Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS20090255806 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 12/488,062
Fecha de publicación15 Oct 2009
Fecha de presentación19 Jun 2009
Fecha de prioridad1 Sep 2004
También publicado comoUS7566391, US8603319, US20060042956, US20130102154
Número de publicación12488062, 488062, US 2009/0255806 A1, US 2009/255806 A1, US 20090255806 A1, US 20090255806A1, US 2009255806 A1, US 2009255806A1, US-A1-20090255806, US-A1-2009255806, US2009/0255806A1, US2009/255806A1, US20090255806 A1, US20090255806A1, US2009255806 A1, US2009255806A1
InventoresWhonchee Lee, Gundu M. Sabde
Cesionario originalMicron Technology, Inc.
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Methods and systems for removing materials from microfeature workpieces with organic and/or non-aqueous electrolytic media
US 20090255806 A1
Resumen
Methods and systems for removing materials from microfeature workpieces are disclosed. A method in accordance with one embodiment of the invention includes providing a microfeature workpiece having a substrate material and a conductive material that includes a refractory metal (e.g., tantalum, tantalum nitride, titanium, and/or titanium nitride). First and second electrodes are positioned in electrical communication with the conductive material via a generally organic and/or non-aqueous electrolytic medium. At least one of the electrodes is spaced apart from the workpiece. At least a portion of the conductive material is removed by passing an electrical current along an electrical path that includes the first electrode, the electrolytic medium, and the second electrode. Electrolytically removing the conductive material can reduce the downforce applied to the workpiece.
Imágenes(9)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones(9)
1. A system for removing material from a microfeature workpiece, comprising:
a workpiece support configured to carry a microfeature workpiece with a process surface of the microfeature workpiece at a workpiece location;
first and second electrodes positioned proximate to the workpiece support, at least one of the first and record electrodes being spaced apart from the workpiece location; and
a polishing medium positioned at least proximate to the workpiece location, at least one of the polishing medium and the workpiece support being movable relative to the other, the polishing medium including a polishing pad material and an electrolytic medium, the electrolytic medium being generally organic, generally non-aqueous or both generally organic and generally non-aqueous, the electrolytic medium including:
a solvent; and
an electrolyte.
2. The system of claim 1, further comprising a corrosion inhibitor that at least inhibits corrosion of at least one of copper and a copper compound.
3. The system of claim 1, further comprising an electrical current source coupled to the first and second electrodes, the electrical current source being configured to pass a varying electrical current through the first and second electrodes.
4. The system of claim 1 wherein the electrolytic medium includes methanol.
5. The system of claim 1 wherein the electrolytic medium includes an alcohol.
6. The system of claim 1 wherein the electrolytic medium is about 90% or more non-aqueous.
7. The system of claim 1 wherein the electrolytic medium includes a corrosion inhibitor.
8. The system of claim 1 wherein the electrolytic medium is approximately 99% or more organic.
9. The system of claim 1, wherein the electrolytic medium includes at least one of NH4Cl, CuCl2, ammonium acetate, NH4-succinate, K-succinate and HF.
Descripción
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    This application is a divisional of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/933,053, filed Sep. 1, 2004, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to systems and methods for removing materials from microfeature workpieces with organic and/or non-aqueous electrolytic media.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0003]
    Microfeature workpieces and workpiece assemblies typically include a semiconductor material having features, such as memory cells, that are linked with conductive lines. The conductive lines can be formed by first forming trenches or other recesses in the semiconductor material and then overlaying a conductive material (such as a metal) in and adjacent to the trenches. The conductive material adjacent to the trenches is then selectively removed to leave conductive lines or vias extending from one feature in the semiconductor material to another.
  • [0004]
    FIG. 1 is a partially schematic illustration of a portion of a microfeature workpiece 10 having a conductive line formed in accordance with the prior art. The microfeature workpiece 10 includes an aperture or recess 16 in an oxide material 13. A barrier layer 14, formed from materials such as tantalum or tantalum compounds, is disposed on the microfeature workpiece 10 and in the aperture 16. A conductive material 15, such as copper, is then disposed on the barrier layer 14. The barrier layer 14 can prevent copper atoms from migrating into the surrounding oxide 13.
  • [0005]
    In a typical existing process, two separate chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) steps are used to remove the excess portions of the conductive material 15 and the barrier layer 14 from the microfeature workpiece 10. In one step, a first slurry and polishing pad are used to remove the conductive material 15 overlying the barrier layer 14 external to the aperture 16, thus exposing the barrier layer 14. In a separate step, a second slurry and a second polishing pad are then used to remove the barrier layer 14 (and the remaining conductive material 15) external to the aperture 16. The resulting conductive line 8 includes the conductive material 15 surrounded by a lining formed by the barrier layer 14.
  • [0006]
    One drawback with the foregoing process is that high downforces are typically required to remove copper and (particularly) tantalum from the microfeature workpiece 10. High downforces can cause other portions of the microfeature workpiece 10 to become dished, scratched or eroded, and/or can smear structures in other parts of the microfeature workpiece 10. A further drawback is that high downforces typically are not compatible with soft substrate materials. However, it is often desirable to use soft materials, such as ultra low dielectric materials, around the conductive features to reduce and/or eliminate electrical coupling between these features.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0007]
    FIG. 1 is a partially schematic, cross-sectional view of a portion of a microfeature workpiece having multiple conductive materials processed in accordance with the prior art.
  • [0008]
    FIGS. 2A-2D are partially schematic, cross-sectional illustrations of a portion of a microfeature workpiece having conductive materials processed in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.
