Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS2147197 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación14 Feb 1939
Fecha de presentación25 Nov 1936
Fecha de prioridad25 Nov 1936
Número de publicaciónUS 2147197 A, US 2147197A, US-A-2147197, US2147197 A, US2147197A
InventoresAlfred A Glidden
Cesionario originalHood Rubber Co Inc
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Article of footwear
US 2147197 A
Imágenes(2)
Previous page
Next page
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

Feb. 14, 1939.

A. A. GLIDDEN ARTICLE OF FOOTWEAR Filed Nov. 25, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet l wad Feb. 14, 1939.

A. A. GLIDDEN ARTICLE OF FOOTWEAR Filed Nov. 25, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 J27 52-7525 i/faed Patented Feb. 14, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ARTICLE OF FOOTWEAR Alfred A. Glidden, Water-town, Mala. asslgnor to Hood Rubber Company, Inc., Water-to This invention relates to articles of footwear and to methods of making the same, and is especially useful in the manufacture of shoes having textile uppers. Heretofore shoes for use in playing athletic games and for similar purposes, sometimes called sneakers or tennis shoes, have been manufactured from substantially nonstretchable canvas or similar woven material. It has been the practice to construct the uppers with a fabric lining attached to the upper by an intervening layer of rubber. In the manufacture of such shoes 9. great amount of waste has been involved in the cutting of the fabric parts, and due to the substantially nonstretchable nature of the textile material comprising the upper dimculty has been experienced in providing the proper shape to such shoes. The resulting shoes are of such a nonabsorbent nature and so impervious to moisture that discomfort has been caused to the wearer by perspiration. The woven materials which have been used in the uppers of such shoes are subject to objectionable shrinkage from repeated wetting and drying, adding further discomfort to the wearer.

The principal objects of the present invention are to provide comfort, stretchability. light weight, breathability and absorption properties in an article of footwear and to provide for economy of materials and convenience of procedure in the manufacture of the same. Other objects will appear from the following description and the accompanying drawings.

0f the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a shoe embodying and made in accordance with the invention, part of the rubber being broken away.

Fig. 2 is a detailed cross sectional view taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the shoe of Fig. 1 during a stage of its manufacture, the parts of the shoe being partially assembled upon a last.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the invention in its completed form.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view of a portion of the upper margin of a shoe illustrating a further embodiment in which an overcast stitching is applied to the margin.

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a further embodiment of the invention in which the elastic textile upper is removable from the remainder of the shoe.

Fig. 7 is a perspective view illustrating the building of the rubber portions of the shoe of Fig. 6 upon a last, the rubber portion of the shoe being shown as partially completed.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a further embodiment of the invention in its completed form.

Referring to the drawings, the invention contemplates the construction "of an article of footwear in which an upper of extensible and elastic textile material, such, for example, as knited material, and of such extent as to form the complete upper including the insole, is fabricated without substantial waste to the desired shape to accommodate the foot without uncomfortable wrlngles. A reinforcing structure, preferably of rubber is provided on the, outer face of the upper in formfitting contact therewith without wrinkling or buckling of either of the parts, while preferably leaving extensive portions of the textile upper exposed to provide breathability and facility of flexing,

Referring to the drawings:

In proceeding according to the method of this inventiona complete and integral, extensible and elastic, unlined shoe upper it is formed, preferably by knitting, to final form and without waste, of yarn which may be of any suitable material, such for example, as cotton, wool, combinations of cotton and wool, animal fibers such as mohair, alpaca. cellulose filaments such as rayon, cellulose acetate or the like, vegetable fibers such as jute, sisal, hemp or especially prepared fibers such as combinations of rayon,

shredded leather held together by resinous bodies,

natural or artificial dispersions of rubber or other agglutinous material.

Infabricating the unitary upper, as by knitting, areas thereof which are normally subjected to greater wear and in which a lower degree of elasticity is desired, such as the toe l I and the heel portion It, may be more densely fabricated to provide therein heavier weight and less extensibility than in the other parts of the upper, as by changing the type of stitch or amount or thickness of the yarn in the knitting. Other areas, such as the ankle portion ii, are preferably made so as to provide softness and elasticity, as by making them of ribbed construction, as shown.

