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Número de publicaciónUS20140014697 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudUS 13/523,316
Fecha de publicación16 Ene 2014
Fecha de presentación14 Jun 2012
Fecha de prioridad14 Jun 2011
Número de publicación13523316, 523316, US 2014/0014697 A1, US 2014/014697 A1, US 20140014697 A1, US 20140014697A1, US 2014014697 A1, US 2014014697A1, US-A1-20140014697, US-A1-2014014697, US2014/0014697A1, US2014/014697A1, US20140014697 A1, US20140014697A1, US2014014697 A1, US2014014697A1
InventoresGlenn Schmierer, James Marchbank
Cesionario originalFunction LLC
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Sports Equipment Carrying System
US 20140014697 A1
Resumen
A carrying system is disclosed. The carrying system comprises a top strap assembly including one or more shoulder straps and an adjustable loop, wherein each of the one or more shoulder straps includes a narrow portion and the adjustable loop includes at least one elastomeric patch. The carrying system further comprises a bottom strap assembly including a fixed loop and a bottom strap, wherein the fixed loop includes at least one elastomeric patch. The carrying system further comprises one or more buckles connecting the top strap assembly to the bottom strap assembly.
Imágenes(14)
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Reclamaciones(3)
What is claimed is:
1. A carrying system comprising:
a top strap assembly including one or more shoulder straps and an adjustable loop, wherein each of the one or more shoulder straps includes a narrow portion and the adjustable loop includes at least one elastomeric patch;
a bottom strap assembly including a fixed loop and a bottom strap, wherein the fixed loop includes at least one elastomeric patch; and
one or more buckles connecting the top strap assembly to the bottom strap assembly.
2. The carrying system of claim 1, wherein one or more of the top strap assembly and the bottom strap assembly include visual cues.
3. The carrying system of claim 1, further comprising:
a stuff sack configured to receive at least the top strap assembly, the bottom strap assembly, and the one or more buckles.
Descripción
  • [0001]
    This application claims priority of U.S. provisional application 61/496,749 filed on Jun. 14, 2011.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    Large sporting equipment or other awkward, oversized items are difficult or burdensome to carry when not in use. In several contexts, a user may carry sports equipment such as a snowboard, a skateboard, a longboard, and skis to a location wherein the user will engage in physical activity. For example, a user may carry a snowboard while hiking to a mountain slope, upon which the user will snowboard once he arrives.
  • [0003]
    Many carrying systems are bulky, complex, uncomfortable, and/or prone to damage. Bulky carrying systems (e.g., backpacks) are burdensome and restrict the user's freedom of movement. Additionally, once the user engages in a physical activity, the user lacks a convenient location to store a bulky carrying system. Further, many carrying systems are complex, causing a user to have to navigate a web of straps to determine the proper arrangement to carry an item. Once a user begins carrying an item, many carrying systems hold items in such a way as to hit, rub, and/or protrude into the user's body or are otherwise uncomfortable. For example, some snowboard carrying systems hold the snowboard in a position where the snowboard hits the user's calves or causes the snowboard bindings or the parts of the carrying system to protrude into the user's back. Further, many carrying systems hold items in a manner that causes the user to have to stabilize the item with at least one hand. Finally, many carrying systems are prone to damage including but not limited to fraying, tearing, ripping, and stretching.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0004]
    Implementations described and claimed herein address the foregoing problems by providing a simple, durable, compactable system for carrying over-sized items such as sports equipment. In one implementation, the carrying system includes a top strap assembly and a bottom strap assembly forming an adjustable shoulder harness. The top strap assembly includes an adjustable loop with a releasable buckle, and the bottom strap assembly includes a fixed loop with a substantially fixed circumference. An item may be positioned within the loops for carrying. For example, a distal end of a snowboard may be inserted into the fixed loop such that a binding associated with the distal end comes to rest upon the fixed loop. A proximal end of the snowboard may be secured via the adjustable loop by fastening the releasable buckle adjacent a binding associated with the proximal end. The circumference of the adjustable loop may be modified to secure the snowboard. The top strap assembly runs over a user's shoulders and connects to the bottom strap assembly via buckles. The carrying system includes a plurality of elastomeric patches to protect the carrying system from damage by the items carried. For example, the elastomeric patches may be placed to protect the carrying system from the edges of a snowboard. The carrying system is substantially compactable and may be condensed and placed into a small case or sack. In one implementation, the fixed loop includes an attached sack into which the top strap assembly and the bottom strap assembly may be folded. Further, the carrying system includes visual cues to aid a user in preparing an item for carrying. Other implementations are also described and recited herein.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTIONS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0005]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of an example carrying system.
