Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS20120078362 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 13/321,144
Número de PCTPCT/US2010/035319
Fecha de publicación29 Mar 2012
Fecha de presentación18 May 2010
Fecha de prioridad18 May 2009
También publicado comoCA2762536A1, CA2979355A1, CN102655823A, CN102655823B, CN105726201A, EP2432420A1, US20170135857, WO2010135369A1
Número de publicación13321144, 321144, PCT/2010/35319, PCT/US/10/035319, PCT/US/10/35319, PCT/US/2010/035319, PCT/US/2010/35319, PCT/US10/035319, PCT/US10/35319, PCT/US10035319, PCT/US1035319, PCT/US2010/035319, PCT/US2010/35319, PCT/US2010035319, PCT/US201035319, US 2012/0078362 A1, US 2012/078362 A1, US 20120078362 A1, US 20120078362A1, US 2012078362 A1, US 2012078362A1, US-A1-20120078362, US-A1-2012078362, US2012/0078362A1, US2012/078362A1, US20120078362 A1, US20120078362A1, US2012078362 A1, US2012078362A1
InventoresDavid Haffner, Ken Curry, Harold Heitzmann, David Applegate
Cesionario originalDose Medical Corporation
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Drug eluting ocular implant
US 20120078362 A1
Resumen
Disclosed herein are drug delivery devices and methods for the treatment of ocular disorders requiring targeted and controlled administration of a drug to an interior portion of the eye for reduction or prevention of symptoms of the disorder. The devices are capable of controlled release of one or more drugs and may also include structures which allows for treatment of increased intraocular pressure by permitting aqueous humor to flow out of the anterior chamber of the eye through the device.
Imágenes(57)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones(24)
1. A drug delivery ocular implant comprising:
an elongate outer shell having a proximal end, a distal end, said outer shell being shaped to define an interior lumen;
at least a first drug positioned within said interior lumen;
wherein said outer shell comprises a substantially uniform first thickness;
wherein said outer shell is permeable or semi-permeable to said drug, thereby allowing at least about 5% of total the elution of the drug to occur through the portions of the shell having said first thickness; and
wherein said outer shell comprises one or more regions of drug release.
2. The implant of claim 1, wherein said one or more regions of drug release are configured to allow a different rate of drug elution as compared to said elution through the outer shell.
3. The implant of claim 1, wherein the overall rate of elution of drug out of the implant is greater in the distal region of the implant.
4. The implant of claim 1, wherein there is a greater amount of the first drug in the distal half of the device as compared to the proximal half of the device.
5. The implant of claim 1, wherein the one or more regions of drug release are configured to allow a greater rate of drug elution as compared to said elution through the outer shell.
6. The implant of claim 1; wherein the one or more regions of drug release comprise one or more of regions of reduced thickness shell material, one or more orifices passing through the outer shell, or combinations thereof.
7. The implant of claim 6, wherein one or more regions of drug release comprise one or more orifices passing through the outer shell, and wherein said orifices are positioned along the long axis of the implant shell.
8. The implant of claim 1, wherein the drug is a steroid and the outer shell comprises silicone or siliconized polyurethane.
9. The implant of claim 8, wherein said outer shell comprises siliconized urethane and wherein said outer shell does not have any orifices passing through the outer shell.
10. The implant of claim 8, wherein the outer shell comprises silicone and the implant has one or more orifices passing through the outer shell.
11. The implant of claim 1, additionally comprising one or more coatings that alter the rate of drug elution from the implant.
12. The implant of claim 1, wherein at least the distal-most about 5 mm to about 10 mm of said interior lumen houses said drug.
13. The implant of claim 1, wherein said outer shell has a length between about 10 mm and about 20 mm, an outer diameter between about 150 microns to about 500 microns, and an interior lumen diameter of about 75 microns to about 475 microns.
14. The implant of claim 1, wherein the elution of said drug from said implant continues for at least a period of at least one year.
15. The implant of claim 1, further comprising a lumen configured to transport ocular fluid from a first location in an eye to one or more other locations, thereby reducing intraocular pressure.
16. A method of treating an ocular condition or disorder in an intraocular target tissue comprising:
making an incision in the temporal portion of the eye,
advancing a delivery device associated with a drug delivery implant through the cornea of the eye and across the anterior chamber of the eye,
inserting the drug delivery implant into the suprachoroidal space of the eye,
wherein the drug delivery implant comprises,
an elongate outer shell having a proximal end, a distal end, said outer shell being shaped to define an interior lumen;
at least a first drug positioned within said interior lumen;
wherein said outer shell comprises a substantially uniform first thickness;
wherein said outer shell is permeable or semi-permeable to said drug, thereby allowing at least about 5% of total the elution of the drug to occur through the portions of the shell having said first thickness; and.
wherein said outer shell comprises one or more regions of drug release;
positioning said implant such that at least one of said one or more regions of drug release are located proximate an intraocular target; and
withdrawing the delivery device from the eye, wherein drug elutes from the implant in sufficient quantity to treat an ocular condition or disorder.
17. The method of claim 16, wherein the intraocular target is in the posterior chamber of the eye.
18. The method of claim 16, wherein the intraocular target is selected from the group consisting of the macula, the retina, the optic nerve, the ciliary body, and the intraocular vasculature.
19. The method of claim 16, wherein the drug elutes from the implant so as to achieve a therapeutic effect for a period of at least one year.
20. The method of claim 16, wherein the implant further comprises a shunt configured to transport ocular fluid from the anterior chamber to one or more physiological outflow pathways, thereby reducing intraocular pressure.
21. The method of claim 16, wherein the drug is a steroid and wherein said implant contains a total load of steroid ranging from about 10 to about 1000 micrograms.
22. (canceled)
23. The method of claim 21, wherein said steroid is released from said implant at a rate ranging from about 0.05 to about 10 micrograms per day thereby achieving a concentration at said target tissue ranging from about 1 to about 100 nanomolar.
24. (canceled)
Descripción
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    This disclosure relates to implantable intraocular drug delivery devices structured to provide targeted and/or controlled release of a drug to a desired intraocular target tissue and methods of using such devices for the treatment of ocular diseases and disorders. In certain embodiments, this disclosure relates to a treatment of increased intraocular pressure wherein aqueous humor is permitted to flow out of an anterior chamber of the eye through a surgically implanted pathway. In certain embodiments, this disclosure also relates particularly to a treatment of ocular diseases with drug delivery devices affixed to the eye, such as to fibrous tissue within the eye.
  • [0003]
    2. Description of the Related Art
  • [0004]
    The mammalian eye is a specialized sensory organ capable of light reception and is able to receive visual images. The retina of the eye consists of photoreceptors that are sensitive to various levels of light, interneurons that relay signals from the photoreceptors to the retinal ganglion cells, which transmit the light-induced signals to the brain. The iris is an intraocular membrane that is involved in controlling the amount of light reaching the retina. The iris consists of two layers (arranged from anterior to posterior), the pigmented fibrovascular tissue known as a stroma and pigmented epithelial cells. The stroma connects a sphincter muscle (sphincter pupillae), which contracts the pupil, and a set of dilator muscles (dilator pupillae) which open it. The pigmented epithelial cells block light from passing through the iris and thereby restrict light passage to the pupil.
  • [0005]
    Numerous pathologies can compromise or entirely eliminate an individual's ability to perceive visual images, including trauma to the eye, infection, degeneration, vascular irregularities, and inflammatory problems. The central portion of the retina is known as the macula. The macula, which is responsible for central vision, fine visualization and color differentiation, may be affected by age related macular degeneration (wet or dry), diabetic macular edema, idiopathic choroidal neovascularization, or high myopia macular degeneration, among other pathologies.
  • [0006]
    Other pathologies, such as abnormalities in intraocular pressure, can affect vision as well. Aqueous humor is a transparent liquid that fills at least the region between the cornea, at the front of the eye, and the lens and is responsible for producing a pressure within the ocular cavity. Normal intraocular pressure is maintained by drainage of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber by way of a trabecular meshwork which is located in an anterior chamber angle, lying between the iris and the cornea or by way of the “uveoscleral outflow pathway.” The “uveoscleral outflow pathway” is the space or passageway whereby aqueous exits the eye by passing through the ciliary muscle bundles located in the angle of the anterior chamber and into the tissue planes between the choroid and the sclera, which extend posteriorly to the optic nerve. About two percent of people in the United States have glaucoma, which is a group of eye diseases encompassing a broad spectrum of clinical presentations and etiologies but unified by increased intraocular pressure. Glaucoma causes pathological changes in the optic nerve, visible on the optic disk, and it causes corresponding visual field loss, which can result in blindness if untreated. Increased intraocular pressure is the only risk factor associated with glaucoma that can be treated, thus lowering intraocular pressure is the major treatment goal in all glaucomas, and can be achieved by drug therapy, surgical therapy, or combinations thereof.
  • [0007]
    Many pathologies of the eye progress due to the difficulty in administering therapeutic agents to the eye in sufficient quantities and/or duration necessary to ameliorate symptoms of the pathology. Often, uptake and processing of the active drug component of the therapeutic agent occurs prior to the drug reaching an ocular target site. Due to this metabolism, systemic administration may require undesirably high concentrations of the drug to reach therapeutic levels at an ocular target site. This can not only be impractical or expensive, but may also result in a higher incidence of side effects. Topical administration is potentially limited by limited diffusion across the cornea, or dilution of a topically applied drug by tear-action. Even those drugs that cross the cornea may be unacceptably depleted from the eye by the flow of ocular fluids and transfer into the general circulation. Thus, a means for ocular administration of a therapeutic agent in a controlled and targeted fashion would address the limitations of other delivery routes.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0008]
    In accordance with several embodiments there is provided a drug delivery ocular implant comprising an elongate outer shell having a proximal end, and a distal end, said outer shell being shaped to define an interior lumen, and at least a first drug positioned within said interior lumen. In certain embodiments, the outer shell comprises a substantially uniform first thickness, wherein said outer shell is permeable or semi-permeable to said drug, thereby allowing at least about 5% of the total elution of the drug to occur through the portions of the shell having said first thickness, and wherein said outer shell comprises one or more regions of drug release. In some embodiments, the one or more regions of drug release comprise regions of greater or increased elution or permeability to the drug than the portion of the outer shell having the first thickness. Such regions of increased permeability may comprise one or more of the outer shell having a reduced thickness, one or more orifices, a different material than the remainder of the outer shell and/or other means to provide increased permeability or elution of the drug. In other embodiments, the entirety of the elution of the drug is through the outer shell, the entirety of which or one or more portions of which may be considered to be a region of drug release.
  • [0009]
    In several embodiments, there is provided a drug delivery ocular implant comprising an elongate outer shell having a proximal end, a distal end, the outer shell being shaped to define an interior lumen, and at least a first drug positioned within the interior lumen. The outer shell preferably has a substantially uniform first thickness that allows about 5 to 15% of the total elution of the drug to occur through the shell having the first thickness. The outer shell may comprise one or more regions of drug release, wherein the regions of drug release are configured to allow different rates of drug elution as compared to each other. In some embodiments, the overall rate of elution of drug out of the implant is optionally differential along the length of the implant.
  • [0010]
    In some embodiments, there are provided implants having regions of drug release that are configured or have one or more regions that allow a greater rate of drug elution as compared to the elution through other regions of the outer shell. In some embodiments, the regions of greater drug release comprise one or more of regions of reduced thickness shell material, one or more orifices passing through the outer shell, or combinations thereof. In some embodiments, the outer shell optionally comprises silicone and/or may have one or more orifices passing through the outer shell. In such embodiments, the orifices may be positioned along the long axis of the implant shell or elsewhere. In other embodiments, the outer shell optionally comprises siliconized urethane and/or may comprise regions of reduced thickness, and may or may not have any orifices passing through the outer shell.
  • [0011]
    In several embodiments disclosed herein, there is provided a drug delivery ocular implant comprising an outer shell having a proximal end, a distal end, and being shaped to define an interior lumen, the outer shell having a substantially uniform first thickness and having one or more regions of a second, reduced shell thickness as compared to the first thickness, and a drug positioned within the interior lumen, wherein the thickness of the outer shell is inversely proportional to the rate of drug elution through the shell. In some embodiments, the outer shell of the first thickness is substantially impermeable to the drug. Release of the drug from the interior lumen is controlled at least in part by the permeability of the outer shell to the drug, with regions of reduced shell thickness having a higher rate of release.
  • [0012]
    Also provided is a drug delivery ocular implant comprising an outer shell having a proximal end, a distal end, and being shaped to define an interior lumen and having one or more partitions located within the interior lumen thereby creating two or more sub-lumens, a drug positioned within each sub-lumen. In some embodiments, at least a portion of the outer shell is substantially impermeable to the drug, and the outer shell also comprises one or more regions that are more permeable to the drug relative to the remainder of the outer shell, and wherein release of the drug from the interior lumen is controlled at least in part by the permeability of the more permeable outer shell regions.
  • [0013]
    In several embodiments there is also provided a drug delivery ocular implant comprising an outer shell having a proximal end, a distal end, and being shaped to define an interior lumen, a drug positioned within the interior lumen, wherein at least a portion of the outer shell is substantially impermeable to the drug, and the outer shell comprises one or more regions that are more permeable to the drug relative to the remainder of the outer shell.
  • [0014]
    In several embodiments disclosed herein, there is provided a drug delivery ocular implant comprising an outer shell being shaped to define an interior lumen, a drug positioned within the interior lumen, wherein the outer shell is comprises a permeable material that is capable of conveying both a solvent and the drug through the outer shell, wherein release of the drug from the interior lumen is initiated by the exposure of the outer shell to a suitable solvent, such that the solvent is conveyed through the permeable material to contact the drug, wherein after contact the solvent contacts the drug, the drug is conveyed through the permeable material to the exterior of the outer shell, and wherein the conveyance of the drug is controlled at least in part by the permeability of the permeable material. The outer shell may also include one or more regions of substantially impermeable material.
  • [0015]
    In several embodiments, there is provided a medical device for the delivery of a therapeutic agent to a patient, comprising an device dimensioned to be positioned at an area of a patient's body, a therapeutic agent positioned on or in at least a portion of the device, and wherein at least a portion of the device provides a physical effect useful toward mitigation of an unwanted side effect of the therapeutic agent.
  • [0016]
    In several embodiments, there is provided a drug delivery ocular implant comprising an outer shell that has one or more orifices therein, the shell being shaped to define an interior lumen a drug positioned within the interior lumen one or more coatings positioned on the interior surface of the shell, the outer surface of the shell, and/or partially or fully enveloping the drug positioned within the interior lumen Embodiments may further comprise one or more of the following optional features: the outer shell comprises a material substantially impermeable to ocular fluids, the outer shell is substantially impermeable to the drug, at least one of the coatings at least partially defines the release rate of the drug, and the implant is dimensioned such that the distal end of the implant is positioned in the suprachoroidal space and the proximal end of the implant is positioned fully within the eye.
  • [0017]
    In several embodiments, there is provided a drug delivery ocular implant comprising an outer shell that is optionally substantially impermeable to ocular fluids and has one or more orifices therein, the shell being shaped to define an interior lumen, a drug positioned within the interior lumen, one or more coatings positioned on the interior surface of the shell, the outer surface of the shell, and/or partially or fully enveloping the drug positioned within the interior lumen, and wherein the implant is dimensioned such that the drug is released to a desired intraocular target post-implantation.
  • [0018]
    In several embodiments, there is provided a drug delivery ocular implant comprising a flexible material compounded or coated with at least one drug, a flexible tether, wherein the flexible material may be rolled or folded to form a tube shape, wherein the tube shape is dimensioned to be placed within a delivery apparatus, wherein the delivery apparatus deploys the drug delivery ocular implant to an intraocular tissue, wherein the tube shape is released upon withdrawal of the delivery apparatus, thereby allowing the flexible material, which may be in the form of a sheet or disc, to return substantially to its original shape or configuration.
  • [0019]
    In several embodiments, there is provided a drug delivery ocular implant comprising an outer shell shaped to define an interior lumen or space with one open end, a cap dimensioned to fit within or over the one open end and having one or more orifices therein, and a drug positioned within the interior lumen. One or more coatings are optionally positioned on the interior surface of the cap, the outer surface of the cap, and/or between layers of drug positioned within the interior lumen.
  • [0020]
    Any embodiments disclosed herein may optionally further comprise a lumen, opening or shunt configured to transport ocular fluid from a first, undesired location, to one or more other locations, thereby reducing intraocular pressure.
  • [0021]
    The implants provided for herein optionally provide differential elution along the length of the implant and in some such embodiments, have a rate of elution that is greater at the distal portion of the implant as compared more proximal regions of the implant. Moreover, implants may optionally additionally comprise one or more coatings on the interior and/or exterior of the device and/or on the drug contained therein, that alter the rate of drug elution from the implant, the coatings optionally covering different portions of the implant.
  • [0022]
    In several embodiments, the distal-most about 5 mm to about 10 mm of the interior lumen houses the drug. In some embodiments, the outer shell has a length between about 10 mm and about 20 mm, an outer diameter between about 150 microns to about 500 microns, and an interior lumen diameter of about 75 microns to about 475 microns.
  • [0023]
    Some embodiments provided for herein result in elution of drug from the implant with zero-order or pseudo zero-order kinetics.
  • [0024]
    Also provided for herein are methods for treating or preventing an ocular condition in an intraocular target tissue comprising making an incision in the cornea or limbus of an eye in an advantageous position (e.g., temporal, nasal, superior, inferior, and the like), advancing a delivery device associated with a drug delivery implant according to several of the embodiments disclosed herein through the cornea of the eye and across the anterior chamber of the eye, inserting the drug delivery implant into the suprachoroidal space of the eye, positioning the implant such that the one or more regions of drug release are located sufficiently near the intraocular target to allow substantially all of the drug released from the implant to reach the intraocular target, and withdrawing the delivery device from the eye.
  • [0025]
    In some embodiments, the intraocular target is the posterior chamber of the eye, the anterior chamber of the eye, both the anterior chamber and posterior of the eye, or the macula, the retina, the optic nerve, the ciliary body, and the intraocular vasculature.
  • [0026]
    In several embodiments, the drug acts on the intraocular target tissue to generate a therapeutic effect for an extended period. In one embodiment, the drug comprises a steroid. In such embodiments, the implant contains a total load of steroid ranging from about 10 to about 1000 micrograms, steroid is released from the implant at a rate ranging from about 0.05 to about 10 micrograms per day and/or the steroid acts on the diseased or damaged target tissue at a concentration ranging from about 1 to about 100 nanomolar. In some embodiments, the steroid additionally generates side effects associated with accumulation of physiologic fluid, and an optional shunt transports the accumulated fluid from the first location to the remote second location (such as, for example, from the anterior chamber to an existing physiological outflow pathway, such as Schlemm's canal or the uveoscleral pathway).
  • [0027]
    Various embodiments of the implants disclosed herein may comprise one or more of the following optional features: drug being placed near the distal end of the shell, one or more barriers placed within the interior lumen and proximal to the drug to limit anterior (or, in some embodiments, posterior) elution of the drug, and/or a barrier that comprises a one-way valve positioned to allow fluid passage through the implant in a proximal to distal direction. In some embodiments having one or more barriers placed within the interior lumen, the one or more barriers facilitate the simultaneous (or sequential) elution of one or more drugs to the anterior and/or posterior chamber for targeted effects.
  • [0028]
    In some embodiments disclosed herein, there are provided coatings, preferably polymeric coatings, that are biodegradable. In some embodiments, two or more polymeric coatings are positioned on a surface of the outer shell and in some such embodiments, each coating has a unique rate of biodegradation in ocular fluid (including being substantially non-biodegradable), covers a different portion of the shell including covering one or more optional orifices in the shell, and/or permits ocular fluid to contact the drug within the interior lumen by passing through an increasing number of patent orifices in the shell over time that are created by the degradation of the coating material. In some embodiments, the coatings are optionally placed on the outer surface of the shell, positioned between the drug and the interior surface of outer shell, and/or positioned to envelop the drug within the interior lumen. The drug may be in the form of one or more pellets, beads, or tablets.
  • [0029]
    In several embodiments, biodegradation of the barriers or coatings is triggered by an externally originating stimulus, such as, for example, intraocular injection of a fluid that initiates biodegradation of the barrier, application of heat, ultrasound, and radio frequency, and the like. In some embodiments, the barriers and/or coatings degrade faster than the drug, while in other embodiments, the degradation rate of the drug is faster, or in still other embodiments, in which the rate of degradation is unique for each.
  • [0030]
    Any of the embodiments disclosed herein optionally further comprise one or more anchor structures, one or more excipients compounded with the drug, one or more orifices or openings in the proximal portion of the device to allow drainage of ocular fluid from the anterior chamber of the eye, and/or one or more wicks passing through any outer shell of the implant.
  • [0031]
    Several embodiments optionally comprise a retention protrusion configured to anchor the implant to an ocular tissue. Such retention protrusions optionally comprise one or more of ridges, claws, threads, flexible ribs, rivet-like shapes, flexible barbs, barbed tips, expanding material (such as a hydrogel), and biocompatible adhesives. In some embodiments, the expanding material is placed on an exterior surface of the outer shell of the implant and expands after contact with a solvent, such as, for example, intraocular fluid.
  • [0032]
    Implants provided for herein are optionally anchored (e.g., any mechanism or element that allows an implant to become affixed to, secured to or otherwise attached, either permanently or transiently, to a suitable target intraocular tissue) to a intraocular tissue, such as ciliary muscles, the ciliary tendons, the ciliary fibrous band, the trabecular meshwork, the iris, the iris root, the lens cortex, the lens epithelium, to or within the lens capsule, the sclera, the scleral spur, the choroid, or to or within Schlemm's canal. In certain embodiments comprising an implant anchored within the lens capsule, such an implant is preferably implanted concurrently, or after, removal of the native lens (e.g., by cataract surgery).
  • [0033]
    In some embodiments, the devices comprise one or more regions that are permeable to a drug or more permeable to a drug than other regions of a device. The increased permeability may be achieved by any means, including, but not limited to: use of thinner or decreased thickness of material that has some degree of permeability to the drug, whereby the decreased thickness increases the rate of diffusion or transport of the drug; orifices or holes wherein the orifices or holes may be of any suitable size or shape to allow egress of drug and/or ingress of ocular fluids; use of a second material that has increased permeability of a drug; use of a coating which enhances transport of a drug from the interior of a device to the exterior; and any combination of the foregoing.
  • [0034]
    Any of the implant embodiments described herein may also further comprise a lumen or passageway to allow drainage of ocular fluid from first location to a second location, such as, for example, from the anterior chamber of the eye to a physiological outflow pathway.
  • [0035]
    In any of the embodiments disclosed herein, the drug preferably is released from the implant to act on a diseased or damaged target tissue to generate a therapeutic effect. In some embodiments, the drug additionally generates side effects associated with accumulation of physiologic fluid and in such embodiments the implant may further comprise a stent or passage to transport the accumulated fluid from the first location to the remote second location.
  • [0036]
    According the disclosure herein, any of the implants described may comprise a shell of metal or polymeric material, which includes homopolymers, polymer blends and copolymers, such as random copolymers and block copolymers. In some embodiments, the polymeric material comprises ethylvinyl acetate-polyethylene, elastane, silicone, polyurethane, and/or polyamide.