In the embodiment of Fig. 1 the entire upper, preferably including the insole, is fabricated as an integral, shaped, sock-like article although in some cases the insole portion may be omitted, if that is desired. In any event the complete article preferably is formed as nearly to the shape of the last on which the shoe is to be built as possible. The fabricated upper is slipped over the building last and the remaining parts of the shoe are assembled thereon and attached in formfitting relation either by adhesion or .by sewing operations. The upper may be wetted either before or after being applied to the last and then dried on the last in order to more closely conform it to the shape of the last.

In order to provide good ventilation and comfort it is desirable to leave as much of the elastic upper exposed as possible and all of the trimming pieces are reduced to a minimum. In the embodiment of Fig. 1, after the upper has been applied to the last, the parts, preferably of rubber including a counter l4, heel reinforcement l8, outsole I1 and a blucher saddle l8 having an integral heel strap I9, which encircles the rear of the shoe, are mounted in place upon the upper as illustrated in Fig. 3, and may be cemented thereto in the places where it is desired to attach the parts to the upper, and a foxing 20 is preferably applied around the lower portion of the shoe 'where it Joins the outer sole. A filler or reinforcing layer 15, preferably of thin, rubberized fabric, may be provided to facilitate assembly and to provide a stronger union of the outsole to the textile upper and to provide greater smoothness of the inner sole bottom. The article is then vulcanized preferably while on the last and then removed therefrom. The eyelets |8a for receiving the shoe lace I8b may be applied to the margins of the blucher saddle 18 after vulcanization. The blucher saddle is permanently attached to the upper only at or near the sole leaving the eyeleted portion free. While rubber is the preferred material, some or all the parts applied to'the upper in this and the other embodiments may in some cases be of any other suitable material, such as fabric, or natural or artificial leather. Where rubber is used, it may be unreinforced, or it may be reinforced, as by fabric, if desired. 1

In the embodiment of Fig. 4 the front of the upper has reinforcing stays 2| secured, thereto, as by cementing or stitching, over the instep and extending to the top of the shoe, and the upper may be slit as at 22, preferably after vulcanization, to provide a vent extending from the top of the shoe to the instep in a forward direction, the stays being provided with eyelets 23 for lacing. A tongue 24 also may be provided. In some cases the tongue 24 and the slit 22 may be omitted, the stays being retained, however, to permit lacing, and for bracing. A strap 25 may be provided, extending around the back of the foot and secured at its ends to the stays. As shown, the shoe may be of the low type with the strap 25 extending along the top margin of the upper.

Where the cutting of the textile upper, to provide the slit 22, or for any other purpose, leaves a raw textile edge which might ravel or fray, the edges may be protected, as by an overcast stitch 26, as illustrated in Fig. 5, where the stitch is shown as extending not only along the margins of the slit, but also along the top margin of the upper at the leg opening.

Other modifications of the invention, in which the rubber portion of the shoe may be detachable from the textile upper to facilitate washing the upper, are illustrated in Figs. 6, '7 and 8.

In the embodiment of Figs. 6 and 7, the lower portion of the textile upper 21 is embraced by an integral rubber covering 28 having no lacings or other fastening means, but provided with a sole 25 and formed with ventilating and expansion-facilitating openings 30 which expose the textile upper.

Whether or not the rubber portion 28 is to be attached to the upper it is preferably built upon the textile upper while the latter is upon a last, as in the building of the embodiments shown in Figs. 1 and 4, or a last which corresponds in dimension and shape with the outside of the lasted textileupper 21 may be constructed, and the rubber portion may be assembled thereabout and vulcanized thereon, as illustrated in Fig. 7, in which a perforated sheet of material 28 is shown as being laid about the last 3|, and the sole 29 is laid thereon in adhesive engagement with the sheet 28. A filler or reinforcing layer 28a, like I5 of Fig. 3, may beprovided if desired, to facilitate uniting the sole 29 to the part 28 and to provide a smooth inner bottom. The vulcanized article will have the same inside dimensions and shape as the textile upper 21 and the two may be assembled without wrinkling of the upper or objectionable localized stretching of either of the parts. If desired, the rubber part 28 may then be cemented to the textile upper over all or a part of their contacting surfaces.

