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Número de publicaciónUS20090192503 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 12/357,564
Fecha de publicación30 Jul 2009
Fecha de presentación22 Ene 2009
Fecha de prioridad24 Ene 2008
También publicado comoCN101951851A, CN101951851B, EP2237732A2, EP2237732A4, US8771263, US8936593, US20120016354, US20140031803, WO2009093230A2, WO2009093230A3
Número de publicación12357564, 357564, US 2009/0192503 A1, US 2009/192503 A1, US 20090192503 A1, US 20090192503A1, US 2009192503 A1, US 2009192503A1, US-A1-20090192503, US-A1-2009192503, US2009/0192503A1, US2009/192503A1, US20090192503 A1, US20090192503A1, US2009192503 A1, US2009192503A1
InventoresHaim Epshtein, Boris Vaynberg
Cesionario originalHaim Epshtein, Boris Vaynberg
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Device, apparatus, and method of adipose tissue treatment
US 20090192503 A1
Resumen
An improved procedure for performing liposuction is obtained by utilizing a needle that includes a laser source conductor with one end of the needle being configured for insertion into a target adipose skin volume and the other end being coupled to a laser source. The needle may include one or more channels for extracting the treated adipose area. A vacuum source can be used in the extraction of the treated adipose. Further, the first end of the needle may include a cap or end-piece that reduces the build up of carbon deposits. A temperature sensor may be used as input to adjust the laser power and prevent over exposure.
Imágenes(6)
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Reclamaciones(38)
1. A disposable needle for adipose tissue laser treatment, said needle comprising a light conducting body having a first end and a second end, the first end being configured for introduction into adipose tissue and the second end adapted to connect at least to a source of laser radiation.
2. The disposable needle according to claim 1, wherein the needle has a cylindrical, elliptical, or polygonal shape.
3. The disposable needle according to claim 1, wherein the first end of the needle is terminated by one of a group of terminations, a plane perpendicular to the optical axis, a plane at an angle to the optical axis, or a radius.
4. The disposable needle according to claim 1, wherein a material resisting carbonization terminates the first end of the needle.
5. The disposable needle according to claim 1, wherein a connector terminates the second end of the needle.
6. The disposable needle according to claim 5, wherein the connector is one of a group of connectors comprising a fiber optics connector or a combination of a fiber optics connector with a liquid conducting channel.
7. The disposable needle according to claim 1, wherein the second end of the needle connects to a source of laser radiation by a direct connection.
8. The disposable needle according to claim 1, wherein the second end of the needle connects to a source of laser radiation by via a fiber optics cable.
9. The disposable needle according to claim 1, wherein the light conducting body further comprises:
a laser radiation conducting guide; and
a protective jacket, said jacket including one or more fluid conducting structures.
10. The disposable needle according to claim 9, wherein said laser radiation conducting guide is solid.
11. The disposable needle according to claim 9, wherein said laser radiation conducting guide is hollow.
12. The disposable needle according to claim 9, wherein said jacket is connected to a facility for adipose tissue laser treatment products removal.
13. The disposable needle according to claim 9, further comprising a temperature sensor located over the treated tissue volume and configured to follow the first end of the needle and measure the temperature of the surface of the tissue over the affected tissue volume.
14. The disposable needle according to claim 9, wherein the temperature sensor is one of a group of contact sensors or non-contact sensors.
15. The disposable needle according to claim 9, wherein the temperature sensor provides the temperature reading to a controller, that controls the laser power coupled to the treated skin volume.
16. The disposable needle according to claim 9, wherein said laser radiation conducting guide is solid.
17. The disposable needle according to claim 9, wherein said laser radiation conducting guide is hollow.
18. The disposable needle according to claim 1, further comprising a temperature sensor located over the treated tissue volume and configured to follow the first end of the needle and measure the temperature of the surface of the tissue over the affected tissue volume.
19. The disposable needle according to claim 1, wherein the temperature sensor is one of a group of contact sensors or non-contact sensors.
20. The disposable needle according to claim 1, wherein the temperature sensor provides the temperature reading to a controller, that controls the laser power coupled to the treated skin volume.