  • [0037]
    In those embodiments having regions of reduced shell thickness, such regions may be created by any suitable means, including one or more of ablation, stretching, etching, grinding, and molding. The region may be in any pattern on or around the implant, including a spiral pattern, patches, rings and/or bands.
  • [0038]
    Regions that are characterized by having an increased rate of drug delivery, be it by reduced shell thickness, orifices, permeable material or any other means or combination of means described herein may be present at or in any portion or combination of portions of the device. Preferably the regions are placed so as to direct the drug to tissues in the eye which are the target of treatment by the drug. In some embodiments, such regions (or a single such region) are preferably concentrated towards the distal end of an elongate device so as to target delivery of a drug to tissues in the distal portions of the posterior chamber of the eye.
  • [0039]
    Implants as described herein may optionally be configured to interact with a recharging device in order to recharge the implant with an additional or supplementary dose of the drug. Such rechargeable implants, optionally comprise a reversible coupling between the proximal end of the implant and a clamping sleeve on the recharging device. In certain embodiments, the clamping sleeve houses flexible clamping grippers that create a secure coupling between the implant and the recharging device. The secure coupling optionally enables the recharging device to enable a flexible pusher or filling tube incorporated into the recharging device to be used to deliver a drug to a lumen of the implant. In several embodiments, the secure coupling between the implant and the recharging device enable a spring loaded flexible pusher tube incorporated into the recharging device to be used to deliver drug to a lumen of the implant. In some embodiments, there is a provided a one-way passage that allows deposition of a drug to the lumen of the implant, but prevents the drug from escaping the lumen through the passage after the removal of the recharging device.
  • [0040]
    In some embodiments, implants are provided that further comprise at least one partition within the interior lumen, thereby creating at least two sub-lumens. In some embodiments having two or more sub-lumens, each sub-lumen optionally houses a different drug or a different concentration of the same drug as compared to the other sub-lumens, optionally releases a drug to a different portion of the eye. In some embodiments where the implant houses multiple drugs one drug is therapeutically effective against an ocular disorder and another drug ameliorates a side effect of administration of the first drug.
  • [0041]
    In addition to sub-lumens, several embodiments are provided for in which implants further comprise: distal regions of the shell that are more permeable to the drugs as compared to more proximal regions; have partitions that are positioned perpendicular to a long axis of the outer shell; have partitions that are semi-permeable to a drug positioned within the sub-lumens; and/or wherein drug release from the sub-lumens occurs first from the distal-most sub-lumen and last from the proximal-most sub-lumen.
  • [0042]
    In some such embodiments, the partitions are optionally varied in permeability to the drugs within the sub-lumens such that the overall elution profile includes periods of time where drug release is reduced or eliminated.
  • [0043]
    Any of the embodiments disclosed herein comprising a lumen, pathway or shunt in addition to drug elution in an implant may optionally drain fluid to any existing physiological outflow pathway, including the suprachoroidal space or Schlemm's canal, and may optionally target drug delivery to the anterior chamber of the eye, the posterior chamber of the eye, both the anterior chamber and posterior of the eye, and/or specifically target the macula, the retina, the optic nerve, the ciliary body, and/or the intraocular vasculature.
  • [0044]
    Any of the embodiments disclosed herein may deliver a drug and/or provide a therapeutic effect for several days, one to two months, at least six months, at least a year, at least two years, at least three years, at least four years, and/or at least five years.
  • [0045]
    Any of the embodiments disclosed herein may be configured to target a diseased or damaged target tissue that is characterized by a limited ability to swell without loss or impairment of physiological function.
  • [0046]
    In several embodiments, there is provided a method of treating or preventing an ocular condition comprising: making an incision in the eye, inserting a drug delivery implant according to several embodiments disclosed herein into the suprachoroidal space of the eye, and withdrawing the delivery device from the eye.
  • [0047]
    In some embodiments, the implants are positioned such that the regions of the implant from which drug is released are located sufficiently near an intraocular target to allow substantially all of the drug released from the implant to reach the intraocular target
  • [0048]
    In several embodiments, the methods disclosed herein optionally comprise one or more of making an incision in the cornea or limbus of the eye in an advantageous position (e.g., temporal, nasal, superior, inferior, and the like), advancing the delivery device through the cornea of the eye and to the site of implantation.
  • [0049]
    In several embodiments there is provided a method for delivering an ocular implant comprising a stent according to several embodiments disclosed herein that simultaneously treats an ocular condition and limits treatment-associated side-effects, particularly those associated with increased fluid accumulation in the eye and/or increased intraocular pressure.
  • [0050]
    Other embodiments optionally comprise placing a peripheral iridotomy adjacent to the implanted drug delivery device and optionally maintaining the peripheral iridotomy as patent with a stent.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0051]
    These and other features, aspects, and advantages of the present disclosure will now be described with reference to the drawings of embodiments, which embodiments are intended to illustrate and not to limit the disclosure. One of ordinary skill in the art would readily appreciated that the features depicted in the illustrative embodiments are capable of combination in manners that are not explicitly depicted, but are both envisioned and disclosed herein.
  • [0052]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a schematic cross sectional view of an eye.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 2 illustrates a drug delivery device in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0054]
    FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate drug delivery devices in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0055]
    FIG. 4 illustrates a drug delivery device in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0056]
    FIG. 5 illustrates a drug delivery device in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0057]
    FIGS. 6A-6I illustrate various aspects of a drug delivery device in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0058]
    FIG. 7 illustrates a cross sectional view of drug delivery implant in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0059]
    FIG. 8 illustrates the distal portion of a drug delivery implant in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0060]
    FIG. 9 illustrates the distal portion of another drug delivery implant in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0061]
    FIGS. 10A-10G illustrate other drug delivery implants in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0062]
    FIG. 11 illustrates a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of multiple drug-containing pellets within the distal portion of a drug delivery implant.
  • [0063]
    FIG. 12 illustrates another drug delivery implant incorporating a shunt in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0064]
    FIGS. 13A-13C illustrate drug delivery implants in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0065]
    FIG. 14 illustrates a drug delivery implant in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0066]
    FIG. 15 illustrates an illustrative embodiment of a drug delivery implant and retention protrusion.
  • [0067]
    FIG. 16 illustrates an embodiment of a drug delivery implant in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0068]
    FIG. 17 illustrates another embodiment of a drug delivery implant in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0069]
    FIGS. 18A-18Q illustrate various drug delivery devices in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0070]
    FIGS. 19A-19X illustrate various anchor elements used in several embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0071]
    FIGS. 20A-20C illustrates a rechargeable drug delivery device in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0072]
    FIG. 21 illustrates an apparatus for implanting a drug delivery in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0073]
    FIG. 22 illustrates another apparatus for implanting a drug delivery device in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein.
  • [0074]
    FIG. 23 illustrates a schematic cross-sectional view of an eye with a delivery device containing an implant being advanced across the anterior chamber. The size of the implant is exaggerated for illustration purposes.
  • [0075]
    FIG. 24 illustrates an additional implantation procedure according to several embodiments disclosed herein. The size of the implant is exaggerated for illustration purposes.
  • [0076]
    FIG. 25 illustrates a schematic cross-sectional view of an eye with a delivery device being advanced adjacent the anterior chamber angle. The size of the implant is exaggerated for illustration purposes.
  • [0077]
    FIG. 26 illustrates a schematic cross-section view of an eye with a delivery device implanting an implant that extends from the anterior chamber through the suprachoroidal space and terminates in close proximity to the macula.
  • [0078]
    FIG. 27 illustrates a schematic cross-sectional view of an eye with a delivery device being advanced across the eye targeting the iris adjacent to the anterior chamber angle. The size of the shunt is exaggerated for illustration purposes.
  • [0079]
    FIG. 28 illustrates a schematic cross-sectional view of an eye with another embodiment of a delivery device targeting the iris adjacent to the anterior chamber angle. The size of the shunt is exaggerated for illustration purposes.
  • [0080]
    FIG. 29 illustrates a schematic cross-section view of an eye with an implant anchored to the iris.
  • [0081]
    FIG. 30 illustrates a schematic cross-section view of an eye with an implant implanted in the anterior chamber angle.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0082]
    Achieving local ocular administration of a drug may require direct injection or application, but could also include the use of a drug eluting implant, a portion of which, could be positioned in close proximity to the target site of action within the eye or within the chamber of the eye where the target site is located (e.g., anterior chamber, posterior chamber, or both simultaneously). Use of a drug eluting implant could also allow the targeted delivery of a drug to a specific ocular tissue, such as, for example, the macula, the retina, the ciliary body, the optic nerve, or the vascular supply to certain regions of the eye. Use of a drug eluting implant could also provide the opportunity to administer a controlled amount of drug for a desired amount of time, depending on the pathology. For instance, some pathologies may require drugs to be released at a constant rate for just a few days, others may require drug release at a constant rate for up to several months, still others may need periodic or varied release rates over time, and even others may require periods of no release (e.g., a “drug holiday”). Further, implants may serve additional functions once the delivery of the drug is complete. Implants may maintain the patency of a fluid flow passageway within an ocular cavity, they may function as a reservoir for future administration of the same or a different therapeutic agent, or may also function to maintain the patency of a fluid flow pathway or passageway from a first location to a second location, e.g. function as a stent. Conversely, should a drug be required only acutely, an implant may also be made completely biodegradable.
  • [0083]
    Implants according to the embodiments disclosed herein preferably do not require an osmotic or ionic gradient to release the drug(s), are implanted with a device that minimizes trauma to the healthy tissues of the eye which thereby reduces ocular morbidity, and/or may be used to deliver one or more drugs in a targeted and controlled release fashion to treat multiple ocular pathologies or a single pathology and its symptoms. However, in certain embodiments, an osmotic or ionic gradient is used to initiate, control (in whole or in part), or adjust the release of a drug (or drugs) from an implant.
  • [0084]
    As used herein, “drug” refers generally to one or more drugs that may be administered alone, in combination and/or compounded with one or more pharmaceutically acceptable excipients (e.g. binders, disintegrants, fillers, diluents, lubricants, drug release control polymers or other agents, etc.), auxiliary agents or compounds as may be housed within the implants as described herein. The term “drug” is a broad term that may be used interchangeably with “therapeutic agent” and “pharmaceutical” or “pharmacological agent” and includes not only so-called small molecule drugs, but also macromolecular drugs, and biologics, including but not limited to proteins, nucleic acids, antibodies and the like, regardless of whether such drug is natural, synthetic, or recombinant. Drug may refer to the drug alone or in combination with the excipients described above. “Drug” may also refer to an active drug itself or a prodrug or salt of an active drug.
  • [0085]
    As used herein, “patient” shall be given its ordinary meaning and shall also refer to mammals generally. The term “mammal”, in turn, includes, but is not limited to, humans, dogs, cats, rabbits, rodents, swine, ovine, and primates, among others. Additionally, throughout the specification ranges of values are given along with lists of values for a particular parameter. In these instances, it should be noted that such disclosure includes not only the values listed, but also ranges of values that include whole and fractional values between any two of the listed values.
  • [0086]
    In several embodiments, a biocompatible drug delivery ocular implant is provided that comprises an outer shell that is shaped to define at least one interior lumen that houses a drug for release into an ocular space. The outer shell is polymeric in some embodiments, and in certain embodiments is substantially uniform in thickness, with the exception of areas of reduced thickness, through which the drug more readily passes from the interior lumen to the target tissue. In other words, a region of drug release may be created by virtue of the reduced thickness. In several other embodiments the shell of the implant comprises one or more regions of increased drug permeability (e.g., based on the differential characteristics of portions of the shell such as materials, orifices, etc.), thereby creating defined regions from which the drug is preferentially released. In other embodiments, if the material of the outer shell is substantially permeable to a drug, the entire outer shell can be a region of drug release. In yet another embodiment, portions of the outer shell that surround where the drug is placed in the interior lumen or void of the device may be considered a region of drug release. For example, if the drug is loaded toward the distal end or in the distal portion of the device (e.g. the distal half or distal ⅔ of the device), the distal portion of the device will be a region of drug release as the drug will likely elute preferentially through those portions of the outer shell that are proximate to the drug. Therefore, as used herein, the term “region of drug release” shall be given its ordinary meaning and shall include the embodiments disclosed in this paragraph, including a region of drug permeability or increased drug permeability based on the characteristics of a material and/or the thickness of the material, one or more orifices or other passageways through the implant (also as described below), regions of the device proximate to the drug and/or any of these features in conjunction with one or more added layers of material that are used to control release of the drug from the implant. Depending on the context, these terms and phrases may be used interchangeably or explicitly throughout the present disclosure.
  • [0087]
    In some embodiments, the outer shell comprises one or more orifices to allow ocular fluid to contact the drug within the lumen (or lumens) of the implant and result in drug release. In some embodiments, as discussed in more detail below, a layer or layers of a permeable or semi-permeable material is used to cover the implant (wholly or partially) and the orifice(s) (wholly or partially), thereby allowing control of the rate of drug release from the implant. Additionally, in some embodiments, combinations of one or more orifices, a layer or layers covering the one or more orifices, and areas of reduced thicknesses are used to tailor the rate of drug release from the implant.
  • [0088]
    In still other embodiments, combinations of materials may be used to construct the implant (e.g., polymeric portions of outer shell bonded or otherwise connected, coupled, or attached to outer shell comprising a different material).
  • [0089]
    In some embodiments, biocompatible drug delivery implants comprise a flexible sheet or disc flexibly optionally associated with (e.g., tethered to) a retention protrusion (e.g., an anchoring element, gripper, claw, or other mechanism to permanently or transiently affix the sheet or disc to an intraocular tissue). In certain of such embodiments, the therapeutic agent is compounded with the sheet or disc and/or coated onto the sheet or disc. In some embodiments, the flexible sheet or disc implants are dimensioned such that they may be rolled or folded to be positioned within the lumen of a delivery instrument, for example a small diameter hollow needle.
  • [0090]
    Following implantation at the desired site within the eye, drug is released from the implant in a targeted and controlled fashion, based on the design of the various aspects of the implant, preferably for an extended period of time The implant and associated methods disclosed herein may be used in the treatment of pathologies requiring drug administration to the posterior chamber of the eye, the anterior chamber of the eye, or to specific tissues within the eye, such as the macula, the ciliary body or other ocular target tissues.
  • [0091]
    FIG. 1 illustrates the anatomy of an eye, which includes the sclera 11, which joins the cornea 12 at the limbus 21, the iris 13 and the anterior chamber 20 between the iris 13 and the cornea 12. The eye also includes the lens 26 disposed behind the iris 13, the ciliary body 16 and Schlemm's canal 22. The eye also includes the uveoscleral outflow pathway 24A, which defines the suprachoroidal space 24 between the choroids 28 and the sclera 11. The eye also includes the posterior region 30 of the eye which includes the macula 32.
  • General
  • [0092]
    In some embodiments functioning as a drug delivery device alone, the implant is configured to deliver one or more drugs to anterior region of the eye in a controlled fashion while in other embodiments the implant is configured to deliver one or more drugs to the posterior region of the eye in a controlled fashion. In still other embodiments, the implant is configured to simultaneously deliver drugs to both the anterior and posterior region of the eye in a controlled fashion. In yet other embodiments, the configuration of the implant is such that drug is released in a targeted fashion to a particular intraocular tissue, for example, the macula or the ciliary body. In certain embodiments, the implant delivers drug to the ciliary processes and/or the posterior chamber. In certain other embodiments, the implant delivers drug to one or more of the ciliary muscles and/or tendons (or the fibrous band). In some embodiments, implants deliver drug to one or more of Schlemm's canal, the trabecular meshwork, the episcleral veins, the lens cortex, the lens epithelium, the lens capsule, the sclera, the scleral spur, the choroid, the suprachoroidal space, retinal arteries and veins, the optic disc, the central retinal vein, the optic nerve, the macula, the fovea, and/or the retina. In still other embodiments, the delivery of drug from the implant is directed to an ocular chamber generally. It will be appreciated that each of the embodiments described herein may target one or more of these regions, and may also optionally be combined with a shunt feature (described below).
  • [0093]
    In several embodiments, the implant comprises an outer shell. In some embodiments, the outer shell is tubular and/or elongate, while in other embodiments, other shapes (e.g., round, oval, cylindrical, etc.) are used In certain embodiments, the outer shell is not biodegradable, while in others, the shell is optionally biodegradable. In several embodiments, the shell is formed to have at least a first interior lumen. In certain embodiments, the first interior lumen is positioned at or near the distal end of the device. In other embodiments, a lumen may run the entire length of the outer shell. In some embodiments, the lumen is subdivided. In certain embodiments, the first interior lumen is positioned at or near the proximal end of the device. In those embodiments additionally functioning as a shunt, the shell may have one or more additional lumens within the portion of the device functioning as a shunt.
  • [0094]
    In several embodiments, the drug (or drugs) is positioned within the interior lumen (or lumens) of the implant shell. In several embodiments, the drug is preferentially positioned within the more distal portion of the lumen. In some embodiments, the distal-most 15 mm of the implant lumen (or lumens) house the drug (or drugs) to be released. In some embodiments, the distal-most 10 mm, including 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 mm of the interior lumen(s) house the drug to be released.
  • [0095]
    In some embodiments, the drug diffuses through the shell and into the intraocular environment. In several embodiments, the outer shell material is permeable or semi-permeable to the drug (or drugs) positioned within the interior lumen, and therefore, at least some portion of the total elution of the drug occurs through the shell itself, in addition to that occurring through any regions of increased permeability, reduced thickness, orifices etc. In some embodiments, about 1% to about 50% of the elution of the drug occurs through the shell itself. In some embodiments, about 10% to about 40% , or about 20% to about 30% of the elution of the drug occurs through the shell itself. In some embodiments, about 5% to about 15%, about 10% to about 25%, about 15% to about 30%, about 20% to about 35%, about 25% to about 40%, about 30% to about 45%, or about 35% to about 50% of the elution of the drug occurs through the shell itself. In certain embodiments, about 1% to 15%, including, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14% of the total elution of the drug (or drugs) occurs through the shell. The term “permeable” and related terms (e.g. “impermeable” or “semi'permeable”) are used herein to refer to a material being permeable to some degree (or not permeable) to one or more drugs or therapeutic agents and/or ocular fluids. The term “impermeable” does not necessarily mean that there is no elution or transmission of a drug through a material, instead such elution or other transmission is negligible or very slight, e.g. less than about 3% of the total amount, including less than about 2% and less than about 1%.
  • [0096]
    In some embodiments, the implant shell has one or more regions of increased drug permeability through which the drug is released to the target ocular tissue in a controlled fashion.
  • [0097]
    In some embodiments, the drug or drugs are positioned within the interior lumen or lumens of an implant wherein the implant shell comprises one or more orifices to allow ocular fluid to contact the agent or agents and result in drug release. In some embodiments, the implant comprises a polymeric coating on the exterior surface of a shell. In other embodiments, the implant comprises a polymeric coating on the interior surface of a shell. In still other embodiments, polymeric coatings are on both the interior and exterior surfaces. In yet other embodiments, the polymeric coatings are biodegradable. Some embodiments comprise a non-polymeric coating (e.g. heparin) in place of, or in addition to the polymeric coatings. Additionally, in some embodiments, combinations of one or more orifices, a layer or layers covering the one or more orifices, and areas of reduced thicknesses are used to tailor the rate of drug release from the implant.
  • [0098]
    In some embodiments, the interior lumen containing the drug(s) are separated from the proximal portion of the implant by way of an proximal barrier within the interior lumen that prevents elution of the drug to the anterior portion of the eye. In some embodiments, the interior lumen(s) containing the drug(s) are separated from the proximal portion of the implant by way of a one way valve within the interior lumen that prevents elution of the drug to the anterior portion of the eye, but allows ocular fluid from the anterior portion of the eye to reach the interior lumen(s) containing the drug(s).
  • [0099]
    In some embodiments, the implant further comprises a proximal portion structured for recharging/refilling the implant with the same, or an additional therapeutic drug, multiple drugs, or adjuvant compound, or compounds.
  • [0100]
    In some embodiments comprising a shunt, the shunt portion, following implantation at an implantation site, drains fluid from an ocular chamber into a physiologic outflow space to reduce intraocular pressure. In some embodiments, the implant is dimensioned such that when either the proximal or distal end of the implant is at an implantation site near a tissue targeted for drug delivery, the outflow ports of the implant will drain ocular fluid to a remote region and/or a physiological outflow pathway.
  • [0101]
    For example, in some embodiments, the implant is dimensioned such that, following implantation, the distal end of the implant is located sufficiently close to the macula that the drug delivered by the implant reaches the macula. In some embodiments incorporating a shunt feature, the implant is dimensioned such that when the distal end of the implant is positioned sufficiently near the macula, the proximal end of the implant extends into the anterior chamber of the eye. In those embodiments, outflow ports in the implant, described in more detail below, are positioned such that the aqueous humor will be drained into the uveoscleral outflow pathway or other physiological outflow pathway.
  • [0102]
    In still other embodiments, combination drug delivery-shunt implants may be positioned in any physiological location that necessitates simultaneous drug delivery and transport of fluid from a first physiologic site to a second site (which may be physiologic or external to a patient). In some embodiments, the shunt feature works in conjunction with the drug delivery function to potentiate the therapeutic effects of the delivered agent. In other embodiments, the therapeutic effects of the delivered agent may be associated with unwanted side effects, such as fluid accumulation or swelling. In some embodiments, the shunt feature functions ameliorate the side effects of the delivered agent. It shall be appreciated that the dimensions and features of the implants disclosed herein may be tailored to attain targeted and/or controlled delivery to various regions of the eye while still allowing communication with a physiological outflow pathway.
  • [0103]
    The delivery instruments, described in more detail below, may be used to facilitate delivery and/or implantation of the drug delivery implant to the desired location of the eye. The delivery instrument may be used to place the implant into a desired position, such as the inferior portion of the iris, the suprachoroidal space near the macula, or other intraocular region, by application of a continual implantation force, by tapping the implant into place using a distal portion of the delivery instrument, or by a combination of these methods. The design of the delivery instruments may take into account, for example, the angle of implantation and the location of the implant relative to an incision. For example, in some embodiments, the delivery instrument may have a fixed geometry, be shape-set, or actuated. In some embodiments, the delivery instrument may have adjunctive or ancillary functions, such as for example, injection of dye and/or viscoelastic fluid, dissection, or use as a guidewire. As used herein, the term “incision” shall be given its ordinary meaning and may also refer to a cut, opening, slit, notch, puncture or the like.
  • [0104]
    In certain embodiments the drug delivery implant may contain one or more drugs which may or may not be compounded with a bioerodible polymer or a bioerodible polymer and at least one additional agent. In still other embodiments, the drug delivery implant is used to sequentially deliver multiple drugs. Additionally, certain embodiments are constructed using different outer shell materials, and/or materials of varied permeability to generate a tailored drug elution profile. Certain embodiments are constructed using different numbers, dimensions and/or locations of orifices in the implant shell to generate a tailored drug elution profile. Certain embodiments are constructed using different polymer coatings and different coating locations on the implant to generate a tailored drug elution profile. Some embodiments elute drug at a constant rate, others yield a zero-order release profile. Yet other embodiments yield variable elution profiles. Still other embodiments are designed to stop elution completely or nearly completely for a predetermined period of time (e.g., a “drug holiday”) and later resume elution at the same or a different elution rate or elution concentration. Some such embodiments elute the same therapeutic agent before and after the drug holiday while other embodiments elute different therapeutic agents before and after the drug holiday.