  • [0006]
    FIG. 2 illustrates a front view of an example top strap assembly.
  • [0007]
    FIG. 3 illustrates a back view of an example top strap assembly.
  • [0008]
    FIG. 4 illustrates a front view of an example bottom strap assembly.
  • [0009]
    FIG. 5 illustrates an assembly of an example bottom strap assembly.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 6 illustrates three views of an example patch.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 7 illustrates a snowboard in an example carrying system.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 8 illustrates a front perspective view of an example carrying in use.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 9 illustrates a side view of an example carrying system in use.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 10 illustrates a back perspective view of an example carrying system in use.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 11 illustrates example operations for folding an example carrying system into an example sack.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 12 illustrates another perspective view of an example carrying system.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 13 illustrates another assembly of an example bottom strap assembly.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTIONS
  • [0018]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of an example carrying system 100. In one implementation, the carrying system 100 includes a top strap assembly 102 and a bottom strap assembly 104. The top strap assembly 102 is configured to stabilize a carried item (not shown) secured by the carrying system 100 during use, and the bottom strap assembly 104 is configured to support the weight of the carried item during use. The carrying system 100 may be used to carry items including, without limitation, a snowboard, a skateboard, a longboard, skis, and such oversized, elongated, or otherwise awkward, generally flat items.
  • [0019]
    The top strap assembly 102 includes one or more shoulder straps 106 configured to run over the shoulders of a user to enable the carrying of an item. In one implementation, each of the shoulder straps 106 includes a buckle 118 (only one of which is shown in FIG. 1) to connect the top strap assembly 102 to the bottom strap assembly 104. In another implementation, the bottom strap assembly 104 includes at least one buckle 118 through which each of the shoulder straps 106 may be threaded. The buckle 118 may be a single piece buckle (e.g., a ladder lock buckle) that holds a strap threaded through the buckle when under tension, which may be released by lifting a tab on the buckle. However, other buckle types including a two-piece buckle may be used. The buckle 118 may be used to adjust the length of the shoulder straps 106, which allows the placement of the top strap assembly 102 and/or the bottom strap assembly 104 to be adjustable.
  • [0020]
    In one implementation, the width of the shoulder straps 106 varies along the length of the shoulder straps 106. For example, the shoulder straps 106 may be wider at portions corresponding to placement on a user's shoulders. The wider portions increase comfort for a user, particularly during extended use, by spreading the weight of the carrying system 100 and the carried item. Alternatively or additionally, the portions of the shoulder straps 106 corresponding to placement on a user's shoulders may include a thin padding or other components to increase comfort. In one implementation, each of the shoulder straps 106 may include a narrow portion 116 to thread through the buckle 118, which minimizes the size of the buckle 118. For example, each of the shoulder straps 106 may be folded over at the narrow portion 116 and tapered down to the buckle 118. The folded material in the narrow portion 116 may be stitched to avoid loose fabric. Having smaller buckles minimizes the weight and storage volume of the carrying system 100 when not in use.
  • [0021]
    The top strap assemble 102 includes an adjustable loop 110 configured to engage an item for carrying. The circumference of the adjustable loop 110 may be adjusted via a releasable buckle 108 to securely hold items of various sizes (e.g., adjusts to hold a range of snowboard sizes). In one implementation, the releasable buckle 108 is a two-piece buckle wherein one piece is configured to receive the other piece, which snaps into place. This implementation permits the adjusted size of the adjustable loop 110 to be maintained while permitting the releasable buckle 108 to quickly open the adjustable loop 110. However, other buckle types including a single piece buckle may be used. The adjustable loop 110 includes an upper back strap 112 opposed to the releasable buckle 108. In one implementation, the shoulder straps 106 are each formed of a continuous length of textile webbing and are connected at the releasable buckle 108. The upper back strap 112 is attached to the shoulder straps 106 to form the adjustable loop 110. For example, terminal ends of the upper back strap 112 may be bar tacked or otherwise firmly attached to the shoulder straps 106. In another implementation, the shoulder straps 106 are fixed to the upper back strap 112, and the terminal ends of the upper back strap 112 each include one end of the releasable buckle 108.