  • [0009]
    FIG. 3 is a partially schematic, cross-sectional view of a portion of a microfeature workpiece having conductive materials processed in accordance with another embodiment of the invention.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 4 is a partially schematic illustration of an apparatus for electrolytically, chemically-mechanically and/or electrochemically-mechanically removing conductive materials from a microfeature workpiece in accordance with still another embodiment of the invention.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 5 is a partially schematic, isometric view of a portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 4.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 6 is a partially schematic, isometric illustration of a portion of an apparatus for removing conductive materials from a microfeature workpiece in accordance with yet another embodiment of the invention.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 7 is a schematic illustration of a rotary apparatus for removing material from a microfeature workpiece in accordance with another embodiment of the invention.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 8 is a schematic illustration of a waveform for electrolytically processing a microfeature workpiece in accordance with still another embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0015]
    The present invention is directed toward methods and systems for removing material from microfeature workpieces by electrochemical-mechanical polishing (ECMP). A method in accordance with one aspect of the invention includes providing a microfeature workpiece having a substrate material and a conductive layer positioned adjacent to a surface of the substrate material, with the conductive layer including at least one of a refractory metal and a refractory metal compound. The method can further include disposing a generally organic and/or generally non-aqueous electrolytic medium in contact with the conductive layer, and positioning first and second electrodes in electrical communication with the conductive layer, with at least one of the electrodes being spaced apart from the workpiece. The method can still further include removing at least a portion of the conductive layer by passing an electrical current along an electrical path that includes the first electrode, the electrolytic medium, and the second electrode.
  • [0016]
    In further embodiments of the invention, both the first and second electrodes can be spaced apart from the microfeature workpiece. The electrolytic medium can be selected to include methanol or another alcohol. The electrolytic medium can further include a corrosion inhibitor, NH4Cl, CuCl2, K-succinate, NH4-succinate, ammonium acetate and/or hydrogen fluoride. The conductive layer can include a barrier layer deposited beneath a blanket layer (e.g., a copper or a copper compound blanket layer), and the method can include removing at least part of the blanket layer before removing the barrier layer. The portion of the barrier layer can be removed with or without contact between the barrier layer and a polishing pad material.
  • [0017]
    Another embodiment of the invention is directed to a system for removing material from a microfeature workpiece. The system can include a workpiece support configured to carry a microfeature workpiece at a workpiece location, first and second electrodes positioned proximate to the workpiece support with at least one of the electrodes spaced apart from the workpiece location, and a polishing medium positioned at least proximate to the workpiece location. At least one of the polishing medium and the workpiece support can be movable relative to the other, and the polishing medium can include a polishing pad material and an electrolytic medium. The electrolytic medium can be generally organic and/or generally non-aqueous, and can include a solvent and an electrolyte. In further embodiments, the electrolytic medium can include methanol or another alcohol, and the electrolytic medium can be approximately 99% or more organic, and/or 90% or more non-aqueous. The system can also include an electrical current source coupled to the first and second electrodes.
  • [0018]
    As used herein, the terms “microfeature workpiece” or “workpiece” refer to substrates on and/or in which microelectronic devices are integrally formed. Typical microdevices include microelectronic circuits or components, thin-film recording heads, data storage elements, microfluidic devices, and other products. Micromachines and micromechanical devices are included within this definition because they are manufactured using much of the same technology that is used in the fabrication of integrated circuits. The substrates can be semiconductive pieces (e.g., doped silicon wafers or gallium arsenide wafers), nonconductive pieces (e.g., various ceramic substrates) or conductive pieces. In some cases, the workpieces are generally round, and in other cases the workpieces have other shapes, including rectilinear shapes. Several embodiments of systems and methods for removing material from microfeature workpieces via electrochemical-mechanical polishing (ECMP) are described below. A person skilled in the relevant art will understand, however, that the invention may have additional embodiments, and that the invention may be practiced without several of the details of the embodiments described below with reference to FIGS. 2A-8.
  • [0019]
    One approach for addressing some of the drawbacks described above with reference to FIG. 1 is to remove conductive materials from the microfeature workpiece with electrolytic processes. Accordingly, a voltage is applied to the conductive material in the presence of an electrolytic liquid to remove the conductive material. However, many existing electrolytic liquids cannot simultaneously remove copper and tantalum, once the tantalum barrier layer has been exposed. Accordingly, chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) techniques are typically used to remove the exposed tantalum barrier layer and the adjacent copper material. However, this approach typically re-introduces the high downforces that the initial electrolytic process was intended to avoid. The following disclosure describes methods and apparatuses for overcoming this drawback.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 2A is a partially schematic, cross-sectional side view of a microfeature workpiece 210 prior to electrolytic processing in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. In one aspect of this embodiment, the microfeature workpiece 210 includes a substrate material 213, such as an oxide (e.g., silicon dioxide) or a low dielectric constant material (e.g., borophosphate silicon glass or tetraethylorthosilicate). The substrate material 213 can include a substrate material surface 217 having a recess or aperture 216 formed by conventional processes, including selective etch processes. A first conductive material 218 is disposed on the substrate material 213 and can form a barrier layer 214 along the walls of the recess 216. A second conductive material 209, such as a blanket fill material, can be disposed on the first conductive material 218 to form a fill or blanket layer 219. In one embodiment, the first conductive material 218 can include a refractory metal, e.g., tantalum or a tantalum compound, including tantalum nitride (TaNx). The second conductive material 209 can include copper or copper alloys, including alloys that have at least 50% copper. In other embodiments, these conductive materials can include other elements or compounds. For example, the first conductive material 218 can include titanium or a titanium compound, including titanium nitride (TiNx). Many if not all of the points described below in the context of tantalum-containing first conductive materials 218 can also apply to titanium-containing first conductive materials, and first conductive materials 218 containing other refractory metals and/or refractory metal compounds. In any of these embodiments, the first conductive material 218 and the second conductive material 209 can collectively define a conductive portion 211 of the microfeature workpiece 210.
  • [0021]
    To form an isolated conductive line within the recess 216, the first conductive material 218 and the second conductive material 209 external to the recess 216 are typically removed. In one embodiment, the second conductive material 209 is removed using a CMP process. In other embodiments, an electrochemical-mechanical polishing (ECMP) process or an electrolytic process is used to remove the second conductive material 209. An advantage of electrolytic and ECMP processes is that the downforce applied to the microfeature workpiece 210 during at least some phases of processing can be reduced or in some cases eliminated.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 2B illustrates, in a split view, portions of both a CMP and an ECMP system for removing an initial portion of the second conductive material 209 from the workpiece 210. For purposes of illustration, portions of both systems are shown in FIG. 2B removing material from a single workpiece 210. In most embodiments, one system or the other is selected to remove the initial portion of the second conductive material 209 from a given workpiece 210. A CMP system 260 a in accordance with one embodiment of the invention includes a polishing medium 285 a having a polishing pad material 283 a and a polishing liquid 284 in contact with the second conductive material 209. The polishing liquid 284 can include a conventional slurry (e.g., having a suspension of abrasive elements), or the abrasive elements can be fixedly embedded in the polishing pad material 283 a. As the polishing medium 285 a and the workpiece 210 move relative to each other, an initial portion of the second conductive material 209 is removed to expose the first conductive material 218.
