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Patentes

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Número de publicaciónUS20100050477 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 12/583,854
Fecha de publicación4 Mar 2010
Fecha de presentación26 Ago 2009
Fecha de prioridad4 Sep 2008
Número de publicación12583854, 583854, US 2010/0050477 A1, US 2010/050477 A1, US 20100050477 A1, US 20100050477A1, US 2010050477 A1, US 2010050477A1, US-A1-20100050477, US-A1-2010050477, US2010/0050477A1, US2010/050477A1, US20100050477 A1, US20100050477A1, US2010050477 A1, US2010050477A1
InventoresThomas Jay Zeek
Cesionario originalThomas Jay Zeek
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Weight lifting shoes
US 20100050477 A1
Resumen
A weight lifting system wherein shoes of substantially normal fit and construction have additional parts that are designed to attach to and detach from corresponding hardware on weights and weight holding devices, and the additional parts on the shoes will not interfere with walking or other exercises or with the normal function of the shoe. Structural support for the added parts is embedded in the sole of the shoe where it will be unnoticeable by the user. The hardware works quickly and easily and a plurality of different weights is preferred with the net result being that the user can quickly and easily pick up and put down weights with their feet, change the amount of weight, and change weights from foot to foot and, hence, can easily move from one exercise to another, and there is no need to remove the shoes when performing other exercises.
Imágenes(12)
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Reclamaciones(11)
1. a shoe that is substantially normal in fit and construction further consisting of parts that are designed to attach to and detach from corresponding hardware that has been added to weights and weight holding devices and having structural support for said parts embedded in the sole of the shoe.
2. the shoe of claim 1 wherein said parts protrude from the sides of the shoe's sole.
3. an assembly consisting of parts that are designed to attach to and detach from corresponding hardware that has been added to weights or weight holding devices and structural support for said parts wherein said structural support can be embedded in the sole of a shoe of substantially normal fit and construction:
a) whereby said assembly can be secured to a user's foot without interfering with the user's ability to walk or perform most other exercises,
b) whereby said assembly can be used to secure said weights or weight holding devices to said user's foot,
c) whereby said user can quickly and easily secure and remove said weights or weight holding devices to and from their foot,
d) whereby said user can perform a variety of exercises by lifting said weights and can quickly and easily move from one exercise to another and can walk and perform other exercises unimpeded without removing said shoe.
4. the assembly of claim 3 wherein said parts are designed to protrude from the sides of the sole of said shoe.
5. the assembly of claim 3 wherein said structural support is thin and flat whereby said structural support can alternately be embedded in the sole of a thin and flexible sandal to be strapped to the shod foot of said user.
6. the assembly of claim 5 wherein said parts are designed to protrude from the sides of the sole of said sandal.
7. a weight lifting system consisting of:
a) an assembly consisting of parts that are designed to attach to and detach from corresponding hardware that has been added to weights or weight holding devices and structural support for said parts wherein said structural support can be embedded in the sole of a shoe of substantially normal fit and construction,
b) a means of securing said assembly to a user's foot wherein said means will not interfere with the user's ability to walk or perform most other exercises, and said assembly will not interfere with the normal function of said means,
c) a weight or weight holding device further consisting of said corresponding hardware.
8. the weight lifting system of claim 7 wherein the means of securing said assembly to a user's foot is a shoe that is substantially normal in fit and construction further consisting of said assembly.
9. the weight lifting system of claim 8 wherein said parts protrude from the sides of the shoe's sole.
10. the weight lifting system of claim 7 wherein said weights and weight holding devices have a substantially flat upper surface for receiving the bottom of said means for securing said assembly.
11. the weight lifting system of claim 8 wherein said weights and weight holding devices have a substantially flat upper surface for receiving the bottom of a shoe.
Descripción
    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit of Provisional Application for Patent No. 61/191,171 filed on Sep. 4, 2008 for “Weight lifting shoes and their weights” from Thomas Jay Zeek.
  • [0002]
    The sandals and weights shown in this application are not claimed per se in this application and will be claimed in a later application.
  • FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • [0003]
    Not Applicable.
  • SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM
  • [0004]
    Not Applicable.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    This invention pertains to weight lifting, specifically to a device that improves the quality and number of exercises that a person can do with their legs. It is a pair of shoes that enable the user to easily pick up and put down weights with their feet and to change weights quickly and they do not interfere with the user's ability to walk or to do other exercises.
  • [0006]
    While exercises for the upper body have always been easy to do and plentiful, exercises for the legs have been fewer and much more difficult to coordinate. One of the reasons for this discrepancy is the simple ability of a person to pick up and put down weights with their hands, while no such ability exists for leg exercises.
  • [0007]
    This problem is normally addressed by the use of large expensive weight lifting machines. Machines called leg curl and leg extension machines take up a lot of room in the user's house and are only good for a couple of exercises. Other weight lifting machines such as donkey kick machines are more expensive and for most people require a gym membership.
  • [0008]
    Many devices have been invented for attaching weights to the user's ankles or feet to increase the number of exercises that can be done. Weighted shoes have been invented which don't hurt the ankles like ankle weights do but they make changing and removing weights difficult, and they hamper walking and other exercises because they remain heavy. U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,517,928 to Shanahan; 3,785,646 to Ruskin; and 6,052,924 to Sabat are examples of such shoes. Methods of adding weights to normal shoes include weights that tie into shoelaces U.S. Pat. No. 5,632,709 to Walsh and a sort of sock that fits over the shoe U.S. Pat. No. 5,728,032 to Glass. In both of those inventions changing weights is time consuming and difficult. All of these inventions are hampered by the limited amount of weight they can employ.
  • [0009]
    Closer to the mark have been devices that attach to shoes and which in turn receive various amounts of weight. U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,114,790 to Venables; 2,849,237 to Simithis; 3,343,836 to James; and 6,196,950 to Emick are all examples of such devices. All of these devices are excellent while the user is actually doing the exercise. They all accommodate heavy weight and in one case the ease of changing weights rivals my own invention, but all have the same drawbacks, namely that they interfere with walking and doing other exercises.
  • [0010]
    U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,114,790 and 3,343,836 mentioned above both use a very thick sole plate through which a dumbbell passes to add weight. The thickness of the sole plates makes walking awkward and makes other exercises awkward and dangerous as the user could easily “fall off their heels.” They would have to be removed when the user is switching between upper body and lower body exercises. U.S. Pat. No. 2,849,237 uses a thick sole plate as the actual weight and carries with it the same problems as above. U.S. Pat. No. 6,196,950 uses a thin sole plate but changing weights requires the user to fumble with individual weight plates instead of trading out the entire weight or weight holding device. The sole plate is very rigid and flat and not at all conducive to walking.
  • [0011]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,267,927 to Catanzano describes a similar device in which the sole plate is made up of a plurality of weights which can be thin but it is rigid and still awkward and is limited in the amount of weight it can incorporate. U.S. Pat. No. 2,214,052 to Good refers to an exercising boot “preferably made by casting suitable metal in a shaping form or mold.” It is intended to be worn in place of shoes and not over shoes and therefore will be difficult to fit properly. Its rigid design again makes walking and other exercises difficult and dangerous.
  • [0012]
    The only invention heretofore that is suitable for heavy weights, allows quick and easy changing of weights, and considers the user's ability to walk and to perform other exercises as well as the user's safety is U.S. Pat. No. 757,983 to Vaile, which discloses a shoe of substantially normal fit and construction with some parts added to accommodate the addition and quick removal of weights, even heavy weights, just like the shoes of my own invention. The mostly normal construction of Vaile's shoe provides comfort, safety, and convenience because it can be worn throughout the user's workout and walking and performing other exercises is still possible, and it provides a solid dependable base for a person who is standing on one foot while exercising with the other foot.
  • [0013]
    Vaile's shoe however still carries with it some drawbacks that need to be addressed.
  • [0014]
    The first drawback of Vaile's invention is that the structural support for the parts that attach to weights comes in the form of a steel toe section in the front of the shoe. This steel toe completely eliminates all flexibility in the shoe from the ball of the foot forward, which interferes with the ability of the user to bend his or her toes back as would be necessary to for instance run on a treadmill or perform any other exercise that involves standing on the toes of either foot.