21. An apparatus for adipose tissue laser treatment, said apparatus comprising:
a disposable needle including:
a light conducting body having a first end configured for introduction into adipose tissue and a second end adapted to at least connect to a source of laser radiation; and
one or more fluid conducting channels;
a controller including:
a facility for adipose tissue laser treatment products removal;
one or more laser power supplies; and
a feedback processing facility configured to read a temperature sensor and adapt laser power such as to provide safe tissue treatment.
22. The apparatus according to claim 21, wherein said facility for adipose tissue laser treatment products removal is a pump.
23. The apparatus according to claim 21, wherein said source of laser radiation operates in one of a group of modes including a pulse mode or continuous radiation mode.
24. The apparatus according to claim 21, wherein said needle is configured to connect to the source of laser radiation in a connection method selected from a group of connection methods including a direct connection or a connection through a fiber optics cable.
25. The apparatus according to claim 21, further comprising a controller providing a user interface and synchronizing operation of said source of laser radiation and the facility for adipose tissue laser treatment products removal.
26. The apparatus according to claim 21, further comprising a temperature sensor configured to follow the first end of the needle and measure the temperature of the tissue surface over the treated tissue volume.
27. The disposable needle according to claim 21, wherein the temperature sensor is one of a group of sensors comprising a contact sensor or a non-contact sensors.
28. The disposable needle according to claim 21, wherein the temperature sensor provides the temperature reading to a controller controlling the laser power coupled to the treated tissue volume.
29. A method for adipose tissue laser treatment, said method comprising:
introducing into a target volume of adipose tissue a needle comprising a light conducting body having a first end being configured for introduction into adipose tissue and a second end, adapted to connect at least to a source of laser radiation; and
operating at least one laser source connected to said second end of said needle to irradiate said target volume of the adipose tissue and melt said tissue.
30. The method according to claim 28, wherein at least two laser sources are utilized and wherein at least one laser source operates in a continuous operation mode and at least one laser source operates in a pulse operation mode.
31. The method according to claim 29, wherein the laser operating in the continuous operation mode (CW) heats up the adipose tissue and the laser source operating in the pulse mode induces mechanical stress on the adipose tissue.
32. The method according to claim 29, wherein both laser sources affect the adipose tissue at the location being irradiated.
33. The method according to claim 29, further comprising monitoring the temperature of the target volume of the adipose tissue and adjust the at least one laser source to avoid excessive damage to the target volume of adipose tissue.
34. The method according to claim 29, further comprising operating simultaneously with one or more laser sources, a facility for adipose tissue laser treatment products removal.
35. A method for adipose tissue laser treatment, said method comprising:
introducing a needle into a target volume of adipose tissue, the needle comprising a light conducting body having a first end configured for introduction into adipose tissue and a second end adapted to connect at least to a source of laser radiation; and
operating a first laser source to heat-up said target volume of the adipose tissue and a second laser source to induce mechanical stress on adipose tissue.
36. The method according to claim 35, wherein the first laser source operates in a continuous mode and the second laser source operates in a pulse mode.
37. The method according to claim 35, wherein said laser source operating in the continuous mode and the laser source operating in pulse mode operate substantially simultaneously.
38. A method of use of the needle of claim 1, said method comprising:
connecting said needle to at least one source of laser radiation and operating the source of laser radiation;
introducing the needle into a target volume of adipose tissue;
supplying laser radiation of sufficient power to convert at least a volume of the adipose tissue into a liquid; and
disposing of the needle upon completion of the treatment.
Descripción
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a non-provisional application being filed under 37 CFR 1.53(b) and 35 USC 111, claiming the benefit of the priority date of the United States Provisional Application for patent that was filed on Jan. 24, 2008 and assigned Ser. No. 61/023,194 which application is hereby incorporated by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    The present device, apparatus, and method relate to the field of adipose tissue treatment and aesthetic body sculpturing.
  • [0003]
    Liposuction is a technique for removal of fat tissue from different sites in a particular human body. The process changes the external contours of the body and sometimes is described as body sculpturing. The fat is removed by a suction device via a cannula, or a small flexible tube inserted into a body cavity for draining off fluid or introducing medication, inserted into the appropriate site in the body. The process is painful and sometimes causes excessive bleeding.