  • [0023]
    An ECMP system 260 b in accordance with an embodiment of the invention includes a polishing medium 285 b having at least two electrodes 220 (two are shown in FIG. 2B as a first electrode 220 a and a second electrode 220 b), separated by an insulator 222. The electrodes 220 can be coupled to an electrical power source 221, for example, a variable signal transmitter or a DC power source. The polishing medium 285 b can further include a polishing pad material 283 b, which contacts the second conductive material 209 of the workpiece 210. In another embodiment, the polishing pad material 283 b can extend between the electrodes 220 a and 220 b to replace the insulator 222, while providing the same insulative function. In either embodiment, a first electrolytic medium 231 a (e.g., an electrolyte-containing liquid or gel) can be disposed between the electrodes 220 and the second conductive material 209. In a particular embodiment, the first electrolytic medium 231 a can include phosphoric acid. The first electrolytic medium 231 a can form part of an electrically conductive path that also includes the first electrode 220 a, the second electrode 220 b, and optionally the second conductive material 209.
  • [0024]
    In operation, an initial portion of the second conductive material 209 can be removed from the workpiece 210 (a) electrolytically via the current supplied by the power source 221, and/or (b) chemically/mechanically as a result of both the chemical interaction between the first electrolytic medium 231 a and the second conductive material 209, and the contact and relative motion between the polishing pad material 283 b and the workpiece 210. The ECMP system 260 b can be operated in different manners, depending on the nature of the workpiece 210 and/or the desired processing parameters. For example, the ECMP system 260 b can be operated to remove material via only chemical-mechanical polishing by not activating the electrodes 220, or the ECMP system 260 b can be operated to remove material via only electrolytic action by activating the electrodes 220 but not contacting the workpiece 210 with the polishing pad material 283 b. The ECMP system 260 b can remove material via ECMP by both activating the electrodes 220 and contacting the workpiece 210 with the polishing pad material 283 b. Any of the foregoing processes can be conducted at least until the initial portion of the second conductive material 209 is removed to expose the first conductive material 218.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 2C illustrates the ECMP system 260 b positioned to remove the exposed first conductive material 218 in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. In one aspect of this embodiment, the first electrolytic medium 231 a described above with reference to FIG. 2B is replaced with a second electrolytic medium 231 b having a different composition. Accordingly, the first electrolytic medium 231 a can be removed during a flushing or rinsing operation. The second electrolytic medium 231 b can include a corrosion inhibitor that inhibits removal of the remaining second conductive material 209 in the recess 216. An advantage of this feature is that the second conductive material 209 in the recess 216 is less likely to become “dished” or otherwise removed in a non-uniform fashion, and is more likely to remain flush and level with the surrounding material. In other embodiments (for example, when dishing is not of particular concern), the second electrolytic medium 231 b can have the same composition as the first electrolytic medium 231 a.
  • [0026]
    The second electrolytic medium 231 b can have a generally organic (i.e., carbon-containing) composition. For example, the second electrolytic medium 231 b can include methanol, ethanol, or another alcohol as a solvent. When the first conductive material includes tantalum, the second electrolytic medium can further include NH4Cl, CuCl2, ammonium acetate, and/or other monovalence organic salts. These compounds can be particularly suitable in cases where the first conductive material 218 includes tantalum or tantalum nitride, the second conductive material 209 includes copper and/or a copper compound, and the removal process need not remove the first conductive material 218 more rapidly than the second conductive material 209 (and in fact may remove the second conductive material 209 more rapidly). In other embodiments, the second electrolytic medium 231 b can include NH4-succinate, K-succinate and/or other monovalence succinate salts. These compounds can be particularly suitable in cases where it is desirable to remove the second conductive material 209 more rapidly than the first conductive material 218. When the first conductive material 218 includes tantalum nitride, the second electrolytic medium 231 b can include hydrogen fluoride in an alcohol or another organic solvent. An advantage of hydrogen fluoride is that it can remove tantalum nitride at a more rapid rate than copper. In one aspect of either embodiment, the second electrolytic medium 231 b can be at least approximately 99% organic (e.g., it can contain at least 99% organic constituents, rather than non-carbon-containing constituents, by volume).
  • [0027]
    The second electrolytic medium 231 b can also be generally non-aqueous. For example, when the second electrolytic medium 231 b includes hydrogen fluoride, the overall composition of the second electrolytic medium 231 b can be about ten percent aqueous or less. When the second electrolytic medium includes other constituents (e.g., NH4Cl, CuCl2, ammonium acetate, NH4-succinate, and/or K-succinate), the overall composition of the second electrolytic medium 231 b can be about one percent aqueous or less.
  • [0028]
    One feature of an embodiment of the foregoing system is that the generally organic (and/or non-aqueous) second electrolytic medium 231 b can remove the first conductive material 218 from the workpiece 210 without requiring high downforces even if (in some cases) higher downforces are used to remove the initial portion of the second conductive material 209. For example, when the first conductive material 218 includes tantalum or tantalum nitride, the downforce applied to the workpiece 210 while the first conductive material 218 is being removed can be from about 1.0 psi to zero psi. In one particular embodiment, the downforce can range from about 0.25 psi to about 0.1 psi or less, and in another particular embodiment, the downforce can be about 0.1 psi or less. By contrast, the typical downforce used to remove the first conductive material in conventional processes is generally from about 2.0 psi to about 5.0 psi. Because the downforce is reduced to such low levels, (a) the likelihood for dishing the second conductive material 209 remaining in the recess 216 can be reduced or eliminated, and/or (b) the likelihood for scratching or otherwise damaging the substrate material 213 when the overlying first conductive material 218 is removed can also be reduced or eliminated.
