverse transcription (underlined sequences) correspond to 5′-end of reverse primers designed for PCR.

Example 3 Lunx is a Superior Molecular Marker for Detection of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Peripheral Blood

In this example, a novel strategy was used to enrich tumor cells from the peripheral blood of 24 Stage I-IV NSCLC patients and determined expression levels for six cancer-associated genes (lunx, muc1, KS1/4, CEA, CK19, and PSE). Using thresholds established at three standard deviations above the mean observed in 15 normal controls, it was observed that lutzx (10/24, 42%), muc1 (5/24, 21%), and CK19 (5/24, 21%) were overexpressed in 14/24 (58%) peripheral blood samples obtained from NSCLC patients. Patients that overexpressed either KS1/4 (n=2) or PSE (n=1) also overexpressed either lunx or muc1. In patients with presumed curable and resectable Stage I-II disease (n=7), at least one marker was overexpressed in 3 (43%) patients. In advanced Stage III-IV patients (n=17), at least one marker was overexpressed in 11 patients (65%). These results provide evidence that circulating tumor cells can be detected in NSCLC patients by a high throughput molecular technique. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical relevance of gene overexpression.

Oligonucleotides. All primers were designed according to the method taught herein. In addition to having the appropriate target specificity and melting temperature, they also spanned at least one intron, and failed to amplify negative control cDNA in which reverse transcriptase enzyme was omitted. Sequences of the internal control β2-microglobin PCR primers were: 5′ GCCGTGTGAACCATGTGA (SEQ ID NO:37) (forward) and 5′ CCAAATGCGGCATCTTCA (SEQ ID NO:38)(reverse). Other sequences (previously described (15) were: lunx, CCCTGGAAGCCTGCAAATT (F) (SEQ ID NO:24) GAACCAACTCAGGCAGGACTTT (R); KS1/4(SEQ ID NO:16), CGCAGCTCAGGAAGAATGTG (F) (SEQ ID NO:20), TGAAGTACACTGGCATTGACGA (R); CK19 (SEQ ID NO:12), CATGAAAGCTGCCTTGGAAGA (F) (SEQ ID NO:39), TGATTCTGCCGCTCACTATCAG (R); CEA (SEQ ID NO:40), GGGCCACTGTCGCATCATGATTGG (F) (SEQ ID NO:22), TGTAGCTGTTGCAAATGCTTTAAGAAAGAAGC (R); PSE (SEQ ID NO:41), AGTGCTCAAGGACATCGAGACG (F) (SEQ ID NO:21), AGCCACTTCTGCACATTGCTG (R) (SEQ ID NO:13).

Synthetic lunx fragment for gene copy determination: ccctggaagcctgcaaattucucugcuugauggacuuggccccuccccauucaaggucuucuggacagccucacagggau cuugaauaaagtcctgcctgagttggttc (SEQ ID NO:42).

Peripheral Blood Specimens. Peripheral blood specimens (10-20mL) were collected using K3 EDTA tubes (Vacutainer®) and immediately placed on ice. Samples were then processed using a porous barrier density gradient centrifugation media (OncoQuick®, Hexa1 Gentech, Holzkirchen, Germany) per manufacturer instructions. Briefly, Pre-cooled 50 mL centrifugation tubes containing 15 mL of separation medium below a porous barrier were filled with peripheral blood and centrifuged at 1600g for 20 min. The entire volume of the upper compartment was then collected and washed for 10 min at 200 g. Cells were pelleted and evaluated as described below.

