Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS2155166 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación18 Abr 1939
Fecha de presentación1 Abr 1936
Fecha de prioridad1 Abr 1936
Número de publicaciónUS 2155166 A, US 2155166A, US-A-2155166, US2155166 A, US2155166A
InventoresKraft Herman T
Cesionario originalGen Tire & Rubber Co
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Tread surface for footwear
US 2155166 A
Resumen  disponible en
Imágenes(1)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

April 18, 1939.

H. T. KRAFT TREAD SURFACE FOR FOOTWEAR Filed April 1 1956 INVENTOR Herman T-Kraf't BY W 4 %6 ATTORNEYS Patented A r. 18,1939

PATENT OFFICE TREAD SURFACE FOR FOOTWEAR Herman T. Kraft, Akron, Ohio, assignor to The General Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio,

a. corporation of @hio Application April 1, 1936, Serial No. 72,020

Claims.

This invention relates to tread surfaces for footwear and particularly to soles and heels for footwear, and among itsobjects is the provision of new and improved soles and heels which will 5 have a maximum frictional contact with the floor or other surface, which will be extremely resilient and furnish a cushioning eifect for the wearer, and which will be simple in design, inexpensive to manufacture and of long wearing qualities.

Other objects will become apparent from a study of the specification and the drawing, in

' which:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a shoe embody- 115 ing the sole and heel construction of this inven- Fig. 3, of a modification of the sole conflguration of this invention;

Fig. 6 is a modification of a sole construction with the ribs or vanes concentric; and

Fig. 7 is a modification of a heel construction corresponding to the sole construction of Fig. 6.

Briefly, my invention is embodied in soles or heels of molded rubber in which a plurality of closely spaced parallel or concentric, flexible and elastic finlike ribs of materially greater depth than width are employed. While the ribs are individually relatively weakand flexible, they F are sufficient in number to carry the loads to which they are normally subjected without substantial distortion. The ribs, however, provide an elastic cushion between the body of the sole or heel and the ground surface, which will yield in any direction under frictional thrusts exerted on the ground engaging edges of the ribs. The rubber in the traction surface of the sole or heel is maintained soft and pliable under all conditions of load and this greatly increases the adhesion of the sole or heel to the surface walked upon. It is this greatly increased non-sldd capacity of the sole and heel that renders the invention particularly useful in connection with athletic shoes.

Referring to the drawing by numerals of reference, l0 designates the sole and II the heel respectively of a shoe I 2. In a preferred embodiment of my invention the sole II) has a plurality of ribs I! of finlikeconstruction, separated by narrow grooves, or spaces 20, giving the bottom of the shoe a deep fluted appearance.

As shown in Fig. 2 these ribs are generally parallel to one another and extend substantially the entire length of the sole. In order to obtain a maximum frictional effect combined with great resiliency, it is important that these ribs be of 5 substantially greater depth than thickness as shown in Figs. 3 and 5. Around the periphery of the sole is a binding strip it which may be formed integrally with the sole, as shown in the drawing, and the ribs l3 may be joined to it at their extremities. The body portion ii of the outer sole which is fastened to the upper margin I6 and inner sole ll may be of any suitable thickness suflicient to serve as a backing for the ribs l3 which are formed integrally thereon. The thinnerthe body portion I5 is constructed the more resilient and pliable the sole will be.

It is proposed to extend the binding strip it which, as pointed out above, may be formed integrally with the sole somewhat above the normal level of the body portion Ill so as to provide the sole with a recessed upper surface into which the vamp of the shoe may be fitted. This construction will give added strength to the shoe and aid in preventing the sole from tearing loose from the vamp.

The construction of the heel is similar to that of the sole. The ribs l3, however, are made considerably deeper than-in the sole so as to give added height to the shoe, and a corresponding increase should be made in their thickness so that they will not be too unstable.