The embodiment ofFig. 8 may be constructed in similar manner. Here a sole 32 is provided with a counter 33, toe cap 34, heel straps 35, and sole straps 36, united to each other. This rubber structure may be assembled either upon a last having the textile upper 31 thereon, or upon a last formed to the same outside dimensions and shape as the outside of the lasted upper 31, and vulcanized thereon. If the rubber portion has been formed without the use of the I textile upper, the upper is then placed therein. Eyelets 38 and a lacing 39 are provided for securing the shoe on the foot. In this embodiment, also, the upper may be either removable or cemented or otherwise attached in place over at least a portion of the area of contact with the rubber parts.

An article of footwear constructed according to the invention has decided advantages over articles of footwear heretofore produced. Because of the unlined, absorbent nature of the upper perspiration is readily absorbed and evaporated from the foot. The high porosity of the upper provides good ventilation, and the flexibility of the upper and its inherent elasticity provide a degree of comfort comparable to wearing well fitted socks without shoes, while the outsole, which may be of any desired type and may be of crepe soling or may be molded to provide any desired anti-skid surface, provides adequate traction and protects the feet in walking. Where the foxing 20 is extended for a substantial distance above the sole the shoe may be used upon wet floors without wetting the feet. Comfort to the wearer is contributed to in a large measure by the fact that the outer parts of the shoe, whether attached to the upper or not, are built to fit each other so that the shoe will fit the wearer without wrinkles or other undesirable non-foot-conforming malformations.

Since the entire upper of the shoe, including the insole, preferably is formed of continuous elastic textile material, such shoes may be worn directly over the feet without the use of stockings or socks. The stretchability of the upper, especially when an upwardly-extending, flexible rubber sole and foxing are provided, permits the elimination of half sizes and makes it easier to provide a good fit.

I claim:

1. A shoe having an upper of porous elastic material providing an elastic top portion, a less flexible midportion and substantially less flexible portions at the lower margin of its sides andat its toe and heel, a sole on said upper and a bracing structure secured to the sole and extending over the instep portion of the upper to restrain the upper from being excessively stretched, the bracing structure covering only a portion of the upper thereby leaving extensive ventilating area of the latter exposed.

2. A shoe having an upper of knitted material providing elasticity and ventilating porosity by virtue of the knitted construction, a sole on the upper, and a bracing structure secured to the sole and extending over the instep portion of the upper to restrain the upper from being excessively stretched, the bracing structure covering only a portion of the upper thereby leaving extensive ventilating area of the latter exposed and said upper having in the foot portion below the ankle a plurality of zones of knitted material of difierent degrees of stiflness merged integrally by knitted union with one another to provide localized reinforcement of the knitted material acting in cooperation with said bracing structure to resist excessive localized stretching while providing portion of said bracing structure a zone of increased density of knitting merging with a zone of the knitted material of less dense knitting spaced from the bracing structure to provide local reinforcement of the knitted material at the margin of the bracing structure against excessive localized stretching.

4. A shoe having an upperof such knitted construction as to provide an elastic top portion, a less flexible midportion and a substantially less flexible lower portion, the upper being porous for ventilation by virtue of the knitted construction, a sole on the upper, and a bracing structure secured to the sole and extending over the instep portion of the upper to restrain the knitted upper from, being excessively stretched, the bracing structure covering only a portion of the upper thereby leaving extensive ventilating area of the latter exposed.

5. A shoe having a sock-like upper of such knitted construction as to provide an elastic top portion, a less flexible midportion, and substantially less flexible portions at the lower margin of its sides and at its toe and heel, a sole essentially of rubber adhered to the upper and a bracing structure essentially of rubber for restraining the upper from being excessively stretched, said structure comprising a portion adhered to the sole and extending over the instep of the upper and a portion adhered to the sole at the heel and extending forwardly around the upper. the bracing structure covering only a portion of the upper thereby leaving extensive ventilating area of the latter exposed.

ALFRED A. GLIDDEN.

Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US2467237 *18 Mar 194612 Abr 1949Mishawaka RubberMethod of making boots from knitted tubular stock
US2495984 *25 Nov 194731 Ene 1950Roy Edna MSole with detachable upper
US2538673 *19 Jul 194916 Ene 1951Donahue Paul AnsleyFootwear
US2581728 *17 Nov 19508 Ene 1952Connecticut Footwear IncRetainer-welt slipper sock
US2586045 *23 Jun 195019 Feb 1952Hoza JohnSock-type footwear
US2636287 *7 Jun 195028 Abr 1953Perry Knitting Company IncStretchable foot covering
US2659911 *29 Dic 195124 Nov 1953Connecticut Footwear IncMethod of producing retainer-welt slipper socks
US2675631 *13 Feb 195120 Abr 1954Doughty John CarrFootwear article of the slipper-sock type
US3035291 *5 Mar 195822 May 1962Cambridge Rubber CoMethod of making footwear having waterproof soles
US3193948 *22 Abr 196313 Jul 1965Dunlop Rubber CoFootwear
US3925912 *31 Jul 197416 Dic 1975Lawrence Peska Ass IncVentilated boot
US4134955 *9 Feb 197716 Ene 1979Air IndustriesInjection molding footwear
US4255876 *31 May 197917 Mar 1981Brs, Inc.Athletic shoe having an upper toe section of stretchable material, external reinforcing strips and improved lacing
US4438574 *26 Mar 198227 Mar 1984Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with two-piece upper forepart section
US4447967 *24 Mar 198215 May 1984Nouva Zarine S.P.A. Construzione Macchine E Stampi Per CalzatureShoe with its vamp zonally covered with injected plastics material securely bonded to the fabric
US4736531 *13 Abr 198712 Abr 1988Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Athletic shoe for aerobic exercise and the like
US5086576 *29 May 199011 Feb 1992Lamson Donald WBicycle shoe
US5243772 *13 Mar 199214 Sep 1993Converse Inc.Shoe with external shell
US5319866 *21 Ago 199114 Jun 1994Reebok International Ltd.Composite arch member
US5319869 *13 Dic 199114 Jun 1994Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe including a heel strap
US5339544 *7 Sep 199323 Ago 1994Lotto S.P.A.Footgear structure
US5343638 *23 Ago 19936 Sep 1994Reebok International Ltd.Upper for an athletic shoe and method for manufacturing the same
US5377430 *17 Sep 19933 Ene 1995Nike, Inc.Shoe with elastic closure system
US5430960 *25 Oct 199311 Jul 1995Richardson; Willie C.Lightweight athletic shoe with foot and ankle support systems
US5495684 *1 Mar 19945 Mar 1996Alsa GmbhShoe with attached legging for use in a clean room
US5533279 *6 Jun 19959 Jul 1996Asics CorporationShoe having a skelton-shaped outer carapace
US5551172 *26 Abr 19953 Sep 1996Yu; Simon S. C.Ventilation structure for a shoe
US5566475 *4 Nov 199422 Oct 1996Salomon S.A.Sports boot having at least a partially elastic lining
US5586398 *13 Oct 199524 Dic 1996Carlson; J. MartinArticle of footwear for more efficient running
US5604997 *24 Feb 199525 Feb 1997Nike, Inc.Shoe upper and method of making same
US5678329 *3 Abr 199621 Oct 1997Wilson Sporting Goods Co.Athletic shoe with midsole side support
US5692319 *7 Jun 19952 Dic 1997Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with 360° wrap fit closure system
US5692320 *1 Jun 19952 Dic 1997K-Swiss Inc.Shock absorbing lacing system for a shoe
US5896608 *7 Mar 199727 Abr 1999Whatley; Ian H.Footwear lasting component
US5926976 *12 Jun 199727 Jul 1999Salomon S.A.Sport boot
US5940990 *19 Jun 199624 Ago 1999Salomon S.A.Shoe with an at least partially elastic lining and volume adjusting system
US6029376 *23 Dic 199829 Feb 2000Nike, Inc.Article of footwear
US6076284 *6 Nov 199520 Jun 2000Ballet Makers, Inc.Shoe with split sole and mid-section reinforcement
US6115941 *7 Jun 199512 Sep 2000Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe with naturally contoured sole
US6115945 *3 Dic 199312 Sep 2000Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures with deformation sipes
US62372511 Oct 199929 May 2001Reebok International Ltd.Athletic shoe construction
US630843913 Dic 200030 Oct 2001Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US63146629 Mar 200013 Nov 2001Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US636045330 May 199526 Mar 2002Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plan
US63671696 May 19999 Abr 2002Salomon S.A.Shoe having an at least partially elastic lining and volume adjusting system
US64877957 Jun 19953 Dic 2002Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US655727413 Abr 20016 May 2003Paul E. LitchfieldAthletic shoe construction
US6584706 *18 Mar 19931 Jul 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US659151919 Jul 200115 Jul 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US66293767 Jun 19957 Oct 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with a concavely rounded sole portion
US666247012 Oct 200116 Dic 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
US666847020 Jul 200130 Dic 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US66754987 Jun 199513 Ene 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US667549912 Oct 200113 Ene 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US670842428 Ago 200023 Mar 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe with naturally contoured sole
