Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS2049320 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación28 Jul 1936
Fecha de presentación2 Dic 1933
Fecha de prioridad8 Dic 1932
Número de publicaciónUS 2049320 A, US 2049320A, US-A-2049320, US2049320 A, US2049320A
InventoresHans Ruben, Moritz Salomonski
Cesionario originalElsbeth Ruben
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Cigarette
US 2049320 A
Imágenes(1)
Previous page
Next page
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

Jy 28, ma@ H. RUBEN Er AL 2,9,32

CIGARETTE Filed Dec. 2, 1953 JQ vfz fans: )gw gm, Z4 m fa/Mand y w Y Patented July 28, 1936 VUNITED STATES PATENT ortica Salomonski, Berlin Germany; said Buben assignor to; Elsbeth Ruben, Charlottenburg, near Berlin, Germany Application December 2, 1933, Serial No. 700,710

' In Germany December 8, 1932 4 Claims.

'Our invention relates to cigarettes, and 4it is an object of our invention to provide a cigarette with means for extinguishing its burning wrapper and tobacco ller, to prevent smouldering of dis- 5 carded cigarettes.

To this end, we treat a zone of the wrapper with a compound which contains an impregnating agent of non-combustion 'supporting properties and an amorphous, organic and liquidbinding substance. Y

The non-combustion-supporting agent must not soak the wrapper, butpenetrateonly for a portion of its thickness so that the non-penetrated portion remains flexible andthe paper does not become weak and brittle.

A suitable compound has the following composition, in per cent by weight:

Water glass (KzSiOa or NazSiOa) 49 Glycerine 1 20 starch 25 Tale 25 In this compolmd the waterglass is the noncombustion-supporting agent, and the starch 25 is the amorphous, organic and liquid-binding substance. The glycerine and talc are added for imparting ductility and resiliency to the Wrapper. We are not limited to a compound of exactly the above composition but may vary the com- 30 position as required. In particular, the percentage of starch must be regulated in conformity with the water content of the water glass. Such regulation is by no means dicult. A desideratum is that the fourth part of the compound 35` should be talc, and that 1% glycerine should be present. Therefore, the percentage of starch vshould be regulated so as to obtain a total percentage of 74 for the water glass and the starch. Preferably, the amorphous compound is ap- 40 plied to the wrapper of the cigarette by spraying. As mentioned, the water glass impregnates the wrapper without soaking it, i. e., it penetrates only for a portion of the wrappers thickness so that the balance of the wrapper remains flexible. 45 By these means, only a superficial layer of the wrapper is penetrated by the impregnating liquid. The starch in the compound absorbs any excess of water which might soak the Wrapper.

Any kind of starch may be used for the com- 50 pound but preferably it should be ne grained and pure White so that the layer of amorphous compound is invisible on the wrapper.

As a rule, the compound is applied to the inner side of the Wrapper, in the immediate vicinity of 55 its tobacco ller, but it may also be applied to and thereupon applying the outer side of the wrapper, or both to the inner and outer sides thereof. Even in the lastmentioned case, with impregnated zones at both sides of the wrapper, the impregnating liquid does not soak the paper of the wrapper but leaves an intermediate zone of unimpregnated paper, as has been found by microscopic investigation.

The amorphous compound may be applied to the wrapper in asingle operation and this is obviously preferable with respect to the manufacture of the cigarettes but we may also subdivide the operation into two stages by rst impregnating the wrapper, for instance, with water glass or alum, of such concentration that the impregnating agent will not soak the wrapper,

the amorphous compound to the impregnated zone of the wrapper.

Any other substances may be admixed to the amorphous compound in addition to those recited above, but under all conditions the compound should contain glycerine and talc, preferably in the proportions of l and respectively, as otherwise the Wrapper would not be as ductile and resilient as required. 25

A substance which is preferably admixed to the compound, is powdered metal or alloy, for instance, powdered bronze.

Oui' invention is performed with simple means and does not increase the cost of manufacture while on the other hand cigarettes which have been treated according to our invention, are superior to those which are on the market at present.

The smouldering of discarded cigarette ends is undesirable under all conditions, and often dangerous. Cigarettes smouldering in an ash tray are particularly unpleasant. Means for extinguishing discarded cigarette ends have already been proposed but they do not eliminate the drawback altogether, apart from the fact that they require the smokers attention.

It has been found that the smouldering of a cigarette is determined by the smouldering of its Wrapper. 'I'he glowing portions of the wrapper 45' creep and ignite the tobacco of the filler but this ignition is secondary, provided, of course, that the cigarette has been discarded, i. e., the smoking has been discontinued. Smouldering is therefore prevented by extinguishing the dame in the Wrapper.

It has already been proposed, as described in U. S. patent to Weil, No. 1,555,320, September 29, 1925, for Cigarette, to treat the paper of wrappers with a non-combustion supporting liquid but the use of an amorphous compound is nowhere disclosed, nor does the patentee limit the penetration oi the liquid into the wrapper.

'I'he said patentee also proposes to provide a band on the cigarette for extinguishing its wrapper but this is not desirable as the band shows and renders the lpaper of the wrapper less ductile and ilexible.