  • Drug Delivery Implants
  • [0105]
    The present disclosure relates to ophthalmic drug delivery implants which, following implantation at an implantation site, provide controlled release of one or more drugs to a desired target region within the eye, the controlled release being for an extended, period of time. Various embodiments of the implants are shown in FIGS. 2-20 and will be referred to herein.
  • [0106]
    FIG. 2 depicts a cross sectional schematic of one embodiment of an implant in accordance with the description herein. The implant comprises an outer shell 54 made of one or more biocompatible materials. The outer shell of the implant is manufactured by extrusion, drawing, injection molding, sintering, micro machining, laser machining, and/or electrical discharge machining, or any combination thereof. Other suitable manufacturing and assembly methods known in the art may also be used. In several embodiments, the outer shell is tubular in shape, and comprises at least one interior lumen 58. In some embodiments the interior lumen is defined by the outer shell and a partition 64. In some embodiments, the partition is impermeable, while in other embodiments the partition is permeable or semi-permeable. In some embodiments, the partition allows for the recharging of the implant with a new dose of drug(s). In some other embodiments, other shell shapes are used, yet still produce at least one interior lumen. In several embodiments the outer shell of the implant 54 is manufactured such that the implant has a distal portion 50 and a proximal portion 52. In several embodiments, the thickness of the outer shell 54 is substantially uniform. In other embodiments the thickness varies in certain regions of the shell. Depending on the desired site of implantation within the eye, thicker regions of the outer shell 54 are positioned where needed to maintain the structural integrity of the implant.
  • [0107]
    In some embodiments, the implant is made of a flexible material. In other embodiments, a portion of the implant is made from flexible material while another portion of the implant is made from rigid material. In some embodiments, the implant comprises one or more flexures (e.g., hinges). In some embodiments, the drug delivery implant is pre-flexed, yet flexible enough to be contained within the straight lumen of a delivery device.
  • [0108]
    In other embodiments, at least a portion of the implant (e.g., an internal spine or an anchor) is made of a material capable of shape memory. A material capable of shape memory may be compressed and, upon release, may expand axially or radially, or both axially and radially, to assume a particular shape. In some embodiments, at least a portion of the implant has a preformed shape. In other embodiments, at least a portion of the implant is made of a superelastic material. In some embodiments, at least a portion of the implant is made up of nitinol. In other embodiments, at least a portion of the implant is made of a deformable material.
  • [0109]
    In several embodiments the majority of the surface of the outer shell of the implant is substantially impermeable to ocular fluids. In several embodiments, the majority of the surface of the outer shell of the implant is also substantially impermeable to the drug 62 housed within the interior lumen of the implant (discussed below). In other embodiments, the outer shell is semi-permeable to drug and/or ocular fluid and certain regions of the implant are made less or more permeable by way of coatings or layers or impermeable (or less permeable) material placed within or on the outer shell.
  • [0110]
    In several embodiments, the outer shell also has one or more regions of drug release 56. In some embodiments the regions of drug release are of reduced thickness compared to the adjacent and surrounding thickness of the outer shell. In some embodiments, the regions of reduced thickness are formed by one or more of ablation, stretching, etching, grinding, molding and other similar techniques that remove material from the outer shell. In other embodiments the regions of drug release are of a different thickness (e.g., some embodiments are thinner and other embodiments are thicker) as compared to the surrounding outer shell, but are manufactured with an increased permeability to one or more of the drug 62 and ocular fluid. In still other embodiments, the outer shell is uniform or substantially uniform in thickness but constructed with materials that vary in permeability to ocular fluid and drugs within the lumen. As such, these embodiments have defined regions of drug release from the implant.
  • [0111]
    The regions of drug release may be of any shape needed to accomplish sufficient delivery of the drug to a particular target tissue of the eye. For example, in FIG. 2, the regions 56 are depicted as defined areas of thinner material. FIG. 3A depicts the regions of drug release used in other embodiments, namely a spiral shape of reduced thickness 56. In some embodiments, the spiral is located substantially at the distal end of the implant, while in other embodiments, the spiral may run the length of the interior lumen. In still other embodiments, the spiral region of drug release is located on the proximal portion of the implant. In some embodiments, the spiral is on the interior of the implant shell (i.e., the shell is rifled; see FIG. 3A). In other embodiments, spiral is on the exterior of the shell (see FIG. 3B). In other embodiments, the region of drug release is shaped as circumferential bands around the implant shell.
  • [0112]
    FIG. 4 depicts another embodiment, wherein a region of drug release is located at the distal-most portion of the implant. Certain such embodiments are used when more posterior regions of the eye are to be treated. Alternatively, or in conjunction with the embodiment of FIG. 4, the proximal portion of the implant may also have a region of drug release at or near the proximal most portion. In other embodiments, the regions of drug release are uniformly or substantially uniformly distributed along the distal and/or proximal portions of the implant. In some embodiments, the regions of drug release are located at or near the distal end of the implant. In certain embodiments, the implants (based on the regions of drug release (based on thickness/permeability, orifices, layers etc.) are strategically placed to create a differential pattern of drug elution from the implant, depending on the target tissue to be treated after implantation. In some embodiments, the regions of drug release are configured to preferentially elute drug from the distal end of the implant. In some such embodiments, the regions of drug release are strategically located at or near a target tissue in the more posterior region of the eye after the implantation procedure is complete. As discussed in more detail below, in several embodiments, the regions of drug release comprises one (or more) orifices that allow communication between an interior lumen of the implant and the environment in which the implant is implanted. It shall also be appreciated from the disclosure herein that, in certain embodiments, combinations of regions of drug release (as described above) may be combined with one or more orifices and/or coatings (below) in order to tailor the drug release profile.
  • [0113]
    In several embodiments, lumens are present in both the proximal and distal portions of the implant (see FIGS. 5; 58 a and 58, respectively). In such embodiments both the proximal 52 and the distal portion 50 of the implant have one or more regions of drug release. In some such embodiments the proximal and distal portions of the implant house two different drugs 62 a (proximal) and 62 (distal) in the lumens. See FIG. 5. In other embodiments, the proximal and distal portion of the implant may house the same drugs, or the same drug at different concentrations or combined with alternate excipients. It will be appreciated that the placement of the regions of drug release, whether within the proximal portion, distal portion, or both portions of the implant, are useful to specifically target certain intraocular tissues. For example, placement of the region of drug release at the distal most portion of the implant, is useful, in some embodiments, for specifically targeting drug release to particular intraocular regions, such as the macula. In other embodiments, the regions of drug release are placed to specifically release drug to other target tissues, such as the ciliary body, the retina, the vasculature of the eye, or any of the ocular targets discussed above or known in the art. In some embodiments, the specific targeting of tissue by way of specific placement of the region of drug release reduces the amount of drug needed to achieve a therapeutic effect. In some embodiments, the specific targeting of tissue by way of specific placement of the region of drug release reduces non-specific side effects of an eluted drug. In some embodiments, the specific targeting of tissue by way of specific placement of the region of drug release increases the overall potential duration of drug delivery from the implant.
  • [0114]
    Regardless of their shape and location(s) on the outer shell of the in implant, the regions of drug release are of a defined and known area. The defined area assists in calculating the rate of drug elution from the implant (described below). The regions of drug release are formed in several embodiments by reducing the thickness of the outer shell in certain defined areas and/or controlling the permeability of a certain region of the outer shell. FIGS. 6A-I represent certain embodiments of the region of drug release. FIGS. 6A and B depict overlapping regions of a thicker 54 and thinner 54 a portion of the outer shell material with the resulting formation of an effectively thinner region of material, the region of drug release 56. FIGS. 6C and 6D depict joinder of thicker 54 with thinner 54 a portions of the outer shell material. The resulting thinner region of material is the region of drug release 56. It will be appreciated that the joining of the thicker and thinner regions may be accomplished by, for example, butt-welding, gluing or otherwise adhering with a biocompatible adhesive, casting the shell as a single unit with varying thickness, heat welding, heat fusing, fusing by compression, or fusing the regions by a combination of heat and pressure. Other suitable joining methods known in the art may also be used.
  • [0115]
    FIG. 6E depicts a thicker sleeve of outer shell material overlapping at least in part with a thinner shell material. The thinner, non-overlapped area, 56, is the region of drug release. It will be appreciated that the degree of overlap of the material is controllable such that the region of non-overlapped shell is of a desired area for a desired elution profile.
  • [0116]
    FIG. 6F illustrates an outer shell material with a thin area 56 formed by one or more of ablation, stretching, etching, grinding, molding and other similar techniques that remove material from the outer shell.
  • [0117]
    FIG. 6G depicts a “tube within a tube” design, wherein a tube with a first thickness 54 is encased in a second tube with a second thickness 54 a. The first tube has one or more breaks or gaps in the shell, such that the overlaid thinner shell 54 a covers the break or gap, thereby forming the region of drug release. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6G, and in certain other embodiments, the break or gap in the shell with a first thickness 54, does not communicate directly with the external environment.
  • [0118]
    FIG. 6H depicts an embodiment wherein the region of drug release is bordered both by the outer shell 54 and by a substantially impermeable matrix material 55 having a communicating particulate matter 57 dispersed within the impermeable matrix. In several embodiments, the communicating particulate matter is compounded with the impermeable matrix material during implant manufacturing. The implant may then be contacted with a solvent, which is subsequently carried through the communicating particulate matter and reaches the drug housed within the lumen of the implant. Preferred solvents include water, saline, or ocular fluid, or biocompatible solvents that would not affect the structure or permeability characteristics of the impermeable matrix.
  • [0119]
    As the drug in the lumen is dissolved into the solvent, it travels through the communicating particulate matter from the lumen of the implant to the ocular target tissue. In some embodiments, the implant is exposed to a solvent prior to implantation in the eye, such that drug is ready for immediate release during or soon after implantation. In other embodiments, the implant is exposed only to ocular fluid, such that there is a short period of no drug release from the implant while the ocular fluid moves through the communicating particulate matter into the lumen of the implant.
  • [0120]
    In some such embodiments, the communicating particulate matter comprises hydrogel particles, for example, polyacrylamide, cross-linked polymers, poly2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) polyethylene oxide, polyAMPS and polyvinylpyrrolidone, or naturally derived hydrogels such as agarose, methylcellulose, hyaluronan. Other hydrogels known in the art may also be used. In some embodiments, the impermeable material is silicone. In other embodiments, the impermeable material may be Teflon®, flexible graphite, silicone rubber, silicone rubber with fiberglass reinforcement, neoprene®, fiberglass, cloth inserted rubber, vinyl, nitrile, butyl, natural gum rubber, urethane, carbon fiber, fluoroelastomer, and or other such impermeable or substantially impermeable materials known in the art. In this and other embodiments disclosed herein, terms like “substantially impermeable” or “impermeable” should be interpreted as relating to a material's relative impermeability with regard to the drug of interest. This is because the permeability of a material to a particular drug depends upon characteristics of the material (e.g. crystallinity, hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, water content, porosity) and also to characteristics of the drug.
  • [0121]
    FIG. 6I depicts another embodiment wherein the region of drug release is bordered both by the outer shell 54 and by an impermeable matrix material 55, such as silicone having a communicating particulate matter 57 dispersed within the impermeable matrix. In other embodiments, the impermeable material may be Teflon®, flexible graphite, polydimethylsiloxane and other silicone elastomers, neoprene®, fiberglass, cloth inserted rubber, vinyl, nitrile, butyl, natural gum rubber, urethane, carbon fiber, fluoroelastomer, and or other such impermeable or substantially impermeable materials known in the art. In several embodiments, the communicating particulate matter is compounded with the impermeable matrix material during implant manufacturing. The resultant matrix is impermeable until placed in a solvent that causes the communicating particulate matter to dissolve. In several embodiments, the communicating particles are salt crystals (for example, sodium bicarbonate crystals or sodium chloride crystals). In other embodiments, other soluble and biocompatible materials may be used as the communicating particulate matter. Preferred communicating particulate matter is soluble in a solvent such as water, saline, ocular fluid, or another biocompatible solvent that would not affect the structure or permeability characteristics of the impermeable matrix. It will be appreciated that certain embodiments, the impermeable matrix material compounded with a communicating particulate matter has sufficient structural integrity to form the outer shell of the implant (i.e., no additional shell material is necessary).
  • [0122]
    In certain embodiments, the communicating particles are extracted with a solvent prior to implantation. The extraction of the communicating particles thus creates a communicating passageway within the impermeable material. Pores (or other passages) in the impermeable material allow ocular fluid to pass into the particles, which communicate the fluid into the lumen of implant. Likewise, the particles communicate the drug out of the lumen of the implant and into the target ocular tissue.
  • [0123]
    In contrast to a traditional pore or orifice (described in more detail below), embodiments such as those depicted in FIGS. 6H and 6I communicate drug from the lumen of the implant to the ocular tissue through the communicating particles or through the resultant vacancy in the impermeable matrix after dissolution of the particle. These embodiments therefore create an indirect passage from the lumen of the implant to the eye (i.e. a circuitous route or tortuous path of passage). Thus, purposeful design of the particulate material, its rate of communication of fluids or rate of dissolution in solvent, allows further control of the rate and kinetics of drug release.
  • [0124]
    In several embodiments, the region of drug release comprises one or more orifices. It shall be appreciated that certain embodiments utilize regions of drug release that are not orifices, either alone or in combination with one or more orifices in order to achieve a controlled and targeted drug release profile that is appropriate for the envisioned therapy. FIG. 7 shows a cross sectional schematic of one embodiment of an implant in accordance with the description herein. As discussed above, the implant comprises a distal portion 50, a proximal portion 52, an outer shell 54 made of one or more biocompatible materials, and one or more orifices that pass through the shell 56 a. In some embodiments the outer shell of the implant is substantially impermeable to ocular fluids. In several embodiments, the implant houses a drug 62 within the interior lumen 58 of the implant.
  • [0125]
    As discussed in more detail below, in some embodiments, the drug comprises a therapeutically effective drug against a particular ocular pathology as well as any additional compounds needed to prepare the therapeutic agent in a form with which the drug is compatible. In some embodiments the therapeutic agent is in the form of a drug-containing pellet. Some embodiments of therapeutic agent comprise a drug compounded with a polymer formulation. In certain embodiments, the polymer formulation comprises a poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) or PLGA co-polymer or other biodegradable or bioerodible polymer. While the drug is represented as being placed within the lumen 58 in FIG. 7, it has been omitted from several other Figures, so as to allow clarity of other features of those embodiments. It should be understood, however, that all embodiments herein optionally include one or more drugs.
  • [0126]
    In several embodiments, the implant further comprises a coating 60 which may be positioned in various locations in or on the implant as described below. In some embodiments, the coating 60 is a polymeric coating. FIG. 8 depicts an implant wherein the coating 60 is positioned inside the implant, but enveloping the therapeutic agent housed within the lumen, while FIG. 9 depicts the coating 60 on the exterior of the shell 54. Some other embodiments may comprise implants with non-polymeric coatings in place of, or in addition to a polymeric coating. The coating is optionally biodegradable. Some other embodiments may comprise an implant made entirely of a biodegradable material, such that the entire implant is degraded over time. In some embodiments, the coating is placed over the entire implant (e.g., enveloping the implant) while in other embodiments only a portion of the implant is covered. Similarly, in some embodiments in which the coating is positioned inside the implant, the coating covers the entire inner surface of the lumen, while in other embodiments, only a portion of the inner surface is covered. It shall be appreciated that, in addition to the regions of drug release described above, implants according to several embodiments, disclosed herein combine regions of drug release with one or more coatings in order to control drug release characteristics.
  • [0127]
    In several embodiments, one or more orifices 56 a traversing the thickness of the outer shell 54 provide communication passages between the environment outside the implant and the interior lumen 58 of the implant (FIGS. 7-9). The one or more orifices are created through the implant shell by way of drilling through the various shells of a particular implant or any other technique known in the art. The orifices may be of any shape, such as spherical, cubical, ellipsoid, and the like. The number, location, size, and shape of the orifices created in a given implant determine the ratio of orifice to implant surface area. This ratio may be varied depending on the desired release profile of the drug to be delivered by a particular embodiment of the implant, as described below. In some embodiments, the orifice to implant surface area ratio is greater than about 1:100. In some embodiments, the orifice to implant surface area ratio ranges from about 1:10 to about 1:50, from about 1:30 to about 1:90, from about 1:20 to about 1:70, from about 1:30 to about 1:60, from about 1:40 to about 1:50. In some embodiments, the orifice to implant surface area ratio ranges from about 1:60 top about 1:100, including about 1:70, 1:80 and 1:90.
  • [0128]
    In other embodiments, the outer shell may contain one or more orifice(s) 56 b in the distal tip of the implant, as shown in FIGS. 10A and 10B. The shape and size of the orifice(s) can be selected based on the desired elution profile. Still other embodiments comprise a combination of a distal orifice and multiple orifices placed more proximally on the outer shell. Additional embodiments comprise combinations of distal orifices, proximal orifices on the outer shell and/or regions of drug release as described above (and optionally one or more coatings). Additional embodiments have a closed distal end. In such embodiment the regions of drug release (based on thickness/permeability of the shell, orifices, coatings, placement of the drug, etc.) are arranged along the long axis of the implant. Such a configuration is advantageous in order to reduce the amount of tissue damage caused by the advancing distal end that occurs during the several embodiments of the implantation procedures disclosed herein.
  • [0129]
    In some embodiments, the distal orifice comprises a biodegradable or bioerodible plug 61 with a plurality of orifice(s) 56 b that maintain drug elution from the implant, should one or more orifices become plugged with tissue during the insertion/implantation. In other embodiments, the orifice(s) can comprise permeable or semi-permeable membranes, porous films or sheets, or the like. In some such embodiments, the permeable or semi-permeable membranes, films, or sheets may lie outside the shell and cover the orifices, inside the shell to cover the orifices or both. The permeability of the material will partially define the release rate of the drug from the implant, which is described in further detail below. Such membranes, sheets, or films are useful in those embodiments having elongated orifices in the outer shell. Arrows in FIG. 10B depict flow of drug out of the implant.
  • [0130]
    In several embodiments, an additional structure or structures within the interior of the lumen partially controls the elution of the drug from the implant. In some embodiments, a proximal barrier 64 a is positioned proximally relative to the drug 62 (FIGS. 7 and 10C). An optional shunt feature may also be included which comprises outflow apertures 66 in communication with a proximal inflow lumen 68 located in the proximal region 52 of the implant. In addition to the layer or layers of permeable or semi-permeable material may be used to envelope the drug discussed above, FIG. 10C depicts an internal plug 210 that is be located between the drug 62 and the various orifices 56 a and 56 b in certain embodiments. In such embodiments, the internal plug need not completely surround the drug. In some embodiments, the material of the internal plug 210 differs from that of the shell 54, while in some embodiments the material of the internal plug 210 is the same material as that of the shell 54. Suitable materials for the internal plug include, but are not limited to, agarose or hydrogels such as polyacrylamide, polymethyl methacrylate, or HEMA (hydroxyethyl methacrylate). In additional any material disclosed herein for use in the shell or other portion of the implant may be suitable for the internal plug, in certain embodiments.
  • [0131]
    In such embodiments where the material is the same, the physical characteristics of the material used to construct 210 are optionally different than that of the shell 54. For example, the size, density, porosity, or permeability of the material of 210 may differ from that of the shell 54. In some embodiments, the internal plug is formed in place (i.e. within the interior lumen of the implant), for example by polymerization, molding, or solidification in situ of a dispensed liquid, powder, or gel. In other embodiments, the internal plug is preformed external to the shell placed within the shell prior to implantation. In such embodiments, tailored implants are constructed in that the selection of a pre-formed internal plug may be optimized based on a particular drug, patient, implant, or disease to be treated. In several embodiments, the internal plug is biodegradable or bioerodible, while in some other embodiments, the internal plug is durable (e.g., not biodegradable or bioerodible).
  • [0132]
    In several embodiments, the internal plug may be closely fit or bonded to the inner wall of shell. In such embodiments, the internal plug is preferably permeable to the drug, thereby allowing passage of the drug through the plug, through the orifices and to the target tissue. In some embodiments, the internal plug is also permeable to body fluids, such that fluids from outside the implant may reach the drug. The overall release rate of drug from the device in this case may be controlled by the physical characteristics of several aspects of the implant components, including, but not limited to, the area and volume of the orifices, the surface area of any regions of drug release, the size and position of the internal plug with respect to both the drug and the orifices and/or regions of drug release, and the permeability of the internal plug to the drug and bodily fluids. In addition, in several embodiments, the internal plug increases path length between the drug and the orifices and/or regions of drug release, thereby providing an additional point of control for the release rate of drug.
  • [0133]
    In several other embodiments, the internal plug 210 may be more loosely fit into the interior lumen of the shell which may allow flow or transport of the drug around the plug. See FIG. 10D. In still other embodiments, the internal plug may comprise two or more pieces or fragments. See FIG. 10E. In such embodiments with a looser fitting or fragmented plug, the drug may elute from the implant by passing through the gap between the internal plug and the interior wall of shell. The drug may also elute from the implant by passing through the gaps between pieces or fragments of the internal plug. The drug may also elute from the implant by passing through the permeable inner plug. Similarly, bodily fluids may pass from the external portion of the implant into the implant and reach the drug by any of these, or other, pathways. It shall be appreciated that elution of the drug can occur as a result of a combination of any of these routes of passage or permeability.
  • [0134]
    In several embodiments, the orifices 56 a are covered (wholly or partially) with one or more elution membranes 100 that provide a barrier to the release of drug 62 from the interior lumen 58 of the implant shell 54. See FIG. 10F. In several embodiments, the elution membrane is permeable to the therapeutic agent, to bodily fluids or to both. In some embodiments the membrane is elastomeric and comprises silicone. In other embodiments, the membrane is fully or partially coated with a biodegradable or bioerodible material, allowing for control of the inception of entry of bodily fluid, or egress of therapeutic agent from the implant. In certain embodiments, the membrane is impregnated with additional agents that are advantageous, for example an anti-fibrotic agent, a vasodilator, an anti-thrombotic agent, or a permeability control agent. In addition, in certain embodiments, the membrane comprises one or more layers 100 a, 100 b, and 100 c in FIG. 10G, for example, allowing a specific permeability to be developed.
  • [0135]
    Similar to the internal plug and regions of drug release described above, the characteristics of the elution membrane at least partially define the release rate of the therapeutic agent from the implant. Thus, the overall release rate of drug from the implant may be controlled by the physical characteristics of the implant, including, but not limited to, the area and volume of the orifices, the surface area of any regions of drug release, the size and position of any internal plug with respect to both the drug and the orifices and/or regions of drug release, and the permeability of any layers overlaying any orifices or regions of drug release to the drug and bodily fluids.
  • [0136]
    In some embodiments, multiple pellets 62 of single or multiple drug(s) are placed end to end within the interior lumen of the implant (FIG. 11). In some such embodiments, the orifices 56 a (or regions of drug release) are positioned at a more distal location on the implant shell. In other such embodiments, the orifices 56 a (or regions of drug release) are positioned at a more proximal location on the implant shell, depending on the ocular tissue being targeted. In some other embodiments a partition 64 is employed to seal therapeutic agents from one another when contained within the same implant inner lumen. In some embodiments, the partition 64 bioerodes at a specified rate. In some embodiments, the partition 64 is incorporated into the drug pellet and creates a seal against the inner dimension of the shell of the implant 54 in order to prevent drug elution in an unwanted direction. In certain embodiments further comprising a shunt, a partition may be positioned distal to the shunt outlet holes, which are described in more detail below.