US672904612 Oct 20014 May 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US67486746 Nov 200215 Jun 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US676361622 Ago 200120 Jul 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US67859852 Jul 20027 Sep 2004Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US67893315 Jun 199514 Sep 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
US6810606 *23 Ene 19952 Nov 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures incorporating a contoured side
US691028818 Dic 200228 Jun 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear incorporating a textile with fusible filaments and fibers
US691819726 Sep 200219 Jul 2005Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6931762 *18 Dic 200223 Ago 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear with knit upper and method of manufacturing the footwear
US698626930 Dic 200417 Ene 2006Nike, Inc.Footwear with knit upper and method of manufacturing the footwear
US69883294 Mar 200524 Ene 2006Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US704766824 Jul 200323 May 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having an upper with a polymer layer
US70476702 Jul 200323 May 2006Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US70826977 Jun 20041 Ago 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US7082703 *30 Ene 20041 Ago 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear for sand sports
US70933798 Nov 200222 Ago 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US712783411 Abr 200331 Oct 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US7131296 *17 Ene 20067 Nov 2006Nike, Inc.Footwear with knit upper and method of manufacturing the footwear
US715262524 May 200426 Dic 2006Reebok International Ltd.Combination check valve and release valve
US7168184 *12 Abr 200130 Ene 2007Kit Shoe LimitedShoes
US716818522 Oct 200330 Ene 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
US717465816 May 200513 Feb 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US723424922 Nov 200426 Jun 2007Anatomic Reseach, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US727844512 Jul 20049 Oct 2007Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US728734119 Ago 200430 Oct 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US733435612 Jul 200526 Feb 2008Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US733756028 Oct 20054 Mar 2008Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US734085129 Mar 200611 Mar 2008Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7347011 *3 Mar 200425 Mar 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US7350321 *22 May 20031 Abr 2008Adidas International Marketing B.V.Shoe upper and methods of manufacture
US7509756 *17 Jun 200531 Mar 2009Columbia Insurance CompanyBrace for a shoe
US751306712 Ene 20067 Abr 2009Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US754669923 Abr 200716 Jun 2009Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US7624517 *18 May 20061 Dic 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with saddle
US76370325 Jun 200629 Dic 2009Nike, Inc.Footwear structure with textile upper member
US764771031 Jul 200719 Ene 2010Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US77214654 Ene 200825 May 2010Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US773524111 Ene 200615 Jun 2010Reebok International, Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7784198 *26 Sep 200631 Ago 2010Roudebush Jacquelyn JArticle of footwear
US781025721 May 200712 Oct 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with removable upper
US7814598 *18 Feb 200819 Oct 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US788264821 Jun 20078 Feb 2011Nike, Inc.Footwear with laminated sole assembly
US802844023 Dic 20094 Oct 2011Nike, Inc.Footwear structure with textile upper member
US803762329 Jun 200618 Oct 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a fluid system
US804228810 Sep 201025 Oct 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US8056264 *31 Oct 200715 Nov 2011Mizuno CorporationUpper structure for a shoe
US814127621 Nov 200527 Mar 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with an internal flexibility slit, including for footwear
US8151489 *9 Abr 201010 Abr 2012Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US820535621 Nov 200526 Jun 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US82098838 Jul 20103 Jul 2012Robert Michael LydenCustom article of footwear and method of making the same
US8225530 *10 Nov 200624 Jul 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
US825614725 May 20074 Sep 2012Frampton E. EliisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US826674920 Sep 201118 Sep 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US829161818 May 200723 Oct 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US844847420 Feb 201228 May 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a knitted component with a tongue