  • [0015]
    A worse drawback of Vaile's steel toe design is that it prevents the user from pushing their toes down, which may be necessary to keep from falling over forward when the user is lifting heavy weights with their upper body, or doing squats with a barbell on their shoulders.
  • [0016]
    Vaile's design also has the drawback of having the weight over the toes of the user's foot. This weight forward design forces the user to exercise their ankle and lower leg muscles and upper leg muscles at the same time. During lateral leg raises for instance the weight will put a twisting force on the user's ankle. Being forced to exercise too many muscles at the same time reduces the effectiveness on the target muscles because the user will get tired before the target muscles have been fully worked.
  • [0017]
    Consequently there remains a need for, and it is the object of the current invention to provide a means for a person to quickly and easily pick up and put down heavy weights with their feet that is supremely safe, that does not hurt, does not hamper walking or other exercises, and that allows the user to switch back and forth unimpeded between upper and lower body exercises.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0018]
    The current invention is a shoe that is normal in every way except for the addition of a small amount of hardware added for the purpose of attaching to weights, and a small amount of structural support for that hardware embedded in the sole of the shoe where it would be unnoticeable to the user, and weights and weight holding devices with hardware for attaching to the hardware of the shoes. A sturdy heel cup for the shoe is desirable.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING
  • [0019]
    FIGS. 1A, B, C, and D show a top, side, front, and perspective view of the current invention.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 2 shows a weight holding device for use with this invention including threaded posts 64 and wing nuts 66 for attaching to the shoes and a platform 60 to hold the shoes in place and a bar 62 for holding weights.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 3 shows the weight holding device of FIG. 2 with ordinary barbell weights 68 added.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 4 shows a top view of a weight holding device for use with this invention using locking clamps 94 instead of wing nuts 66. The locking nut 86 is not shown in this view.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 5 shows a side view of the weight holding device for use with this invention with the locking clamps 94 open.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 6 shows a side view of the weight holding device for use with this invention with the locking clamps 94 in a closed position.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 7 shows a cross sectional view of the threaded rod 84 and plunger 82 of the locking clamp 94 and the hole 96 that the smooth post 90 goes into.
  • [0026]
    FIGS. 8A and B show views of the invention being worn by a user with the weight holding device attached.
  • [0027]
    FIGS. 9A, B, and C show a person doing various exercises using the shoes and the weight holding device that I invented.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 10 shows a perspective view of a weight with hardware for attaching to the shoes of this invention and a curved bottom 102 to facilitate walking.
  • [0029]
    FIGS. 11A and B show two views of this invention using pegs 110 instead of tabs 6. The spacers 111 maintain a constant width to fit between the hardware in FIG. 12 even across various shoe sizes.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 12 shows an end view of a weight holding device with hardware to attach to the pegs 110 shown in FIGS. 11A and B.
  • [0031]
    FIGS. 13A, B, and C show various views of an assembly which is to be embedded in the sole of a shoe including the hardware for attaching to weights and the structural support for that hardware.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 14 shows the same assembly as 13A-C for a smaller shoe size.
  • [0033]
    FIGS. 15A and B are a top and side view of a different embodiment of the assembly shown in FIGS. 13A-C.
  • [0034]
    FIGS. 16A and B are a top and side view of a sturdy heel cup for the shoe.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 17 is a top view of the shoe with abbreviated tabs 32 for latching onto the corresponding hardware on weights, and the sturdy heel cup 5 glued onto the outside of the shoe.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 18 is a side view of the shoe with full tabs 6 and the heel cup 5 glued onto the shoe.
  • [0037]
    FIGS. 19A and B show an alternate use for the tabs 6 and the tab assembly 116 shown in FIGS. 15A and B wherein the tab assembly 116 is an integral part of a thin and flexible sandal which is to be strapped to the shod foot of the user.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0038]
    A preferred embodiment of the shoe of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 1A (top view), 1B (side view), 1C (front view), and 1D (perspective view).