  • [0137]
    In certain alternative embodiments, the orifices or regions of drug release may be positioned along a portion of or substantially the entire length of the outer shell that surrounds the interior lumen and one or more partitions may separate the drugs to be delivered.
  • [0138]
    Several embodiments of the implant may also comprise a shunt in addition to functioning as a drug delivery device. The term “shunt” as used herein is a broad term, and is to be given its ordinary and customary meaning to a person of ordinary skill in the art (and it is not to be limited to a special or customized meaning), and refers without limitation to the portion of the implant defining one or more fluid passages for transport of fluid from a first, often undesired location, to one or more other locations. In some embodiments, the shunt can be configured to provide a fluid flow path for draining aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of an eye to an outflow pathway to reduce intraocular pressure, such as is depicted generally in FIG. 12. In other embodiments the shunt can be configured to provide a fluid flow path for draining aqueous humor to an outflow pathway. Still other embodiments can be configured to drain ocular fluid or interstitial fluid from the area in and around the eye to a remote location. Yet other combination drug delivery-shunt implants may be configured to drain physiological fluid from a first physiologic site to a second site (which may be physiologic or external to a patient).
  • [0139]
    The shunt portion of the implant can have an inflow portion 68 and one or more outflow portions 66. As described above, the outflow portion may be disposed at or near the proximal end 52 of the implant. While not illustrated, in some embodiments a shunt outflow portion may be disposed at or near the distal end of the implant with the inflow portion residing a different location (or locations) on the implant. In some embodiments, when the implant is deployed, the inflow portion may be sized and configured to reside in the anterior chamber of the eye and the outflow portion may be sized and configured to reside in the supraciliary or suprachoroidal space. In some embodiments, the outflow portion may be sized and configured to reside in the supraciliary region of the uveoscleral outflow pathway, the suprachoroidal space, other part of the eye, or within other physiological spaces amenable to fluid deposition.
  • [0140]
    In some embodiments, at least one lumen extends through the shunt portion of the implant. In some embodiments, there is at least one lumen that operates to conduct the fluid through the shunt portion of the implant. In certain embodiments, each lumen extends from an inflow end to an outflow end along a lumen axis. In some embodiments the lumen extends substantially through the longitudinal center of the shunt. In other embodiments, the lumen can be offset from the longitudinal center of the shunt.
  • [0141]
    In implants additionally comprising a shunt in the proximal portion of the device, the first (most proximal) outflow orifice on the implant is positioned between 1 and 10 mm from the anterior chamber of the subject. In some embodiments additionally comprising a shunt in the proximal portion of the device, the first (most proximal) outflow orifice on the implant is positioned preferably between 2 and 5 mm from the anterior chamber of the subject. Additional outflow orifices may be positioned in more distal locations, up to or beyond the point where the interior lumen housing the drug or therapeutic agent begins.
  • [0142]
    In some embodiments, the implant is formed with one or more dividers positioned longitudinally within the outer shell, creating multiple additional sub-lumens within the interior lumen of the shell. The divider(s) can be of any shape (e.g. rectangular, cylindrical) or size that fits within the implant so as to form two or more sub-lumens, and may be made of the same material or a different material than the outer shell, including one or more polymers, copolymers, metal, or combinations thereof. In one embodiment, a divider is made from a biodegradable or bioerodible material. The multiple sub-lumens may be in any configuration with respect to one another. In some embodiments, a single divider may used to form two sub-lumens within the implant shell. See e.g., FIG. 13A. In some embodiments, the two sub-lumens are of equal dimension. In other embodiments the divider may be used to create sub-lumens that are of non-equivalent dimensions. In still other embodiments, multiple dividers may be used to create two or more sub-lumens within the interior of the shell. In some embodiments the lumens may be of equal dimension. See, e.g. FIG. 13B. Alternatively, the dividers may be positioned such that the sub-lumens are not of equivalent dimension.
  • [0143]
    In some embodiments, one or more of the sub-lumens formed by the dividers may traverse the entire length of the implant. In some embodiments, one or more of the sub-lumens may be defined of blocked off by a transversely, or diagonally placed divider or partition. The blocked off sub-lumens may be formed with any dimensions as required to accommodate a particular dose or concentration of drug.
  • [0144]
    In other embodiments, the implant is formed as a combination of one or more tubular shell structures 54 that are substantially impermeable to ocular fluids that are nested within one another to form a “tube within a tube” design, as shown in FIG. 13C. In alternative embodiments, a cylindrical divider is used to partition the interior of the implant into nested “tubes.” In such embodiments, a coating 60, which can optionally be polymer based, can be located in or on the tubular implant. In such embodiments, at least a first interior lumen 58 is formed as well as an ocular fluid flow lumen 70. In some embodiments, the ocular fluid flow lumen 70 is centrally located. In other embodiments, it may be biased to be located more closely to the implant shell. In still other embodiments, additional shell structures are added to create additional lumens within the implant. Drugs 62 may be positioned within one or more of said created lumens. Orifices or regions of drug release may be placed as necessary to allow ocular fluid to contact the therapeutic agent. In certain embodiments the coating is placed on the outer surface of the outer shell. In certain embodiments, two or more biodegradable coatings are used on a single implant, with each coating covering a separate or overlapping portion of the implant. In those embodiments employing biodegradable coatings, each coating optionally has a unique rate of biodegradation in ocular fluid.
  • [0145]
    In some embodiments, a wick 82 is included in the implant (FIG. 14). The wick may take any form that assists in transporting ocular fluid from the external side of the device to an interior lumen more rapidly than would be achieved through the orifices of regions of drug release alone. While FIG. 14 depicts a wick passing through an orifice, it shall be appreciated that an implant having only regions of drug release are also capable of employing a wick. In such embodiments a wick may be positioned to pass through the outer shell during the manufacture of the implant such that an orifice is not created. In some embodiments, a fiber is positioned in an orifice or through the outer shell such a portion of the wick lies adjacent to the drug within the lumen of the implant. In other embodiments, the drug is formed around the wick, so that ocular fluid is delivered directly to an interior portion of the agent. In still other embodiments, one or more wicks are used as described above, thus allowing dissolution of the agent from the exterior and interior portions of the pellet or mass of drug.
  • [0146]
    FIG. 15 shows a cross sectional schematic of one embodiment of an implant in accordance with the description herein and further comprising a retention protrusion 359 for anchoring the implant to ocular tissue. While depicted in FIG. 15, and other Figures, as having the distal portion being the implant end and the proximal portion being the retention protrusion 359 end, in some embodiments, depending on the site and orientation of implantation, the distal portion and proximal portion may be reversed relative to the orientation in FIG. 15. Additionally, while the illustrated implant depicts the presence of orifices that pass through the outer shell, it shall be appreciated that embodiments of the implants comprising regions of drug release based on thickness and/or permeability of the shell material can also be used in conjunction with a retention feature. Moreover, implants comprising combinations of one or more orifices, one or more layers of permeable and/or semi-permeable material, and one or more areas of drug release based on thickness and/or permeability of the shell material are used in several embodiments.
  • [0147]
    In several embodiments, implants comprise a sheet 400 and a retention protrusion 359. See FIG. 16. In some embodiments, the sheet is not joined to a retention protrusion. The sheet can be made of any biocompatible material, including but not limited to, polymers, fibers, or composite materials. In some embodiments, the sheet is compounded with one or more therapeutic agent(s). In some embodiments, the sheet is coated with a material that is compounded with one or more therapeutic agents. In other embodiments, a sheet compounded with a first therapeutic agent is coated with a material compounded with a second therapeutic agent, a different concentration of the first therapeutic agent, or an auxiliary agent. In some embodiments the sheet is biodegradable, while in others it is not. In other embodiments, a Disc 402 (FIG. 17) is used in place of a sheet. In several embodiments, the sheet or disc is flexible.
  • [0148]
    For delivery of some embodiments of the sheet or disc implants, the sheets or discs are dimensioned such that they can be rolled, folded, or otherwise packaged within a delivery instrument. In some embodiments, the entire implant is flexible. In some embodiments, the implant is pre-curved or pre-bent, yet still flexible enough to be placed within a non-curved lumen of a delivery apparatus. In some embodiments the flexible sheets or discs have thicknesses ranging from about 0.01 mm to about 1.0 mm. Preferably, the delivery instrument has a sufficiently small cross section such that the insertion site self seals without suturing upon withdrawal of the instrument from the eye, for example an outer dimension preferably no greater than about 18 gauge and is not smaller than about 27 or 30 gauge. In such embodiments, the rolled or folded sheets or discs can return to substantially their original dimensions after attachment to the ocular tissue and withdrawal of the delivery instrument. In certain embodiments, thicknesses of about 25 to 250 microns, including about 50 to 200 microns, about 100 to 150 microns, about 25 to 100 microns, and about 100 to 250 microns are used.
  • [0149]
    The implant is dimensioned, in some embodiments, to be affixed (e.g., tethered) to the iris and float within the aqueous of the anterior chamber. In this context, the term “float” is not meant to refer to buoyancy of the implant, but rather that the sheet surface of the implant is movable within ocular fluid of the anterior chamber to the extent allowed by the retention protrusion. In certain embodiments, such implants are not tethered to an intraocular tissue and are free floating within the eye. In certain embodiments, the implant can be adhesively fixed to the iris with a biocompatible adhesive. In some embodiments, a biocompatible adhesive may be pre-activated, while in others, contact with ocular fluid may activate the adhesive. Still other embodiments may involve activation of the adhesive by an external stimulus, after placement of the implant, but prior to withdrawal of the delivery apparatus. Examples of external stimuli include, but are not limited to heat, ultrasound, and radio frequency, or laser energy. In certain embodiments, affixation of the implant to the iris is preferable due to the large surface area of the iris. In other embodiments, the implant is flexible with respect to a retention protrusion affixed to the iris, but is not free floating. Embodiments as disclosed herein are affixed to the iris in a manner that allows normal light passage through the pupil.
  • [0150]
    As discussed above, several embodiments disclosed herein employ multiple materials of varying permeability to control the rate of drug release from an implant. FIGS. 18A-18Q depict additional implant embodiments employing materials with varied permeability to control the rate of drug release from the implant. FIG. 18A shows a top view of the implant body 53 depicted in FIG. 18B. The implant body 53 comprises the outer shell 54 and retention protrusion 359. While not explicitly illustrated, it shall be appreciated that in several embodiments, implants comprising a body and a cap are also constructed without a retentions protrusion. FIG. 18C depicts an implant cap 53 a, which, in some embodiments, is made of the same material as the outer shell 54. In other embodiments, the cap 53 is made of a different material from the outer shell. A region of drug release 56 is formed in the cap through the use of a material with permeability different from that of the shell 54. It shall also be appreciated that implants comprising a body and a cap (and optionally a retention protrusion) may be constructed with orifices through the body or the cap, may be constructed with layers or coatings of permeable or semi-permeable material covering all or a portion of any orifices, and may also be constructed with combinations of the above and regions of drug release based on thickness and/or permeability of the shell material. See 18E-18F.
  • [0151]
    FIGS. 18G-18J depict assembled implants according to several embodiments disclosed herein. The implant body 53 is joined with the implant cap 53 a, thereby creating a lumen 58 which is filled with a drug 62. In some embodiments, the material of the implant body 54 differs from that of the cap 54 a. Thus, the assembly of a cap and body of differing materials creates a region of drug release 56.
  • [0152]
    Additional non-limiting embodiments of caps are shown in FIGS. 18K and 18L. In FIG. 18K, an O-ring cap 53 a with a region of drug release 56 is shown in cross-section. In other embodiments there may be one or more regions of drug release in the cap. An o-ring 99 (or other sealing mechanism) is placed around the cap such that a fluid impermeable seal is made between the cap and the body of the implant when assembled. In FIG. 18L, a crimp cap is shown. The outer shell of the cap comprises regions that are compressible 98 such that the cap is securely placed on, and sealed to, the body of the implant. As discussed above, certain embodiments employ orifices and layers in place of, or in addition to regions of drug release based on thickness and/or permeability of the shell material. As also shown in FIG. 18M, an O-ring cap 53 a is shown in cross-section. A coating 60 is placed within the outer shell 54 of the cap and covering an orifice 56 a. In other embodiments there may be one or more orifices in the cap. In FIG. 18N, a crimp cap comprising an orifice and a coating is shown. While the coatings are shown positioned within the caps, it shall be appreciated that other locations are used in some embodiments, including on the exterior of the cap, within the orifice, or combinations thereof (See FIG. 18O).
  • [0153]
    Additionally, as shown in FIGS. 18P and 18Q, in certain embodiments, coatings are employed within the drug material such that layers are formed. Coatings can separate different drugs 62 a, 62 b, 62 c, 62 d within the lumen (FIG. 18P). In certain embodiments, coatings are used to separate different concentration of the same drug (FIG. 18Q). It shall be appreciated that such internal layers are also useful in embodiments comprising regions of drug release (either alone or in combination with other drug release elements disclosed herein, e.g., orifices). In certain embodiments, the layers create a particularly desired drug elution profile. For example, use of slow-eroding layers is used to create periods of reduced drug release or drug “holidays.” Alternatively, layers may be formulated to create zero order (or other kinetic profiles) as discussed in more detail below.
  • [0154]
    In each of the embodiments depicted in the Figures, as well as other embodiments, the coatings or outer layers of shell material may be formed by spraying, dipping, or added by some other equivalent means known in the art. Thus, in some embodiments, the permeability of the region of drug release or layer(s) covering an orifice (and hence the elution rate) will be at least partially defined by the materials used in manufacturing the implant, the coatings (if any) on the implant, and the effective thickness of implant outer shell.
  • [0155]
    During manufacture of the implants of certain embodiments, one or more interior lumen 58 is formed within the outer shell of the implant. In some embodiments, an interior lumen is localized within the proximal portion of the implant, while in other embodiments, an interior lumen runs the entire length or any intermediate length of the implant. Some embodiments consist of a single interior lumen, while others comprise two or more interior lumens. In some embodiments, one or more of the internal lumens may communicate with an ocular chamber or region, e.g., the anterior chamber. In some embodiments, implants are dimensioned to communicate with more than one ocular chamber or region. In some embodiments, both the proximal and the distal end of the implant are positioned within a single ocular chamber or region, while in other embodiments, the ends of the implant are positioned in different ocular chambers or regions.
  • [0156]
    A drug 62 is housed within the interior lumen 58 of the implant. The drug 62 comprises a therapeutically effective agent against a particular ocular pathology as well as any additional compounds needed to prepare the drug in a form with which the drug is compatible. In some embodiments, one or more of the internal lumens may contain a different drug or concentration of drug, which may be delivered simultaneously (combination therapy) or separately. In some preferred embodiments, an interior lumen is sized in proportion to a desired amount of drug to be positioned within the implant. The ultimate dimensions of an interior lumen of a given embodiment are dictated by the type, amount, and desired release profile of the drug or drugs to be delivered and the composition of the drug(s).
  • [0157]
    In some embodiments, the drug is in the form of a drug-containing pellet, while in other embodiments, the drug is a liquid, a slurry, micropellets or powder. In certain such embodiments, the form of the drug allows the implant to be flexible. In some embodiments the drug is compounded with a polymer formulation. In some embodiments, the drug positioned in the lumen is pure drug. In certain embodiments, the polymer formulation comprises a poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) or PLGA co-polymer or other biodegradable or bioerodible polymer. In still other embodiments, the interior lumen contains only drug.
  • [0158]
    In some embodiments, multiple pellets 62 of single or multiple drug(s) are placed within an interior lumen of the implant. In some embodiments an impermeable partition 64 is used to seal drug(s) within the lumen, such that the sole route of exit from the implant is through the region of drug release. In some embodiments, the impermeable partition 64 may bioerode at a specified rate. In some embodiments, the impermeable partition 64 is incorporated into the drug pellet and creates a seal against the inner dimension of the shell of the implant 54. In other embodiments, more than one impermeable partition is used within a lumen, thereby creating sub-lumens, which may contain different drugs, the same drug at a different concentration, or the same or another drug compounded with different excipients etc. In such embodiments, sequential drug release or release of two agents that are inert within the implant and active when co-mingled outside their respective sub-lumens may be achieved.
  • [0159]
    FIGS. 19A-19W illustrate embodiments of drug various embodiments of retention protrusions. As used herein, retention protrusion is to be given its ordinary meaning and may also refer to any mechanism or anchor element that allows an implant to become affixed, anchored, or otherwise attached, either permanently or transiently, to a suitable target intraocular tissue (represented generally as 15 in FIGS. 19A-19G). For example, a portion of an implant that comprises a biocompatible adhesive may be considered a retention protrusion, as may barbs, barbs with holes, screw-like elements, knurled elements, and the like. In some embodiments, implants are sutured to a target tissue. For example, in some embodiments, implants are sutured to the iris, preferably the inferior portion. It should be understood that any retention means may be used with any illustrated (and/or described) implant (even if not explicitly illustrated or described as such).
  • [0160]
    Intraocular targets for anchoring of implants include, but are not limited to the fibrous tissues of the eye. In some embodiments, implants are anchored to the ciliary muscles and/or tendons (or the fibrous band). In some embodiments, implants are anchored into Schlemm's canal, the trabecular meshwork, the episcleral veins, the iris, the iris root, the lens cortex, the lens epithelium, the lens capsule, the sclera, the scleral spur, the choroid, the suprachoroidal space, the anterior chamber wall, or disposed within the anterior chamber angle. As used herein, the term “suprachoroidal space” shall be given its ordinary meaning and it will be appreciated that other potential ocular spaces exist in various regions of the eye that may be encompassed by the term “suprachoroidal space.” For example, the suprachoroidal space located in the anterior region of the eye is also known as the supraciliary space, and thus, in certain contexts herein, use of “suprachoroidal space” shall be meant to encompass the supraciliary space.
  • [0161]
    The retention protrusions may be formulated of the same biocompatible material as the outer shell. In some embodiments the biodegradable retention protrusions are used. In alternate embodiments, one or more of the retention protrusions may be formed of a different material than the outer shell. Different types of retention protrusions may also be included in a single device.
  • [0162]
    In some embodiments, see for example FIG. 19A, the retention protrusion 359 may comprise a ridged pin 126 comprising a ridge 128 or series of ridges formed on the surface of a base portion 130. Such ridges may be formed in any direction on the surface of the implant including, but not limited to, biased from the long axis of the implant, spiraling around the implant, or encircling the implant (see, e.g. FIG. 19B). Likewise, the ridges may be distinct or contiguous with one another. Other anchoring elements may also be used, such as raised bumps; cylinders; deep threads 134, as shown in FIG. 19C; ribs 140, as shown in FIG. 19D; a rivet shaped base portion 146, as shown in FIG. 19E; biocompatible adhesive 150 encircling the retention element 359 where it passes through an ocular tissue, as shown in FIG. 19F; or barbs 170, as shown in FIG. 19G. In some embodiments, the retention protrusion is positioned within a pre-existing intraocular cavity or space, shown generally as 20. For example, as depicted in FIG. 19H, an elongated blade 34 resides within Schlemm's canal 22 and is attached to a base portion 130 that traverses the trabecular meshwork 21. In other embodiments, as depicted in FIG. 19I, based on the dimensions of intraocular spaces, which are well-known in the art, a shorter base 130 a is used and attached to the elongated blade 34 residing within Schlemm's canal 22.
  • [0163]
    In certain embodiments, an expandable material 100 is used in conjunction with or in place of a physical retention protrusion. For example, in FIG. 19J, the base 130 is covered, in particular areas, with an expandable material 100. Upon contact with an appropriate solvent, which includes ocular fluid, the material expands (as depicted by the arrows), thus exerting pressure on the surrounding tissue, for example the trabecular meshwork 21 and base of Schlemm's canal 22 in FIG. 19J.
  • [0164]
    In some embodiments, an external stimulus is used to induce the expansion of the expandable material 100. As depicted in FIG. 19K, the base 130 is covered, in particular areas, with an expandable material 100. Upon stimulation by an external stimuli hv, the material expands (as depicted by the arrows), thus exerting pressure on the surrounding tissue, for example the trabecular meshwork 21 and base of Schlemm's canal 22 in FIG. 19K. Suitable external stimuli include, but are not limited to, light energy, electromagnetic energy, heat, ultrasound, radio frequency, or laser energy.
  • [0165]
    In several other embodiments, the expandable material 100, is coated or layered on the outer shell 54, which expands in response to contact with a solvent. See FIGS. 19L-19Q. In some embodiments, once the implant is fully positioned within the desired intraocular space, contact with bodily fluid causes the expandable material to swell, solidify or gel, or otherwise expand. (Compare dimension D to D1 in FIGS. 19L-19Q). As a result, the expanded material exerts pressure on the surrounding ocular tissue, which secures in the implant in position.
  • [0166]
    In some embodiments, the expanding material fills any voids between the implant shell and the surrounding intraocular tissue. In some such embodiments, the expanded material seals one portion of the implant off fills or otherwise seals the volume around the implant outer shell such that fluid is prevented from flowing around the implant, and must flow through the implant.
  • [0167]
    In other embodiments, such as those schematically depicted in FIGS. 19P and 19Q, the expandable material 100 is positioned on selected areas of the implant shell 54, such that the expanded material exerts pressure on the surrounding ocular tissue, but also maintains the patency of a natural ocular fluid passageway by the creation of zones of fluid flow 102 around the implant shell and expandable material. In still other embodiments, the expandable material can be positioned within the lumen of the implant, such that the expansion of the material assists or causes the lumen to be maintained in a patent state.
  • [0168]
    The expandable material can be positioned on the implant by dipping, molding, coating, spraying, or other suitable process known in the art.
  • [0169]
    In some embodiments, the expandable material is a hydrogel or similar material. Hydrogel is a three-dimensional network of cross-linked, hydrophilic polymer chains. The hydrophilicity of the polymer chains cause the hydrogel to swell in the presence of sufficient quantities of fluid. In other embodiments, the expandable material is foam, collagen, or any other similar biocompatible material that swells, solidifies or gels, or otherwise expands. In some embodiments, the expandable material begins to expand immediately on contact with an appropriate solvent. In other embodiments, expansion occurs after passage of a short period of time, such that the implant can be fully positioned in the desired target site prior to expansion of the material. Preferred solvents that induce expansion include water, saline, ocular fluid, aqueous humor, or another biocompatible solvents that would not affect the structure or permeability characteristics of the outer shell.
  • [0170]
    The expansion of the expandable material is varied in several embodiments. In some embodiments, as described above, the material is positioned on the outer shell of implant such that the expanded material exerts pressure on the surrounding ocular tissue, thereby securing the implant in position. In other embodiments, the expandable material may be placed adjacent to, surrounding, or under another anchoring element (such as those described above), such that the expansion of the expandable material causes the anchoring element to move from a first, retracted state to a second, expanded state wherein the anchoring element anchors the implant against an ocular structure in the expanded state. In some embodiments, the expandable material is designed to expand only in two dimensions, while in other embodiments, the material expands in three dimensions.
  • [0171]
    Although FIGS. 19L and 19M depict the expandable material as rectangular in cross-section, it will be appreciated that the cross-sectional shape can vary and may include circular, oval, irregular, and other shapes in certain embodiments. The relative expansion (change from dimension D to D1) of the material is also controlled in several embodiments. In certain embodiments the D to D1 change is greater than in other embodiments, while in some embodiments, a smaller D to D1 change is realized upon expansion of the material.