  • [0029]
    In a particular embodiment for which the first conductive material 218 includes tantalum nitride, the polishing pad material 283 b can contact the first conductive material 218 with a vanishingly small downforce. In still another embodiment, the polishing pad material 283 b can be out of contact with the workpiece 210 (as indicated by dashed lines in FIG. 2C) or eliminated entirely (as indicated by phantom lines in FIG. 2C). In either embodiment, most or all of the first conductive material 218 external to the recess 216 can be removed with little or no contact between the polishing pad material 283 b and the first conductive material 218. In some cases, small amounts of residual first conductive material 218 remaining after the electrolytic process described above can be removed by very light contact, provided by the polishing pad material 283 b or another device (e.g., a brush).
  • [0030]
    Another feature of the foregoing embodiments is that one or more of the constituents of the second electrolytic medium 231 b can preferentially remove the first conductive material 218. For example, when the first conductive material 218 includes tantalum, and the second conductive material 209 includes copper, both disposed in a tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) substrate material 213, the second electrolytic medium 231 b can include K-succinate in methanol, which can remove tantalum approximately twice as fast as it removes copper, and can remove little or no TEOS. Accordingly, the second electrolytic medium 231 b can remove the first conductive material 218 without dishing the second conductive material 209 and/or without scratching the substrate material 213. It is believed that one explanation for the foregoing behavior is that the second electrolytic medium 231 b forms a stable copper-organic complex or other low solubility copper-organic compound at the interface between the copper and the electrolytic medium 231 b. Accordingly, the second electrolytic medium 231 b passivates the copper while retaining electrolytic properties. The copper-organic complex can be stable in the solid phase, and can have a limited or zero solubility in the second electrolytic medium 231 b. The process performed by the second electrolytic medium 231 b is therefore unlike that of typical passivating agents, including BTA, which are generally ineffective in a non-aqueous solution, and/or are not stable in the presence of an external electrical current.
  • [0031]
    Yet another feature of an embodiment of the second electrolytic medium 231 b is that, whether it is generally organic, generally non-aqueous, or both, it can effectively remove tantalum and tantalum compounds at rates higher than those available with conventional methods, and/or with downforces lower than those associated with conventional methods. It is believed that at least one mechanism by which embodiments of the second electrolytic medium 231 b achieve this result is by reducing and/or eliminating the passivation of tantalum into tantalum oxide (TaOx).
  • [0032]
    In any of the foregoing embodiments, the first conductive material 218 and the second conductive material 209 external to the recess 216 can be removed to produce a microfeature workpiece 210 having an embedded conductive structure 208, as shown in FIG. 2D. In one embodiment, the conductive structure 208 can include a conductive line and in other embodiments, conductive structure 208 can include a via or other feature in the microfeature workpiece 210. In any of these embodiments, the foregoing processes can provide a conductive structure 208 having a smooth external surface 207 that includes smooth external surface portions for both the first conductive material 218 and the second conductive material 209.
  • [0033]
    In the embodiments described above with reference to FIGS. 2A-2D, both the first and second electrodes 220 a, 220 b are spaced apart from the microfeature workpiece 210 as they remove conductive materials from the microfeature workpiece 210. An advantage of this arrangement is that the conductive material removal process can be relatively uniform. Another advantage of this arrangement is that it reduces the direct, physical contact with the workpiece 210 as the conductive materials are removed. In other embodiments, one or more of the electrodes 220 can be positioned in direct contact with the microfeature workpiece 210. For example, as shown in FIG. 3, a first electrode 320 a can be positioned in a spaced-apart orientation relative to the microfeature workpiece 210, and a second electrode 320 b can be connected to a rear surface of the microfeature workpiece 210. A conductive path 308 (e.g., an internal via) between the rear surface and the conductive portion 211 of the microfeature workpiece can complete the circuit between the electrodes 320 a, 320 b, allowing the signal transmitter 221 to remove conductive material in a manner generally similar to that described above.
  • [0034]
    FIGS. 4-8 illustrate apparatuses for electrolytically, chemically-mechanically, and/or electrochemically-mechanically removing material from microfeature workpieces to perform the processes described above with reference to FIGS. 2A-3. For purposes of illustration, the apparatuses are shown supporting the microfeature workpiece 210 face-down against an upwardly facing polishing pad. In other embodiments, the relative positions and orientations of the workpiece 210 and the polishing pad can be reversed, as shown in FIGS. 2B-3.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 4 schematically illustrates an apparatus 460 for electrolytically, chemically-mechanically and/or electrochemically-mechanically polishing the microfeature workpiece 210 in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. In one aspect of this embodiment, the apparatus 460 has a support table 480 with a top-panel 481 at a workstation where an operative portion “W” of a polishing pad 483 is positioned. The top-panel 481 is generally a rigid plate to provide a flat, solid surface to which a particular section of the polishing pad 483 may be secured during polishing. The polishing pad 483 can have a relatively soft composition which, together with the relatively low down force described above, can reduce the likelihood for scratching the workpiece 210 and/or removing material from the workpiece 210 in a non-uniform manner. In one embodiment, the polishing pad 483 can include a Politex™ pad, available from Rohm and Haas of Phoenix, Ariz., and in other embodiments, the polishing pad 483 can include other relatively soft pads available from other sources.
  • [0036]
    The apparatus 460 can also have a plurality of rollers to guide, position and hold the polishing pad 483 over the top-panel 481. The rollers can include a supply roller 487 a, idler rollers 487 b, guide rollers 487 c, and a take-up roller 487 d. The supply roller 487 a carries an unused or preoperative portion of the polishing pad 483, and the take-up roller 487 d carries a used or postoperative portion of the polishing pad 483. Additionally, the idler rollers 487 b and the guide rollers 487 c can stretch the polishing pad 483 over the top-panel 481 to hold the polishing pad 483 stationary during operation. A motor (not shown) drives at least one of the supply roller 487 a and the take-up roller 487 d to sequentially advance the polishing pad 483 across the top-panel 481. Accordingly, clean preoperative sections of the polishing pad 483 may be quickly substituted for used sections to provide a consistent surface for polishing and/or cleaning the microfeature workpiece 210.
