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Número de publicaciónUS2202984 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación4 Jun 1940
Fecha de presentación17 Mar 1939
Fecha de prioridad17 Mar 1939
Número de publicaciónUS 2202984 A, US 2202984A, US-A-2202984, US2202984 A, US2202984A
InventoresWilliam Drypolcher
Cesionario originalAbraham Obstfeld, Lou Obstfeld
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Staple remover
US 2202984 A
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

June 4, 1940. w. DRYPOLCHER.

STAPLE REMOVER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed larch 17, 1939 ZZZ-:13.

' INVENTOR ML L 714 ail P0161717? ATTORNEY Patented June 4, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE STAPLE REMOVED.

William Drypolcher, Valley Stream, N. Y.,

limo! to Lou Obltfeld, Brooklyn, N. Y., and

Abraham Obstfeld,

New York, N. Y.

Application March 17, 1939, Serial No. 282,332 23 Claims.v (Cl. 254-28) cutting of the staples themselves while attempting to remove the same. To fulfill these objects, I

have devised a tool which preliminarily bends.

thetop or crown of the staple downwardly at thecenter, thereby swinging the, clenched staple legs outwardly so that they may then be readily withdrawn from the stapled material. For this purpose, the tool comprises a pair of spaced lifting fingers or support prongs which are sharpened at their ends and so spaced that they may be inserted beneath the crown-of the staple. The tool further comprises a staple bending finger which is disposed above the middle of the crown. When the tool is operated, these fingersiare relatively moved in different directions so that the bending finger bends the center of the crown downwardly between the lifting fingers. The resulting bending of the crown causes the staple legs to open, and the lifting movement of the spaced fingers serves to withdraw the opened legs from the stapled material.

Further objects of the invention are to design a tool in several specific forms each characterized by important advantages. In one such form the tool is made somewhat like a pair of pliers, with the aforesaid lifting and bending fingers secured to the jaws of the pliers. These fingers are preferably so mounted on the jaws as to be slightly yieldable. This avoids breakage in the event that the tool is operated too forcibly or too suddenly. Moreover, iteases the operation of the tool, for the handles may be squeezed together in one smooth continuous movement, yet the staple is removed with a rapid motion or snap when it has finally been deformed-to opened condition. To the operator, the tool appears to function with great ease and without any consciousness of the fact that considerable force is really being applied to the staple itself. The spaced support prongs are preferably provided with stops to limit the insertion of the prongs beneath the staple, thus preventing movement beyond the position for effective removal of the staple.

In another form of the invention,' the tool is provided with two oppositely movable pairs of prongs which slide beneath the staple when the handles of the tool are operated. The bending of the staple is accomplished by a special bending finger which moves transversely of the prongs against the top of the staple. The desired movement of the bending finger is readily obtained by the -provision of suitable linkage between the oppositely movable parts of the tool and the transversely movable bending finger.

Either form of tool may be used for all purposes, but the first mentioned form is especially 1o convenient for ordinary oiilce use where in most cases only a single staple need be removed, as

beneath the staple. The second mentioned tool is of particular convenience where many staples particularly from comparatable or work bench and to apply the tool in rapid succession to the various staples.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing, and other objects which will hereinafter appear, my

a s Fig. 1 1s a side elevation of a staple remover embodying features of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view thereof;

Figs. 3 through 6 are side elevations showing successive stages in the operation of the tool, 35 Fig. 3 showing the position of the parts when the lifting fingers are first inserted beneath a staple crown, Fig. 4 shows the relation of the parts as the tool begins to bend the crown of the staple, Fig. 5 shows a later stage in the operation of the 40 tool and also indicates the flexing of the spring mountings of the fingers, and 'Fig. 6 shows the relation of the parts when the staple has been withdrawn; and

Figs. 7 through 10 are explanatory of the oper- 45 ation of the tool, Fig. 7 showing the staple in normal clenched condition, Fig. 8 showing the insertion of the lifting fingers beneath the staple crown, Fig. 9 showing how the crown is bent to open the legs, and Fig. 10 showing the final con- 50 dition of the staple after it has been removed from the clenched material.

Fig. 11 is a side elevation of a modified tool;

Fig. 12 is a partially sectioned view taken approximately in the plane of the line I2-l2 of Fig. 11; and

Figs. l3, l4 and 15 are explanatory of the operation of the tool.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, the tool comprises spaced lifting fingers or support prongs l2 and a bending finger I4 disposed thereover and adapted for movement therebetween. The lifting fingers 12 are preferably pointed or sharpened with a chisel edge at the tips, as is indicated at IS in Fig. 1. Moreover, they preferably converge slightly when viewed in plan, this being indicated at IS in Fig. 2. The spacing of the lifting fingers I2 is such that they may be inserted between the legs of the staple, and the sharpened convergent tips of the fingers facilitate insertion of the fingers beneath the crown of an already clenched staple.