  • [0172]
    FIGS. 19P and 19Q show side views of an implant having expandable anchoring elements 100 comprising projections extending radially outward from the body of the implant. In some such embodiments, the anchoring elements are individually connected to the implant body, while in other embodiments, they are interconnected by a sheath region that mounts over the implant body.
  • [0173]
    In selected embodiments, the implant and/or the retention protrusion additionally includes a shunt feature. The term “shunt” as used herein is a broad term, and is to be given its ordinary and customary meaning to a person of ordinary skill in the art (and it is not to be limited to a special or customized meaning), and refers without limitation to the portion of the implant defining one or more fluid passages for transport of fluid from a first, often undesired location, to one or more other locations. The term “stent” may also be used to refer to a shunt. In some embodiments, the shunt can be configured to provide a fluid flow path for draining aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of an eye to an outflow pathway to reduce intraocular pressure, for example, as in FIG. 19R and FIG. 19S. In still other embodiments, the shunt feature of the implant may be positioned in any physiological location that necessitates simultaneous drug delivery and transport of fluid from a first physiologic site to a second site (which may be physiologic or external to a patient).
  • [0174]
    The shunt portion of the implant can have an inflow portion 38 k and one or more outflow portions 56 k. In some embodiments, the inflow and outflow portions are positioned at various locations on the implant depending on the physiological space in which they are to be located. As shown in FIG. 19R, the outflow portion may be disposed at or near the proximal end 52 of the implant. When the implant is deployed, the inflow portion may be sized and configured to reside in the anterior chamber of the eye and the outflow portion may be sized and configured to reside within the trabecular meshwork 23 or Schlemm's canal 22. In other embodiments, the outflow portion may be sized and configured to reside in the supraciliary region of the uveoscleral outflow pathway, the suprachoroidal space, other part of the eye, or within other physiological spaces amenable to fluid deposition.
  • [0175]
    At least one lumen can extend through the shunt portion of the implant. In some embodiments, there is at least one lumen that operates to conduct the fluid through the shunt portion of the implant. In certain embodiments, each lumen extends from an inflow end to an outflow end along a lumen axis. In some embodiments the lumen extends substantially through the longitudinal center of the shunt. In other embodiments, the lumen can be offset from the longitudinal center of the shunt.
  • [0176]
    Additional embodiments comprising a shunt may be used to drain ocular fluid from a first location to different location. As depicted in FIG. 19T, a shunt 30 p directs aqueous from the anterior chamber 20 directly into a collector channel 29 which empties into aqueous veins. The shunt 30 p has a distal end 160 that rests against the back wall of Schlemm's canal. A removable alignment pin 158 is utilized to align the shunt lumen 42 p with the collector channel 29. In use, the pin 158 extends through the implant lumen and the shunt lumen 42 p and protrudes through the base 160 and extends into the collector channel 29 to center and/or align the shunt 30 p over the collector channel 29. The shunt 30 p is then pressed firmly against the back wall 92 of Schlemm's canal 22. A permanent bio-glue 162 is used between the shunt base and the back wall 92 of Schlemm's canal 22 to seat and securely hold the shunt 30 p in place. Once positioned, the pin 158 is withdrawn from the shunt and implant lumens 42 p to allow the aqueous to flow from the anterior chamber 20 through the implant, through the shunt, and into the collector duct 29. The collector ducts are nominally 20 to 100 micrometers in diameter and are visualized with a suitable microscopy method (such as ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM)) or laser imaging to provide guidance for placement of the shunt 30 p. In another embodiment, the pin 158 is biodegradable in ocular fluid, such that it need not be manually removed from the implant.
  • [0177]
    In some embodiments, the shunt 30 p is inserted through a previously made incision in the trabecular meshwork 23. In other embodiments, the shunt 30 p may be formed with blade configuration to provide self-trephining capability. In these cases, the incision through the trabecular meshwork 23 is made by the self-trephining shunt device which has a blade at its base or proximate to the base.
  • [0178]
    As shown in FIG. 19U, a shunt extending between an anterior chamber 20 of an eye, through the trabecular meshwork 23, and into Schlemm's canal 22 of an eye can be configured to be axisymmetric with respect to the flow of aqueous therethrough. For example, as shown in FIG. 19U, the shunt 229A comprises an inlet end 230 configured to be disposed in the anterior chamber 20 and associated with a drug delivery implant in accordance with embodiments disclosed herein. For clarity of the shunt feature, the implant is not shown. The second end 231 of the shunt 229A is configured to be disposed in Schlemm's canal 22. At least one lumen 239 extends through the shunt 229A between the inlet and outlet ends 230, 232. The lumen 239 defines an opening 232 at the inlet end 230 as well as an outlet 233 at the outlet end 231.
  • [0179]
    In the illustrated embodiment, an exterior surface 238 of the shunt 229A is cone-shaped. Thus, a circumference of the exterior surface 238 adjacent to the inlet end 230 is smaller than the circumference of the outer surface 238 at the outlet end 231.
  • [0180]
    With the shunt 229A extending through the trabecular meshwork 23, the tissue of the trabecular meshwork 23 provides additional anchoring force for retaining the shunt 229A with its inlet end 230 in the anterior chamber and its outlet end 231 in Schlemm's canal. For example, the trabecular meshwork 23 would naturally tend to close an aperture occupied by the shunt 229A. As such, the trabecular meshwork 23 would tend to squeeze the shunt 229A. Because the exterior surface 238 is conical, the squeezing force applied by the trabecular meshwork 23 would tend to draw the shunt 229A towards Schlemm's canal 22 In the illustrated embodiment, the shunt 229A is sized such that a portion 234 of the shunt 229 adjacent to the inlet end 230 remains in the anterior chamber 20 while a portion 235 of the shunt 229 adjacent to the outlet end 231 remains in Schlemm's canal 22.
  • [0181]
    In the illustrated embodiment, the outer surface 238 of the shunt 229A is smooth. Alternatively, the outer surface 238 can have other contours such as, for example, but without limitation curved or stepped. In one embodiment, the outer surface 238 can be curved in a concave manner so as to produce a trumpet-like shape. Alternatively, the outer surface 238 can be convex.
  • [0182]
    In certain embodiments, the shunt 229A preferably includes one or plurality of posts or legs 236 configured to maintain a space between the outlet opening 233 and a wall of Schlemm's canal 22. As such, the legs 236 prevent a wall of Schlemm's canal from completely closing off the outlet opening 233 of the shunt 229A. In the illustrated embodiment, the legs 236 are coupled to the distal-most surface of the shunt 229A and are substantially parallel to an implant axis extending through the shunt 229A and between the anterior chamber 20 and Schlemm's canal 22.
  • [0183]
    This arrangement of the legs 236 and the outlet 233 imparts an axisymmetric flow characteristic to the shunt 229A. For example, aqueous can flow from the outlet 233 in any direction. Thus, the shunt 229A can be implanted into Schlemm's canal at any angular position relative to its implant axis. Thus, it is not necessary to determine the angular orientation of the shunt 229A prior to implantation, nor is it necessary to preserve a particular orientation during an implantation procedure.
  • [0184]
    FIG. 19V illustrates a modification of the shunt 229A, identified generally by the reference numeral 229B. In this embodiment, the shunt 229B includes a flange 237 extending radially from the portion 234. Preferably, the flange 237 is configured to retain the first portion 234 within the anterior chamber 20. It is to be recognized that although generally, aqueous will flow from the anterior chamber 20 towards Schlemm's canal 22, the shunt 229A, 229B or any of the above-described shunts as well as other shunts described below, can provide for omni-directional flow of aqueous.
  • [0185]
    FIG. 19W illustrates another modification of the shunt 229A, identified generally by the reference numeral 229C. In this embodiment, the outer surface 238C is not conical. Rather, the outer surface 238C is cylindrical. The shunt 229C includes a flange 240 that can be the same size and shape as the flange 237. The legs 236C extend from the flange 240.
  • [0186]
    Constructed as such, the natural tendency of the tissue of the trabecular meshwork 21 to close the hole in which the shunt 229C is disposed, aids in anchoring the shunt 229C in place. Additionally, the legs 236C aid in preventing the walls of Schlemm's canal from completely closing the outlet 233C of the lumen 239C.
  • [0187]
    With reference to FIG. 19X, another embodiment of an axisymmetric trabecular shunting device is illustrated therein and identified generally by the reference numeral 229F.
  • [0188]
    The shunt 229F comprises an inlet (proximal) section having a first flange 240F, an outlet (distal) section having a second flange 237F and a middle section 284 connecting the inlet section and the outlet section. A lumen 239F of the device 229F is configured to transport aqueous, liquid, or therapeutic agents between the inlet section and the outlet section.
  • [0189]
    The inlet section of the shunt 229F has at least one inlet opening 286 and the outlet section comprises at least one outlet opening 287. In some embodiments, the inlet opening 286 is directly associated with the proximal end of an implant, such that ocular fluid flowing through a lumen of the implant passes into the lumen 239F of the shunt. In other embodiments, the shunt is joined or associated with an implant in a manner where the inlet opening 286 receives ocular fluid directly from an ocular cavity, without having first passed through the implant. In still other embodiments, the shunt carries fluid from both sources (e.g., from the eye and from the implant lumen).
  • [0190]
    A further advantage of such embodiments is provided where the outlet section 237F includes at least one opening 287, 288 suitably located for discharging substantially axisymmetrically the aqueous, liquid or therapeutic agents, wherein the opening 287, 288 is in fluid communication with the lumen 285 of the device 281. In the illustrated embodiment, the openings 288 extend radially from the lumen 285 and open at the outwardly facing surface around the periphery of the outlet flange 237F.
  • [0191]
    It should be understood that all such anchoring elements and retention protrusions may also be made flexible. It should also be understood that other suitable shapes can be used and that this list is not limiting. It should further be understood the devices may be flexible, even though several of the devices as illustrated in the Figures may not appear to be flexible. In those embodiments involving a rechargeable device, the retention protrusions not only serve to anchor the implant, but provide resistance to movement to allow the implant to have greater positional stability within the eye during recharging.
  • [0192]
    For the sake of clarity, only a small number of the possible embodiments of the implant have been shown with the various retention projections. It should be understood that any implant embodiment may be readily combined with any of the retention projections disclosed herein, and vice versa.
  • [0193]
    It will further be appreciated that, while several embodiments described above are shown, in some cases as being anchored within or to particular intraocular tissues, that each embodiment may be readily adapted to be anchored or deployed into or onto any of the target intraocular tissues disclosed herein or to other ocular tissues known in the art.
  • [0194]
    Additionally, while embodiments described both above and below include discussion of retention projections, it will be appreciated that several embodiments of the implants disclosed herein need not include a specific retention projection. Such embodiments are used to deliver drug to ocular targets which do not require a specific anchor point, and implants may simply be deployed to a desired intraocular space. Such targets include the vitreous humor, the ciliary muscle, ciliary tendons, the ciliary fibrous band, Schlemm's canal, the trabecular meshwork , the episcleral veins, the anterior chamber and the anterior chamber angle, the lens cortex, lens epithelium, and lens capsule, the ciliary processes, the posterior chamber, the choroid, and the suprachoroidal space. It will be appreciated that certain embodiments, the use of a retention protrusion is optional for a particular target tissue.
  • [0195]
    Some embodiments disclosed herein are dimensioned to be wholly contained within the eye of the subject, the dimensions of which can be obtained on a subject to subject basis by standard ophthalmologic techniques. Upon completion of the implantation procedure, in several embodiments, the proximal end of the device may be positioned in or near the anterior chamber of the eye. The distal end of the implant may be positioned anywhere within the suprachoroidal space. In some embodiments, the distal end of the implant is near the limbus. In other embodiments, the distal end of the implant is positioned near the macula in the posterior region of the eye. In other embodiments, the proximal end of the device may be positioned in or near other regions of the eye. In some such embodiments, the distal end of the device may also be positioned in or near other regions of the eye. As used herein, the term “near” is used at times to as synonymous with “at,” while other uses contextually indicate a distance sufficiently adjacent to allow a drug to diffuse from the implant to the target tissue. In still other embodiments, implants are dimensioned to span a distance between a first non-ocular physiologic space and a second non-ocular physiologic space.
  • [0196]
    In one embodiment, the drug delivery implant is positioned in the suprachoroidal space by advancement through the ciliary attachment tissue, which lies to the posterior of the scleral spur. The ciliary attachment tissue is typically fibrous or porous, and relatively easy to pierce, cut, or separate from the scleral spur with the delivery instruments disclosed herein, or other surgical devices. In such embodiments, the implant is advanced through this tissue and lies adjacent to or abuts the sclera once the implant extends into the uveoscleral outflow pathway. The implant is advanced within the uveoscleral outflow pathway along the interior wall of the sclera until the desired implantation site within the posterior portion of the uveoscleral outflow pathway is reached.
  • [0197]
    In some embodiments the total length of the implant is between 2 and 30 mm in length. In some embodiments, the implant length is between 2 and 25 mm, between 6 and 25 mm, between 8 and 25 mm, between 10 and 30 mm, between 15 and 25 mm or between 15 and 18 mm. In some embodiments the length of the implant is about 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, or 25 mm. So that that the delivery device containing an implant can be inserted and advanced through the cornea to the iris and produce only a self-sealing puncture in the cornea, in some embodiments, the outer diameter of the implants are between about 100 and 600 microns. In some embodiments, the implant diameter is between about 150-500 microns, between about 125-550 microns, or about 175-475 microns. In some embodiments the diameter of the implant is about 100, 125, 150, 160, 170, 180, 190, 200, 225, 250, 275, 300, 325, 350, 375, 400, 425, 450, 460, 470, 475, 480, 490, or 500 microns. In some embodiments, the inner diameter of the implant is from about between 50-500 microns. In some embodiments, the inner diameter is between about 100-450 microns, 150-500 microns, or 75-475 microns. In some embodiments, the inner diameters is about 80, 90, 100, 110, 125, 150, 175, 200, 225, 250, 275, 300, 325, 350, 375, 400, 410, 420, 425, 430, 440, or 450 microns. In some embodiments, including but not limited to those in which the device is disc or wafer-shaped, the thickness is from about 25 to 250 microns, including about 50 to 200 microns, about 100 to 150 microns, about 25 to 100 microns, and about 100 to 250 microns.
  • [0198]
    In further embodiments, any or all of the interior lumens formed during the manufacture of the implants may be coated with a layer of hydrophilic material, thereby increasing the rate of contact of ocular fluid with the therapeutic agent or agents positioned within the lumen. In one embodiment, the hydrophilic material is permeable to ocular fluid and/or the drug. Conversely, any or all of the interior lumens may be coated with a layer of hydrophobic material, to coordinately reduce the contact of ocular fluid with the therapeutic agent or agents positioned within the lumen. In one embodiment, the hydrophobic material is permeable to ocular fluid and/or the drug.
  • [0199]
    Selected embodiments of the drug delivery implants described herein allow for recharging of the implant, i.e. refilling the implant with additional (same or different) therapeutic agent. In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 20A-20C, the proximal end 52 of the implant is open and interacts with a recharging device 80. The recharging device 80 comprises a clamping sleeve 72 that houses flexible clamping grippers 74 that interacts with the proximal end 52 of the implant. A flexible pusher tube 76 that may be spring loaded contains a small internal recess 78 that holds the new therapeutic agent 62 for delivery to the implant lumen 58. In FIG. 20A, a new dose of agent, coated in a shell and capped with proximal barrier is inserted into the lumen of the implant. FIGS. 20B and 20C depict recharging the implant with multiple drug pellets. In such embodiments, a one-way passage 70 allows the insertion of a recharging device carrying a drug pellet into the lumen of the implant, but upon removal of the recharging device, the passage closes to prevent the drug from escaping the lumen. In addition to providing the ability to renew dose of drug in the implant, recharging an implant with multiple pellets may provide one or more other benefits. In some embodiments, the pellets are sized to allow an increased surface area of drug that is exposed to ocular fluids (as compared to an implant packed with a solid drug core). As the exposure to ocular fluid is one variable in the overall elution rate of a drug, in such embodiments, the size of the pellets may be adjusted as needed to provide a particular desired release rate. Moreover, in certain embodiments, the size of the multiple pellets is adjusted to provide a greater rate or capacity for fluid to flow through the lumen of the implant, even when a full drug load is present. For example, if an ocular condition is known to require drug therapy in addition to removal/diversion of ocular fluid, the pellets can be sized to deliver a sufficient quantity of drug to provide a therapeutic effect and simultaneously allow ocular fluid to flow through the lumen of the implant from a first location to a second location. Additionally, the presence of multiple pellets, or a plurality of particles, as opposed to a single solid core of drug, allows, in certain embodiments, the implant to be flexible. In such embodiments, the shape of the pellets may be designed to provide space around the periphery of the pellets such that the implant is able to articulate as needed to fit within or adjacent to a desired physiological space without inhibition of this articulation from pellet to pellet contact. It shall be appreciated that in such embodiments, the pellets may contact one another to some degree, still allowing for a high degree of efficiency in packing the implant with drug. It shall also be appreciated that in certain embodiments where flexibility of the implant is unnecessary or undesirable, the pellets may be shaped to contact one another more fully, thereby supplementing the rigidity of an implant.
  • [0200]
    It will be appreciated that the elements discussed above are not to be read as limiting the implants to the specific combinations or embodiments described. Rather, the features discussed are freely interchangeable to allow flexibility in the construction of a drug delivery implant in accordance with this disclosure.
  • Delivery Instruments
  • [0201]
    Another aspect of the systems and methods described herein relates to delivery instruments for implanting an implant for delivering a drug to the eye and optionally for draining fluid from the anterior chamber into a physiologic outflow space. In some embodiments, the implant is inserted into the eye from a site transocularly situated from the implantation site. The delivery instrument is sufficiently long to advance the implant transocularly from the insertion site across the anterior chamber to the implantation site. At least a portion of the instrument may be flexible. The instrument may comprise a plurality of members longitudinally moveable relative to each other. In some embodiments, at least a portion of the delivery instrument is curved. In some embodiments, a portion of the delivery instrument is rigid and another portion of the instrument is flexible.
  • [0202]
    In some embodiments, the delivery instrument has a distal curvature. The distal curvature of the delivery instrument may be characterized in some embodiments as a radius of approximately 10 to 30 mm. In some embodiments the distal curvature has a radius of about 20 mm.
  • [0203]
    In some embodiments, the delivery instrument has a distal angle 88 (with a measure denoted by χ in FIG. 21). The angle measure χ may be characterized as approximately 90 to 180 degrees relative to the proximal segment 94 of the delivery instrument. In some embodiments, the angle measure χ may be characterized as between about 145 and about 170 degrees. In some embodiments the angle measure is between about 150 and about 170 degrees, or between about 155 and about 165 degrees. The angle can incorporate a small radius of curvature at the “elbow” so as to make a smooth transition from the proximal segment of the delivery instrument to the distal segment. The length of the distal segment may be approximately 0.5 to 7 mm in some embodiments, while in some other embodiments, the length of the distal segment is about 2 to 3 mm.
  • [0204]
    In other embodiments, a curved distal end is preferred. In such embodiments, the height of the delivery instrument/shunt assembly (dimension 90 in FIG. 22) is less than about 3 mm in some embodiments, and less than 2 mm in other embodiments.
  • [0205]
    In some embodiments, the instruments have a sharpened feature at the forward end and are self-trephinating, i.e., self-penetrating, so as to pass through tissue without pre-forming an incision, hole or aperture Alternatively, a trocar, scalpel, spatula, or similar instrument can be used to pre-form an incision in the eye tissue before passing the shunt into such tissue.
  • [0206]
    For delivery of some embodiments of the drug eluting ocular implant, the instrument has a sufficiently small cross section such that the insertion site self seals without suturing upon withdrawal of the instrument from the eye. An outer dimension of the delivery instrument is preferably no greater than about 18 gauge and is not smaller than about 27 or 30 gauge.
  • [0207]
    For delivery of some embodiments of the drug eluting ocular implant, an incision in the corneal tissue is made with a hollow needle through which the implant is passed. The needle has a small diameter size (e.g., 18 or 19 or 20 or 21 or 22 or 23 or 24 or 25 or 26 or 27 gauge) so that the incision is self sealing and the implantation occurs in a closed chamber with or without viscoelastic. A self-sealing incision may also be formed using a conventional “tunneling” procedure in which a spatula-shaped scalpel is used to create a generally inverted V-shaped incision through the cornea. In a preferred mode, the instrument used to form the incision through the cornea remains in place (that is, extends through the corneal incision) during the procedure and is not removed until after implantation. Such incision-forming instrument either may be used to place the ocular implant or may cooperate with a delivery instrument to allow implantation through the same incision without withdrawing the incision-forming instrument. Of course, in other modes, various surgical instruments may be passed through one or more corneal incisions multiple times.
  • [0208]
    Some embodiments include a spring-loaded pusher system. In some embodiments, the spring-loaded pusher includes a button operably connected to a hinged rod device. The rod of the hinged rod device engages a depression in the surface of the pusher, keeping the spring of the pusher in a compressed conformation. When the user pushes the button, the rod is disengaged from the depression, thereby allowing the spring to decompress, thereby advancing the pusher forward.
  • [0209]
    In some embodiments, an over-the wire system is used to deliver the implant. The implant may be delivered over a wire. In some embodiments, the wire is self-trephinating. The wire may also function as a trocar. The wire may be superelastic, flexible, or relatively inflexible with respect to the implant. The wire may be pre-formed to have a certain shape. The wire may be curved. The wire may have shape memory, or be elastic. In some embodiments, the wire is a pull wire. The wire may also be a steerable catheter.
  • [0210]
    In some embodiments, the wire is positioned within a lumen in the implant. The wire may be axially movable within the lumen. The lumen may or may not include valves or other flow regulatory devices.
  • [0211]
    In some embodiments, the delivery instrument is a trocar. The trocar may be angled or curved. In some embodiments, the trocar is flexible. In other embodiments the trocar is relatively rigid. In other embodiments, the trocar is stiff. In embodiments where the trocar is stiff, the implant is relatively flexible. The diameter of the trocar is about 0.001 inches to about 0.01 inches. In some embodiments, the diameter of the trocar is 0.001, 0.002, 0.003, 0.004, 0.005, 0.006, 0.007, 0.008, 0.009, or 0.01 inches.
  • [0212]
    In some embodiments, delivery of the implant is achieved by applying a driving force at or near the proximal end of the implant. The driving force may be a pulling or a pushing applied to the end of the implant.
  • [0213]
    The instrument may include a seal or coating to prevent aqueous humor from passing through the delivery instrument and/or between the members of the instrument when the instrument is in the eye. The seal aids in preventing backflow. In some embodiments, the instrument is coated with the coating and a hydrophilic or hydrophobic agent. In some embodiments, one region of the instrument is coated with the coating plus the hydrophilic agent, and another region of the instrument is coated with the coating plus the hydrophobic agent. The delivery instrument may additionally comprise a seal between various members comprising the instrument. The seal may comprise a hydrophobic or hydrophilic coating between slip-fit surfaces of the members of the instrument. The seal may be disposed proximate of the implant when carried by the delivery instrument. In some embodiments, the seal is present on at least a section of each of two devices that are machined to closely fit with one another.