  • [0004]
    Recently, liposuction procedures have been improved by the use of infrared laser radiation delivered through a fiber inserted into a cannula and introduced into the treated tissue site. Laser radiation liquefies the adipose tissue. The liquefied tissue is then removed by suction or may be left in the body, where it gradually dissipates. Laser assisted liposuction is considered to be a more advanced and minimally invasive procedure when compared to traditional liposuction techniques.
  • [0005]
    High temperature developed at the tip of the fiber causes frequent fiber tip carbonization, forcing the treatment provider to remove the fiber, clean the carbonized end or cleave the end and insert it back into the cannula for continued treatment. The cannula with the fiber also has to be removed for liquefied tissue suction performed through the same skin port. The fiber and the cannula have to be sterilized between the different processes and patients. Alternatively, a new sterile fiber and cannula would have to be used. All of the above restrictions have the effect of slowing down the process, increasing the treated subject discomfort and increasing the cost of the treatment.
  • [0006]
    Thus, there is a need in the art and the related industries for a suitable solution to these and other existing problems.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • [0007]
    A variety of embodiments may be provided to achieve an improved technique to conduct liposuction of a target adipose tissue volume. For instance, one embodiment includes a needle with an inner core for conducting laser energy, with one end being configured for insertion into the target volume and the other end being coupleable to a laser source. The needle is inserted into the target volume of adipose tissue and at least one laser source connected to needle irradiates the target volume of the adipose tissue and melts the tissue. In some embodiments, two or more laser sources may be utilized with at least one laser source operating in a continuous operation mode and at least one laser source operating in a pulse operation mode. In such an embodiment, the laser operating in the continuous operation mode (CW) heats up the adipose tissue and the laser source operating in the pulse mode induces mechanical stress on the adipose tissue.
  • [0008]
    In some embodiments, a temperature probe may be utilized to monitor the temperature of the target volume of the adipose tissue and provide feedback to the laser source. Advantageously, this aspect results in allowing the at least one laser source to be adjusted avoid excessive damage to the target volume of adipose tissue.
  • [0009]
    These and other embodiments will be more fully appreciated by reviewing the detailed description and the related figures.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING
  • [0010]
    The disclosure is provided by way of non-limiting examples only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • [0011]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of the first exemplary embodiment of a disposable laser radiation conveying needle.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 2 is a schematic illustration of a cross section of the needle of FIG. 1.
  • [0013]
    FIGS. 3A and 3B are schematic illustrations of additional exemplary needle cross sections.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic illustration of the second exemplary embodiment of a disposable laser radiation conveying needle with a carbonization resisting tip.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration of an exemplary embodiment of the apparatus for laser assisted liposuction employing the present needle.
  • [0016]
    FIGS. 6A-6C are schematic illustrations of the third exemplary embodiment of a disposable laser radiation conveying needle with liquefied fat removal channels.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 7 is a schematic illustration of an apparatus and method of tissue treatment employing the present disposable laser radiation conveying needle.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 8 is a schematic illustration of the forth exemplary embodiment of a disposable laser radiation conveying needle.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 9 is a schematic illustration of an additional exemplary embodiment of an apparatus for laser assisted liposuction employing the present needle.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION
  • [0020]
    The principles and execution of the device, apparatus, and method described herein may be understood with reference to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals denote like elements through the several views and the accompanying description of non-limiting, exemplary embodiments.
  • [0021]
    The term “needle,” as used in the text of the present disclosure, means a flexible or rigid light guide configured to be inserted into the subject tissue to deliver laser radiation to a target volume of adipose tissue. In certain embodiments, the needle can be configured to withdraw liquid from the target volume in addition to the above stated uses.
  • [0022]
    The term adipose is known to those skilled in the art, and one non-limiting definition, provided for convenience only includes fatty skin tissue, or skin tissue consisting of, resembling, or relating to fat. Adipose tissue is a type of connective tissue consisting of adipose cells, which are specialized to produce and store large fat globules. These globules are composed mainly of glycerol esters of oleic, palmitic, and stearic acids.