  • [0022]
    The bottom strap assembly 104 includes at least one bottom strap 120 and a fixed loop 122, which is configured to further engage an item for carrying. The circumference of the fixed loop 122 is substantially fixed to ensure speedy and proper placement of the item for carrying. For example, a snowboard may be inserted into the fixed loop 122 such that the lower one of the bindings comes to rest on the fixed loop 122. In this position, the snowboard will be placed in a manner that prevents the snowboard from hitting a user's calves. The fixed loop 122 includes a lower back strap 124. In one implementation, the lower back strap 124 is attached to the bottom strap 120 to form the fixed loop 122. For example, terminal ends of the lower back strap 124 may be bar tacked or otherwise firmly attached to the bottom strap 124. In another implementation, the bottom strap 124 is folded over at two points and attached to the lower back strap 124 at the two points to form the fixed loop 122. From each of the two points attached to the lower back strap 124, the bottom strap 120 extends to connect to each of the shoulder straps 106 by the buckles 118.
  • [0023]
    The top strap assembly 102 and the bottom strap assembly 104 include one or more engaging portions (e.g., 114, 126, 128 and 130). At the engaging portions, the material is more prone to damage. Accordingly, the engaging portions may include localized durable fabric or cut-proof material. For example, the engaging portions 114, 126, 128 and/or 130 may include elastomeric patches (e.g., Hypalon® patches) to protect the adjustable loop 110 and the fixed loop 122 from sharp edges of an item (e.g., the edges of a snowboard).
  • [0024]
    In one implementation, the carrier system 100 includes visual and/or tactile cues including, but not limited to, colors, patterns, and other unique identifying features. The visual cues guide a user regarding inserting an item into and donning the carrying system 100. For example, one or more of the upper back strap 112 and the lower back strap 124 may include a visual cue to indicate to the user which straps touch the flat base of a snowboard. Visual cues on the upper back strap 112 and the lower back strap 124 may be used to instruct that the releasable buckle 108 is not placed such that it protrudes into the user's back. Further, the buckle 118 on each shoulder strap 106 and the releasable buckle 108 may have visual and/or tactile cues. For example, in an implementation where the buckle 118 and the releasable buckle 108 are both twopiece buckles, the visual and/or tactile cues will help the user avoid incorrectly pairing the buckle pieces. There may be other cues to help a user distinguish portions of the carrier system 100 (e.g., distinguish the top strap assembly 102 from the bottom strap assembly 104, etc.). In one implementation, once an item is properly secured via the adjustable loop 110 and the fixed loop 122, the shoulder straps 106 may be clearly identified by a user.
  • [0025]
    An item that is properly secured via the adjustable loop 110 and the fixed loop 122 has a solid connection to the back of a user during use. As such, the user may carry the item without using a hand to stabilize the item. In one implementation, the top strap assembly 102 includes a chest strap spanning the shoulder straps 106 for further stabilization of the carrier system 100. Further, the placement and connection of the item maximizes freedom of movement of the user.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 2 illustrates a front view of an example top strap assembly 200. The top strap assembly 200 includes a back strap 202 and shoulder straps 208 and 214. In one implementation, the shoulder straps 208 and 214 include a buckle 212 and 218, respectively. The buckles 208 and 214 may be single piece buckles (e.g., a ladder lock buckle) that holds a strap threaded through the buckle under tension, which may be released by lifting a tab on the buckle. However, other buckle types including a two-piece buckle may be used.