RNA isolation and gene-specific cDNA synthesis. Total cellular RNA was isolated from pelleted cells using a guanidinum thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform solution (RNA STAT-60™; TEL-TEST, Friendswood, Tex.). Briefly, pelleted cells recovered from peripheral blood specimens were resuspended in 1 ml of RNA STAT-60™. Total RNA was isolated as per manufacturer's instructions with the exception that 1 μl of a 50 mg/ml solution of glycogen (Sigma, St. Louis, Mo.) was added to the aqueous phase prior to addition of isopropanol. Final RNA pellet was dissolved in 50 μl of 1× RNA secure buffer (Ambion, Austin, Tex.). RNA was quantified by UV absorbance at 260 nm. Complementary DNA (cDNA) was made from 5 ng of total RNA using 200 U of M-MLV reverse transcriptase (Promega, Madison, Wis.) and the following gene-specific RT primers (70 ng each): CCAAATGCGGCAT (β2-microglobin) (SEQ ID NO:9), TGAAGTACACTGG (KS1/4) (SEQ ID NO:4), GAACCAACTCAGGC (lunx) (SEQ ID NO:8), GCCACCATTACCT (muc1) (SEQ ID NO:7), TGATTCTGCCGC (CK19) (SEQ ID NO:43), GTTCCCATCAATCAG (CEA) (SEQ ID NO:44), AGCCACTTCTGC (PSE) (SEQ ID NO:5). Final reaction volume was 20 □l. The annealing temperature was in accordance with standard RT conditions, i.e., approximately 40-42° C.

Real-time RT-PCR. Real-time. RT-PCR was performed on a PE Biosystems Gene Amp® 5700 Sequence Detection System (Foster City, Calif.). All reaction components were purchased from PE Biosystems. Standard reaction volume was 10 μl and contained 1× SYBR Green PCR Buffer, 3.5 mM MgCl2, 0.2 mM each of dATP, dCTP, dGTP, and 0.4 mM of dUTP, 0.25U AmpliTaq Gold®, 0.1U AmpErase® UNG enzyme, 0.7 μl cDNA template, and 0.25 mM of forward and reverse primer. Initial step of RT-PCR was 2 min at 50° C. for AmpErase® UNG activation, followed by a 10-min hold at 95° C. Cycles (n=40 first round) consisted of a 15 sec melt at 95° C., followed by a 1 min annealing/extension at 60° C. The final step was a 60° C. incubation for 1 min. All reactions were performed in triplicate and a negative control lacking cDNA was included. For a blood sample to be considered evaluable, a cutoff value was set for the β2-microglobin internal control gene at ≦25 (corresponding to approximately 2×104 gene copies).

Reliable Detection of 20 lunx Gene Copies by Real-time PCR.

To determine whether a single round of real-time RT-PCR could be used for the sensitive detection of NSCLC, studies were first performed on a synthetic fragment encoding a portion of lunx, a gene previously shown to be expressed in metastatic lymph nodes of NSCLC patients (15). Ct values for various fragment dilutions were obtained and plotted as a function of initial fragment copy number. FIG. 2 demonstrates a strong linear relationship between the Ct value and the log of fragment copy number (R2=0.9981). Reliable fluorescent signals were obtained for reactions containing as few as 20 gene copies (FIG. 2; log value=1.4). In contrast, reliable fluorescent signals were not obtained for samples that contained only 2 gene copies, regardless of the fluorescent threshold setting used for real-time measurements. These data provide evidence that a single round (as opposed to two) of real-time PCR reliably amplifies ≧20 gene copies, a result amenable to detection of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood.

Detection of lunx Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood of NSCLC Patients.

To assess the ability of real-time RT-PCR to detect circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of NSCLC patients, samples from 15 healthy volunteers and 24 patients with Stage I-IV NSCLC were obtained. Tumor cells were first enriched from peripheral blood by a newly developed porous barrier density gradient (PBDG) centrifugation system (20). The depletion of mononuclear cells in the enriched cell fraction after PBDG centrifugation is approximately 300- to >500-fold (20, 22). Mean tumor cell recovery rates for PBDG are comparable to that achieved by ficoll purification (20, 22). Previous studies in the breast cancer setting have shown that the upper limit of detection using real-time RT-PCR is one cancer cell among 5×108 peripheral blood cells (22).

Using a single round of real-time PCR (40 cycles), expression levels were determined for five genes associated with NSCLC: lunx, KS1/4, muc1, CK19, and CEA (15), as well as one gene (PSE) associated with prostate (23) and breast cancer (24, 25). Mean expression levels of the cancer-associated genes were normalized to β2-microglobin using Q-gene software (26). In the normal control peripheral blood samples, expression of the lunx gene was not detectable (FIG. 3). For other genes, expression was detected in a limited number of patients: muc1 and CK19 (four samples), CEA and PSE (3 samples), and KS1/4 (2 samples) (FIG. 3). Based on data obtained from the normal control population, threshold values were set for marker positivity at three standard deviations beyond the mean normalized expression values of each respective gene (FIG. 3; horizontal lines). Assuming a normal distribution of the control peripheral blood samples, three standard deviations correspond to a test specificity level of 99.9%. In the control patient group, no gene was overexpressed above threshold levels.

