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Número de publicaciónUS2288168 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación30 Jun 1942
Fecha de presentación20 May 1941
Fecha de prioridad20 May 1941
Número de publicaciónUS 2288168 A, US 2288168A, US-A-2288168, US2288168 A, US2288168A
InventoresLeu Edward E
Cesionario originalLeu Edward E
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Heel
US 2288168 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

June 30, 1942. E. E. LEU 2,288,168

HEEL

Filed May 20, 1941 Patented June 3o, 1942 UNITEDA STATES PATENT OFFICE azssnss HEEL Edward E. Leu, Chicago, lll. Application May zo, 1941, serial No. 394,313 s claims. (ci. :is-39) This invention relates to interchangeable heels for boots, shoes, or like foot wear.

One object of my invention is to provide a heel plate which is readily attachable to, or removable from, an ordinary heel being held thereon interchangeably and against displacement.

A further object of my invention is to provide a heel plate which when attached will rotate automatically and will be subjected to automatic rotation when worn by a person having shoes equipped with my invention; it being subjected to rotation by the motion or stride of movement employed in the walking gait by a person walking.

Another object of my invention is to provide a. rotating heel plate which will relieve the pain to which the toes of a person walking may be subjected while walking. For example, when the foot is put down on the pavement with the ordinary heel which does not rotate, and which in arresting the shoe itself by frictional contact will cause the toes of the foot to continue to move forward relatively, within the shoe, and thus cause the tips of the toes to contact the inner tip of the shoe, and when toes are tender or sore, the irritation will be further aggravated by walking and by the action which is provided by ordinary heels. With my particular heel plate or disc, which rotates while in motion when the foot within the shoe is put down on the sidewalk or pavement, the rotation of the heel takes up some of the momentum and allows the shoe to move forward with the foot so that there is no relative displacement of the foot with respect to the shoe. This action will protect the toes from being subjected to painful contact from irritation, and from pain caused by contact within the tip of the shoe as a result of walking.

These and other like objects are attained by the novel construction and combination of parts hereinafter more fully described and set forth in the appended claims.-

In the accompanying drawing forming a ma.- terial part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a section of the heel portion of a shoe showing my invention attached thereto.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged longitudinal cross-sectional view on the line 2-2 of Figure 4.

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view on the line 3-3 of Figure 2.

Fig. 4 is a transversal cross-sectional view on the line 4-4 of Figure 2.

Fig. 5 is an exploded perspective view of members 2I and I2 comprising importantV elements of my invention.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary plan view showing the action taking place when the rotating disc or plate is to be removed from assembly.

Referring more particularly to Figure 1, I show a shoe generally designated by the numeral 1, having an upper member 8, a sole member 9, and leather heel portion I0, to which my invention is secured. My invention being generally designated and comprised of members II and I2.

Referring more particularly to Figure 2, it will be noticed that the member II is shaped like a standard rubber heel and is diierentiated `from a standard rubber heel by being provided with the recess I3 having an arcuate semi-circular portion to accommodate the rotating plate or heel member I2, and is further provided with an elongated recess 34 in order to accommodate the sliding element 3|.

The heel proper isprovided with two rubber button structures 31 cast integrally with the heel member II, and by virtue of which it is secured to the heel portion I0 of the shoe 1 by means of screws 24, and at the rear portion by a shorter screw member 23. The member II is provided with the elongated recess 34 and a deeper recess 39 as indicated for purposes presently to be described.

Within the recess 34 is mounted the member 3I having a bent portion 29 leading to a handle member comprised of sections 36 and 28, which may be grasped in the fingers and pulled to the dotted position indicated in Figure 2.

To the member II` is secured a guide plate 25 which is formed approximately as shown, having anchoring lugs 21 and 26. This member is attached preferably by placing it in the mold prior to injecting into the mold the plastic rubber when the heel member I I is to be made. The guide member 25 is provided with a guide hole 42 to accommodate the portion 36 of the member 3|.

In like manner, bushing member I9 is placed in the mold prior to the injection of the plastic material. The bushing member I9 is provided with anchoring angcs 29 indicated in Figure 2 in order to locate and rigidly secure the same to the heel member II when it is formed.

The disc member I2 is provided with a rotating stud having a head I5, a reduced shoulder I6 which is journaled in the bushing or sleeve I9 and which is provided with a further reduced shank portion I1 and a head portion I8. The head portion I8 is either of the same or a lesser diameter than the reduced body portion I6 so that it will readily pass thru the opening within the sleeve or bushing member I9 when it ls assembled. The head I of the rotating stud is sufficiently large to insure stability and also to provide proper anchoring means for securing the rotating stud firmly within the rotating heel member I2.