  • [0027]
    In one implementation, the shoulder straps 208 and 214 are each 40 mm nylon gros grain webbing that is 0.55 mm to 0.65 mm thick and 19 inches long. However, other materials and sizes are contemplated. Further, the shoulder straps 208 and 214 may be tapered to form narrow portions 210 and 216. For example, each of the shoulder straps 208 and 214 may be folded over to form the narrow portions 210 and 216. The folded material in the narrow portions 210 and 216 may be stitched to avoid loose fabric. One of the terminal ends of the shoulder strap 208 and one of the terminal ends of the shoulder strap 214 are threaded through the buckle 212 and 218, respectively, and may be bar tacked. The narrow portions 210 and 216 minimize the sizes of the buckles 212 and 218. For example, the buckles 212 and 218 may be 20 mm. Having smaller buckles minimizes the weight and compressed volume of the top strap assembly 200. The other terminal end of the shoulder strap 208 and the other terminal end of the shoulder strap 214 are each folded around and affixed (e.g., bar tacked) to the back strap 202. In one implementation, the terminal ends of the shoulder straps 208 are affixed to the back strap 202 approximately 5 inches apart.
  • [0028]
    The back strap 202 includes a releasable buckle 206, which may be buckled to form an adjustable loop. The length of the back strap 202 may be adjusted via the releasable buckle 206. In one implementation, the releasable buckle 206 is a two-piece buckle wherein one terminal end of the back strap 202 has a piece of the releasable buckle 206 configured to receive the other piece of the releasable buckle 206 on the other terminal end of the back strap 202. However, other buckle types including a single piece buckle may be used. The width of the back strap 202 is minimized to reduce the size of the releasable buckle 206. For example, the back strap 202 may be 20 mm allowing the releasable buckle 206 may be 20 mm.
  • [0029]
    In one implementation, the back strap 202 is 20 mm nylon gros grain webbing that is 0.55 mm to 0.65 mm thick. However, other materials are contemplated. In one implementation, to protect the back strap 202 at portions that may be prone to damage resulting from sharp edges (e.g., edges of a snowboard) or friction, one or more patches 204 may be attached to the back strap 202. The patches 204 may be elastomeric patches, localized durable fabric, or cut-proof material. For example, the patches 204 may be Hypalon® patches that are non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based, scrim reinforced, and 1 mm thick. In another implementation, the back strap 202 substantially comprises an elastomeric material with a portion of the back strap 202 comprising nylon gros grain webbing threaded through the releasable buckle 206 to permit adjustment of the back strap 202.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 3 illustrates a back view of an example top strap assembly 300. The top strap assembly 300 includes a back strap 302 and shoulder straps 308 and 314. In one implementation, the shoulder straps 308 and 314 include a buckle 312 and 318, respectively. The buckles 308 and 314 may be single piece buckles (e.g., a ladder lock buckle) that holds a strap threaded through the buckle under tension, which may be released by lifting a tab on the buckle. However, other buckle types including a two-piece buckle may be used.
  • [0031]
    In one implementation, the shoulder straps 308 and 314 are each 40 mm nylon gros grain webbing that is 0.55 mm to 0.65 mm thick and 19 inches long. However, other materials and sizes are contemplated. Further, the shoulder straps 308 and 314 may be tapered to form narrow portions 310 and 316. For example, each of the shoulder straps 308 and 314 may be folded over at the narrow portions 310 and 316. The folded material in the narrow portions 310 and 316 may be stitched to avoid loose fabric. One of the terminal ends of the shoulder strap 308 and one of the terminal ends of the shoulder strap 314 are threaded through the buckle 312 and 318, respectively, and may be bar tacked. The narrow portions 310 and 316 minimize the sizes of the buckles 312 and 318. For example, the buckles 312 and 318 may be 20 mm. Having smaller buckles minimizes the weight and compressed volume of the top strap assembly 300. The other terminal end of the shoulder strap 308 and the other terminal end of the shoulder strap 314 are each attached (e.g., bar tacked) to the back strap 302. In one implementation, the terminal ends of the shoulder straps 308 are affixed to the back strap 302 approximately 5 inches apart.