  • [0039]
    The shoe 40 a is substantially normal in every way but further consists of a sturdy heel cup 5 hidden in the heel of the shoe to help to keep the shoe 40 a on the user's foot and a means of tightening the heel cup 5 comfortably around the user's heel, in this case the shoe lace 44. FIG. 18 shows how the shoelace 44 tightens the heel cup 5. A separate means for making the shoe fit the user's foot should be used so that a comfortable fit can be achieved independently from the tightness of the heel cup 5. A hook and loop (Velcro®) shoe strap 42 is used in this example to make the shoe fit comfortably. In the preferred embodiment the strap should describe a Z shape to cover more of the user's foot. The heel cup is shown in FIGS. 16A, 16B, 17, and 18.
  • [0040]
    The shoe 40 a further consists of hardware in the form of tabs 6 protruding from the sides of the sole of the shoe which are designed to attach to corresponding hardware that is permanently attached to a weight or a weight holding device such as a special dumbbell, enabling the wearer of the shoe to quickly and easily pick up and put down weights with their feet and to exercise by lifting the weights with their legs.
  • [0041]
    The tabs 6 in this case are an integral part of an assembly, in this case a tab assembly 116, shown in FIGS. 15A and B consisting of the tabs 6 and a main body 114 preferably comprising a single piece of stiff, sturdy and durable material such as Lexan® polycarbonate from SABIC Innovative Plastics, although any strong and durable material will do, including steel, brass, bronze, fiberglass, or any of several kinds of plastic, provided that said material can be firmly glued and is not brittle, or the tab assembly can be made of several pieces of differing materials. The tabs 6 also have a notch 24 and a concavity 22 which enable them to lock onto the hardware that comes with the weights as will be described in detail later.
  • [0042]
    The concavity 22 is made by the addition of an ordinary metal washer 20 with a notch cut into it but it can also be made by drilling directly into the base material if the tabs are thick enough to accommodate that.
  • [0043]
    The tab assembly 116 shown in detail in FIGS. 15A and 15B is passed through a void in the sole of the shoe so that a tab 6 protrudes on each side of the shoe and it is glued into that place using a glue that is suitable for the materials chosen for the tab assembly and the sole of the shoe. The tab assembly may further be mechanically fastened to the sole of the shoe using short deep thread screws. A thin rubber laminate 31 is then laminated to the bottom of the entire shoe including the tabs. The thin rubber laminate 31 can have a thin layer of stretch resistant fabric on its top side for added strength. While the main body 114 of the tab assembly 116 is shown in FIGS. 15A and B as a small and nearly square piece of material it can be made as large as the entire sole of the shoe and the same is true of the main body 114 of the peg assembly 115 a shown in FIGS. 13A-C and 115 b in FIG. 14.
  • [0044]
    In the preferred embodiment the distance between the notches 24 in the tab assembly 116 would remain constant over several shoe sizes so that the distance between the posts 64, 90 on the weights 100 and the weight holding devices 61 a, 61 b can remain constant. This would enable different members of a single household to share weights and weight holding devices or a single person to use the same weights while their feet grow and their shoe size changes, and retailers would not have to stock the weights in a large variety of sizes. About four sizes of tab assembly 116 should be plenty even if the main body 114 of the tab assembly changes with every shoe size
  • [0045]
    FIG. 2 shows a weight holding device 61 a for use with the shoes 40 a in FIGS. 1A-D, 8A and B, 9 A-C, and 18, and the shoes 40 b in FIG. 17, and the sandals shown in FIGS. 19A and B. It consists of a 1″ diameter bar 62 that is fitted with a platform 60 and two threaded posts 64 and two wing nuts 66. The approximate dimensions of the platform 60 are 7″ in width, 2.5″ front to back, and about 0.25″ in thickness, although the thickness is only for strength and can vary according to the material it is made of. The other dimensions of the platform can vary according to the size of the shoe 40 a or 40 b that is being used since the shoe 40 a or 40 b needs to fit between the threaded posts 64, but the platform 60 and the distance between the posts 64 should be limited to a few sizes to match the few sizes of the tab assembly 116 for the reasons listed in paragraph 0044 above. The platform 60 also acts as a weight collar and prevents the weights 68 from moving any closer to the user's shoe 40 a or 40 b and maintains space for the user's fingers to operate the wing nuts 66.