  • [0037]
    The apparatus 460 can also have a carrier assembly 490 that controls and protects the microfeature workpiece 210 during polishing. The carrier assembly 490 can include a workpiece holder 492 to pick up, hold and release the microfeature workpiece 210 at appropriate stages of the polishing process. The carrier assembly 490 can also have a support gantry 494 carrying a drive assembly 495 that can translate along the gantry 494. The drive assembly 495 can have an actuator 496, a drive shaft 497 coupled to the actuator 496, and an arm 498 projecting from the drive shaft 497. The arm 498 carries the workpiece holder 492 via a terminal shaft 499 such that the drive assembly 495 orbits the workpiece holder 492 about an axis E-E (as indicated by arrow “R1”). The terminal shaft 499 may also rotate the workpiece holder 492 about its central axis F-F (as indicated by arrow “R2”).
  • [0038]
    The polishing pad 483 and a polishing liquid 484 define a polishing medium 485 that electrolytically, chemically-mechanically, and/or electro-chemically-mechanically removes material from the surface of the microfeature workpiece 210. In some embodiments, the polishing pad 483 may be a nonabrasive pad without abrasive particles, and the polishing liquid 484 can be a slurry with abrasive particles and chemicals to remove material from the microfeature workpiece 210. In other embodiments, the polishing pad 483 can be a fixed-abrasive polishing pad in which abrasive particles are fixedly bonded to a suspension medium. To polish the microfeature workpiece 210 with the apparatus 460, the carrier assembly 490 can position the microfeature workpiece 210 with a process surface of the workpiece 210 at a workpiece location in contact with the polishing liquid 484. Optionally the carrier assembly 490 can also press the microfeature workpiece 210 against a polishing surface 488 of the polishing pad 483. The drive assembly 495 then orbits the workpiece holder 492 about the axis E-E and optionally rotates the workpiece holder 492 about the axis F-F to translate the substrate 210 across the polishing surface 488. As a result, the abrasive particles and/or the chemicals in the polishing medium 485 and/or electrolytic action remove material from the surface of the microfeature workpiece 210 in a chemical and/or chemical-mechanical and/or electrochemical-mechanical polishing process.
  • [0039]
    During ECMP processing, the polishing liquid 484 can include an electrolyte which can be pre-mixed in the polishing liquid 484 or stored in an electrolyte supply vessel 430 and delivered with a conduit 437, as described in greater detail below with reference to FIG. 5. In either embodiment, the apparatus 460 can further include a current supply 421 coupled to electrodes positioned proximate to the polishing pad 483.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 5 is a partially exploded, partially schematic isometric view of a portion of the apparatus 460 described above with reference to FIG. 4. In one aspect of the embodiment shown in FIG. 5, the top-panel 481 houses a plurality of electrode pairs, each of which includes a first electrode 520 a and a second electrode 520 b. The first electrodes 520 a are coupled to a first lead 528 a and the second electrodes 520 b are coupled to a second lead 528 b. The first and second leads 528 a and 528 b are coupled to the current supply 421 (FIG. 4). In one aspect of this embodiment, the first electrodes 520 a can be separated from the second electrodes 520 b by an electrode dielectric layer 529 a that includes Teflon™ or another suitable dielectric material. The electrode dielectric layer 529 a can accordingly control the volume and dielectric constant of the region between the first and second electrodes 520 a and 520 b to control the electrical coupling between the electrodes.
  • [0041]
    The electrodes 520 a and 520 b can be electrically coupled to the microfeature workpiece 210 (FIG. 4) by the polishing pad 483. In one aspect of this embodiment, the polishing pad 483 is saturated with an electrolytic liquid 531 supplied by the supply conduits 437 through apertures 538 in the top-panel 481 just beneath the polishing pad 483. Accordingly, the electrodes 520 a and 520 b are selected to be compatible with the electrolytic liquid 531. In an another arrangement, the electrolytic liquid 531 can be supplied to the polishing pad 483 from above (for example, by disposing the electrolytic liquid 531 in the polishing liquid 489, rather than by directing the electrolytic liquid upwardly through the polishing pad 483). Accordingly, the apparatus 460 can include a pad dielectric layer 529 b positioned between the polishing pad 483 and the electrodes 520 a and 520 b. When the pad dielectric layer 529 b is in place, the electrodes 520 a and 520 b can be isolated from physical contact with the electrolytic liquid 531 and can accordingly be selected from materials that are not necessarily compatible with the electrolytic liquid 531.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 6 is an isometric view of a portion of an apparatus 660 having electrodes 620 (shown as a first electrode 620 a and a second electrode 620 b), and a polishing medium 685 arranged in accordance with another embodiment of the invention. In one aspect of this embodiment, the polishing medium 685 includes polishing pad portions 683 that project beyond the electrodes 620 a and 620 b. Each polishing pad portion 683 can include a polishing surface 688 and a plurality of flow passages 686 coupled to a fluid source (not shown in FIG. 6) with a conduit 637. Each flow passage 686 can have an aperture 682 proximate to the polishing surface 688 to provide an electrolytic liquid 631 proximate to an interface between the microfeature workpiece 210 and the polishing surface 688. In one aspect of this embodiment, the pad portions 683 can include recesses 681 surrounding each aperture 682. Accordingly, the electrolytic liquid 631 can proceed outwardly from the flow passages 686 while the microfeature workpiece 210 is positioned directly overhead and remains spaced apart from the electrodes 620. In other embodiments, the polishing pad portions 683 can be applied to other electrodes, such as those described above with reference to FIGS. 4 and 5 to provide for mechanical as well as electromechanical material removed.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 7 is a partially schematic, cross-sectional side elevational view of a rotary apparatus 760 for mechanically, chemically and/or electrolytically processing the microfeature workpiece 210 in accordance with another embodiment of the invention. In one aspect of this embodiment, the apparatus 760 has a generally circular platen or table 780, a carrier assembly 790, a polishing pad 783 positioned on the table 780, and a polishing liquid 784 on the polishing pad 783. The polishing pad 783 can be a fixed abrasive polishing pad or, alternatively, the polishing liquid 784 can include slurry having a suspension of abrasive elements and the polishing pad 783 can be a non-abrasive pad. A drive assembly 795 rotates (arrow “G”) and/or reciprocates (arrow “H”) the platen 780 to move the polishing pad 783 during planarization. Accordingly, the motion of the microfeature workpiece 210 relative to the polishing pad 783 can include circular, elliptical, orbital, precessional or non-precessional motions.