  • [0032]
    The back strap 302 includes a releasable buckle 306, which may be buckled to form an adjustable loop. The length of the back strap 302 may be adjusted via the releasable buckle 306. In one implementation, the releasable buckle 306 is a two-piece buckle wherein one terminal end of the back strap 302 has a piece of the releasable buckle 306 configured to receive the other piece of the releasable buckle 306 on the other terminal end of the back strap 302. However, other buckle types including a single piece buckle may be used. The width of the back strap 302 is minimized to reduce the size of the releasable buckle 306. For example, the back strap 302 may be 20 mm allowing the releasable buckle 306 may be 20 mm.
  • [0033]
    In one implementation, the back strap 302 is 20 mm nylon gros grain webbing that is 0.55 mm to 0.65 mm thick. However, other materials are contemplated. In one implementation, to protect the back strap 302 at portions that may be prone to damage resulting from sharp edges (e.g., edges of a snowboard) or friction, one or morepatches 304 may be attached to the back strap 302. The patches 304 may be elastomeric patches, localized durable fabric, or cut-proof material. For example, the patches 304 may be Hypalon® patches that are non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based, scrim reinforced, and 1 mm thick. In another implementation, the back strap 302 substantially comprises an elastomeric material with a portion of the back strap 302 comprising nylon gros grain webbing threaded through the releasable buckle 306 to permit adjustment of the back strap 302.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 4 illustrates a front view of an example bottom strap assembly 400. The bottom strap assembly 400 includes at least one bottom strap 406 and a back strap 402. In one implementation, the bottom strap 406 and the back strap 402 are 20 mm gros grain webbing. The length of the back strap 402 is substantially fixed to form a fixed loop. In one implementation, the bottom strap assembly 400 includes two bottom straps 406, which are attached to the back strap 402. For example, one terminal end of each of the bottom straps 406 may be bar tacked or otherwise firmly attached to the back strap 402. In another implementation, the bottom strap assembly 400 includes one bottom strap 406, which is folded over at two points and attached to the back strap 402 at the two points. The two points may include patches 404, which attach the bottom strap 406 to the back strap 402. The patches 404 may be elastomeric patches, localized durable fabric, or cut-proof material. For example, the patches 404 may be Hypalon® patches that are non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based, scrim reinforced, and 1 mm thick. In still another implementation, the back strap 402 may comprise an elastomeric material (e.g., Hypalon®). The terminal ends of the back strap 402 are folded over and affixed to the elastomeric back strap 402 to form the fixed loop.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 5 illustrates an assembly of an example bottom strap assembly 500. The bottom strap assembly 500 includes a back strap 502, patches 504, and a bottom strap 506. The back strap 502 and the bottom strap 506 may be nylon gros grain webbing and the patches 504 may be elastomeric patches, localized durable fabric, or cut-proof material. For example, the patches 504 may be Hypalon® patches that are non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based, scrim reinforced, and 1 mm thick. In one implementation, the patches 504 are attached to the terminal ends of the back strap 502. The bottom strap 506 is folded over at two points, forming a portion having a length that is slightly less than the total length of the back strap 502. The two points are attached to the patches 504 to form a fixed loop 508.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 6 illustrates three views 600, 602, and 604 of an example patch. A front view 600 shows a patch 606 attached to a back strap 608. The patch 606 protects the back strap 608 from damage by a carried item. For example, portions of the back strap 608 may be prone to damage resulting from sharp edges (e.g., edges of a snowboard) or friction, and the patch 606 may be attached to the back strap 608 to protect these portions. The patch 606 may be an elastomeric patch, localized durable fabric, or cut-proof material. For example, the patch 606 may be a Hypalon® patch that is non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based and scrim reinforced.
  • [0037]
    A perspective view 602 shows a patch 610 attached to a back strap 612. The back strap 612 forms a loop to secure an item for carrying. The patch 610 is placed at engaging portions of the back strap 612. In one implementation, the patch 610 has pretension to securely wrap around the item. The patch 610 may be stretched slightly along its length after one end thereof is fastened across its width with robust stitching then its opposite end is similarly stitched to the back strap 612. For example, the pretension enables the patch 610 to wrap around the edge of a snowboard tightly. Additionally, the pretension ensures that the patch 610 stretches normally and bunching of the patch material is minimized. The patch 610 may be an elastomeric patch, localized durable fabric, or cut-proof material. For example, the patch 610 may be a Hypalon® patch that is non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based and scrim reinforced. Accordingly, the patch 610 holds its shape while an item is carried.