It has alsodleen proposed to prevent smouldering by provi ng a. layer on the wrapper, or by impregnating the wrapper.

A layer, in order to be effective, must be comparatively thick and it does not make a difierence in this respect whether it is on the inner or on the outer side of the wrapper. Such a thick layer, however, renders the wrapper less iiexible and this is particularly undesirable if the cigarettes are made mechanically.

Impregnation also involves certain diiliculties. Firstly, an impregnation which is expected to be effective by itself, cannot be obtained in a fraction of a second which is the time available for the impregnation in modern cigarette manufacture. Secondly, .an eective impregnation involves soaking of the wrapper throughout its thickness by which, as stated above, the exibility and strength of the paper are reduced too much.

Our invention eliminates these drawbacks by associating the impregnated material with the layer. Preferably, in a cigarette having a layer of an amorphous and non-combustion supporting substance for preventing smouldering, the irnpregnation involves only the surface layer of the wrapper to which the said amorphous vlayer sticks. By these means, as described, a portion of the paper is unchanged and so the strength of the paper is not reduced to such an extent that the paper might break, and on account of the impregnation the amorphous layer canbe comparatively thin.

A supercial impregnation of the wrapper in a cigarette, as described, and the subsequent coating with an amorphous and non-combustion supporting substance which may be metal powder, for instance, bronze powder, or may contain such powder; are effected without diiiiculty in up-todate cigarette manufacture.-

In the accompanying drawing, several adaptations of our invention are illustrated by way oi' example.

In the drawing Fig. 1'is a perspective illustration of a cigarette with an impregnated zone at one end which extends through to theendof thecigarette,

Fig. 2 is an axial section, much enlarged, showing a portion of the wrapper of a cigarette in which the impregnated zone and the amorphous layer are on the inner, and

Fig. 3 is a similar section of a wrapper in which the zone and the layer are on the outer side of the wrapper,

Fig. 4 is a similar section in which one zone and one layer are on the inner, and another zone and another layer are on the outer side of the Wrapper,

Fig. 5 shows a wrapper for the cigarette in Fig. l, spread out, and

Fig. 6 shows a wrapper, also spread out, for a cigarette in which the impregnated zone is spaced apart from the adjacent end.

Referring now to the drawing, and rst to Fig. 1, the cigarette comprises a wrapper'l, oi any suitable material, and a tobacco ller 2 in the wrapper. An impregnated zone i extends inwardly on the wrapper I from the rear end of the cigarette.

As mentioned. the impregnated zone i is preferably on the inner side of the wrapper, as il-` lustrated in Fig. 2. The compound containing 5 the amorphous substance and an impregnating liquid may be applied to the innerside of the wrapper in a single operation, or the impregnating liquid may be applied rst, and the amorphous compound is then applied to the impregnated portion of the wrapper. Under all conditions, however, the impregnating liquid, for instance, water glass or alum, should be of such concentration that `it will not penetrate beyond a given depth, as indicated by the more closely l5 shaded rectangle 3, and that a portion of the paper in the wrapper conserves its exibility and strength, properties which are obviously deteriorated in the impregnated portion 3. l is the amorphous layer on the impregnated zone.

Fig. 3 shows the impregnated zone on the outer side of the wrapper I. Otherwise. this section is quite similar to that in Fig. 2.

Referring to Fig.y 4, the inner impregnated zone il, with the impregnated portion 3 and the 25 layer 4 of amorphous substance, is combined with an outer impregnated zone it which includes the impregnated portion 33 and the layer 44. It will appear that the paper Yof the Wrapper I is not soaked throughout but has an unimpregnated 3 section-between the portions 3 and 33.

Fig. 5 shows the wrapper I for the cigarettes in Figs. 1 to 4, all of which have the impregnated zones i (or i1 and i0) extending as far as the rear end of the cigarette.

Fig. 6 shows a wrapper for a cigarette whose impregnated zone I is spaced apart from the rear end of the cigarette. This zone has been shown narrower than the zone (or ii and is) only by way of example. Obviously it might be as wide .as i, ori might be as narrow as I, as desired orv required.

Our invention also relates to the method of applying the compound to the wrapper. This is eiected by spraying the compound onto the wrapper. As compared with the usual method of pasting a band to the wrapper which may be saidv to be of a physico-chemical character, the spraying method is essentially mechanical and by regulating the spraying pressure the adhesion of the 50 compound to the wrapper, and the depth to which Y the impregnating liquid penetrates into the wrapper, can be regulate We claim:

1. A cigarette comprising a wrapper, a tobacco iiller, and a zone in said wrapper impregnated with a compound which contains water glass, glycerine, starch and talc.

2. A cigarette comprising a wrapper, a tobacco ller, and a zone in said wrapper impregnated 60 with a compound which contains water glass, glycerine, starch and talc, the last-mentioned constituent making up one-fourth of the compound.

3. A cigarette comprising a wrapper, a Vtobacco e5',

filler, and a zone in said wrapper impregnated with a compound which contains water glass,- glycerine, starch whose percentage is determined. by the water content of the water glass, and talc.