  • [0044]
    The carrier assembly 790 controls and protects the microfeature workpiece 210 during the material removal process. The carrier assembly 790 typically has a substrate holder 792 with a pad 794 that holds the microfeature workpiece 210 via suction. A drive assembly 796 of the carrier assembly 790 typically rotates and/or translates the substrate holder 792 (arrows “I” and “J,” respectively). Alternatively, the substrate holder 792 may include a weighted, free-floating disk (not shown) that slides over the polishing pad 783.
  • [0045]
    To remove material from the microfeature workpiece 210 with the apparatus 760 in one embodiment, the carrier assembly 790 positions the microfeature workpiece 210 and (optionally) presses the microfeature workpiece 210 against a polishing surface 788 of the polishing pad 783. The platen 780 and/or the substrate holder 792 then move relative to one another to translate the microfeature workpiece 210 across the polishing surface 788. As a result, the abrasive particles in the polishing pad 783 and/or the chemicals in the planarizing liquid 784 remove material from the surface of the microfeature workpiece 210.
  • [0046]
    The apparatus 760 can also include a current source 721 coupled with leads 728 a and 728 b to one or more electrode pairs 770 (one of which is shown in FIG. 11). The electrode pairs 770 can be integrated with the platen 780 in generally the same manner with which the electrodes 520 a and 520 b (FIG. 5) are integrated with the top panel 581 (FIG. 5). Alternatively, the electrode pairs 770 can be integrated with the polishing pad 783. In either embodiment, the electrode pairs 770 can include electrodes having shapes and configurations generally similar to any of those described above with reference to FIGS. 3-6 to electrolytically remove conductive material from the microfeature workpiece 210.
  • [0047]
    The foregoing apparatuses described above with reference to FIGS. 4-7 can be used to electrolytically, chemically-mechanically and/or electrochemically-mechanically process the microfeature workpiece 210. When the apparatuses are used to electrolytically or electrochemically-mechanically process the microfeature workpiece 210, they can provide a varying electrical current that passes from the electrodes, through the conductive material of the microfeature workpiece 210 via the electrolytic liquid. For example, as shown in FIG. 8, the apparatus can generate a high-frequency wave 804 and can superimpose a low-frequency wave 802 on the high-frequency wave 804. In one aspect of this embodiment, the high-frequency wave 804 can include a series of positive or negative voltage spikes contained within a square wave envelope defined by the low-frequency wave 802. Each spike of the high-frequency wave 804 can have a relatively steep rise-time slope to transfer charge through the dielectric material to the electrolytic liquid, and a more gradual fall-time slope. The fall-time slope can define a straight line, as indicated by high-frequency wave 804, or a curved line, as indicated by high-frequency wave 804 a. In other embodiments, the high-frequency wave 804 and the low-frequency wave 802 can have other shapes depending, for example, on the particular characteristics of the dielectric material and the electrolytic liquid, the characteristics of the microfeature workpiece 210, and/or the target rate at which conductive material is to be removed from the microfeature workpiece 210.
  • [0048]
    The voltage applied to the workpiece 210 can be selected based on the material removed from the workpiece 210. For example, when removing tantalum from the workpiece 210, the current can be applied at a potential of 7.8 volts rms. When tantalum nitride is removed from the workpiece 210, the current can be applied at a potential of about 15 volts rms. In both embodiments, the workpiece 210 can be rotated at a speed of about 30 RPM.
  • [0049]
    The methods described above with reference to FIGS. 2A-3 may be performed with the apparatuses described above with reference to FIGS. 4-8 in a variety of manners in accordance with several embodiments of the invention. For example, in one embodiment, a single apparatus can be used to remove the initial quantity of the second conductive material 209 via CMP and then the first and second conductive materials 218, 209 simultaneously via ECMP. Alternatively, one apparatus can initially remove the second material 209 (e.g., via CMP) and the same or another apparatus can subsequently remove both the first and second conductive materials 218, 209 via ECMP. In either embodiment, the liquid used during ECMP of the first conductive material 218 can be generally organic, which can significantly reduce (or eliminate) the downforce applied to the microfeature workpiece 210 during electrolytic processing.
  • [0050]
    From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that specific embodiments of the invention have been described herein for purposes of illustration, but that various modifications may be made without deviating from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, methods and features shown and/or described in the context of certain embodiments of the invention can be eliminated, combined or re-ordered in other embodiments. Accordingly, the invention is not limited except as by the appended claims.
Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US6083840 *25 Nov 19984 Jul 2000Arch Specialty Chemicals, Inc.Slurry compositions and method for the chemical-mechanical polishing of copper and copper alloys
US6100197 *12 Oct 19998 Ago 2000Nec CorporationMethod of fabricating a semiconductor device
US6103096 *12 Nov 199715 Ago 2000International Business Machines CorporationApparatus and method for the electrochemical etching of a wafer
US6103628 *1 Dic 199815 Ago 2000Nutool, Inc.Reverse linear polisher with loadable housing
US6103636 *20 Ago 199715 Ago 2000Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for selective removal of material from wafer alignment marks
US6115233 *28 Jun 19965 Sep 2000Lsi Logic CorporationIntegrated circuit device having a capacitor with the dielectric peripheral region being greater than the dielectric central region
US6117781 *22 Abr 199912 Sep 2000Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.Optimized trench/via profile for damascene processing
US6121152 *11 Jun 199819 Sep 2000Integrated Process Equipment CorporationMethod and apparatus for planarization of metallized semiconductor wafers using a bipolar electrode assembly
US6132586 *11 Jun 199817 Oct 2000Integrated Process Equipment CorporationMethod and apparatus for non-contact metal plating of semiconductor wafers using a bipolar electrode assembly
US6171467 *24 Nov 19989 Ene 2001The John Hopkins UniversityElectrochemical-control of abrasive polishing and machining rates
US6174425 *14 May 199716 Ene 2001Motorola, Inc.Process for depositing a layer of material over a substrate
US6176992 *1 Dic 199823 Ene 2001Nutool, Inc.Method and apparatus for electro-chemical mechanical deposition
US6180947 *7 Ago 199830 Ene 2001Nikon CorporationMulti-element deflection aberration correction for electron beam lithography
US6187651 *6 May 199913 Feb 2001Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Methods of forming trench isolation regions using preferred stress relieving layers and techniques to inhibit the occurrence of voids
US6190494 *29 Jul 199820 Feb 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for electrically endpointing a chemical-mechanical planarization process
US6196899 *21 Jun 19996 Mar 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Polishing apparatus
US6197182 *7 Jul 19996 Mar 2001Technic Inc.Apparatus and method for plating wafers, substrates and other articles
US6206756 *10 Nov 199827 Mar 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Tungsten chemical-mechanical polishing process using a fixed abrasive polishing pad and a tungsten layer chemical-mechanical polishing solution specifically adapted for chemical-mechanical polishing with a fixed abrasive pad
US6218309 *30 Sep 199917 Abr 2001Lam Research CorporationMethod of achieving top rounding and uniform etch depths while etching shallow trench isolation features
US6250994 *1 Oct 199826 Jun 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatuses for mechanical and chemical-mechanical planarization of microelectronic-device substrate assemblies on planarizing pads
US6259128 *23 Abr 199910 Jul 2001International Business Machines CorporationMetal-insulator-metal capacitor for copper damascene process and method of forming the same
US6273786 *20 Oct 199914 Ago 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Tungsten chemical-mechanical polishing process using a fixed abrasive polishing pad and a tungsten layer chemical-mechanical polishing solution specifically adapted for chemical-mechanical polishing with a fixed abrasive pad
US6276996 *10 Nov 199821 Ago 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Copper chemical-mechanical polishing process using a fixed abrasive polishing pad and a copper layer chemical-mechanical polishing solution specifically adapted for chemical-mechanical polishing with a fixed abrasive pad
US6280581 *29 Dic 199828 Ago 2001David ChengMethod and apparatus for electroplating films on semiconductor wafers
US6287974 *30 Jun 199911 Sep 2001Lam Research CorporationMethod of achieving top rounding and uniform etch depths while etching shallow trench isolation features
US6299741 *29 Nov 19999 Oct 2001Applied Materials, Inc.Advanced electrolytic polish (AEP) assisted metal wafer planarization method and apparatus
US6303956 *26 Feb 199916 Oct 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Conductive container structures having a dielectric cap
US6368184 *6 Ene 20009 Abr 2002Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.Apparatus for determining metal CMP endpoint using integrated polishing pad electrodes
US6368190 *26 Ene 20009 Abr 2002Agere Systems Guardian Corp.Electrochemical mechanical planarization apparatus and method
US6379223 *29 Nov 199930 Abr 2002Applied Materials, Inc.Method and apparatus for electrochemical-mechanical planarization
US6395152 *2 Jul 199928 May 2002Acm Research, Inc.Methods and apparatus for electropolishing metal interconnections on semiconductor devices
US6395607 *9 Jun 199928 May 2002Alliedsignal Inc.Integrated circuit fabrication method for self-aligned copper diffusion barrier
US6416647 *19 Abr 19999 Jul 2002Applied Materials, Inc.Electro-chemical deposition cell for face-up processing of single semiconductor substrates
US6455370 *16 Ago 200024 Sep 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Method of patterning noble metals for semiconductor devices by electropolishing
US6461911 *16 Mar 20018 Oct 2002Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Semiconductor memory device and fabricating method thereof
US6464855 *4 Oct 200015 Oct 2002Speedfam-Ipec CorporationMethod and apparatus for electrochemical planarization of a workpiece
US6504247 *29 Ene 20027 Ene 2003Alliedsignal Inc.Integrated having a self-aligned Cu diffusion barrier
US6515493 *12 Abr 20004 Feb 2003Speedfam-Ipec CorporationMethod and apparatus for in-situ endpoint detection using electrical sensors
US6537144 *17 Feb 200025 Mar 2003Applied Materials, Inc.Method and apparatus for enhanced CMP using metals having reductive properties
US6551935 *31 Ago 200022 Abr 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Slurry for use in polishing semiconductor device conductive structures that include copper and tungsten and polishing methods
US6599806 *22 May 200129 Jul 2003Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Method for manufacturing a capacitor of a semiconductor device
US6603117 *12 Jun 20025 Ago 2003Greene, Tweed & Co.Self contained sensing apparatus and system
US6605539 *28 Nov 200112 Ago 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Electro-mechanical polishing of platinum container structure
US6607988 *28 Dic 200019 Ago 2003Hitachi, Ltd.Manufacturing method of semiconductor integrated circuit device
US6620037 *14 May 200216 Sep 2003Cabot Microelectronics CorporationChemical mechanical polishing slurry useful for copper substrates
US6632335 *22 Dic 200014 Oct 2003Ebara CorporationPlating apparatus
US6689258 *30 Abr 200210 Feb 2004Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.Electrochemically generated reactants for chemical mechanical planarization
US6693036 *6 Sep 200017 Feb 2004Sony CorporationMethod for producing semiconductor device polishing apparatus, and polishing method
US6705926 *24 Oct 200116 Mar 2004Cabot Microelectronics CorporationBoron-containing polishing system and method