  • [0038]
    A back view 604 shows a patch 614 attached to a back strap 616. The patch 614 protects the back strap 616 from damage by an item. For example, portions of the back strap 614 may be prone to damage resulting from sharp edges (e.g., edges of a snowboard) or friction, and the patch 614 may be attached to the back strap 616 to protect these portions. The patch 614 extends beyond the width of the back strap 616 at these portions. The patch 614 may be an elastomeric patch, localized durable fabric, or cut-proof material. For example, the patch 614 may be a Hypalon® patch that is non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based and scrim reinforced.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 7 illustrates a snowboard in an example carrying system 700. The snowboard has a proximal end 702 and a distal end 706. The snowboard includes a first binding 704 associated with the proximal end 702 and a second binding 708 associated with the distal end 706. In one implementation, the carrying system 700 includes a top strap assembly 710 and a bottom strap assembly 712. The top strap assembly 710 is configured to stabilize the carrying system 700 during use, and the bottom strap assembly 712 is configured to support the weight of the snowboard during carrying.
  • [0040]
    The top strap assembly 710 includes one or more shoulder straps 714 configured to run over the shoulders of a user to enable the carrying of the snowboard. Although FIG. 7 illustrates one shoulder strap 714, it should be understood that a second shoulder strap (not shown) is substantially symmetrically arranged to run over the opposite shoulder of the user (e.g., the right shoulder of a user). In one implementation, each of the shoulder straps 714 includes a buckle 724 to connect the top strap assembly 710 to the bottom strap assembly 712. The buckle 724 may be a single piece buckle (e.g., a ladder lock buckle) that holds a strap threaded through the buckle under tension, which may be released by lifting a tab on the buckle. However, other buckle types including a two-piece buckle may be used. The buckle 724 allows the placement of the top assembly 710 and/or the bottom strap assembly 712 to be adjustable. In one implementation, each of the shoulder straps 714 may include a narrow portion 722 to thread through the buckle 724, which minimizes the size of the buckle 724. For example, each of the shoulder straps 714 may be folded over at the narrow portion 722 and tapered down to the buckle 724. The folded material in the narrow portion 722 may be stitched to avoid loose fabric.
  • [0041]
    The top strap assemble 710 includes an adjustable loop 718 configured to engage the snowboard for carrying. The circumference of the adjustable loop 718 may be adjusted via a releasable buckle 716 to securely hold a range of snowboard sizes. In one implementation, the releasable buckle 716 is a two-piece buckle wherein one piece is configured to receive the other piece, which snaps into place. However, other buckle types including a single piece buckle may be used. The bottom strap assembly 712 includes at least one bottom strap 726 and a fixed loop 728, which is configured to further engage the snowboard for carrying. The circumference of the fixed loop 728 is substantially fixed to ensure proper placement of the snowboard. The bottom strap 726 connects the bottom strap assembly 712 to the top strap assembly 710 via the buckles 724.
  • [0042]
    In one implementation, to carry the snowboard, the distal end 706 may be inserted into the fixed loop 728 until the second binding 708 comes to rest on the fixed loop 728. The adjustable loop 718 is wrapped around the proximal end 702 and secured under the first binding 704 using the releasable buckle 716. The circumference of the adjustable loop 718 may be changed to secure the snowboard. A user may run the shoulder straps 714 over his shoulders and adjust the placement of the snowboard via the buckles 724. The carrying system 700 places the snowboard in a manner that prevents the snowboard from hitting the user's calves.