  • [0046]
    The bar 62 is of a standard diameter for accepting normal barbell weights 68 that are available at most sporting goods stores.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 3 shows the weight holding device of FIG. 2 with normal barbell weights 68 added to the bars 62. The weights 68 are held onto the bars 62 with ordinary weight clamps 70 which are also available at most sporting goods stores. The user of this invention would ideally have several of these weight holding devices 61 a with a different amount of weight on each or several weights 100 to completely obviate the need for fumbling with the barbell weights 68, but the invention is still very valuable for picking up and putting down the weight even if the user only has one.
  • [0048]
    The shoes and weights of this invention work by the user wearing the shoes 40 a sliding the tabs 6 under the wing nuts 66 so that the notches 24 accept the threaded posts 64 and the concavities 22 are directly under the wing nuts 66. The user then tightens the wing nuts 66 into the concavities 22 until they are pressing firmly on the tabs 6 and are mostly surrounded by the washers 20. The weight 100 or weight holding device 61 a is now locked firmly to the shoe 40 a because the notches 24 will not allow the threaded posts 64 to move left, right, or back; the washers 20 reach around the wing nuts 66 and will not allow them to move forward; and the wing nuts 66 will not allow the tabs 6 to come up off of the platform 60. Additionally, the thin rubber laminate 31 on the bottoms of the tabs 6 is being pressed firmly to the platform 60 which creates friction preventing any horizontal movement of the shoe on the platform. The user is now free to lift his or her foot and hence the weight in any manner they desire.
  • [0049]
    After performing the desired number of repetitions of a given exercise the user can quickly and easily remove the weight by loosening the wing nuts 66 and sliding their foot back off of the platform 60. The user can then attach the weight to their other foot or attach a different weight to the same foot and continue exercising, or they can leave the weights off and do some upper body exercises with no weights attached to their feet. The shoes 40 a will not interfere in any way with push ups, sit ups, walking, or almost any other exercise. The wing nuts 66 never need to be removed from the threaded posts 64, only loosened enough to provide clearance for the washers 20.
  • [0050]
    FIGS. 4, 5, and 6 show a top view and side views of a weight holding device 61 b that replaces the threaded posts 64 and wing nuts 66 with smooth posts 90 and locking clamps 94.
  • [0051]
    The locking clamps 94 work in the same way as Visegrip® locking pliers and use most of the same components. With the locking clamps open as is shown in FIG. 5, the shoe 40 a is slid onto the platform 60 so that the notches 24 accept the smooth posts 90. With the concavity 22 mostly encircling the smooth post 90 and directly under the plunger 82, the user locks the locking clamp 94 down onto the tab 6 by pushing down on the thumb lever 80 which causes the plunger 82 to go down into the concavity 22. FIG. 6 shows the locking clamp 94 in the position for holding down on a tab 6. When the user wants to release the clamps they can simply pull up on the thumb lever 80. This weight holding device also works with the shoes 40 b in FIG. 17.
  • [0052]
    The locking clamps 94 can be adjusted by means of the threaded rod 84. With the locking clamps 94 open as in FIG. 5 the user can slide the shoe 40 a into position and depress the thumb lever 80. If the user determines that the clamp is too tight or too loose they can release the clamp and then twist the threaded rod 84 and close the clamp again. When the desired tightness is achieved the user should tighten the locking nut 86 which will hold the threaded rod 84 in place. Clamps of this type are available from Good Hand Inc., 7141 Paramount Blvd., Pico Rivera, Calif. 90660.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 7 shows a cross sectional view of the threaded rod 84 and plunger 82 from the locking clamp 94. This view shows the hole 96 which accepts the smooth post 90 when the plunger 82 goes down into the concavity 22. The smooth post 90 prevents the plunger 82 from moving on a horizontal plane and makes sure the plunger 82 goes in exactly the right place.