In Fig. 5 I have shown a modification of a shoe sole embodying my invention corresponding to the cross-section of Fig. 3. In this modification the fins or ribs l3 are similar to those shown in Fig. 3 except that the ribs l8 lying in a cen-, tral portion of a shoe are substantially deeper than those, I9, lying in the peripheral portion of the shoe sole. I

In the'modification of my invention shown in Fig. 6 the ribs or fins l3 instead of running in straight lines the length of the sole are formed concentrically one within another. However, they are still substantially of greater depth than width and the spaces between such ribs are relatively the same as described above for straight ribs.

In Fig. 7 is shown a modification of. a heel structure embodying this invention but instead of the ribs being in substantially straight lines as shown in Fig. 2 they are formed concentrically to correspond with the modified sole shown in Fig. 6.

In the manufacture of soles and heels embodying this invention any material which is sufliciently pliable, resilient and wear resisting (such as rubber) may be used. It will be seen that because of the yieldability of the individual ribs, a resilient sole is provided which tends to conform to the configuration of the surface over which the wearer is walking.

In constructing footwear embodying the present invention it is desirable that the ribs B be of the proper height or depth and thickness with regard to the substance out of which they are formed so that when a normal person for whom that particular footwear may be designed is supported on the sole the ribs l3 will not beexcessively deformed.

However, the ribs should be sufiiciently thin and flexible to yield under severe frictional thrusts exerted upon their ground engaging edges such as will be exerted when the wearer jumps, stops or turns quickly, as in running upon a gymnasium floor. This yielding action of the ribs provides a cushion between the shoe sole and floor which allows an appreciable relative movement between the body of the sole and the floor engaging edges of the ribs before the force of impact is checked by the frictional action of the ribs on the floor, thus increasing the resistance of the sole to slippage on the floor surface and reducing the strain on the ankle and foot of the wearer.

As pointed out above, the ribs or flutes comprising the configuration on the outer sole of a shoe or other footwear embodying this invention are relatively unstable. This is because they are substantially deeper than they are wide, and when a pressure is applied at an angle to the vertical axis of one of these flutes such flutes will not offer a great resistance to being deform ed. The ribs, however, do not completely collapse because, as pointed out above, the adjacent ribs are relatively close together and mutually interact to support one another under deformation.

Since the ribs or flutes are relatively thin and resilient they are somewhat extensible longitudinally and when a force is applied along one edge, such as when the person wearing the footwear makes a sudden stop, they will tend to extend themselves longitudinally and take up the sudden shock of stopping.

The ability of a shoe constructed according to 1 the present invention to cushion and partially absorb thrusts suddenly applied to its friction surface results in superior resistance to slipping and, since there is less sliding of the shoe on ground surfaces and less abrasion on the bottom surface of the shoe, the shoe has superior wear ing ualities.

Although several embodiments of the invention have been herein shown and described, it will be understood that numerous modifications of the construction shown may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of this invention as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A shoe tread portion comprising an elongated, laterally stable, binding strip that is continuous along" the periphery of said shoe tread portion, and a group of parallel, longitudinally extending, flexible flnlike ribs disposed within said peripherally extending binding strip, each of said flexible ribs being separated from each other by grooves and having flat, substantially parallel sides and being of materially greater depth than width and being laterally unstable and being disposed sufficiently close to each other to provide mutual support under compression and thrust.

2. A rubber shoe tread having a tread body provided with a normally convex road-engaging face having substantially thruout its width and length narrow, closely spaced ribs whichare longitudinally continuous, and which are substantially parallel and spaced by narrow rela-. tively deep, substantially parallel-sided grooves, said ribs being individually weak, elastic and flexible, but suflicient in number and in inter-supporting engagement to carry the weight of normal loads without substantial distortion, said ribs under load being normally straight but being capable of stretching and bowing to serpentive form when subjected to frictional thrusts directed longitudinally of said ribs.

3. A shoe tread of rubber comprising a body portion, a series of closely spaced substantially parallel resilient ribs formed integrally therewith, the ribs being of materially greater depth than thickness and separated from one another by grooves of less width than the effective width of the ribs, and a binding strip substantially continuous about the tread periphery, said binding strip having a ground-engaging edge substantially planar and flush with the ground-engaging edges of the ribs.