  • [0023]
    Reference is made to FIG. 1, which is a schematic illustration of the first exemplary embodiment of a disposable laser radiation conveying needle. Needle 100 is practically a needle shaped solid or hollow light conducting body 104 having a first end 108 and a second end 112 (In the context of the present disclosure “light” and “laser radiation” have the same meaning.). The first end 108 of needle 100 can be shaped for piercing and penetrating the skin of a subject (not shown) and the second end 112 of the needle 100, depending on the length of the needle 100, is adapted to connect directly to a source of laser radiation by means of fiber optics type connector 116 or with the help of an additional interim cable. The length of needle 100 may vary from a few millimeters to a few hundred millimeters and depends on the type of treatment required or being performed. The connection to the source of laser radiation may be performed by any type of fiber optics or similar type connectors. Line 118 designates the optical axis of needle 100.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 2 is a cross section view of needle 100 taken at line I-I of FIG. 1, and is shown to have a round cross section. Needle 100 includes a solid light conducting core 120, a cladding 124 having a refractive index lower than core 120, and a protective jacket 128 that protects the sensitive fiber and provides the necessary stiffness to the needle 100. In some embodiments, as best shown in FIGS. 3B and 3C, a jacket 132 may have an elliptical shape (FIG. 3B) or the jacket 136 may have a polygonal (FIG. 3C) cross section. The diameter of core 120 can vary but operable embodiments may be 100 micron to 1500 micron, in some embodiments the diameter of cladding 124 may range from 200 micron to 2500 micron and the size of jacket 128, 132, and 136 may be 500 micron to 3000 micron or even more. Connection of needle body 104 to connector 116 may be performed by crimping, epoxy glue, or any other well known means that is established in the fiber optics industry.
  • [0025]
    First end 108 of needle 100 may be shaped for piercing the skin of a subject and may be terminated by a plane perpendicular to the optical axis 118 or oriented at an angle to the optical axis 118 of needle 100. Alternatively, end 108 may have a radius or an obtuse angle. In such case, a skin incision is made by any well known surgical means and the needle is introduced into the tissue through the skin incision. Other needle end 108 shapes that improve either skin penetration properties or laser power delivery quality are also possible and anticipated by various embodiments.
  • [0026]
    In an alternative embodiment, laser radiation emitted through the end of needle 100, assists needle 100 into the skin penetration process by providing a skin incision suitable for continuous or pulsed laser power. Such laser-performed incision may be advantageous in some aspects because it is accompanied by a simultaneous haemostatic effect, which coagulates the blood, reduces patient bleeding and shortens the recovery period.
  • [0027]
    In a second exemplary embodiment of a disposable laser radiation conveying needle shown in FIG. 4, the first end 108 of needle 100 is terminated by a sapphire, YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnett), or diamond plate 140, or coating. During use, certain materials resulting from interaction of the tissue with high laser power, deposit on end 108 of needle 100. These carbonized deposits increase laser light absorption at the end 108 of needle 100 and this deposit should be periodically removed. Strong laser power absorption in carbonized deposit can increase local temperature at the end 108 resulting in needle damage. Sapphire, YAG, and diamond or other similar material are generally resistant to high temperature and their use as a termination of the first end 108 of needle 100 significantly improves needle life, and its carbonization resistance.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration of an exemplary embodiment of an apparatus for laser assisted liposuction employing the illustrated embodiments, or other embodiments of the needle. Connector 116 connects needle 100 via an optical cable 156 to a source of laser radiation 160 configured to provide laser radiation emitted by one or more lasers incorporated in the source 160 to needle 100. Laser radiation source 160 may be packaged into a controller 164, or may be a stand alone unit. In some embodiments, needle 100 may be made long enough to connect directly to the source of laser radiation 160. In such cases, optical cable 156 may become redundant. Controller 164 may operate the source of laser radiation 160 in a pulse, continuous or other radiation mode.