  • [0043]
    The top strap assembly 710 and the bottom strap assembly 712 include one or more engaging portions (e.g., 720 and 730). At the engaging portions, the material is more prone to damage resulting from the friction from the edges of the snowboard. Accordingly, the engaging portions may include localized durable fabric or cut-proof material. In one implementation, the engaging portions 720 and 730 may include elastomeric patches (e.g., Hypalon® patches) to protect the adjustable loop 718 and the fixed loop 728. In another implementation, the fixed loop 728 and the adjustable loop 718 may substantially comprise an elastomeric material.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 8 illustrates a front perspective view of an example carrying system 800 in use. A user 802 uses the carrying system 800 to carry a snowboard 804. The snowboard 804 is secured in the carrying system 800, and shoulder straps 808 enable the user 802 to carry the snowboard 804. The position of the snowboard 804 may be adjusted via buckle 806 on the shoulder straps 808. The carrying system 800 places the snowboard 804 in such a manner that the user 802 may carry the snowboard 804 long distances comfortably. For example, the snowboard 804 is placed such that the snowboard 804 does not hit the calves of the user 802 while walking. Further, the user 802 may carry the snowboard 804 without using a hand to stabilize the snowboard. In one implementation, a chest strap connects the shoulder straps 808 across the chest of the user 802 for further stabilization of the carrier system 800. The placement and connection of the snowboard 804 maximizes freedom of movement of the user 802.
  • [0045]
    FIG. 9 illustrates a side view of an example carrying system 900 in use. A user 902 uses the carrying system 900 to carry a snowboard. The carrying system 900 includes an adjustable loop 908 and a fixed loop 910. In one implementation, to carry the snowboard, one end of the snowboard may be inserted into the fixed loop 910 until a first binding 906 comes to rest on the fixed loop 910. The adjustable loop 908 is wrapped around the snowboard and secured under a second binding 904. The user 902 may run shoulder straps 912 over his shoulders and adjust the placement of the snowboard. The shoulder straps 912 enable the user 902 to carry the snowboard. The carrying system 900 secures the snowboard such that there is a solid connection of the snowboard to the back of the user 902 during use. The snowboard is placed such that the user 902 may carry the snowboard long distances comfortably. For example, the placement of the snowboard prevents the snowboard from hitting the calves of the user 902 while walking. Further, the user 902 may carry the snowboard without using a hand to stabilize the snowboard. The placement and connection of the snowboard maximizes freedom of movement of the user 902.
  • [0046]
    FIG. 10 illustrates a back perspective view of an example carrying system 1000 in use. A user 1002 uses the carrying system 1000 to carry a snowboard. The carrying system 1000 includes an adjustable loop 1008 and a fixed loop 1010. In one implementation, to carry the snowboard, one end of the snowboard may be inserted into the fixed loop 1010 until a first binding 1006 comes to rest on the fixed loop 1010. The adjustable loop 1008 is wrapped around the snowboard and secured under a second binding 1004 using a releasable buckle. The circumference of the adjustable loop 1008 may be changed to secure the snowboard. The user 1002 may run shoulder straps 1012 over his shoulders and adjust the placement of the snowboard. The shoulder straps 1012 enable the user 1002 to carry the snowboard. The carrying system 1000 secures the snowboard such that there is a solid connection of the snowboard to the back of the user 1002 during use. The snowboard is placed such that the user 1002 may carry the snowboard long distances comfortably. For example, the placement of the snowboard prevents the snowboard from hitting the calves of the user 1002 while walking. Further, the user 1002 may carry the snowboard without using a hand to stabilize the snowboard. The placement and connection of the snowboard maximizes freedom of movement of the user 1002.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 11 illustrates example operations 1100 for folding an example carrying system into an example sack. In one implementation, a carrying system 1102 includes a stuff sack 1104 having a flap 1106. The flap 1106 is attached to a fixed loop 1108, for example, with a bar tack. The carrying system 1102 may be folded for storage in the stuff sack 1104. A folded carrying system 1112 is inserted into a sack 1110, which holds the folded carrying system 1112 while reducing the volume of the folded carrying system 1112. A cinched sack 1114 holds a compressed carrying system. The cinched sack 1114 includes a flap, which is used to ensure that the compressed carrying system is guided into and contained within the cinched sack 1114. The volume of a loaded sack 1116 holding a carrying system is small enough such that a user 1118 may place the loaded sack 1116 into a pocket. For example, the volume of a folded carrying system ranges from approximately 10 to 13 cubic inches, and the weight of the carrying system ranges from approximately 50 to 57 grams.