4. A shoe tread of rubber comprising a body portion, a series of closely spaced substantially parallel resilient ribs formed integrally therewith, the ribs being of materially greater depth than thickness and separated from one another by grooves of less width than the effective width of the ribs, a binding strip substantially continuous about the tread periphery and having a ground-engaging edge substantiallyflush with the ground-engaging edges of the ribs, and the ends of the ribs integrally secured into the side of the binding strip to reinforce the strip and the ribs.

5. A shoe tread of rubber comprising a body portion, a series of closely spaced substantially parallel resilient ribs formed integrally there- "with, the ribs being of materially greater depth than thickness and separated from one another by grooves of less width than the efiective width of the ribs, a binding strip substantially continuous about the tread periphery and having a ground-engaging edge substantially flush with the ground-engaging edges of the ribs, and the ends of the ribs integrally secured into the side of the binding strip to reinforce the strip and the ribs, the binding strip extending above the upper margin of the body portion to provide a peripheral band for attaching the tread to a shoe upper.

HERMAN T. KRAFT.

Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3114981 *18 May 196224 Dic 1963Murawski Stephen AMolded shoe
US3947979 *23 Ago 19716 Abr 1976The B. F. Goodrich CompanyMud resistant elastomer
US4624062 *17 Jun 198525 Nov 1986Autry Industries, Inc.Sole with cushioning and braking spiroidal contact surfaces
US4777738 *12 Ago 198618 Oct 1988The Stride Rite CorporationSlip-resistant sole
US5384973 *11 Dic 199231 Ene 1995Nike, Inc.Sole with articulated forefoot
US5425184 *29 Mar 199320 Jun 1995Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US5625964 *7 Jun 19956 May 1997Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US5784808 *17 Sep 199628 Jul 1998Hockerson; StanIndependent impact suspension athletic shoe
US5909948 *4 Abr 19948 Jun 1999Ellis, Iii; Frampton E.Shoe sole structures
US6055746 *5 May 19972 May 2000Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US6115945 *3 Dic 199312 Sep 2000Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures with deformation sipes
US6295744 *15 Feb 19952 Oct 2001Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US630843913 Dic 200030 Oct 2001Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US63146629 Mar 200013 Nov 2001Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US636045330 May 199526 Mar 2002Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plan
US6487795 *7 Jun 19953 Dic 2002Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6516541 *29 Dic 199911 Feb 2003Bcny International, Inc.Flexible shoe sole and methods of construction for a shoe utilizing the sole
US657488912 Feb 200110 Jun 2003M. Bruce CagnerFlexible shoe sole
US659151919 Jul 200115 Jul 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US66093123 Dic 199326 Ago 2003Anatomic Research Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US666247012 Oct 200116 Dic 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
US666847020 Jul 200130 Dic 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US66754987 Jun 199513 Ene 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US667549912 Oct 200113 Ene 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US670842428 Ago 200023 Mar 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe with naturally contoured sole
US672904612 Oct 20014 May 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US67486746 Nov 200215 Jun 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US676361622 Ago 200120 Jul 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US67893315 Jun 199514 Sep 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
US6860037 *23 Oct 20031 Mar 2005 Desert boot outsole
US687725413 Nov 200212 Abr 2005Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US691819726 Sep 200219 Jul 2005Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6990755 *9 Oct 200331 Ene 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US70826977 Jun 20041 Ago 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US70933798 Nov 200222 Ago 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US712783411 Abr 200331 Oct 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US716818522 Oct 200330 Ene 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
US716819018 Jul 200230 Ene 2007Reebok International Ltd.Collapsible shoe