  • [0054]
    The hole 96 has to be deep enough to keep the smooth post 90 from hitting the top of the hole 96 because that would prevent the plunger 82 from fully descending into the concavity 22. There should always be some air space above the smooth post 90 when the locking clamp 94 is closed.
  • [0055]
    FIGS. 8A and 8B show the shoe 40 a with the weight holding device 61 a attached in the proper way.
  • [0056]
    FIGS. 9A, 9B, and 9C show a person using this invention to perform various exercises.
  • [0057]
    FIG. 10 shows a special weight 100 designed specifically for use with the shoes 40 a and 40 b of this invention. It has a curved bottom 102 to facilitate walking a few steps to or from a chair and it can be made of plastic filled with sand, concrete, lead, etc. or it can be made of a single piece of cast iron. It can be made in various sizes.
  • [0058]
    FIGS. 11A and 11B show a front view and a perspective view of a different embodiment of this invention designed for use with the weight holding device 61 c shown in FIG. 12. The tab assembly 116 is replaced by a peg assembly 115 a shown in FIGS. 13A-C, wherein the tabs 6 are replaced by pegs 110 and spacers 111.
  • [0059]
    FIG. 12 shows an end view of a weight holding device 61 c which is designed for use with the shoes 40 c shown in FIGS. 11A and 11B. The user wearing the shoes 40 c engages the weight holding device 61 c by stepping down on it so that the pegs 110 are forced through the latches 112. The latches 112 have a spring and close automatically to hold the pegs 110 in place. The spacers 111 contact the sides of the latch mechanisms 131 to prevent any lateral movement by the shoe 40 c. The distance filled by the spacers 111 should remain constant over several shoe sizes as is shown in FIGS. 13A-C and FIG. 14 for the reasons discussed in paragraph 0044 above. When the user of this embodiment of the invention wants to release the shoe 40 c from the latch mechanisms 131 they only have to depress the latch levers 113 and the latches 112 will move out of the way.
  • [0060]
    FIGS. 13A-C show a top, side, and front view of an assembly, in this case a peg assembly 115 a, used to make the shoes 40 c of this invention. It consists of a main body 114, pegs 110, and spacers 111. This is an alternative to the tab assembly 116 described in detail in paragraphs 0041-0043 above. It employs the same main body 114 and the considerations for the choice of materials are the same as for that embodiment, except that the pegs 110 should be made of steel.
  • [0061]
    The peg assembly 115 a is also built into the shoe 40 c in basically the same manner as the tab assembly 116. The peg assembly 115 a is passed through a void in the sole of the shoe so that a peg and spacer protrude from each side. The peg assembly 115 a is glued into that place using a suitable glue and like the tab assembly 116 may be further secured to the shoe sole with short deep thread screws. The main body 114 is again shown as a small and nearly square piece of material but as in the tab assembly 116 described in paragraph 0043 above, the main body can be as large as the entire footprint of the shoe.
  • [0062]
    The difference in construction for shoes 40 c using the peg assembly 115 a compared to shoes 40 a using the tab assembly 116 rests in the fact that the pegs 110 are higher than the tabs 6 and therefore the peg assembly 115 a should not be in direct contact with the thin rubber laminate on the bottom of the shoe but should be placed higher in the sole of the shoe.
  • [0063]
    If the main body 114 of the peg assembly 115 a is small as shown in FIGS. 13A-C, a layer of stretch resistant fabric can be added into the sole of the shoe 40 c for added strength, but a larger main body is preferable and the same is true for the tab assembly 116.
  • [0064]
    FIG. 14 shows a top view of a peg assembly 115 b which is the same in every way as the peg assembly 115 a in FIG. 13A except that the main body 114 is smaller for a smaller shoe size while the pegs 110 and spacers 111 remain the same size and cover the same distance.
  • [0065]
    FIGS. 15A and 15B are a top and side view of the tab assembly 116 described in detail in paragraphs 0041 through 0043 above.