  • [0214]
    The delivery instrument may include a distal end having a beveled shape. The delivery instrument may include a distal end having a spatula shape. The beveled or spatula shape may or may not include a recess to contain the implant. The recess can include a pusher or other suitable means to push out or eject the implant.
  • [0215]
    The delivery instrument may be configured to deliver multiple implants. In some such embodiments, the implants may be arranged in tandem (or serially for implant numbers greater than two) within the device.
  • Procedures
  • [0216]
    For delivery of some embodiments of the ocular implant, the implantation occurs in a closed chamber with or without viscoelastic.
  • [0217]
    The implants may be placed using an applicator, such as a pusher, or they may be placed using a delivery instrument having energy stored in the instrument, such as disclosed in U.S. Patent Publication 2004/0050392, filed Aug. 28, 2002, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,331,984, issued Feb. 19, 2008, the entirety of which is incorporated herein by reference and made a part of this specification and disclosure. In some embodiments, fluid may be infused through an applicator to create an elevated fluid pressure at the forward end of the implant to ease implantation.
  • [0218]
    In one embodiment of the invention, a delivery apparatus (or “applicator”) similar to that used for placing a trabecular stent through a trabecular meshwork of an eye is used. Certain embodiments of such a delivery apparatus are disclosed in U.S. Patent Publication 2004/0050392, filed Aug. 28, 2002, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,331,984, issued Feb. 19, 2008; U.S. Publication No.: 2002/0133168, entitled APPLICATOR AND METHODS FOR PLACING A TRABECULAR SHUNT FOR GLAUCOMA TREATMENT, now abandoned; and U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/276,609, filed Mar. 16, 2001, entitled APPLICATOR AND METHODS FOR PLACING A TRABECULAR SHUNT FOR GLAUCOMA TREATMENT, now expired, each of which is incorporated by reference and made a part of this specification and disclosure.
  • [0219]
    The delivery apparatus includes a handpiece, an elongate tip, a holder and an actuator. The handpiece has a distal end and a proximal end. The elongate tip is connected to the distal end of the handpiece. The elongate tip has a distal portion and is configured to be placed through a corneal incision and into an anterior chamber of the eye. The holder is attached to the distal portion of the elongate tip. The holder is configured to hold and release the drug delivery implant. The actuator is on the handpiece and actuates the holder to release the drug delivery implant from the holder. In one embodiment, a deployment mechanism within the delivery apparatus includes a push-pull type plunger.
  • [0220]
    In some embodiments, the holder comprises a clamp. In some embodiments, the apparatus further comprises a spring within the handpiece that is configured to be loaded when the drug delivery implant is being held by the holder, the spring being at least partially unloaded upon actuating the actuator, allowing for release of the drug delivery implant from the holder.
  • [0221]
    In various embodiments, the clamp comprises a plurality of claws configured to exert a clamping force onto at least the proximal portion of the drug delivery implant. The holder may also comprise a plurality of flanges.
  • [0222]
    In some embodiments, the distal portion of the elongate tip is made of a flexible material. This can be a flexible wire. The distal portion can have a deflection range, preferably of about 45 degrees from the long axis of the handpiece. The delivery apparatus can further comprise an irrigation port in the elongate tip.
  • [0223]
    In some embodiments, the method includes using a delivery apparatus that comprises a handpiece having a distal end and a proximal end and an elongate tip connected to the distal end of the handpiece. The elongate tip has a distal portion and being configured to be placed through a corneal incision and into an anterior chamber of the eye. The apparatus further has a holder attached to the distal portion of the elongate tip, the holder being configured to hold and release the drug delivery implant, and an actuator on the handpiece that actuates the holder to release the drug delivery implant from the holder.
  • [0224]
    The delivery instrument may be advanced through an insertion site in the cornea and advanced either transocularly or posteriorly into the anterior chamber. angle and positioned at base of the anterior chamber angle. Using the anterior chamber angle as a reference point, the delivery instrument can be advanced further in a generally posterior direction to drive the implant into the iris, inward of the anterior chamber angle.
  • [0225]
    Optionally, based on the implant structure, the implant may be laid within the anterior chamber angle, taking on a curved shape to match the annular shape of the anterior chamber angle.
  • [0226]
    In some embodiments, the implant may be brought into position adjacent the tissue in the anterior chamber angle or the iris tissue, and the pusher tube advanced axially toward the distal end of the delivery instrument. As the pusher tube is advanced, the implant is also advanced. When the implant is advanced through the tissue and such that it is no longer in the lumen of the delivery instrument, the delivery instrument is retracted, leaving the implant in the eye tissue.
  • [0227]
    The placement and implantation of the implant may be performed using a gonioscope or other conventional imaging equipment. In some embodiments, the delivery instrument is used to force the implant into a desired position by application of a continual implantation force, by tapping the implant into place using a distal portion of the delivery instrument, or by a combination of these methods. Once the implant is in the desired position, it may be further seated by tapping using a distal portion of the delivery instrument.
  • [0228]
    In one embodiment, the drug delivery implant is affixed to an additional portion of the iris or other intraocular tissue, to aid in fixating the implant. In one embodiment, this additional affixation may be performed with a biocompatible adhesive. In other embodiments, one or more sutures may be used. In another embodiment, the drug delivery implant is held substantially in place via the interaction of the implant body's outer surface and the surrounding tissue of the anterior chamber angle.
  • [0229]
    FIG. 23 illustrates one embodiment of a surgical method for implanting the drug delivery implant into an eye, as described in the embodiments herein. A first incision or slit is made through the conjunctiva and the sclera 11 at a location rearward of the limbus 21, that is, posterior to the region of the sclera 11 at which the opaque white sclera 11 starts to become clear cornea 12. In some embodiments, the first incision is posterior to the limbus 21, including about 3 mm posterior to the limbus. In some embodiments, the incision is made such that a surgical tool may be inserted into the anterior chamber at a shallow angle (relative to the anteroposterior axis), as shown in FIG. 23. In other embodiments, the first incision may be made to allow a larger angle of instrument insertion (see, e.g. FIGS. 24-26). Also, the first incision is made slightly larger than the width of the drug delivery implant. In one embodiment, a conventional cyclodialysis spatula may be inserted through the first incision into the supraciliary space to confirm correct anatomic position.
  • [0230]
    A portion of the upper and lower surfaces of the drug delivery implant can be grasped securely by the surgical tool, for example, a forceps, so that the forward end of the implant is oriented properly. The implant may also be secured by viscoelastic or mechanical interlock with the pusher tube or wall of the implant delivery device. In one embodiment, the implant is oriented with a longitudinal axis of the implant being substantially co-axial to a longitudinal axis of the grasping end of the surgical tool. The drug delivery implant is disposed through the first incision.
  • [0231]
    The delivery instrument may be advanced from the insertion site transocularly into the anterior chamber angle and positioned at a location near the scleral spur. Using the scleral spur as a reference point, the delivery instrument can be advanced further in a generally posterior direction to drive the implant into eye tissue at a location just inward of the scleral spur toward the iris.
  • [0232]
    Optionally, based on the implant structure, the shearing edge of the insertion head of the implant can pass between the scleral spur and the ciliary body 16 posterior to the trabecular meshwork.
  • [0233]
    The drug delivery implant may be continually advanced posteriorly until a portion of its insertion head and the first end of the conduit is disposed within the anterior chamber 20 of the eye. Thus, the first end of the conduit is placed into fluid communication with the anterior chamber 20 of the eye. The distal end of the elongate body of the drug delivery implant can be disposed into the suprachoroidal space 24 of the eye so that the second end of the conduit is placed into fluid communication with the suprachoroidal space 24. Alternatively, the implant may be brought into position adjacent the tissue in the anterior chamber angle, and the pusher tube advanced axially toward the distal end of the delivery instrument. As the pusher tube is advanced, the implant is also advanced. When the implant is advanced through the tissue and such that it is no longer in the lumen of the delivery instrument, the delivery instrument is retracted, leaving the implant in the eye tissue.
  • [0234]
    The placement and implantation of the implant may be performed using a gonioscope or other conventional imaging equipment. In some embodiments, the delivery instrument is used to force the implant into a desired position by application of a continual implantation force, by tapping the implant into place using a distal portion of the delivery instrument, or by a combination of these methods. Once the implant is in the desired position, it may be further seated by tapping using a distal portion of the delivery instrument.
  • [0235]
    In one embodiment, the drug delivery implant is sutured to a portion of the sclera 11 to aid in fixating the implant. In one embodiment, the first incision is subsequently sutured closed. As one will appreciate, the suture used to fixate the drug delivery implant may also be used to close the first incision. In another embodiment, the drug delivery implant is held substantially in place via the interaction of the implant body's outer surface and the tissue of the sclera 11 and ciliary body 16 and/or choroid 12 without suturing the implant to the sclera 11. Additionally, in one embodiment, the first incision is sufficiently small so that the incision self-seals upon withdrawal of the surgical tool following implantation of the drug delivery implant without suturing the incision.
  • [0236]
    As discussed herein, in some embodiments the drug delivery implant additionally includes a shunt comprising a lumen configured provide a drainage device between the anterior chamber 20 and the suprachoroidal space 24. Upon implantation, the drainage device may form a cyclodialysis with the implant providing a permanent, patent communication of aqueous humor through the shunt along its length. Aqueous humor is thus delivered to the suprachoroidal space where it can be absorbed, and additional reduction in pressure within the eye can be achieved.
  • [0237]
    In some embodiments it is desirable to deliver the drug delivery implant ab interno across the eye, through a small incision at or near the limbus (FIG. 24). The overall geometry of the system makes it advantageous that the delivery instrument incorporates a distal curvature, or a distal angle. In the former case, the drug delivery implant may be flexible to facilitate delivery along the curvature or may be more loosely held to move easily along an accurate path. In the latter case, the implant may be relatively rigid. The delivery instrument may incorporate an implant advancement element (e.g. pusher) that is flexible enough to pass through the distal angle.
  • [0238]
    In some embodiments, the implant and delivery instrument are advanced together through the anterior chamber 20 from an incision at or near the limbus 21, across the iris 13, and through the ciliary muscle attachment until the drug delivery implant outlet portion is located in the uveoscleral outflow pathway 24 a (e.g. exposed to the suprachoroidal space 24 defined between the sclera 11 and the choroid 12). FIG. 24 illustrates a transocular implantation approach that may be used with the delivery instrument inserted well above the limbus 21. In other embodiments (see, e.g., FIG. 25), the incision may be made more posterior and closer to the limbus 21. In one embodiment, the incision will be placed on the nasal side of the eye with the implanted location of the drug delivery implant 40 on the temporal side of the eye. In another embodiment, the incision may be made temporally such that the implanted location of the drug delivery implant is on the nasal side of the eye. In some embodiments, the operator simultaneously pushes on a pusher device while pulling back on the delivery instrument, such that the drug delivery implant outlet portion maintains its location in the posterior region of the suprachoroidal space 24 near the macula 34, as illustrated in FIG. 26. The implant is released from the delivery instrument, and the delivery instrument retracted proximally. The delivery instrument is withdrawn from the anterior chamber through the incision.
  • [0239]
    In some embodiments, it is desirable to implant a drug delivery implant with continuous aqueous outflow through the fibrous attachment zone, thus connecting the anterior chamber 20 to the uveoscleral outflow pathway 24 a, in order to reduce the intraocular pressure in glaucomatous patients. In some embodiments, it is desirable to deliver the drug delivery implant with a device that traverses the eye internally (ab interno), through a small incision in the limbus 21.
  • [0240]
    FIG. 27 shows an illustrative transocular method for placing any of the various implant embodiments taught or suggested herein at the implant site within the eye 10. A delivery apparatus 100 b generally comprises a syringe portion 116 and a cannula portion 118. The distal section of the cannula 118 optionally has at least one irrigating hole 120 and a distal space 122 for holding the drug delivery implant 30. The proximal end 124 of the lumen of the distal space 122 is sealed from the remaining lumen of the cannula portion 118. The delivery apparatus of FIG. 27 may be employed with the any of the various drug delivery implant embodiments taught or suggested herein. In some embodiments, the target implant site is the inferior portion of the iris. It should be understood that the angle of the delivery apparatus shown in FIG. 27 is illustrative, and angles more or less shallow than that shown may be preferable in some embodiments.
  • [0241]
    FIG. 28 shows an illustrative method for placing any of the various implant embodiments taught or suggested herein at implant site on the same side of the eye. In one embodiment, the drug delivery implant is inserted into the anterior chamber 20 of the eye 10 to the iris with the aid of an applicator or delivery apparatus 100 c that creates a small puncture in the eye from the outside. In some embodiments, the target implant site is the inferior portion of the iris.
  • [0242]
    FIG. 29 illustrates a drug delivery implant consistent with several embodiments disclosed herein affixed to the iris 13 of the eye 10 consistent with several implantation methods disclosed herein. It shall be appreciated that the iris is but one of many tissues that an implant as described here may be anchored to.
  • [0243]
    FIG. 30 illustrates another possible embodiment of placement of a drug delivery implant consistent with several embodiments disclosed herein. In one embodiment, the outer shell 54 of an implant consistent with several embodiments disclosed herein is shown positioned in the anterior chamber angle. In one embodiment, the transocular delivery method and apparatus may be used to position the drug delivery implant wholly within the anterior chamber angle, wherein the drug delivery implant substantially tracks the curvature of the anterior angle. In some embodiments, the implant is positioned substantially within the anterior chamber angle along the inferior portion of the iris.
  • [0244]
    In some embodiments, the placement of the implant may result in the drug target being upstream of the natural flow of aqueous humor in the eye. For example, aqueous humor flows from the ciliary processes to the anterior chamber angle, which, based on the site of implantation in certain embodiments, may create a flow of fluid against which a drug released from an implant may have to travel in order to make contact with a target tissue. Thus, in certain embodiments, for example when the target tissue is the ciliary processes, eluted drug must diffuse through iris tissue to get from the anterior chamber to target receptors in the ciliary processes in the posterior chamber. The requirement for diffusion of drug through the iris, and the flow of the aqueous humor, in certain instances, may limit the amount of eluted drug reaching the ciliary body.
  • [0245]
    To overcome these issues, certain embodiments involve placement of a peripheral iridotomy (PI), or device-stented PI, at a location adjacent to a drug eluting implant to facilitate delivery of a drug directly to the intended site of action (i.e., the target tissue). The creation of a PI opens a relatively large communication passage between the posterior and anterior chambers. While a net flow of aqueous humor from the posterior chamber to the anterior chamber still exists, the relatively large diameter of the PI substantially reduces the linear flow velocity. Thus, eluted drug is able to diffuse through the PI without significant opposition from flow of aqueous humor. In certain such embodiments, a portion of the implant is structured to penetrate the iris and elute the drug directly into the posterior chamber at the ciliary body. In other embodiments, the implant is implanted and/or anchored in the iris and elutes drug directly to the posterior chamber and adjacent ciliary body.
  • [0246]
    FIG. 22 shows a meridional section of the anterior segment of the human eye and schematically illustrates another embodiment of a delivery instrument 38 that may be used with embodiments of drug delivery implants described herein. In FIG. 22, arrows 82 show the fibrous attachment zone of the ciliary muscle 84 to the sclera 11. The ciliary muscle 84 is coextensive with the choroid 28. The suprachoroidal space 24 is the interface between the choroid 28 and the sclera 11. Other structures in the eye include the lens 26, the cornea 12, the anterior chamber 20, the iris 13, and Schlemm's canal 22.
  • [0247]
    The delivery instrument/implant assembly can be passed between the iris 13 and the cornea 12 to reach the iridocorneal angle. Therefore, the height of the delivery instrument/shunt assembly (dimension 90 in FIG. 22) is less than about 3 mm in some embodiments, and less than 2 mm in other embodiments.
  • [0248]
    The suprachoroidal space 24 between the choroid 28 and the sclera 11 generally forms an angle 96 of about 55° with the optical axis 98 of the eye. This angle, in addition to the height requirement described in the preceding paragraph, are features to consider in the geometrical design of the delivery instrument/implant assembly.
  • [0249]
    The overall geometry of the drug delivery implant system makes it advantageous that the delivery instrument 38 incorporates a distal curvature 86, as shown in FIG. 22, a distal angle 88, as shown in FIG. 21, or a combination thereof. The distal curvature (FIG. 23) is expected to pass more smoothly through the corneal or scleral incision at the limbus. In this embodiment, the drug delivery implant may be curved or flexible. Alternatively, in the design of FIG. 21, the drug delivery implant may be mounted on the straight segment of the delivery instrument, distal of the “elbow” or angle 88. In this case, the drug delivery implant may be straight and relatively inflexible, and the delivery instrument may incorporate a delivery mechanism that is flexible enough to advance through the angle. In some embodiments, the drug delivery implant may be a rigid tube, provided that the implant is no longer than the length of the distal segment 92.
  • [0250]
    The distal curvature 86 of delivery instrument 38 may be characterized as a radius of between about 10 to 30 mm in some embodiments, and about 20 mm in certain embodiments. The distal angle of the delivery instrument in an embodiment as depicted in FIG. 21 may be characterized as between about 90 to 170 degrees relative to an axis of the proximal segment 94 of the delivery instrument. In other embodiments, the angle may be between about 145 and about 170 degrees. The angle incorporates a small radius of curvature at the “elbow” so as to make a smooth transition from the proximal segment 94 of the delivery instrument to the distal segment 92. The length of the distal segment 92 may be approximately 0.5 to 7 mm in some embodiments, and about 2 to 3 mm in certain embodiments.
  • [0251]
    In some embodiments, a viscoelastic, or other fluid is injected into the suprachoroidal space to create a chamber or pocket between the choroid and sclera which can be accessed by a drug delivery implant. Such a pocket exposes more of the choroidal and scleral tissue area, provides lubrication and protection for tissues during implantation, and increases uveoscleral outflow in embodiments where the drug delivery implant includes a shunt, causing a lower intraocular pressure (TOP). In some embodiments, the viscoelastic material is injected with a 25 or 27G cannula, for example, through an incision in the ciliary muscle attachment or through the sclera (e.g. from outside the eye). The viscoelastic material may also be injected through the implant itself either before, during or after implantation is completed.
  • [0252]
    In some embodiments, a hyperosmotic agent is injected into the suprachoroidal space. Such an injection can delay IOP reduction. Thus, hypotony may be avoided in the acute postoperative period by temporarily reducing choroidal absorption. The hyperosmotic agent may be, for example glucose, albumin, HYPAQUE™ medium, glycerol, or poly(ethylene glycol). The hyperosmotic agent can breakdown or wash out as the patient heals, resulting in a stable, acceptably low IOP, and avoiding transient hypotony.
  • Controlled Drug Release
  • [0253]
    The drug delivery implants as described herein, function to house a drug and provide drug elution from the implant in a controlled fashion, based on the design of the various components of the implant, for an extended period of time. Various elements of the implant composition, implant physical characteristics, implant location in the eye, and the composition of the drug work in combination to produce the desired drug release profile.
  • [0254]
    As described above the drug delivery implant may be made from any biological inert and biocompatible materials having desired characteristics. Desirable characteristics, in some embodiments, include permeability to liquid water or water vapor, allowing for an implant to be manufactured, loaded with drug, and sterilized in a dry state, with subsequent rehydration of the drug upon implantation. Also desirable is an implant constructed of a material comprising microscopic porosities between polymer chains. These porosities may interconnect, which forms channels of water through the implant material. In several embodiments, the resultant channels are convoluted and thereby form a tortuous path which solublized drug travels during the elution process. Implant materials advantageously also possess sufficient permeability to a drug such that the implant may be a practical size for implantation. Thus, in several embodiments, the implant material is sufficiently permeable to the drug to be delivered that the implant is dimensioned to reside wholly contained within the eye of a subject. Implant material also ideally possesses sufficient elasticity, flexibility and potential elongation to not only conform to the target anatomy during and after implantation, but also remain unkinked, untorn, unpunctured, and with a patent lumen during and after implantation. In several embodiments, implant material would advantageously processable in a practical manner, such as, for example, by molding, extrusion, thermoforming, and the like.
  • [0255]
    Illustrative, examples of suitable materials for the outer shell include polypropylene, polyimide, glass, nitinol, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl pyrolidone, collagen, chemically-treated collagen, polyethersulfone (PES), poly(styrene-isobutyl-styrene), polyurethane, ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA), polyetherether ketone (PEEK), Kynar (Polyvinylidene Fluoride; PVDF), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), Pebax, acrylic, polyolefin, polydimethylsiloxane and other silicone elastomers, polypropylene, hydroxyapetite, titanium, gold, silver, platinum, other metals and alloys, ceramics, plastics and mixtures or combinations thereof. Additional suitable materials used to construct certain embodiments of the implant include, but are not limited to, poly(lactic acid), polyethylene-vinyl acetate, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), poly(D,L-lactide), poly(D,L-lactide-co-trimethylene carbonate), collagen, heparinized collagen, poly(caprolactone), poly(glycolic acid), and/or other polymer, copolymers, or block co-polymers, thermoplastic polyurethanes silicone-modified polyether urethanes, poly(carbonate urethane), or polyimide. Thermoplastic polyurethanes are polymers or copolymers which may comprise aliphatic polyurethanes, aromatic polyurethanes, polyurethane hydrogel-forming materials, hydrophilic polyurethanes, or combinations thereof. Non-limiting examples include elasthane (poly(ether urethane)) such as Elasthane™ 80A, Lubrizol, Tecophilic™, Pellethane™, carbothane™, Tecothane™, Tecoplast™, and Estane™. Silicone-modified polyether urethanes may include Carbosil™ 20 or Pursil™ 20 80A, and the like. Poly(carbonate urethane) may include Bionate™ 80A or similar polymers. In several embodiments, one or more biodegradable materials are used to construct all or a portion of the implant, or any other device disclosed herein. Such materials include any suitable material that degrades or erodes over time when placed in the human or animal body. Accordingly, as the term is used herein, biodegradable material includes bioerodible materials. In such biodegradable embodiments, the degradation rate of the biodegradable outer shell is another variable (of many) that may be used to tailor the drug elution rate from an implant.
  • [0256]
    In order to control the dose or duration of treatment, in embodiments wherein the therapeutic agents are delivered via flexible tethered implants (see, e.g., FIGS. 16-17), one or more flexible sheets or discs may be simultaneously used. Similarly the material used to construct the sheets or discs and/or the coatings covering them may be prepared to control the rate of release of the drug, similar to as discussed below.
  • [0257]
    The drugs carried by the drug delivery implant may be in any form that can be reasonably retained within the device and results in controlled elution of the resident drug or drugs over a period of time lasting at least several days and in some embodiments up to several weeks, and in certain preferred embodiments, up to several years. Certain embodiments utilize drugs that are readily soluble in ocular fluid, while other embodiments utilize drugs that are partially soluble in ocular fluid.
  • [0258]
    For example, the therapeutic agent may be in any form, including but not limited to a compressed pellet, a solid, a capsule, multiple particles, a liquid, a gel, a suspension, slurry, emulsion, and the like. In certain embodiments, drug particles are in the form of micropellets, fine powders, or slurries, each of which have fluid-like properties, allowing for recharging by injection into the inner lumen(s).
  • [0259]
    When more than one drug is desired for treatment of a particular pathology or when a second drug is administered such as to counteract a side effect of the first drug, some embodiments may utilize two agents of the same form. In other embodiments, agents in different form may be used. Likewise, should one or more drugs utilize an adjuvant, excipient, or auxiliary compound, for example to enhance stability or tailor the elution profile, that compound or compounds may also be in any form that is compatible with the drug and can be reasonably retained with the implant.