US71717677 Nov 20056 Feb 2007Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US717465816 May 200513 Feb 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US728734119 Ago 200430 Oct 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US72903571 Abr 20056 Nov 2007Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with an articulated sole structure
US733435612 Jul 200526 Feb 2008Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US739260518 Dic 20061 Jul 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US754669923 Abr 200716 Jun 2009Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US755585124 Ene 20067 Jul 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a fluid-filled chamber with flexion zones
US76072419 Oct 200727 Oct 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with an articulated sole structure
US763703519 Ene 200729 Dic 2009Reebok International Ltd.Collapsible shoe
US764771031 Jul 200719 Ene 2010Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US775277219 Sep 200613 Jul 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a fluid-filled chamber with flexion zones
US794194113 Jul 200717 May 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating foam-filled elements and methods for manufacturing the foam-filled elements
US802032028 Dic 200920 Sep 2011Reebok International Ltd.Collapsible shoe
US814127621 Nov 200527 Mar 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with an internal flexibility slit, including for footwear
US820535621 Nov 200526 Jun 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US825614725 May 20074 Sep 2012Frampton E. EliisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US829161818 May 200723 Oct 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US83038858 Sep 20056 Nov 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US8424223 *4 Feb 200823 Abr 2013Compagnie Generale Des Etablissements MichelinHigh-performance sports shoe
US849432416 May 201223 Jul 2013Frampton E. EllisWire cable for electronic devices, including a core surrounded by two layers configured to slide relative to each other
US850522131 Ago 201113 Ago 2013Reebok International LimitedCollapsible shoe
US856132324 Ene 201222 Oct 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear devices with an outer bladder and a foamed plastic internal structure separated by an internal flexibility sipe
US856709527 Abr 201229 Oct 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear or orthotic inserts with inner and outer bladders separated by an internal sipe including a media
US861312217 Feb 201124 Dic 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating foam-filled elements and methods for manufacturing the foam-filled elements
US867024624 Feb 201211 Mar 2014Frampton E. EllisComputers including an undiced semiconductor wafer with Faraday Cages and internal flexibility sipes
US873223022 Sep 201120 May 2014Frampton Erroll Ellis, IiiComputers and microchips with a side protected by an internal hardware firewall and an unprotected side connected to a network
US873286812 Feb 201327 May 2014Frampton E. EllisHelmet and/or a helmet liner with at least one internal flexibility sipe with an attachment to control and absorb the impact of torsional or shear forces
US20100170114 *4 Feb 20088 Jul 2010Societe De Technologie MichelinHigh-Performance Sports Shoe
CN100455227C8 Oct 200428 Ene 2009耐克国际有限公司Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
EP0206511A2 *19 May 198630 Dic 1986Autry Industries, IncSole with cushioning and braking spiroidal contact surfaces
EP1920670A1 *8 Oct 200414 May 2008NIKE International Ltd.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
EP2298103A1 *8 Oct 200423 Mar 2011Nike International LtdArticle of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
EP2298104A1 *8 Oct 200423 Mar 2011Nike International LtdArticle of footwear with articulated sole structure
EP2298105A1 *8 Oct 200423 Mar 2011Nike International LtdArticle of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
EP2298106A1 *8 Oct 200423 Mar 2011Nike International LtdArticle of footwear with articulated sole structure
EP2311341A1 *8 Oct 200420 Abr 2011Nike International LtdArticle of footwear with articulated sole structure
WO1991005491A1 *19 Oct 19902 May 1991Frampton E Ellis IiiShoe sole structures which are siped to provide natural deformation paralleling the foot
WO1991011924A1 *7 Feb 199122 Ago 1991Frampton E Ellis IiiShoe sole structures with deformation sipes
WO1991019429A1 *18 Jun 199126 Dic 1991Frampton E Ellis IiiShoe sole structures
WO1992007483A1 *5 Nov 199114 May 1992Frampton E Ellis IiiShoe sole structures
WO2005034670A2 *8 Oct 200421 Abr 2005Nike IncArticle of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.36/59.00C, D02/960, 36/32.00R
Clasificación internacionalA43B13/22, A43B13/14
Clasificación cooperativaA43B13/223
Clasificación europeaA43B13/22B