4. A cigarette comprising a wrapper, a tobacco

Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US2666437 *10 Jun 195019 Ene 1954Alphonse LattofCigarette extinguisher
US2718889 *13 Nov 195127 Sep 1955Claussen Wells HHeat absorbing and transferring band for cigarettes
US2976190 *27 May 195721 Mar 1961Meyer Louis CCigarettes
US3183914 *24 Ene 196218 May 1965Charles C CohnCigarette
US3632384 *2 Jul 19684 Ene 1972Saint Pastou JosephMethod of making cigarette paper with ash-retaining means
US3977416 *18 Sep 197431 Ago 1976Minoru AkibaCigarette with a snuffer
US4187862 *17 Jul 197812 Feb 1980Cohn Charles CTreatment of cigarette paper
US4452259 *10 Jul 19815 Jun 1984Loews Theatres, Inc.Smoking articles having a reduced free burn time
US4615345 *11 Jul 19847 Oct 1986Kimberly-Clark CorporationNonflammable cellulose web loith burn promoted zones
US4805644 *30 Jun 198621 Feb 1989Kimberly-Clark CorporationInorganic fillers, burn modifier sodium and potassium salts of organic and inorganic acids
US5191906 *23 Mar 19929 Mar 1993Philip Morris IncorporatedProcess for making wrappers for smoking articles which modify the burn rate of the smoking article
US5474095 *6 Abr 199412 Dic 1995Philip Morris IncorporatedPaper having crossdirectional regions of variable basis weight
US5878753 *11 Mar 19979 Mar 1999Schweitzer-Mauduit International, Inc.A wrapper for cigerettes which promotes a self-extinguishing of cigerettes when dropped or left unattended on a flammable substrate; maintaining the taste
US5878754 *10 Mar 19979 Mar 1999Schweitzer-Mauduit International, Inc.A wrapper for cigerettes which promotes a self-extinguishing of cigerettes when dropped or left unattended on a flammable substrate
US685446927 Jun 200115 Feb 2005Lloyd Harmon HancockMethod for producing a reduced ignition propensity smoking article
US692901325 Nov 200216 Ago 2005R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Companyincorporate at least one fibrous material (e.g., flax fibers, hardwood pulp fibers and/or softwood pulp fibers), filler material (e.g., calcium carbonate ) in particulate form, ethyl cellulose, ethylene-vinyl acetate coating; controlled burn
US697649325 Nov 200220 Dic 2005R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Companya multilayered cigarette wrapper; a patterned base sheet, multiple filler layers and an overcoat layer
US699719025 Nov 200214 Feb 2006R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyWrapping materials for smoking articles
US704798216 May 200323 May 2006R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyMethod for registering pattern location on cigarette wrapping material
US707351420 Dic 200211 Jul 2006R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyUseful for applying an additive material to desired locations of wrapping materials of cigarettes in an efficient, effective and desired manner; automatic
US707714520 Dic 200218 Jul 2006R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyEquipment and methods for manufacturing cigarettes
US711787120 Dic 200210 Oct 2006R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyMethods for manufacturing cigarettes
US719501920 Dic 200227 Mar 2007R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyEquipment for manufacturing cigarettes
US72344719 Oct 200326 Jun 2007R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette and wrapping materials therefor
US723755915 Oct 20033 Jul 2007R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyWrapping materials for smoking articles
US727554822 Ago 20032 Oct 2007R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyEquipment for manufacturing cigarettes
US727554920 Dic 20022 Oct 2007R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyGarniture web control
US727612016 May 20032 Oct 2007R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyMaterials and methods for manufacturing cigarettes
US728154022 Ago 200316 Oct 2007R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyEquipment and methods for manufacturing cigarettes
US73639299 Oct 200329 Abr 2008R.J. Reynolds Tabacco CompanyMaterials, equipment and methods for manufacturing cigarettes
US744839016 May 200311 Nov 2008R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyEquipment and methods for manufacturing cigarettes
US767725613 Sep 200516 Mar 2010R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyWrapping materials for smoking articles
US777521719 May 200617 Ago 2010R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyMethods and apparatus for manufacturing cigarettes
US833766430 Dic 200825 Dic 2012Philip Morris Usa Inc.Method and apparatus for making slit-banded wrapper using moving orifices
US870168230 Jul 200922 Abr 2014Philip Morris Usa Inc.Banded paper, smoking article and method
US87079674 Mar 201129 Abr 2014Philip Morris Usa Inc.Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US873337017 Ago 201127 May 2014Philip Morris Usa Inc.Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
US883337717 Ago 201116 Sep 2014Philip Morris Usa Inc.Banded papers, smoking articles and methods
WO1981002243A1 *7 Feb 198020 Ago 1981C CohnTreatment of cigarette paper
WO1986006591A1 *30 Sep 198520 Nov 1986Vladimir SirotaMethod of manufacturing a small cigar, cigarette and the like, and small cigar, cigarette and the like made thereby
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.131/349
Clasificación internacionalA24D1/00, A24D1/10
Clasificación cooperativaA24D1/10
Clasificación europeaA24D1/10