The operating principle of this staple remove. may be explained with reference to Figs. 7 through 10. When the liftingfingers l2 are first inserted beneath the crown 20 of the staple, the staple changes from the condition shown in Fig. 7 to that shown in Fig. 8. Operation of the tool causes the lifting fingers l2 and the bending finger l4 to relatively move in opposite directions, the bending finger l4 being brought downwardly against the crown 20 of the staple and bending the same as shown in Fig. 9. This causes the legs 22 of the staple to spread or open out substantially as shown in the drawings. The opening of the legs brings them into a position favorable to easy withdrawal of the legs from the stapled material 24. Referring now to Fig. 10, continued operation of the tool brings i4 well below the lifting fingers i2, and the pressure of bending finger on the stapled material 24 results in an upward pull on the staple legs by the lifting fingers i2. The staple is thus withdrawn from the stapled material, and the staple is incidentally further deformed, substantially as shown in the drawmgs.

Reverting now to Figs. 1 and 2, the relative movement ofthe fingers i2 and I4 is here obtained by mounting the same on the jaws 30 and 32 of a plier-like tool 34. Jaw 30 is formed integrally with a handle 36, and jaw' 32 is formed integrally with a handle 38. The levers are crossed and pivoted at 40. The handles are normally spread apart by means of a suitable restoring spring. In the present case, a spring wire is coiled about the pin 40, as is shown at 42 (Fig. 2), and one end 44- is received within and bears against the upper handle 38, while the other end 46 is received within and bears against the lower handle 36. If desired, either end, in this case the end 46, may be extended and curled around to form a loop 48 which, if properly dimensioned, may be used to function as a yieldable stop between the handles, and which, in any event, facilitates hanging the tool on any convenient peg or projection.

The arms or levers of the pliers are preferably made of heavy gauge sheet metal which is bent to channel shape in order to stiffen and rigidify the same. The channeling at the handles is open inwardly, and this makes it possible to form the same with well-rounded surfaces which are comfortable to grasp when operating the tool. The channeling at the jaws opens outwardly. This desired result is readily obtained because of the crossing of the levers at the pivot pin 40. The horizontal or connecting wall of each channel lever is cut away in the region the bending finger ,with outwardly projecting l4 and staple crown 20 inserted through the if necessary, the fingers of pin 40, and the side walls of the channels may, if desired, be enlarged somewhat, as is indicated at 50, to receive the pin 40 and to provide a broad bearing surface between the walls of one channel received just inside the walls of the other channel, as is best shown in Fig. 2.

The lifting fingers l2 project from the lower jaw 32. More specifically, the lifting fingers are formed at one end of a preferably resilient strip of metal 52, which strip is received between the side walls 54 of jaw 22 and is secured against the top or connecting wall 56 of jaw 32, as by means of a screw 54 or rivet or other suitable fastening. Instead of securing the arm 52 rigidly to jaw 22, as by the use of several screws or rivets, I prefer to yieldably support arm 52 by means of a series of leaf springs 80, 02, 62, 84, and 66, these springs being progressively shorter in length, and the assembly forming a sturdy and stiff, yet somewhat yieldable, mounting for the fingers i2.

Similarly, the bending finger I4 is formed at the forward end of an arm 68 which fits between the side 10 of the upper jaw 30, and which is secured against the top of the horizontal connecting wall I2 of jaw III by means of screw I4, or like means. Here, again, the arm 88 might be secured rigidly to jaw 30, but is preferably yieldably mounted on jaw 30 by means of the progressively shortened cantilever or leaf spring elements I6, 18, 80, 82, and 84. These are all held by screw 14.

The lifting fingers l2 are preferably provided stops or lugs 86, best shown in Fig. 2. These limit the insertion of prongs i2 through the staple.