US6722942 *21 May 200120 Abr 2004Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.Chemical mechanical polishing with electrochemical control
US6722950 *6 Nov 200120 Abr 2004Planar Labs CorporationMethod and apparatus for electrodialytic chemical mechanical polishing and deposition
US6726823 *24 Nov 199927 Abr 2004Acm Research, Inc.Methods and apparatus for holding and positioning semiconductor workpieces during electropolishing and/or electroplating of the workpieces
US6736952 *12 Feb 200118 May 2004Speedfam-Ipec CorporationMethod and apparatus for electrochemical planarization of a workpiece
US6753250 *12 Jun 200222 Jun 2004Novellus Systems, Inc.Method of fabricating low dielectric constant dielectric films
US6776693 *4 Jun 200217 Ago 2004Applied Materials Inc.Method and apparatus for face-up substrate polishing
US6780772 *21 Dic 200124 Ago 2004Nutool, Inc.Method and system to provide electroplanarization of a workpiece with a conducting material layer
US6797623 *8 Mar 200128 Sep 2004Sony CorporationMethods of producing and polishing semiconductor device and polishing apparatus
US6808617 *19 Sep 200126 Oct 2004Sony CorporationElectrolytic polishing method
US6846227 *28 Feb 200225 Ene 2005Sony CorporationElectro-chemical machining appartus
US6848970 *16 Sep 20021 Feb 2005Applied Materials, Inc.Process control in electrochemically assisted planarization
US6852630 *23 Abr 20018 Feb 2005Asm Nutool, Inc.Electroetching process and system
US6858124 *16 Dic 200222 Feb 20053M Innovative Properties CompanyMethods for polishing and/or cleaning copper interconnects and/or film and compositions therefor
US6867136 *22 Jul 200215 Mar 2005Nutool, Inc.Method for electrochemically processing a workpiece
US6867448 *31 Ago 200015 Mar 2005Micron Technology, Inc.Electro-mechanically polished structure
US6881664 *7 Jul 200319 Abr 2005Lsi Logic CorporationProcess for planarizing upper surface of damascene wiring structure for integrated circuit structures
US6884338 *16 Dic 200226 Abr 20053M Innovative Properties CompanyMethods for polishing and/or cleaning copper interconnects and/or film and compositions therefor
US6893328 *23 Abr 200317 May 2005Rohm And Haas Electronic Materials Cmp Holdings, Inc.Conductive polishing pad with anode and cathode
US6899804 *21 Dic 200131 May 2005Applied Materials, Inc.Electrolyte composition and treatment for electrolytic chemical mechanical polishing
US6951599 *1 Jul 20024 Oct 2005Applied Materials, Inc.Electropolishing of metallic interconnects
US7074113 *30 Ago 200011 Jul 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatus for removing conductive material from a microelectronic substrate
US7078308 *29 Ago 200218 Jul 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for removing adjacent conductive and nonconductive materials of a microelectronic substrate
US7094131 *21 Jun 200122 Ago 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Microelectronic substrate having conductive material with blunt cornered apertures, and associated methods for removing conductive material
US7112121 *21 Jun 200126 Sep 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatus for electrical, mechanical and/or chemical removal of conductive material from a microelectronic substrate
US7112122 *17 Sep 200326 Sep 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatus for removing conductive material from a microelectronic substrate
US7129160 *29 Ago 200231 Oct 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Method for simultaneously removing multiple conductive materials from microelectronic substrates
US7192335 *29 Ago 200220 Mar 2007Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for chemically, mechanically, and/or electrolytically removing material from microelectronic substrates
US7229535 *6 Jun 200312 Jun 2007Applied Materials, Inc.Hydrogen bubble reduction on the cathode using double-cell designs
US20020025760 *21 Jun 200128 Feb 2002Whonchee LeeMethods and apparatus for electrically and/or chemically-mechanically removing conductive material from a microelectronic substrate
US20020104764 *20 Nov 20018 Ago 2002Gautam BanerjeeElectropolishing and chemical mechanical planarization
US20020115283 *20 Feb 200122 Ago 2002Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing Ltd.Planarization by selective electro-dissolution
US20030054729 *29 Ago 200220 Mar 2003Whonchee LeeMethods and apparatus for electromechanically and/or electrochemically-mechanically removing conductive material from a microelectronic substrate
US20030064669 *23 May 20023 Abr 2003Basol Bulent M.Low-force electrochemical mechanical processing method and apparatus
US20030109198 *29 Ago 200212 Jun 2003Whonchee LeeMethods and apparatus for electrically detecting characteristics of a microelectronic substrate and/or polishing medium
US20030113996 *12 Oct 200119 Jun 2003Takeshi NogamiSemiconductor production device and production method for semiconductor device
US20030127320 *27 Nov 200210 Jul 2003Ismail EmeshApparatus for electrochemically depositing a material onto a workpiece surface
US20030129927 *29 Ago 200210 Jul 2003Whonchee LeeMethods and apparatus for selectively removing conductive material from a microelectronic substrate
US20030178320 *26 Feb 200325 Sep 2003Applied Materials, Inc.Method and composition for polishing a substrate
US20040043705 *29 Ago 20024 Mar 2004Whonchee LeeMethod and apparatus for chemically, mechanically, and/or electrolytically removing material from microelectronic substrates
US20040154931 *12 Feb 200312 Ago 2004Akihisa HongoPolishing liquid, polishing method and polishing apparatus
US20050173260 *28 Feb 200511 Ago 2005Basol Bulent M.System for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US20050178743 *1 Feb 200518 Ago 2005Applied Materials, Inc.Process control in electrochemically assisted planarization
US20050196963 *20 Feb 20048 Sep 2005Whonchee LeeMethods and apparatuses for electrochemical-mechanical polishing
US20060042956 *1 Sep 20042 Mar 2006Whonchee LeeMethods and systems for removing materials from microfeature workpieces with organic and/or non-aqueous electrolytic media
US20060163083 *21 Ene 200527 Jul 2006International Business Machines CorporationMethod and composition for electro-chemical-mechanical polishing
US20060189139 *3 Abr 200624 Ago 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatuses for electrochemical-mechanical polishing
US20060191800 *14 Abr 200631 Ago 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatus for removing conductive material from a microelectronic substrate
US20060199351 *28 Abr 20067 Sep 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for removing adjacent conductive and non-conductive materials of a microelectronic substrate
US20060208322 *28 Abr 200621 Sep 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for removing adjacent conductive and non-conductive materials of a microelectronic substrate
US20060217040 *2 Jun 200628 Sep 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatus for removing conductive material from a microelectronic substrate
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.204/196.01
Clasificación internacionalC23F13/00
Clasificación cooperativaH01L21/30625, C25F3/08, C25F3/02, B23H5/08, C25F1/00
Clasificación europeaB23H5/08, C25F3/02, C25F1/00, C25F3/08