  • [0260]
    In some embodiments, treatment of particular pathology with a drug released from the implant may not only treat the pathology, but also induce certain undesirable side effects. In some cases, delivery of certain drugs may treat a pathological condition, but indirectly increase intraocular pressure. Steroids, for example, may have such an effect. In certain embodiments, a drug delivery shunt delivers a steroid to an ocular target tissue, such as the retina or other target tissue as described herein, thereby treating a retinal pathology but also possibly inducing increased intraocular pressure which may be due to local inflammation or fluid accumulation. In such embodiments, the shunt feature reduces undesirable increased intraocular pressure by transporting away the accumulated fluid. Thus, in some embodiments, implants functioning both as drug delivery devices and shunts can not only serve to deliver a therapeutic agent, but simultaneously drain away accumulated fluid, thereby alleviating the side effect of the drug. Such embodiments can be deployed in an ocular setting, or in any other physiological setting where delivery of a drug coordinately causes fluid accumulation which needs to be reduced by the shunt feature of the implant. In some such embodiments, drainage of the accumulated fluid is necessary to avoid tissue damage or loss of function, in particular when the target tissue is pressure sensitive or has a limited space or capacity to expand in response to the accumulated fluid. The eye and the brain are two non-limiting examples of such tissues.
  • [0261]
    It will be understood that embodiments as described herein may include a drug mixed or compounded with a biodegradable material, excipient, or other agent modifying the release characteristics of the drug. Preferred biodegradable materials include copolymers of lactic acid and glycolic acid, also known as poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) or PLGA. It will be understood by one skilled in the art that although some disclosure herein specifically describes use of PLGA, other suitable biodegradable materials may be substituted for PLGA or used in combination with PLGA in such embodiments. It will also be understood that in certain embodiments as described herein, the drug positioned within the lumen of the implant is not compounded or mixed with any other compound or material, thereby maximizing the volume of drug that is positioned within the lumen.
  • [0262]
    It may be desirable, in some embodiments, to provide for a particular rate of release of drug from a PLGA copolymer or other polymeric material. As the release rate of a drug from a polymer correlates with the degradation rate of that polymer, control of the degradation rate provides a means for control of the delivery rate of the drug contained within the therapeutic agent Variation of the average molecular weight of the polymer or copolymer chains which make up the PLGA copolymer or other polymer may be used to control the degradation rate of the copolymer, thereby achieving a desired duration or other release profile of therapeutic agent delivery to the eye.
  • [0263]
    In certain other embodiments employing PLGA copolymers, rate of biodegradation of the PLGA copolymer may be controlled by varying the ratio of lactic acid to glycolic acid units in a copolymer.
  • [0264]
    Still other embodiments may utilize combinations of varying the average molecular weights of the constituents of the copolymer and varying the ratio of lactic acid to glycolic acid in the copolymer to achieve a desired biodegradation rate.
  • [0265]
    As described above, the outer shell of the implant comprises a polymer in some embodiments. Additionally, the shell may further comprise one or more polymeric coatings in various locations on or within the implant. The outer shell and any polymeric coatings are optionally biodegradable. The biodegradable outer shell and biodegradable polymer coating may be any suitable material including, but not limited to, poly(lactic acid), polyethylene-vinyl acetate, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), poly(D,L-lactide), poly(D,L-lactide-co-trimethylene carbonate), collagen, heparinized collagen, poly(caprolactone), poly(glycolic acid), and/or other polymer or copolymer.
  • [0266]
    As described above, some embodiments of the implants comprise a polymeric outer shell that is permeable to ocular fluids in a controlled fashion depending on the constituents used in forming the shell. For example, the concentration of the polymeric subunits dictates the permeability of the resulting shell. Therefore, the composition of the polymers making up the polymeric shell determines the rate of ocular fluid passage through the polymer and if biodegradable, the rate of biodegradation in ocular fluid. The permeability of the shell will also impact the release of the drug from the shell. Also as described above, the regions of drug release created on the shell will alter the release profile of a drug from the implant. Control of the release of the drug can further be controlled by coatings in or on the shell that either form the regions of drug release, or alter the characteristics of the regions of drug release (e.g., a coating over the region of drug release makes the region thicker, and therefore slows the rate of release of a drug).
  • [0267]
    For example, a given combination of drug and polymer will yield a characteristic diffusion coefficient D, such that:
  • [0000]
    Elution rate = [ D × A × ( C i - C o ) ] d
  • [0268]
    where D=diffusion coefficient (cm2/sec)
      • A=area of the region of drug release
      • (Ci−Co)=difference in drug concentration between the inside and outside of the device.
      • d=thickness of the region of drug release
  • [0272]
    Thus, the area and thickness of the region of drug release are variables that determine, in part, the rate of elution of the drug from the implant, and are also variable that can be controlled during the process of manufacturing the implant. In some embodiments using a highly insoluble drug, the region of drug release could be manufactured to be thin (d is small) or with a large overall area (A is large) or a combination of the two (as dictated by the structural sufficiency of the outer shell). In either case, the end result is that the elution rate of the drug can be increased to compensate for the low solubility of the drug based on the structure and design of the implant.
  • [0273]
    In contrast, in some embodiments using a highly soluble drug, the regions of drug release are made of substantially the same thickness as the remainder of the outer shell, made of small area, or combinations thereof.
  • [0274]
    Additionally, certain embodiments use additional polymer coatings to either (i) increase the effective thickness (d) of the region of drug release or (ii) decrease the overall permeability of the of that portion of the implant (region of drug release plus the coating), resulting in a reduction in drug elution. In still other embodiments, multiple additional polymer coatings are used. By covering either distinct or overlapping portions of the implant and the associated regions of drug release on the outer shell, drug release from various regions of the implant are controlled and result in a controlled pattern of drug release from the implant overall. For example, an implant with at least two regions of drug release may be coated with two additional polymers, wherein the additional polymers both cover over region of release and only a single polymer covers the other region. Thus the elution rate of drug from the two regions of drug release differ, and are controllable such that, for example, drug is released sequentially from the two regions. In other embodiments, the two regions may release at different rates. In those embodiments with multiple interior lumens, different concentrations or different drugs may also be released. It will be appreciated that these variables are controllable to alter to rate or duration of drug release from the implant such that a desired elution profile or treatment regimen can be created.
  • [0275]
    In several embodiments as described herein, there are no direct through holes or penetrating apertures needed or utilized to specifically facilitate or control drug elution. As such, in those embodiments, there is no direct contact between the drug core (which may be of very high concentration) and the ocular tissue where adjacent to the site where the implant is positioned. In some cases, direct contact of ocular tissue with high concentrations of drug residing within the implant could lead to local cell toxicity and possible local cell death.
  • [0276]
    It shall however, be appreciated that, in several other embodiments, disclosed herein, that the number, size, and placement of one or more orifices through the outer shell of the implant may be altered in order to produce a desired drug elution profile. As the number, size, or both, of the orifices increases relative to surface area of the implant, increasing amounts of ocular fluid pass across the outer shell and contact the therapeutic agent on the interior of the implant. Likewise, decreasing the ratio of orifice:outer shell area, less ocular fluid will enter the implant, thereby providing a decreased rate of release of drug from the implant. Additionally, multiple orifices provides a redundant communication means between the ocular environment that the implant is implanted in and the interior of the implant, should one or more orifices become blocked during implantation or after residing in the eye. In other embodiments, the outer shell may contain one (or more) orifice(s) in the distal tip of the implant. As described above, the shape and size of this orifice is selected based on the desired elution profile. In some embodiments, a biodegradable polymer plug is positioned within the distal orifice, thereby acting as a synthetic cork. Tissue trauma or coring of the ocular tissue during the process of implantation is also reduced, which may prevent plugging or partial occlusion of the distal orifice. Additionally, because the polymer plug may be tailored to biodegrade in a known time period, the plug ensures that the implant can be fully positioned before any elution of the drug takes place. Still other embodiments comprise a combination of a distal orifice and multiple orifices placed more proximally on the outer shell, as described above.
  • [0277]
    Moreover, the addition of one or more permeable or semi-permeable coatings on an implant (either with orifices or regions of drug release) may also be used to tailor the elution profile. Additionally, combinations of these various elements may be used in some embodiments to provide multiple methods of controlling the drug release profile.
  • [0278]
    Further benefitting the embodiments described herein is the expanded possible range of uses for some ocular therapy drugs. For example, a drug that is highly soluble in ocular fluid may have narrow applicability in treatment regimes, as its efficacy is limited to those pathologies treatable with acute drug administration. However, when coupled with the implants as disclosed herein, such a drug could be utilized in a long term therapeutic regime. A highly soluble drug positioned within the distal portion of the implant containing one or more regions of drug release may be made to yield a particular, long-term controlled release profile.
  • [0279]
    Alternatively, or in addition to one or more regions of drug release, one or more polymeric coatings may be located outside the implant shell, or within the interior lumen, enveloping or partially enveloping the drug. In some embodiments comprising one or more orifices, the polymeric coating is the first portion of the implant in contact with ocular fluid, and thus, is a primary controller of the rate of entry of ocular fluid into the drug containing interior lumen of the implant. By altering the composition of the polymer coating, the biodegradation rate (if biodegradable), and porosity of the polymer coating the rate at which the drug is exposed to and solublized in the ocular fluid may be controlled. Thus, there is a high degree of control over the rate at which the drug is released from such an embodiment of an implant to the target tissue of the eye. Similarly, a drug with a low ocular fluid solubility may be positioned within an implant coated with a rapidly biodegradable or highly porous polymer coating, allowing increased flow of ocular fluid over the drug within the implant.
  • [0280]
    In certain embodiments described herein, the polymer coating envelopes the therapeutic agent within the lumen of the implant. In some such embodiments, the ocular fluid passes through the outer shell of the implant and contacts the polymer layer. Such embodiments may be particularly useful when the implant comprises one or more orifices and/or the drug to be delivered is a liquid, slurry, emulsion, or particles, as the polymer layer would not only provide control of the elution of the drug, but would assist in providing a structural barrier to prevent uncontrolled leakage or loss of the drug outwardly through the orifices. The interior positioning of the polymer layer could, however, also be used in implants where the drug is in any form.
  • [0281]
    In some ocular disorders, therapy may require a defined kinetic profile of administration of drug to the eye. It will be appreciated from the above discussion of various embodiments that the ability to tailor the release rate of a drug from the implant can similarly be used to accomplish achieve a desired kinetic profile. For example the composition of the outer shell and any polymer coatings can be manipulated to provide a particular kinetic profile of release of the drug. Additionally, the design of the implant itself, including the thickness of the shell material, the thickness of the shell in the regions of drug release, the area of the regions of drug release, and the area and/or number of any orifices in the shell provide a means to create a particular drug release profile. Likewise, the use of PLGA copolymers and/or other controlled release materials and excipients, may provide particular kinetic profiles of release of the compounded drug. By tailoring the ratio of lactic to glycolic acid in a copolymer and/or average molecular weight of polymers or copolymers having the drug therein (optionally with one or more other excipients), sustained release of a drug, or other desirable release profile, may be achieved.
  • [0282]
    In certain embodiments, zero-order release of a drug may be achieved by manipulating any of the features and/or variables discussed above alone or in combination so that the characteristics of the implant are the principal factor controlling drug release from the implant. Similarly, in those embodiments employing PLGA compounded with the drug, tailoring the ratio of lactic to glycolic acid and/or average molecular weights in the copolymer-drug composition can adjust the release kinetics based on the combination of the implant structure and the biodegradation of the PLGA copolymer.
  • [0283]
    In other embodiments, pseudo zero-order release (or other desired release profile) may be achieved through the adjustment of the composition of the implant shell, the structure and dimension of the regions of drug release, the composition any polymer coatings, and use of certain excipients or compounded formulations (PLGA copolymers), the additive effect over time replicating true zero-order kinetics.
  • [0284]
    For example, in one embodiment, an implant with a polymer coating allowing entry of ocular fluid into the implant at a known rate may contain a series of pellets that compound PLGA with one or more drugs, wherein the pellets incorporate at least two different PLGA copolymer formulations. Based on the formulation of the first therapeutic agent, each subsequent agent may be compounded with PLGA in a manner as to allow a known quantity of drug to be released in a given unit of time. As each copolymer biodegrades or erodes at its individual and desired rate, the sum total of drug released to the eye over time is in effect released with zero-order kinetics. It will be appreciated that embodiments additionally employing the drug partitions as described herein, operating in conjunction with pellets having multiple PLGA formulations would add an additional level of control over the resulting rate of release and kinetic profile of the drug.
  • [0285]
    Non-continuous or pulsatile release may also be desirable. This may be achieved, for example, by manufacturing an implant with multiple sub-lumens, each associated with one or more regions of drug release. In some embodiments, additional polymer coatings are used to prevent drug release from certain regions of drug release at a given time, while drug is eluted from other regions of drug release at that time. Other embodiments additionally employ one or more biodegradable partitions as described above to provide permanent or temporary physical barriers within an implant to further tune the amplitude or duration of period of lowered or non-release of drug from the implant. Additionally, by controlling the biodegradation rate of the partition, the length of a drug holiday may be controlled. In some embodiments the biodegradation of the partition may be initiated or enhanced by an external stimulus. In some embodiments, the intraocular injection of a fluid stimulates or enhances biodegradation of the barrier. In some embodiments, the externally originating stimulus is one or more of application of heat, ultrasound, and radio frequency, or laser energy.
  • [0286]
    Certain embodiments are particularly advantageous as the regions of drug release minimize tissue trauma or coring of the ocular tissue during the process of implantation, as they are not open orifices. Additionally, because the regions are of a known thickness and area (and therefore of a known drug release profile) they can optionally be manufactured to ensure that the implant can be fully positioned before any elution of the drug takes place.
  • [0287]
    Placement of the drug within the interior of the outer shell may also be used as a mechanism to control drug release. In some embodiments, the lumen may be in a distal position, while in others it may be in a more proximal position, depending on the pathology to be treated. In those embodiments employing a nested or concentric tube device, the agent or agents may be placed within any of the lumens formed between the nested or concentric polymeric shells
  • [0288]
    Further control over drug release is obtained by the placement location of drug in particular embodiments with multiple lumens. For example, when release of the drug is desired soon after implantation, the drug is placed within the implant in a first releasing lumen having a short time period between implantation and exposure of the therapeutic agent to ocular fluid. This is accomplished, for example by juxtaposing the first releasing lumen with a region of drug release having a thin outer shell thickness (or a large area, or both). A second agent, placed in a second releasing lumen with a longer time to ocular fluid exposure elutes drug into the eye after initiation of release of the first drug. This can be accomplished by juxtaposing the second releasing lumen with a region of drug release having a thicker shell or a smaller area (or both). Optionally, this second drug treats side effects caused by the release and activity of the first drug.
  • [0289]
    It will also be appreciated that the multiple lumens as described above are also useful in achieving a particular concentration profile of released drug. For example, in some embodiments, a first releasing lumen may contain a drug with a first concentration of drug and a second releasing lumen containing the same drug with a different concentration. The desired concentration profile may be tailored by the utilizing drugs having different drug concentration and placing them within the implant in such a way that the time to inception of drug elution, and thus concentration in ocular tissues, is controlled.
  • [0290]
    Further, placement location of the drug may be used to achieve periods of drug release followed by periods of no drug release. By way of example, a drug may be placed in a first releasing lumen such that the drug is released into the eye soon after implantation. A second releasing lumen may remain free of drug, or contain an inert bioerodible substance, yielding a period of time wherein no drug is released. A third releasing lumen containing drug could then be exposed to ocular fluids, thus starting a second period of drug release.
  • [0291]
    It will be appreciated that the ability to alter any one of or combination of the shell characteristics, the characteristics of any polymer coatings, any polymer-drug admixtures, the dimension and number of regions of drug release, the dimension and number of orifices, and the position of drugs within the implant provides a vast degree of flexibility in controlling the rate of drug delivery by the implant.
  • [0292]
    The drug elution profile may also be controlled by the utilization of multiple drugs contained within the same interior lumen of the implant that are separated by one or more plugs. By way of example, in an implant comprising a single region of drug release in the distal tip of the implant, ocular fluid entering the implant primarily contacts the distal-most drug until a point in time when the distal-most drug is substantially eroded and eluted. During that time, ocular fluid passes through a first semi-permeable partition and begins to erode a second drug, located proximal to the plug. As discussed below, the composition of these first two drugs, and the first plug, as well as the characteristics of the region of drug release may each be controlled to yield an overall desired elution profile, such as an increasing concentration over time or time-dependent delivery of two different doses of drug. Different drugs may also be deployed sequentially with a similar implant embodiment.
  • [0293]
    Partitions may be used if separation of two drugs is desirable. A partition is optionally biodegradable at a rate equal to or slower than that of the drugs to be delivered by the implant. The partitions are designed for the interior dimensions of a given implant embodiment such that the partition, when in place within the interior lumen of the implant, will seal off the more proximal portion of the lumen from the distal portion of the lumen, The partitions thus create individual compartments within the interior lumen. A first drug may be placed in the more proximal compartment, while a second drug, or a second concentration of the first drug, or an adjuvant agent may be placed in the more distal compartment. As described above, the entry of ocular fluid and rate of drug release is thus controllable and drugs can be released in tandem, in sequence or in a staggered fashion over time.
  • [0294]
    Partitions may also be used to create separate compartments for therapeutic agents or compounds that may react with one another, but whose reaction is desired at or near ocular tissue, not simply within the implant lumen. As a practical example, if each of two compounds was inactive until in the presence of the other (e.g. a prodrug and a modifier), these two compounds may still be delivered in a single implant having at least one region of drug release associated only with one drug-containing lumen. After the elution of the compounds from the implant to the ocular space the compounds would comingle, becoming active in close proximity to the target tissue. As can be determined from the above description, if more than two drugs are to be delivered in this manner, utilizing an appropriately increased number of partitions to segregate the drugs would be desirable.
  • [0295]
    In certain embodiments, a proximal barrier serves to seal the therapeutic agent within a distally located interior lumen of the implant. The purpose of such a barrier is to ensure that the ocular fluid from any more distally located points of ocular fluid entry is the primary source of ocular fluid contacting the therapeutic agent. Likewise, a drug impermeable seal is formed that prevents the elution of drug in an anterior direction. Prevention of anterior elution not only prevents dilution of the drug by ocular fluid originating from an anterior portion of the eye, but also reduces potential side of effects of drugs delivered by the device. Limiting the elution of the drug to sites originating in the distal region of the implant will enhance the delivery of the drug to the target sites in more posterior regions of the eye. In embodiments that are fully biodegradable, the proximal cap or barrier may comprise a biocompatible biodegradable polymer, characterized by a biodegradation rate slower than all the drugs to be delivered by that implant. It will be appreciated that the proximal cap is useful in those embodiments having a single central lumen running the length of the implant to allow recharging the implant after the first dose of drug has fully eluted. In those embodiments, the single central lumen is present to allow a new drug to be placed within the distal portion of the device, but is preferably sealed off at or near the proximal end to avoid anteriorly directed drug dilution or elution.
  • [0296]
    Similar to the multiple longitudinally located compartments that may be formed in an implant, drugs may also be positioned within one or more lumens nested within one another. By ordering particularly desirable drugs or concentrations of drugs in nested lumens, one may achieve similarly controlled release or kinetic profiles as described above.
  • [0297]
    Wicks, as described above, may also be employed to control the release characteristics of different drugs within the implant. One or more wicks leading into separate interior lumens of an implant assist in moving ocular fluid rapidly into the lumen where it may interact with the drug. Drugs requiring more ocular fluid for their release may optionally be positioned in a lumen where a wick brings in more ocular fluid than an orifice alone would allow. One or more wicks may be used in some embodiments.
  • [0298]
    In some embodiments, drugs are variably dimensioned to further tailor the release profile by increasing or limiting ocular fluid flow into the space in between the drug and walls of the interior lumen. For example, if it was optimal to have a first solid or semi solid drug elute more quickly than another solid or semi-solid drug, formation of the first drug to a dimension allowing substantial clearance between the drug and the walls of the interior lumen may be desirable, as ocular fluid entering the implant contacts the drug over a greater surface area. Such drug dimensions are easily variable based on the elution and solubility characteristics of a given drug. Conversely, initial drug elution may be slowed in embodiments with drugs dimensioned so that a minimal amount of residual space remains between the therapeutic agent and the walls of the interior lumen. In still other embodiments, the entirety of the implant lumen is filled with a drug, to maximize either the duration of drug release or limit the need to recharge an implant.
  • [0299]
    Certain embodiments may comprise a shunt in addition to the drug delivery portion of the implant. For example, once the implant is positioned in the desired intraocular space (in an anterior-posterior direction), a shunt portion of the implant comprising at least one outflow channel can be inserted into a physiological outflow space (for example anchored to the trabecular meshwork and releasing fluid to Schlemm's canal). In some embodiments, a plurality of apertures thus assists in maintaining patency and operability of the drainage shunt portion of the implant. Moreover, as described above, a plurality of apertures can assist in ameliorating any unwanted side effects involving excess fluid production or accumulation that may result from the actions of the therapeutic agent delivered by the implant.
  • [0300]
    As described above, duration of drug release is desired over an extended period of time. In some embodiments, an implant in accordance with embodiments described herein is capable of delivering a drug at a controlled rate to a target tissue for a period of several (i.e. at least three) months. In certain embodiments, implants can deliver drugs at a controlled rate to target tissues for about 6 months or longer, including 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 24 months, without requiring recharging. In still other embodiments, the duration of controlled drug release (without recharging of the implant) exceeds 2 years (e.g., 3, 4, 5, or more years). It shall be appreciated that additional time frames including ranges bordering, overlapping or inclusive of two or more of the values listed above are also used in certain embodiments.
  • [0301]
    In conjunction with the controlled release of a drug to a target tissue, certain doses of a drug (or drugs) are desirable over time, in certain embodiments. As such, in some embodiments, the total drug load, for example the total load of a steroid, delivered to a target tissue over the lifetime of an implant ranges from about 10 to about 1000 μg. In certain embodiments the total drug load ranges from about 100 to about 900 μg, from about 200 to about 800 μg, from about 300 to about 700 μg, or from about 400 to about 600 μg. In some embodiments, the total drug load ranges from about 10 to about 300 μg, from about 10 to about 500 μg, or about 10 to about 700 μg. In other embodiments, total drug load ranges from about 200 to about 500 μg, from 400 to about 700 μg or from about 600 to about 1000 μg. In still other embodiments, total drug load ranges from about 200 to about 1000 μg, from about 400 to about 1000 μg, or from about 700 to about 1000 μg. In some embodiments total drug load ranges from about 500 to about 700 μg, about 550 to about 700 μg, or about 550 to about 650 μg, including 575, 590, 600, 610, and 625 μg. It shall be appreciated that additional ranges of drugs bordering, overlapping or inclusive of the ranges listed above are also used in certain embodiments.