  • [0029]
    Controller 164 may further include a facility 168 for adipose tissue laser treatment products removal and a display 172, and/or a set of buttons providing a user interface and synchronizing operation of said source of laser radiation 160 with facility 168. Controller 164 further includes a temperature feedback loop 176 configured to receive temperature from a temperature sensor (see FIG. 8) and adapt laser power such as to provide safe tissue treatment. When laser radiation of proper power and wavelength is applied to adipose tissue, it liquefies the tissue and, in particular, the fat. The liquefied adipose tissue may be removed or may be left in the body, where it gradually dissipates through the body. FIGS. 6A-C, collectively referred to as FIG. 6 is a schematic illustration of the third exemplary embodiment of a disposable laser radiation conveying needle with liquefied fat removal channels. FIG. 6A is a cross section of a disposable needle 600. Needle 600 has a type of jacket 180 implemented as a structure containing a number of liquid conducting channels 184. Jacket 180 may be connected to facility 168, which may be a stand-alone facility or incorporated into controller 164 facility for liquefied fat and other adipose tissue laser treatment products removal. Needle 600 includes a solid light conducting core 620, a cladding 624 having a refractive index lower than core 620. A suction or vacuum provided by a pump (not shown) that is a part of facility 168 removes the liquefied tissue. Optical cable 156 (FIG. 5) may be implemented to have liquid conducting channels 184 in addition to optical fiber or a liquid collecting chamber communicating with a separate liquid conducting channel included in cable 156.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 6B illustrates a flexible or rigid needle 186 having a hollow light guide 188. The open end of guide 188, which is introduced into the adipose tissue, is terminated by a sapphire, diamond, or YAG window 190. Similar to needle 600 of FIG. 6A, needle 186 has channels 184 for liquefied fat and other adipose tissue laser treatment products removal.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 6C is an illustration of a needle 202 the body 204 of which is made of sapphire. Such needle is more resistant than plastic or glass needles to deposition on it of carbonized laser treatment products. Needle 202 may have a jacket (not shown) with liquid conducting channels. Alternatively, the jacket may be made of porous material with a suitable degree of porosity.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 7 is a schematic illustration of the method of tissue treatment with the apparatus of various embodiments presented in the present disclosure, as well as embodiments not presented. For adipose tissue 210 treatment, needle 100, or any other needle described above or other needle embodiments incorporating one or more of the above-described elements, is connected by its second end 112 to a source of laser radiation 160 located in controller 164. First end 108 of needle 100 pierces the subject skin or tissue 210 and enables insertion of needle 100 into a target volume 218 of adipose tissue 210 to be treated. Controller 164 operates laser source 160 to irradiate target volume 218 of adipose tissue 210. Radiation provided by one or more laser sources 160 liquefies at least a section of adipose tissue 210 adjacent to the first end 108 of needle 100. Controller 164 operates adipose tissue laser treatment products removal facility 168 that removes liquefied fat simultaneously with laser source 160.
  • [0033]
    In order to facilitate the process of tissue melting location observation an additional, second laser, visible through skin/tissue laser, such as a HeNe laser may be coupled to the needle or cable 156. This second laser, which is visible through skin, may assist the treatment provider in repositioning first end 108 of needle 100. In an alternative embodiment, a temperature sensitive cream, or a temperature sensitive liquid crystal paste, or a liquid crystal film may be spread on the tissue over the treated adipose tissue section. The paste/cream and the film may be such as Chromazone ink commercially available from Liquid Crystal Resources/Hallcrest, Inc. Glenview Ill. 60026 U.S.A. Needle 100 may be disposed of upon completion of treatment.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 8 is a schematic illustration of a forth exemplary embodiment of a disposable laser radiation conveying needle. Needle 230 is similar to any one of earlier described needles or may incorporate one or more of the afore-described aspects. It connects to a handle 240 which, with the help of optical cable 244, connects to controller 164. A temperature sensor 248 is mounted on a cantilever 252 configured to follow the first end 256 of needle 230 and measure the temperature of the tissue surface 262. Sensor 248 measures the temperature on the surface of the skin/tissue, and indicates or cuts-off the laser power when the treatment should be discontinued to avoid damage to the tissue surface 262. Temperature sensor 248 may be a contact sensor, being in contact with skin 262 or a non-contact sensor. During the treatment, the treatment provider moves handle 240 back and forth, as shown by arrow 242 within tissue 264. Temperature sensor 248 follows laser radiation emitting first end 256 of needle 230 and provides tissue/skin 262 temperature reading to controller 164 controlling the laser power coupled to the treated tissue volume 260. A feedback loop 176 of controller 164 is configured to read the temperature sensor and adapt laser power such as to provide safe tissue treatment. Cantilever 252 with temperature sensor 248 attached to it may be implemented as a part of handle 240 or as a removable and disposable or reusable part.