  • [0048]
    FIG. 12 illustrates another perspective view of an example carrying system 1200. In one implementation, the carrying system 1200 includes an adjustable loop 1202 and a fixed loop 1204 configured to engage an item for carrying.
  • [0049]
    The circumference of the adjustable loop 1202 may be adjusted via a releasable buckle 1208 to securely hold a range of items. In one implementation, the releasable buckle 1208 is a two-piece buckle wherein one piece is configured to receive the other piece, which snaps into place. However, other buckle types including a single piece buckle may be used. The adjustable loop includes an upper back strap 1206, which is made from a material to resist damage resulting from the friction from an item. The upper back strap 1206 is comprised of durable fabric or cut-proof material. In one implementation, the upper back strap 1206 may be an elastomeric material (e.g., Hypalon®) that is non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based, scrim reinforced, and 1 mm thick. The adjustable loop 1202 further includes an adjustable portion 1210, which is relatively thin (e.g., 0.55 mm to 0.65 mm thick) compared to the upper back strap 1206 such that the adjustable portion 1210 may be easily thread through the releasable buckle 1208 during adjustment of the adjustable loop 1202. The upper back strap 1206 is of a length relative to the adjustable loop 1210 so as to wrap around the edge portions of the carried item. In this way, the more robust, cut resistant material used to form the upper back strap 1206 is preferentially positioned to contact and grip these likely sharp-edged portions of the carried item.
  • [0050]
    The circumference of the fixed loop 1204 is substantially fixed to ensure proper placement of the item. The fixed loop 1204 includes a bottom strap 1214 and a lower back strap 1212, which is made from a material to resist damage resulting from the friction from an item. The lower back strap 1212 is comprised of durable fabric or cut-proof material. In one implementation, the lower back strap 1212 may be an elastomeric material (e.g., Hypalon®) that is non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based, scrim reinforced, and limn thick. The lower back strap 1212 is affixed to the bottom strap 1214 to form the fixed loop 1204. The bottom strap 1214 may be nylon gros grain webbing. As with the upper back strap 1206, the lower back strap 1212 is of a length relative to the bottom strap 1214 so as to wrap around the edge portions of the carried item. In this way, the more robust, cut resistant material used to form the lower back strap 1212 is preferentially positioned to contact and grip these likely sharp-edged portions of the carried item.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 13 illustrates another assembly of an example bottom strap assembly 1300. The bottom strap assembly 1300 includes a back strap 1302 and a bottom strap 1304. The bottom strap 1304 may be nylon gros grain webbing and the back strap 1302 may comprise a durable or cut-proof material, such as an elastomeric material. For example, the back strap 1302 may be Hypalon® that is non-polyvinyl chloride (non-PVC) based, scrim reinforced, and 1 mm thick. In one implementation, the terminal ends of the back strap 1302 are folded over and affixed to the bottom strap 1304 to form the fixed loop 1306. For example, the terminal ends of the back strap 1302 may folded over and affixed to the bottom strap 1304 approximately 8.75 inches apart, resulting in the back strap 1302 being approximately 12.5 inches in length and the bottom strap 1304 having two straps extending from the fixed loop 1306, each strap being approximately 16.5 inches in length. In one implementation, the terminal ends of the bottom strap 1304 are each folded over and affixed to the bottom strap 1304 to form an end loop 1308 approximately 0.625 inches in length. Each end loop 1308 protects the terminal ends of the bottom strap 1304 from fraying or other damage.
  • [0052]
    The above specification, examples, and data provide a complete description of the structure and use of exemplary embodiments of the invention. Since many embodiments of the invention can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, the invention resides in the claims hereinafter appended. Furthermore, structural features of the different embodiments may be combined in yet other embodiments without departing from the recited claims.
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.224/259
Clasificación internacionalA45F3/02, A45F3/04
Clasificación cooperativaA45F3/02, A45F3/047, A45F2003/142, A45F3/14