The operation of the tool has already been explained in connection with Figs. '7 through 10, but additional reference may now be made to Figs. 3- through 6 which show the parts in elevation. At the outset, the lifting fingers l2 are staple, as is indicated in Fig. 3. As the handles of the tool are squeezed together, the bending finger l4 reaches and begins to bend the crown of the staple, as is indicated in Fig. 4. Continued movement causes the bending finger l4 to bear downwardly against the top of the stapled material 24, and causes the'lifting fingers l2 to bear upwardly at the staple legs. The resulting bending and deformation of the staple requires considerable force, and,

may bend or flex relative to the jaws 30 and 32, as is indicated in broken lines in Fig. 5. Finally, the bending of the crown opens the legs enough, and the downward push of bending finger l4 on the stapled material, or the upward pull of prongs I2 on the staple, becomes great enough to overcome the resistance of the staple, and the staple legs are withdrawn from the material. At this time, the fingers are restored to their normal relation to the jaws of the tool, the spring pressure causing this restoration with a definite surge or snap, with the result that the staple seems to be removed with considerable ease and speed, and

the parts are related substantially as shown in Fig. 6 of the drawings. 1

Referring now to Figs. 11 through 15 of the drawings, the tool there shown comprises plierlike handles pivoted at 92. The jaws 94 are formed integrally with the handles and carry pairs of prongs 96 and 98. The prongs 98 are spaced apart an amount such as to fit beneath the crown of the staple to be removed. The

prongs are spaced apart a slightly less amount such that they are adapted to pass between the prongs" when the prongs are moved together, as is indicated by the change from the position of Fig. 13 to that of Fig. 14. In the specific form piece of metal I00 are connected by an outside wall I 04, as is best shown in Figs. 12 and 15, but in the latter figure, a large part of the wall I00 has been broken away in order to expose the inner parts oi the mechanism.

The prongs 06 are similarly formed at the lowerends of the spaced sides of a single piece of metal I00, this piece of metal being bent to channel shape and secured, as by spot-welding, to the side walls of the other jaw 04 of the tool. The parts I00 and I 00 may be made identical, except for the fact previously mentioned that one pair of prongs is preferably so spaced as to overlap or slide between the other pair of prongs when the tool is operated.

The bending finger is indicated at 0. It is centered between the jaws and is actuated by links H2 and H4, link H2 being pivoted to one of the Jaws 04 and the part I00 at III, and the link Ill being similarly pivoted to the other jaw and to the part I00 at Ill. Both links are pivoted in common to the bending finger III, preferably on opposite sides of the finger, by means of a pin I20. The pin I20 is locatedbelow the pins III and I I 0 when holding the tool vertical, as in Figs. 13 and 14. The arrangement is obviously such that when the Jaws are moved together, the finger III is moved downwardly by the links H2 and Ill. The action simulates a toggle action, and thereby provides considerable mechanical advantage, a substantial force being exerted on the staple without necessitating an inconvenient degree of force at the handles.

The upper end of finger H0 is bifurcated, as is indicated at I22. The bifurcated end is slidably related to the main pivot 92 of the too]. When, as in the present case, the pivot 02 is closely surrounded by the coils I24 of a return spring I20 (Fig. 11) it is convenient to space the ends I22 apart an amount sufilcient to straddle the coils I20 of the spring. The sliding relation between the upper end of the bending finger and the pivot 02 is such that the bending finger is centralized, and is guided during its movement, but there is no intereference with free reciprocation of the bending finger.

The operation of the tool will be clear from comparison of Figs. 3 and 4, the tool first being placed against the stapled material 00 on opposite sides of the staple I32 which is to be removed. The lower end of the bending finger is preferably recessed slightly, as is indicated at I34, and is disposed directly above the middle of the staple. The handles are squeezed together while holding the tool against material I00. This causes the sharpened prongs 96 and 00 to pass beneath the crown of the staple while at the same time the bending finger IIO pushes downwardly on the staple and the material I30. This causes a preliminary bending of the staple with consequent opening outwardly of the staple legs, and finally the legs are withdrawn from the stapled material, as is most clearly shown in Fig. 15. The successive stages in the opening and removal posed that the lifting fingers of the staple need not be drawn in detail, for the operation-is substantially the same as that shown and described in connection with Figs. 7 through 10 of the drawings.

' It is believed that the construction and operation, as well as the many advantages of my improved staple remover, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description thereof. In connection with the first form of the invention, it will be understood that while I have referred to the Jaw 30 as a top Jaw, and to the bending finger I4 as being moved downwardly, or the lifting fingers I2 being moved upwardly, this terminology has been used merely for convenience. The tool may be operated in any position, and in practice may, for example, be operated sidewardly as often as vertically, particularly when the stapled material is held in one hand while the tool is manipulated with the other, instead of resting the stapled material on a desk or other horizontal surface. Similarly, in connection with the second form of the invention, the tool may be held horizontally instead of vertically, particularly if the stapled material is held in the hand of the operator.

It will be apparent that while I have shown and described my invention in several preferred forms, many changes and modifications may be made in the structures disclosed without departing from the spirit of the invention defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. The method of removing a clenched staple from stapled material which includes preliminarily bending the middle of the crown of the "staple downwardly in order to open or spread apart the clenched staple legs, and withdrawing the opened staple legs from the stapled material.