  • [0035]
    As disclosed above, source of laser radiation 160 may contain one or more laser sources operating at the same or different wavelengths. Accordingly, in an additional embodiment, laser beams from two laser sources with different wavelengths could be used to optimize simultaneous adipose tissue (or fat) destruction and blood hemostatis. The laser wavelengths may be, for example, 1,064 micrometer wavelength provided by a NdYAG laser and a 0.9 micrometer wavelength provided by a laser diode. Another suitable set of wavelengths is 1,064 micron and 0.532 micron. Such combination of laser wavelengths reduces bleeding, makes the fat removal procedure safer and shortens the patient recovery time.
  • [0036]
    In yet a further embodiment, two lasers guided through the same needle may operate each in different modes of operation. For example, a continuous wave (CW) laser with wavelength of 0.808 micron, 0.980 micron or about 1,500 micron may be delivered to target volume 218 (FIG. 7) of adipose tissue to preheat the volume to a desired temperature and liquefy the adipose tissue (fat).
  • [0037]
    Following this or almost simultaneously with a CW operating laser that heats-up the tissue, a pulsed IR laser, for example an Ho-(Holmium), Tm-(Thulium) or Er:Yag (Erbium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) laser generating pulses in sub-millisecond or millisecond range may be applied to the same target tissue volume 218. During the course of the laser pulse, the target tissue (cells and intercellular fluid) near the end 108 of needle 100 changes to overheated (high-pressure) gas forming expanding micro bubbles collapsing at the end of the pulse. Mechanical stress developed by the pulsed laser action can increase the rate of membrane of adipose cells disruption and release of liquefied fat from the cell. This opto-mechanical action of laser radiation makes fat removal/suction more efficient.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 9 is a schematic illustration of an additional embodiment of an apparatus for laser assisted liposuction employing one of the afore-described needles or other needle embodiments including one or more of the afore-described aspects or elements. Fiber optics type connector 116 (FIGS. 1, 4, and 5) may be implemented as a T-type connector 236 where fluid/liquid conducting channels 184 (FIG. 6A) connect directly to laser treatment products removal facility 168 via a tube 274. This element simplifies cable 156 structure so that the cable 156 contains a light guide only.
  • [0039]
    The apparatus disclosed above may also be used for skin tightening. The needle is inserted subcutaneously into a treatment recipient so that the first end of the fiber is introduced within the tissue underlying the dermis. Laser source emits radiation of suitable power that is conveyed by the needle to the dermis, where the radiation causes collagen destruction and shrinkage within the treatment area.
  • [0040]
    Advantageously, the described embodiments of disposable needles enable continuous adipose tissue treatment process eliminates, or at least provides great attenuation in, the need for frequent needle removal, cleaning, and cleaving. Further, this advantageously significantly reduces the treatment time, makes the subject treatment more comfortable and simplifies the treatment process.
  • [0041]
    While the exemplary embodiments of the disposable needle and the method of using it have been illustrated and described, it will be appreciated that various changes can be made therein without affecting the spirit and scope of the needle and the method of using it. The scope of the needle and the method of using it, therefore, are defined by reference to the following claims presented herein.
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.606/15, 604/542
Clasificación internacionalA61B18/20, A61M1/00
Clasificación cooperativaA61B2017/00154, A61M1/008, A61B2018/2065, A61M2202/08, A61B2017/00141, A61B18/24, A61B2018/00464, A61B18/201
Clasificación europeaA61B18/24
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
6 Abr 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: SYNERON MEDICAL LTD, ISRAEL
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:EPSHTEIN, HAIM;VAYNBERG, BORIS;REEL/FRAME:022508/0529;SIGNING DATES FROM 20090102 TO 20090126
Owner name: SYNERON MEDICAL LTD, ISRAEL
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:EPSHTEIN, HAIM;VAYNBERG, BORIS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20090102 TO 20090126;REEL/FRAME:022508/0529
20 Sep 2017ASAssignment
Owner name: ING CAPITAL LLC, AS COLLATERAL AGENT, NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:SYNERON MEDICAL LTD.;CANDELA CORPORATION;PRIMAEVA CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:043925/0001
Effective date: 20170920