In the peripheral blood samples derived from NSCLC patients (n=24), 14/24 (58%) overexpressed at least one marker gene (FIG. 3, Table 3). The gene most highly overexpressed was lunx (10/24 samples (42%)). muc1 and CK19 were each overexpressed in 5/20 (21%) of patients, three of whom overexpressed both markers. Overexpression of KS1/4 and PSE was observed in 2 and 1 patients, respectively, all of whom overexpressed either lunx or muc1 (Table 1). In patients with presumed curable and resectable Stage I-II disease (n=7), lunx was overexpressed in 2 (29%) blood samples.

Conclusion.

The ability to detect nucleic acid fragments by PCR is directly proportional to gene copy number, fragment amplification efficiency, and detection threshold, and inversely proportional to the formation of primer dimers. Due to their extremely low concentration (and hence, gene copy numbers), the molecular detection of cancer cells in peripheral blood has proven challenging compared to other unpreserved tissues such as lymph node. In this study, evidence was provided that the use of real-time PCR and SYBR Green I chemistry allows for reproducible detection of 20 copies of an artificial lunx sequence by PCR cycle number 36 (FIG. 2). These results provide evidence that a single round of real-time RT-PCR is sufficient for detection of genes present in low abundance.

Using a single round of real-time PCR, the peripheral blood of NSCLC patients was analyzed for expression of five genes associated with NSCLC: lunx, KS1/4, muc1, CK19, and CEA (15). With respect to normal control samples, overexpression of at least one gene was observed in 14/24 (58%) NSCLC patients. Of Stage I-III patients (n=7), 3 (43%) were positive for at least one marker, while 11/17 (65%) Stage III-V patients were marker positive. Ten NSCLC blood samples were positive for lunx, providing evidence that this marker was the most sensitive for detection of circulating NSCLC cells.

The results described in this paper provide evidence that lunx was the most sensitive marker for detection of circulating NSCLC cells.

TABLE 3
Detection of Gene Overexpression in NSCLC Patients
Patient
Information Real-time RT-PCR Results1
Pt # Stage Age LUNX MUC1 CK19 KS1/4 PSE CEA
 1 IA 78
 2 IA 67 1 1
 3 IB 57
 4 IB 52
 5 IB 75 1
 6 IIB 75
 7 IIB 41 1 1
 8 III 55
 9 III 67
10 IIIA 64
11 IIIA 71
12 IIIB 59 1
13 IIIB 63 1
14 IIIB 54 1 1 1
15 IIIB 54 1
16 IIIB 67 1
17 IV 66
18 IV 62 1
19 IV 62
20 IV 74 1
21 IV 46 1
22 IV 77 1 1
23 IV 67 1 1 1
24 IV 52 1 1 1
Total: 10  5 5 2 1 0
1No overexpression of the respective gene is indicated by “—”; overexpression is indicated by “1”.

Throughout this application, various publications are referenced. The disclosures of these publications in their entireties are hereby incorporated by reference into this application in order to more fully describe the state of the art to which this invention pertains.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and variations can be made in the present invention without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention. Other embodiments of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from consideration of the specification and practice of the invention disclosed herein. It is intended that the specification and examples be considered as exemplary only, with a true scope and spirit of the invention being indicated by the following claims.

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WO2014003580A1 *28 Jun 20133 Ene 2014Caldera Health LtdTargeted rna-seq methods and materials for the diagnosis of prostate cancer
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Clasificación de EE.UU.435/6.16, 536/24.33, 435/91.2
Clasificación internacionalC12P19/34, C07H21/04, C12Q1/68
Clasificación cooperativaC12Q2600/158, C12Q1/6886
Clasificación europeaC12Q1/68M6B
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