2. The method of removing a clenched staple from stapled. material which includes holding the middle o1 the crown down and pulling the ends of the crown up, thereby bending the crown in order to open the clenched staple legs, and at the same time withdrawing the staple legs from the stapled material.

3. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising relatively movable fingers so arranged as to bend the crown in such direction that the clenched ends of the staple legs are swung outwardly, so that they may be removed with minimum tearing of the stapled material.

4. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising spaced support means, a staple bending means, and means to move the bending means relative to the support means, the parts being so disposed that the support means may be used to support the crown of a staple, while the bending means is moved against the crown to so bend the middle of the crown downwardly that the legs are opened or spread apart to withdraw the opened staple from the stapled material.

5. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising a pair of spaced lifting fingers, a staple bending finger, pivoted means to relatively move the lifting fingers and the bending finger in opposite directions, and resilient restoring means to move the fingers back to initial position, the parts being so dismay be inserted beneath the crown of the staple, the relative movement of said fingers causing the bending finger to move over the crown and between the lifting fingers.

6. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising a pair of spaced lifting fingers, a staple bending finger, and means to relatively move the lifting fingers and the bending finger in opposite directions, the parts being so disposed that the lifting fingers may be inserted beneath the crown of the staple while the bending finger is disposed above the middle of the crown, the relative movement of said fingers causing the bending finger to bend the center of the crown downwardly between the lifting fingers in such fashion that the clenched ends of the staple legs are swung outwardly and .withdrawn with minimum tearing of the stapled material.

"I. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising a pair of handles, means for normally spreading the handles, a pair of spaced support prongs and a bending finger connected to the handles, said parts being so related that when thehandles are squeezed together the bending finger is moved between the support prongs.

8. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising pivotally related plier-like handles and jaws, means for normally spreading the handles, a pair of spaced lifting fingers and a bending finger connected to the jaws, said parts being so related that when the handles are squeezed together the bending finger is moved between the lifting fingers, the lifting fingers being so dimensioned that they may be inserted beneath the crown of the staple, the bending finger when pressed downwardly functioning to bend the crown of the staple between the lifting fingers in order to open out the clenched legs of the staple as the staple is lifted from the stapled material.

9. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising a pair of handles, means for normally spreading the handles, apair of spaced support prongs on one handle, and handle, said prongs and fingers being so related that when the handles are squeezed together the bending finger is moved between the support prongs.

10. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising pivotally related plier-like handles and jaws, means for normally spreading the handles, a pair of spaced lifting fingers secured to one jaw, a bending finger secured to the other jaw, said fingers being so related that when the handles are squeezed together the bending finger is moved between the lifting fingers, the lifting fingers being so dimensioned that they may be inserted beneath the crown of the staple, the bending finger when pressed downwardly functioning to bend the crown of the staple between the lifting fingers in order to open out the clenched legs of the staple as the staple is lifted from the stapled material.

11. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising a pair of spaced support prongs, a staple bending finger, and means to move the bending finger between the support prongs, the parts being so disposed that the support prongs may be inserted beneath the crown of a staple, and stop lugs projecting outwardly from said support prongs in order to limit the insertion of said prongs beneath the crown of the staple.

12. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising 'a pair of spaced lifting fingers, a staple bending finger, means to relatively move the lifting fingers and a bending finger on the other the bending finger in opposite directions, the parts being so disposed that the lifting fingers may be inserted beneath the crown of the staple while the bending finger 'is disposed above the middle of the crown, and stop lugs projecting outwardly from said lifting fingers to limit the insertion of said fingers beneath the crown of the staple, the relative movement of said fingers causing the bending finger to bend the center of the crown downwardly between the lifting fingers in such fashion that the clenched ends of the staple legs are swung outwardly and withdrawn with minimum tearing of the stapled material.

13. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising pivotally related plier-like handles and jaws, a pair of spaced lifting fingers on the lower jaw, a series of leaf spring members therebeneath to provide a-slightly yieldable mounting for the fingers, a bending finger on the upper jaw, and a series of leaf spring members secured thereabove to provide a slightly yieldable mounting for the bending finger, said fingers being so related that when the handles are squeezed together the bending finger is moved between the lifting fingers.

14. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising pivotally related plier-like handles and jaws, said handles being made of heavy gauge sheet metal channeled to form rounded handle surfaces and channeled jaws, the channeling at the handles being open inwardly and at the jaws being open outwardly, a restoring spring for normally spreading the handles, a pair of spaced lifting fingers projecting from the channeled lower jaw, and a bending finger projecting from the channeled upper jaw, said fingers being so related that when the handles are squeezed together the bending finger is moved between the lifting fingers, whereby the lifting fingers may be inserted beneath the crown of the staple and the bending finger pressed downwardly to bend the crown of the staple between the lifting fingers, in order to open out the clenched legs of the staple as the staple is lifted from the stapled material.

15. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising pivotally the channeled lower jaw, a series of leaf spring members therebeneath and secured in said channeled lower jaw to provide a slightly yieldable mounting for the fingers, a bending finger projecting from the channeled upper jaw, and a series of leaf spring members secured thereabove in said channeled upper jaw to provide a slightly yieldable mounting for the bending finger, said fingers being so related that when the handles are squeezed together the bending finger is moved between the lifting fingers.

16. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising a pair of spaced support prongs, another pair of oppositely directed spaced support prongs, a staple bending finger disposed between said prongs and movable transversely thereof, and means to oppositely move the support prongs to overlapping relation and to move the bending finger between the overlapped prongs, the parts being so disposedthat the support prongs may be inserted finger through the overlapped prongs to a point rected spaced substantially beyond the same, the parts being so disposed that the support prongs may be inserted beneath the crown of a staple and the bending finger moved against the top of the crown, the relative movement causing the bending finger to bend the center of the crown downwardly between the support prongs in such fashion that the clenched ends of the staple legs are swung outwardly and withdrawn with minimum tearing of the stapled material.

18. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising pivotally related plier-like handles and jaws, means for normally separating the handles, a pair of spaced prongs secured to one jaw, a pair or oppositely directed spaced prongs secured to the other jaw, said prongs being movable to overlapping relation when the jaws are moved together, a bending finger disposed between the jaws, and means to cause the bending finger to move through the overlapping prongs when the handles are squeezed together. I

19. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising pivotally related plier-like handles and jaws, means for normally separating the handles, a pair of spaced prongs secured to one jaw, a pair of oppositely diprongs secured to the-other jaw, said prongs being movable to overlapping relation when the jaws are moved together, a bending finger disposed between the jaws, toggle arms pivotally connected at one end to the bending finger and at their opposite ends to the jaws, whereby the bending finger is moved through the overlapping prongs when the, handles are squeezed together.

20. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising pivotally related piier-like handles and jaws, means for normally separating the handles, a pair of spaced lifting'fingers secured to one jaw, a pair 01' oppositely directed spaced lifting fingers secured to the other jaw, said fingers being movable to side by side relation when the jaws are moved together, a bending finger disposed between the jaws and centered between the lifting fingers,

toggle arms pivotally connected at their lower ends to the bending finger and at their upper ends to the jaws, whereby the bending finger is moved through the overlapping fingers when the jaws are brought together, the lifting fingers being so dimensioned that they may be inserted beneath the crown of the staple, the bending finger when pressed downwardly functioning to bend the crown of the staple between the lifting fingers in order to open out the clenched legs of the staple as the staple is lifted from the stapled materi-al.

21. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising a pair of handles, means for normally spreading the handles, a pair of spaced support prongs on one handle, and a bending finger on the other handle, said prongs and fingers being so related that when the handles are squeezed together the bending finger is moved between the support prongs, at least a. part of the aforesaid structure being resiliently yieldable to afford yielding or the relatively movable parts, said yleldable part being stifi enough, however, to effect the desired bending and removal of the staple.

22. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising a pair of spaced support prongs, a staple bending finger, and means to move the bent finger between the support prongs, the parts being so disposed that the support prongs may be inserted beneath the crown of a. staple, and stop means to limit the insertion of said prongs beneath the crown of the staple.

23. A tool for removing clenched staples from stapled material, said tool comprising pivotally related 'plier-like handles and jaws, means for normally separating the handles, a pair oi spaced prongs secured to one jaw, a pair-of oppositely directed spaced prongs secured to the other jaw,

said prongs being movable to overlapping relation when the jaws are moved together, toggle arms connected at their outer ends to the jaws and at their inner ends to one another for movement in a direction transversely of the prongs in a plane disposed between said prongs.

WILLIAM DRYPOLCHER.

Citada por
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US2470726 *19 Nov 194517 May 1949Internat Staple And Machine CoStaple remover
US2481647 *29 Ene 194513 Sep 1949De Generes William EStaple remover
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.254/28, 29/270, 235/58.00R, D08/48
Clasificación internacionalB25C11/02, B25C11/00
Clasificación cooperativaB25C11/02
Clasificación europeaB25C11/02