  • [0302]
    Similarly, in other embodiments, controlled drug delivery is calculated based on the elution rate of the drug from the implant. In certain such embodiments, an elution rate of a drug, for example, a steroid, is about 0.05 μg /day to about 10 μg/day is achieved. In other embodiments an elution rate of about 0.05 μg /day to about 5 μg/day, about 0.05 μg /day to about 3 μg/day, or about 0.05 μg /day to about 2 μg/day is achieved. In other embodiment, an elution rate of about 2 μg /day to about 5 μg/day, about 4 μg /day to about 7 μg/day, or about 6 μg /day to about 10 μg/day is achieved. In other embodiments, an elution rate of about 1 μg /day to about 4 μg/day, about 3 μg /day to about 6 μg/day, or about 7 μg /day to about 10 μg/day is achieved. In still other embodiments, an elution rate of about 0.05 μg /day to about 1 μl g/day, including 0.06, 0.07, 0.08, 0.09, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, or 0.9 μg/day is achieved. It shall be appreciated that additional ranges of drugs bordering, overlapping or inclusive of the ranges listed above are also used in certain embodiments.
  • [0303]
    Alternatively, or in addition to one or more of the parameters above, the release of drug from an implant may be controlled based on the desired concentration of the drug at target tissues. In some embodiments, the desired concentration of a drug, for example, a steroid, at the target tissue, ranges from about 1 nM to about 100 nM. In other embodiments the desired concentration of a drug at the site of action ranges from about 10 nM to about 90 nM, from about 20 nM to about 80 nM, from about 30 nM to about 70 nM, or from about 40 nM to about 60 nM. In still other embodiments the desired concentration of a drug at the site of action ranges from about 1 nM to about 40 nM, from about 20 nM to about 60 nM, from about 50 nM to about 70 nM, or from about 60 nM to about 90 nM. In yet other embodiments the desired concentration of a drug at the site of action ranges from about 1 nM to about 30 nM, from about 10 nM to about 50 nM, from about 30 nM to about 70 nM, or from about 60 nM to about 100 nM. In some embodiments, the desired concentration of a drug at the site of action ranges from about 45 nM to about 55 nM, including 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, and 54 nM. It shall be appreciated that additional ranges of drugs bordering, overlapping or inclusive of the ranges listed above are also used in certain embodiments.
  • [0304]
    Certain embodiments described above are rechargeable. In some such embodiments, recharging is accomplished by injecting new drug into the lumen(s). In some embodiments, refilling the implanted drug delivery implant entails advancing a recharging device through the anterior chamber to the proximal end of the implant where the clamping sleeve may slide over the proximal end of the implant. See, e.g., FIG. 20A. An operator may then grasp the proximal end of the implant with the flexible clamping grippers to hold it securely. A new dose of drug in a therapeutic agent or a new drug is then pushed to its position within the implant by a flexible pusher tube which may be spring loaded. In some embodiments, the pusher tube includes a small internal recess to securely hold the therapeutic agent while in preparation for delivery to the implant. In other embodiments a flat surface propels the therapeutic agent into position within the implant.
  • [0305]
    The spring travel of the pusher is optionally pre-defined to push the therapeutic agent a known distance to the distal-most portion of the interior lumen of the implant. Alternatively, the spring travel can be set manually, for example if a new therapeutic agent is being placed prior to the time the resident therapeutic agent is fully eluted from the implant, thereby reducing the distance by which the new therapeutic agent needs to be advanced. In cooperation with optional anchor elements, the recharging process may be accomplished without significant displacement of the implant from its original position.
  • [0306]
    Optionally, seals for preventing leakage during recharging may be included in the recharging device. Such seals may desirable if, for example, the form of the drug to be refilled is a liquid. Suitable seals for preventing leakage include, for example, an o-ring, a coating, a hydrophilic agent, a hydrophobic agent, and combinations thereof. The coating can be, for example, a silicone coat such as MDX™ silicone fluid.
  • [0307]
    In other embodiments, recharging entails the advancement of a recharging device through the anterior chamber by way of a one-way valve. See FIGS. 20B and 20C. The valve comprises two or more flaps 70, open at the proximal end and reversibly closed at the distal end. The advancement of the recharging device opens the flaps at the posterior end, which allows for the deposition of drug into the posterior chamber. Upon removal of the recharging device, the flaps return to their closed position (at the distal end), thereby retaining the deposited drug within the lumen. In some embodiments, the one way valve is formed such that a seal is created to prevent backflow of liquid (including powders or micropellets with liquid-like flow properties) drug from the lumen. In other embodiments, a fluid-tight seal is not formed.
  • [0308]
    Other suitable retention methods may be used to hold the newly placed drug pellet in place. For example, in some embodiments, a deformable O-ring with an inner diameter smaller than the newly placed pellet is used. In such embodiments, the recharging device displaces the O-ring sufficiently to allow passage of the drug pellet through the O-ring. Upon removal of the device, however, the O-ring returns to its original diameter, thereby retaining the pellet within the lumen.
  • [0309]
    In yet other embodiments a plug made of a “self-healing” material that is penetrable by the recharging device is used. In such embodiments, pressure from the recharging device allows the device to penetrate the plug and deposit a new drug into the interior lumen. Upon withdrawal of the recharging device, the plug re-seals, and retains the drug within the lumen.
  • [0310]
    The one-way valve may be created of any material sufficiently flexible to allow the insertion and retention of a new drug into the lumen. Such materials include, but are not limited to, silicone, Teflon®, flexible graphite, sponge, silicone rubber, silicone rubber with fiberglass reinforcement, neoprene®, red rubber, wire inserted red rubber, cork & neoprene®, vegetable fiber, cork & rubber, cork & nitrile, fiberglass, cloth inserted rubber, vinyl, nitrile, butyl, natural gum rubber, urethane, carbon fiber, fluoroelastomer, and the like.
  • Drugs
  • [0311]
    The therapeutic agents utilized with the drug delivery implant, may include one or more drugs provided below, either alone or in combination. The drugs utilized may also be the equivalent of, derivatives of, or analogs of one or more of the drugs provided below. The drugs may include but are not limited to pharmaceutical agents including anti-glaucoma medications, ocular agents, antimicrobial agents (e.g., antibiotic, antiviral, antiparasitic, antifungal agents), anti-inflammatory agents (including steroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory), biological agents including hormones, enzymes or enzyme-related components, antibodies or antibody-related components, oligonucleotides (including DNA, RNA, short-interfering RNA, antisense oligonucleotides, and the like), DNA/RNA vectors, viruses (either wild type or genetically modified) or viral vectors, peptides, proteins, enzymes, extracellular matrix components, and live cells configured to produce one or more biological components. The use of any particular drug is not limited to its primary effect or regulatory body-approved treatment indication or manner of use. Drugs also include compounds or other materials that reduce or treat one or more side effects of another drug or therapeutic agent. As many drugs have more than a single mode of action, the listing of any particular drug within any one therapeutic class below is only representative of one possible use of the drug and is not intended to limit the scope of its use with the ophthalmic implant system.
  • [0312]
    As discussed above, the therapeutic agents may be combined with any number of excipients as is known in the art. In addition to the biodegradable polymeric excipients discussed above, other excipients may be used, including, but not limited to, benzyl alcohol, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxymethylcellulose, cetyl alcohol, croscarmellose sodium, dextrans, dextrose, fructose, gelatin, glycerin, monoglycerides, diglycerides, kaolin, calcium chloride, lactose, lactose monohydrate, maltodextrins, polysorbates, pregelatinized starch, calcium stearate, magnesium stearate, silcon dioxide, cornstarch, talc, and the like. The one or more excipients may be included in total amounts as low as about 1%, 5%, or 10% and in other embodiments may be included in total amounts as high as 50%, 70% or 90%.
  • [0313]
    Examples of drugs may include various anti-secretory agents; antimitotics and other anti-proliferative agents, including among others, anti-angiogenesis agents such as angiostatin, anecortave acetate, thrombospondin, VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drugs such as ranibizumab (LUCENTIS®) and bevacizumab (AVASTIN®), pegaptanib (MACUGEN®), sunitinib and sorafenib and any of a variety of known small-molecule and transcription inhibitors having anti-angiogenesis effect; classes of known ophthalmic drugs, including: glaucoma agents, such as adrenergic antagonists, including for example, beta-blocker agents such as atenolol propranolol, metipranolol, betaxolol, carteolol, levobetaxolol, levobunolol and timolol; adrenergic agonists or sympathomimetic agents such as epinephrine, dipivefrin, clonidine, aparclonidine, and brimonidine; parasympathomimetics or cholingeric agonists such as pilocarpine, carbachol, phospholine iodine, and physostigmine, salicylate, acetylcholine chloride, eserine, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, demecarium bromide); muscarinics; carbonic anhydrase inhibitor agents, including topical and/or systemic agents, for example acetozolamide, brinzolamide, dorzolamide and methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, diamox, and dichlorphenamide; mydriatic-cycloplegic agents such as atropine, cyclopentolate, succinylcholine, homatropine, phenylephrine, scopolamine and tropicamide; prostaglandins such as prostaglandin F2 alpha, antiprostaglandins, prostaglandin precursors, or prostaglandin analog agents such as bimatoprost, latanoprost, travoprost and unoprostone.
  • [0314]
    Other examples of drugs may also include anti-inflammatory agents including for example glucocorticoids and corticosteroids such as betamethasone, cortisone, dexamethasone, dexamethasone 21-phosphate, methylprednisolone, prednisolone 21-phosphate, prednisolone acetate, prednisolone, fluroometholone, loteprednol, medrysone, fluocinolone acetonide, triamcinolone acetonide, triamcinolone, triamcinolone acetonide, beclomethasone, budesonide, flunisolide, fluorometholone, fluticasone, hydrocortisone, hydrocortisone acetate, loteprednol, rimexolone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents including, for example, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, bromfenac, nepafenac, and ketorolac, salicylate, indomethacin, ibuprofen, naxopren, piroxicam and nabumetone; anti-infective or antimicrobial agents such as antibiotics including, for example, tetracycline, chlortetracycline, bacitracin, neomycin, polymyxin, gramicidin, cephalexin, oxytetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, gentamycin, erythromycin, penicillin, sulfonamides, sulfadiazine, sulfacetamide, sulfamethizole, sulfisoxazole, nitrofurazone, sodium propionate, aminoglycosides such as gentamicin and tobramycin; fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin; bacitracin, erythromycin, fusidic acid, neomycin, polymyxin B, gramicidin, trimethoprim and sulfacetamide; antifungals such as amphotericin B and miconazole; antivirals such as idoxuridine trifluorothymidine, acyclovir, gancyclovir, interferon; antimicotics; immune-modulating agents such as antiallergenics, including, for example, sodium chromoglycate, antazoline, methapyriline, chlorpheniramine, cetrizine, pyrilamine, prophenpyridamine anti-histamine agents such as azelastine, emedastine and levocabastine; immunological drugs (such as vaccines and immune stimulants); MAST cell stabilizer agents such as cromolyn sodium, ketotifen, lodoxamide, nedocrimil, olopatadine and pemirolastciliary body ablative agents, such as gentimicin and cidofovir; and other ophthalmic agents such as verteporfin, proparacaine, tetracaine, cyclosporine and pilocarpine; inhibitors of cell-surface glycoprotein receptors; decongestants such as phenylephrine, naphazoline, tetrahydrazoline; lipids or hypotensive lipids; dopaminergic agonists and/or antagonists such as quinpirole, fenoldopam, and ibopamine; vasospasm inhibitors; vasodilators; antihypertensive agents; angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors; angiotensin-1 receptor antagonists such as olmesartan; microtubule inhibitors; molecular motor (dynein and/or kinesin) inhibitors; actin cytoskeleton regulatory agents such as cyctchalasin, latrunculin, swinholide A, ethacrynic acid, H-7, and Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitors; remodeling inhibitors; modulators of the extracellular matrix such as tert-butylhydro-quinolone and AL-3037A; adenosine receptor agonists and/or antagonists such as N-6-cylclophexyladenosine and (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine; serotonin agonists; hormonal agents such as estrogens, estradiol, progestational hormones, progesterone, insulin, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, peptide and vasopressin hypothalamus releasing factor; growth factor antagonists or growth factors, including, for example, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, platelet derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, somatotrapin, fibronectin, connective tissue growth factor, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs); cytokines such as interleukins, CD44, cochlin, and serum amyloids, such as serum amyloid A.
  • [0315]
    Other therapeutic agents may include neuroprotective agents such as lubezole, nimodipine and related compounds, and including blood flow enhancers, sodium channels blockers, glutamate inhibitors such as memantine, neurotrophic factors, nitric oxide synthase inhibitors; free radical scavengers or anti-oxidants; chelating compounds; apoptosis-related protease inhibitors; compounds that reduce new protein synthesis; radiotherapeutic agents; photodynamic therapy agents; gene therapy agents; genetic modulators; and dry eye medications such as cyclosporine A, delmulcents, and sodium hyaluronate.
  • [0316]
    Other therapeutic agents that may be used include: other beta-blocker agents such as acebutolol, atenolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, asmolol, labetalol, nadolol, penbutolol, and pindolol; other corticosteroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents such aspirin, betamethasone, cortisone, diflunisal, etodolac, fenoprofen, fludrocortisone, flurbiprofen, hydrocortisone, ibuprofen, indomethacine, ketoprofen, meclofenamate, mefenamic acid, meloxicam, methylprednisolone, nabumetone, naproxen, oxaprozin, prednisolone, prioxicam, salsalate, sulindac and tolmetin; COX-2 inhibitors like celecoxib, rofecoxib and Valdecoxib; other immune-modulating agents such as aldesleukin, adalimumab (HUMIRA®), azathioprine, basiliximab, daclizumab, etanercept (ENBREL®), hydroxychloroquine, infliximab (REMICADE®), leflunomide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, and sulfasalazine; other anti-histamine agents such as loratadine, desloratadine, cetirizine, diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, dexchlorpheniramine, clemastine, cyproheptadine, fexofenadine, hydroxyzine and promethazine; other anti-infective agents such as aminoglycosides such as amikacin and streptomycin; anti-fungal agents such as amphotericin B, caspofungin, clotrimazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole, terbinafine and nystatin; anti-malarial agents such as chloroquine, atovaquone, mefloquine, primaquine, quinidine and quinine; anti-mycobacterium agents such as ethambutol, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, rifampin and rifabutin; anti-parasitic agents such as albendazole, mebendazole, thiobendazole, metronidazole, pyrantel, atovaquone, iodoquinaol, ivermectin, paromycin, praziquantel, and trimatrexate; other anti-viral agents, including anti-CMV or anti-herpetic agents such as acyclovir, cidofovir, famciclovir, gangciclovir, valacyclovir, valganciclovir, vidarabine, trifluridine and foscarnet; protease inhibitors such as ritonavir, saquinavir, lopinavir, indinavir, atazanavir, amprenavir and nelfinavir; nucleotide/nucleoside/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors such as abacavir, ddl, 3TC, d4T, ddC, tenofovir and emtricitabine, delavirdine, efavirenz and nevirapine; other anti-viral agents such as interferons, ribavirin and trifluridiene; other anti-bacterial agents, including cabapenems like ertapenem, imipenem and meropenem; cephalosporins such as cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, cefditoren, cephalexin, cefaclor, cefepime, cefoperazone, cefotaxime, cefotetan, cefoxitin, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, ceftaxidime, ceftibuten, ceftizoxime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime and loracarbef; other macrolides and ketolides such as azithromycin, clarithromycin, dirithromycin and telithromycin; penicillins (with and without clavulanate) including amoxicillin, ampicillin, pivampicillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin, oxacillin, piperacillin, and ticarcillin; tetracyclines such as doxycycline, minocycline and tetracycline; other anti-bacterials such as aztreonam, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, linezolid, nitrofurantoin and vancomycin; alpha blocker agents such as doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin; calcium-channel blockers such as amlodipine, bepridil, diltiazem, felodipine, isradipine, nicardipine, nifedipine, nisoldipine and verapamil; other anti-hypertensive agents such as clonidine, diazoxide, fenoldopan, hydralazine, minoxidil, nitroprusside, phenoxybenzamine, epoprostenol, tolazoline, treprostinil and nitrate-based agents; anti-coagulant agents, including heparins and heparinoids such as heparin, dalteparin, enoxaparin, tinzaparin and fondaparinux; other anti-coagulant agents such as hirudin, aprotinin, argatroban, bivalirudin, desirudin, lepirudin, warfarin and ximelagatran; anti-platelet agents such as abciximab, clopidogrel, dipyridamole, optifibatide, ticlopidine and tirofiban; prostaglandin PDE-5 inhibitors and other prostaglandin agents such as alprostadil, carboprost, sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil; thrombin inhibitors; antithrombogenic agents; anti-platelet aggregating agents; thrombolytic agents and/or fibrinolytic agents such as alteplase, anistreplase, reteplase, streptokinase, tenecteplase and urokinase; anti-proliferative agents such as sirolimus, tacrolimus, everolimus, zotarolimus, paclitaxel and mycophenolic acid; hormonal-related agents including levothyroxine, fluoxymestrone, methyltestosterone, nandrolone, oxandrolone, testosterone, estradiol, estrone, estropipate, clomiphene, gonadotropins, hydroxyprogesterone, levonorgestrel, medroxyprogesterone, megestrol, mifepristone, norethindrone, oxytocin, progesterone, raloxifene and tamoxifen; anti-neoplastic agents, including alkylating agents such as carmustine lomustine, melphalan, cisplatin, fluorouracil3, and procarbazine antibiotic-like agents such as bleomycin, daunorubicin, doxorubicin, idarubicin, mitomycin and plicamycin; anti proliferative agents (such as 1,3-cis retinoic acid, 5-fluorouracil, taxol, rapamycin, mitomycin C and cisplatin); antimetabolite agents such as cytarabine, fludarabine, hydroxyurea, mercaptopurine and 5-flurouracil (5-FU); immune modulating agents such as aldesleukin, imatinib, rituximab and tositumomab; mitotic inhibitors docetaxel, etoposide, vinblastine and vincristine; radioactive agents such as strontium-89; and other anti-neoplastic agents such as irinotecan, topotecan and mitotane.
  • [0317]
    While certain embodiments of the disclosure have been described, these embodiments have been presented by way of example only, and are not intended to limit the scope of the disclosure. Indeed, the novel methods, systems, and devices described herein may be embodied in a variety of other forms. For example, embodiments of one illustrated or described implant may be combined with embodiments of another illustrated or described shunt. Moreover, the implants described above may be utilized for other purposes. For example, the implants may be used to drain fluid from the anterior chamber to other locations of the eye or outside the eye. Furthermore, various omissions, substitutions and changes in the form of the methods, systems, and devices described herein may be made without departing from the spirit of the disclosure.
Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3416530 *2 Mar 196617 Dic 1968Richard A. NessEyeball medication dispensing tablet
US3710795 *29 Sep 197016 Ene 1973Alza CorpDrug-delivery device with stretched, rate-controlling membrane
US3961628 *21 Abr 19758 Jun 1976Alza CorporationOcular drug dispensing system
US4093708 *9 Mar 19776 Jun 1978Alza CorporationOsmotic releasing device having a plurality of release rate patterns
US4450150 *11 May 198122 May 1984Arthur D. Little, Inc.Biodegradable, implantable drug delivery depots, and method for preparing and using the same
US4743248 *11 Ago 198610 May 1988Alza CorporationDosage form for delivering acid sensitive beneficial agent
US4955881 *25 Jul 198911 Sep 1990Alza CorporationRuminant dispensing device
US5128145 *2 Ago 19917 Jul 1992Alza CorporationDosage form for Parkinson's disease, spasticity and muscle spasms
US5773019 *27 Sep 199530 Jun 1998The University Of Kentucky Research FoundationImplantable controlled release device to deliver drugs directly to an internal portion of the body
US7101567 *19 May 19995 Sep 2006Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co., Ltd.Controlled release preparations having multi-layer structure
US7431710 *18 Mar 20057 Oct 2008Glaukos CorporationOcular implants with anchors and methods thereof
US7678065 *24 Sep 200416 Mar 2010Glaukos CorporationImplant with intraocular pressure sensor for glaucoma treatment
US7708711 *12 Nov 20034 May 2010Glaukos CorporationOcular implant with therapeutic agents and methods thereof
US7776024 *26 Oct 200717 Ago 2010Microchips, Inc.Method of actuating implanted medical device
US8118768 *6 Oct 200821 Feb 2012Dose Medical CorporationDrug eluting ocular implant with anchor and methods thereof
US20020052640 *29 Jun 20012 May 2002Steve BigusSheath for self-expanding stents
US20030083646 *14 Dic 20011 May 2003Avantec Vascular CorporationApparatus and methods for variably controlled substance delivery from implanted prostheses
US20030176854 *11 Mar 200318 Sep 2003Alcon, Inc.Implantable drug delivery system
US20040111080 *29 May 200210 Jun 2004Microsolutions, Inc.Methods and implantable devices and systems for long term delivery of a pharmaceutical agent
US20040180075 *14 Mar 200216 Sep 2004Robinson Michael R.Ocular therapeutic agent delivery devices and methods for making and using such devices
US20050119737 *1 Jun 20042 Jun 2005Bene Eric A.Ocular implant and methods for making and using same
US20080081064 *28 Sep 20073 Abr 2008Surmodics, Inc.Implantable Medical Device with Apertures for Delivery of Bioactive Agents
US20080177153 *7 Dic 200724 Jul 2008The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaTherapeutic agent delivery systems and devices
US20080228127 *9 Nov 200718 Sep 2008Glaukos CorporationUveoscleral shunt and methods for implanting same
US20090149947 *9 Jun 200511 Jun 2009J.A.C.C. GmbhImplantable device for drug delivery and improved visibility
US20090227933 *7 Abr 200810 Sep 2009S.K. PharmaceuticalsOptic nerve implants
US20160045363 *10 Mar 201418 Feb 2016Dose Medical CorporationImplants with controlled drug delivery features and methods of using same
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US90954133 Jun 20144 Ago 2015Aquesys, Inc.Intraocular shunt manufacture
US91139943 Jun 201425 Ago 2015Aquesys, Inc.Intraocular shunt manufacture
US912572319 Feb 20138 Sep 2015Aquesys, Inc.Adjustable glaucoma implant
US959215424 Ago 201514 Mar 2017Aquesys, Inc.Intraocular shunt manufacture
US960373810 Mar 201428 Mar 2017Dose Medical CorporationImplants with controlled drug delivery features and methods of using same
US963625512 Feb 20102 May 2017Dose Medical CorporationUveoscleral drug delivery implant and methods for implanting the same
US966891522 Nov 20116 Jun 2017Dose Medical CorporationDrug eluting ocular implant
US20110045424 *13 Mar 200924 Feb 2011Colin Litten-BrownCandle
US20130274692 *4 Ago 201117 Oct 2013Yair AlsterSubconjuctival implant for posterior segment drug delivery
US20150342875 *28 May 20153 Dic 2015Dose Medical CorporationImplants with controlled drug delivery features and methods of using same
WO2015073571A1 *12 Nov 201421 May 2015Dose Medical CorporationOcular implants configured to store and release stable drug formulations
WO2016141350A1 *4 Mar 20169 Sep 2016Microvention, Inc.Drug delivery device
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.623/6.13
Clasificación internacionalA61F2/16
Clasificación cooperativaA61K9/0051, A61F9/0017, A61F9/00781, A61F2250/0068, A61F2210/0004
Clasificación europeaA61K9/00M16B, A61F9/00B2
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
13 Jun 2012ASAssignment
Owner name: DOSE MEDICAL CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HAFFNER, DAVID;CURRY, KEN;HEITZMANN, HAROLD;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20120607 TO 20120608;REEL/FRAME:028370/0861