  • [0066]
    FIGS. 16A and 16B are a top and side view of the heel cup 5 hidden in the shoe 40 a in FIGS. 1A-D and the shoe 40 c in FIGS. 11A and 11B. FIGS. 17 and 18 show shoes with this same heel cup 5 glued to the outside of the shoe and FIG. 18 further shows how the shoelace 44 is used to tighten the heel cup 5 without affecting the overall fit of the shoe. It should also be noted that the arms of the heel cup 134 will act as a draw string around the top of the user's foot in addition to the grip that the heel cup 5 will create on the user's heel. The shoes may be further engineered to enhance this feature.
  • [0067]
    FIG. 17 shows a top view of a shoe 40 b that uses a third version of hardware for attaching to weights. The tab 6 in FIGS. 1A to 1D is replaced by an abbreviated tab 32 which has an abbreviated washer 34 and an abbreviated concavity 36 and an abbreviated notch 38. This can all be made by simply sawing the ends off of the tab assembly 116 shown in FIGS. 15A and 15B. FIG. 17 also shows the heel cup 5 glued to the outside of the shoe 40 b.
  • [0068]
    FIG. 18 shows a side view of the shoe in FIGS. 1A to 1D but with the heel cup 5 on the outside of the shoe.
  • [0069]
    FIGS. 19A and 19B show a thin and flexible sandal which uses the tab assembly 116 as an integral part of its main body with a thin rubber laminate 30 and a non slip upper surface 28 as well as a heel cup and various straps to secure it to the shod foot of the user. Its thinness and flexibility make it safe and easy to use and to wear. It is shown as an alternative use for the tabs 6, the tab assembly 116, or any other such shoe part or assembly.
  • [0070]
    Accordingly the reader will see that the shoes and weights and the various hardware of this invention will provide a method of lower body exercises that is effective, safe, easy to operate, low cost, and can be used and kept easily in a small room or apartment.
  • [0071]
    Although the description above contains many specificities, exact descriptions of the hardware used to attach the weights to the shoes may be innumerable, and examples shown should not be construed as limiting the scope of this invention but as merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention. Parts that attach to corresponding hardware on the weights may be recessed into the sides or the bottom of the shoe's sole. Additionally, the shoes of this invention can be boots, loafers using the disclosed heel cup, high tops, or any other kind of shoe that is found to work.
  • [0000]
    REFERENCE NUMERALS USED IN DRAWINGS
     5 heel cup
     6 tab
    20 washer
    22 concavity
    24 notch
    28 non-slip surface
    30 thin rubber laminate
    31 thin rubber laminate
    32 abbreviated tab
    34 abbreviated washer
    36 abbreviated concavity
    38 abbreviated notch
     40a shoe with tabs
     40b shoe with abbreviated tabs
     40c shoe with pegs
    42 shoe strap
    44 shoelace
    60 platform
     61a weight holding device with wing nuts
     61b weight holding device with locking clamps
     61c weight holding device with latch mechanism
    62 bar
    64 threaded post
    66 wing nut
    68 barbell weight
    70 weight clamp
    80 thumb lever
    82 plunger
    84 threaded rod
    86 locking nut
    90 smooth post
    94 locking clamp
    96 hole
    100  special weight
    102  curved bottom
    110  peg
    111  spacer
    112  latch
    113  latch lever
    114  main body of assembly
    115a peg assembly
    115b small peg assembly
    116  tab assembly
    131  latch mechanism
    134  arm of heel cup
Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US757983 *14 Abr 190319 Abr 1904Percy A VaileBoot or shoe for athletic purposes.
US2114790 *17 May 193719 Abr 1938Robert C HoffmanExercising device
US2214052 *13 Jul 193810 Sep 1940Harry L GoodExercising boot
US2849237 *2 May 195726 Ago 1958Ted SimithisInterchangeable exercising shoe
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.36/132, 482/105
Clasificación internacionalA63B21/065, A43B5/00
Clasificación cooperativaA43B5/00, A63B21/0004, A43B19/005, A63B21/4015, A63B21/072
Clasificación europeaA43B19/00B, A63B21/00D, A63B21/14A7F, A63B21/072, A43B5/00