US849029822 Sep 201123 Jul 2013Mizuno CorporationUpper structure for a shoe
US849029918 Dic 200823 Jul 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having an upper incorporating a knitted component
US849432416 May 201223 Jul 2013Frampton E. EllisWire cable for electronic devices, including a core surrounded by two layers configured to slide relative to each other
US851672110 Ene 201127 Ago 2013Saucony Ip Holdings LlcArticles of footwear
US852257715 Mar 20113 Sep 2013Nike, Inc.Combination feeder for a knitting machine
US856132324 Ene 201222 Oct 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear devices with an outer bladder and a foamed plastic internal structure separated by an internal flexibility sipe
US856709527 Abr 201229 Oct 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear or orthotic inserts with inner and outer bladders separated by an internal sipe including a media
US859034525 Ago 201126 Nov 2013Nike, Inc.Footwear structure with textile upper member
US85958782 Ago 20103 Dic 2013Nike, Inc.Method of lasting an article of footwear
US862189117 May 20127 Ene 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a knitted component with a tongue
US865091626 Jun 201218 Feb 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
US867024624 Feb 201211 Mar 2014Frampton E. EllisComputers including an undiced semiconductor wafer with Faraday Cages and internal flexibility sipes
US86776529 Mar 201225 Mar 2014Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US8701232 *5 Sep 201322 Abr 2014Nike, Inc.Method of forming an article of footwear incorporating a trimmed knitted upper
US873223022 Sep 201120 May 2014Frampton Erroll Ellis, IiiComputers and microchips with a side protected by an internal hardware firewall and an unprotected side connected to a network
US873286812 Feb 201327 May 2014Frampton E. EllisHelmet and/or a helmet liner with at least one internal flexibility sipe with an attachment to control and absorb the impact of torsional or shear forces
US87458957 Jun 201210 Jun 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
US874589620 May 201310 Jun 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having an upper incorporating a knitted component
US88001724 Abr 201112 Ago 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a knit upper with a polymer layer
US883953215 Mar 201123 Sep 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a knitted component
US20080028640 *1 Ago 20067 Feb 2008David LacorazzaAthletic shoe having a segmented upper
US20090126231 *6 Nov 200621 May 2009Oy Feelmax LtdFootwear Piece
US20120023783 *2 Ago 20102 Feb 2012Colt Carter NicholsCycling shoe
US20140059891 *28 Jun 20136 Mar 2014Chung-Kuang LinStructure of shoe
US20140130270 *17 Jul 201315 May 2014Nike, Inc.Article Of Footwear Incorporating A Knitted Component
US20140245547 *9 May 20144 Sep 2014Nike, Inc.Article Of Footwear Incorporating A Knitted Component
US20140245635 *9 May 20144 Sep 2014Nike, Inc.Article Of Footwear Incorporating A Knitted Component
CN101237788B14 Jul 200626 May 2010耐克国际有限公司Footwear structure with textile upper member
DE102012206062A113 Abr 201217 Oct 2013Adidas AgSchuhoberteil
EP0047710A1 *4 Sep 198117 Mar 1982François BellocqSports shoe
EP0651953A1 *15 Oct 199410 May 1995Salomon S.A.Sports shoe with an at least partially elastic lining
EP2649898A127 Mar 201316 Oct 2013adidas AGShoe upper
WO1995011604A1 *25 Oct 19944 May 1995Willie Charles RichardsonLightweight althletic shoe with foot and ankle support systems
WO1996033631A1 *19 Abr 199631 Oct 1996Simon Siu Chi YuVentilation structure for a shoe
WO2006070421A1 *31 Dic 20046 Jul 2006Madrisano CatinariBiodegradable shoe having natural anti-bacterial action
WO2007015806A2 *14 Jul 20068 Feb 2007Nike IncFootwear structure with textile upper member
WO2008063385A1 *5 Nov 200729 May 2008Nike IncArticle of footwear having a flat knit upper construction or other upper construction
WO2009058720A1 *27 Oct 20087 May 2009Keds CorpArticles of footwear
WO2014078159A2 *7 Nov 201322 May 2014Nike International Ltd.Article of footwear incorporating a knitted component
WO2014081679A1 *19 Nov 201330 May 2014Nike International Ltd.Footwear upper incorporating a knitted component with sock and tongue portions
WO2014081680A1 *19 Nov 201330 May 2014Nike International Ltd.Footwear upper incorporating a knitted component with collar and throat portions
WO2014134024A1 *25 Feb 20144 Sep 2014Nike International Ltd.Article of footwear with reinforced elastic upper
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.36/9.00R, D02/912, 36/45, 36/3.00A, 36/3.00R
Clasificación internacionalA43B1/02, A43B5/10
Clasificación cooperativaA43B1/02, A43B23/0235, A43B1/04, A43B5/10, A43C1/04
Clasificación europeaA43B1/04, A43B23/02B50, A43B1/02, A43B5/10, A43C1/04