The rotating heel member I2 is provided with a series of arcuately shaped recesses or grooves I4 which are provided for the purpose of conveying a lubricant such as graphite to the intermediate bearing plate member 2| which is made preferably of metal, and is provided with a series of holes 22 which will permit the graphite or lubricant to pass thru on the opposite side of the plate member and thus furnish lubrication between the surfaces 40 and 4| respectively, when the heel member I2 is subjected to rotation with respect to the stationary heel member II.

In Figure 3, the sectional view further elucidates the specific structure indicated in Figures 1 and 2, indicating clearly the shoe 1, comprising its component elements, namely, the upper 8, the sole 9, the heel I0 and the inner sole 38.

In Figure 4, the means provided for removing the disc plate I2 is more clearly indicated and it is comprised of an enlarged opening 32 in the member 3| having 'a reduced opening 33. The opening 32 is large enough to clear the head I8 of the stud embedded in the rotating disc I2, whereas the reduced portion 33 is large enough to permit the shank I'I of the stud to work freely and to rotate freely therein.

The member 3| is held in place by tensioning meanssuch as the spring 30 indicated in Figure 2 and Figure 4. The spring has a tendency to keep the heel member, normally, in locked position. When the spring is compressed by virtue of a pull on the handle member 28 to the right as shown in Figure 2, the enlarged opening 32 will align itself with the stud head |8 thus permitting removal of the plate member I2.

The handle member 28 is to be retained in this position when it is desired to replace the disc plate I2, then it is released, whereupon the spring 30 expanding to its normal shape will cause the member 3| to move to the left, thus bringing the reduced opening 33 underneath or below the head I8 causing a rotatable locking effect between the disc member I2 and the heel member II, permitting free and easy rotation as heretofore explained. The member 2| is provided with an opening 35 to clear the reduced body I6 of the rotating stud so as to permit it to rotate freely therein.

In attaching or removing a disc heel I2 after it has been substantially worn and ls no longer useful, it is merely necessary to pull the handle member 28 to the dotted position indicated in Figure 2, compressing the spring 30, and causing the enlarged opening 32 to align co-axially with the head I8, the opening 32 being larger than the diameter of the head I8 will permit removal of the disc plate member by allowing the stud to which it is secured to drop freely therethru, and likewise in assembling another heel disc member I2 to the heel II, it is merely necessary to compress the spring 3U by pulling the handle member 28 and aligning the rotating stud within the bushing I9, and then releasing.. the handle member 28 which will cause the spring 30 to move the member 3| to the left, thus aligning the reduced recess 33 with the stud member I8. Thus it can be seen thatthe heel disc I2 is free to rotate by virtue of its rotatable attachment, and furthermore, because of the lubricating means provided by the plate 2| and the lubricant which maybe passed freely therethru, thru the openings 22 thereof; hence the graphite which is placed within the groove I4 passing thru the openings 22 and lubricating the bearing surfaces 40 and 4| respectively so as to provide free and easy rotation.

Not only is it possible by virtue of the rotation.

of the heel to maintain an even and level disc plate member as well as even wear resulting from constant walking, but when it is suiciently worn, it may be interchangeably replaced with another heel member of the same size almost instantaneously and without requiring an experienced cobbler to perform the Work.

It is also to be noted thatI have provided this construction for people who are subjected to pain in the toes because of the fact that their walking gait subjects the foot to a resultant movement of the foot with respect to'the shoe, thus causing the toes to be pounded frequently and continually against the tip of the shoe, thus aggravating a painful or sore foot condition.

Altho, I have enumerated numerous advantages, the actual showing embodied herein may suggest other advantages which have not been specified or mentioned. I believe I have indicated a preferred form of the embodiment of my invention and described the same succinctly, in order to produce the results enumerated, and inasmuch as I believe that my disclosure is susceptible of many'modiflcations, alterations and improvements, I reserve the right to all changes, alterations, modifications and improvements which come within the scope and spirit of my invention, and within the purview of the foregoing description; my invention to be limited only by the subjoined claims.

Having thus described and revealed my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. In a device of the character described, interchangeably removable and replaceable heel means rotatably secured to fixed heel means, the said removable and replaceable heel Vmeans adapted to receive limited and intermittent rotation imparted to it by a wearer equipped with the said device when walking, the said removable and replaceable heel means provided with arcuately shaped lubricant transfer recesses.

2. A device of the character described comprising, fixed heel means secured to foot Wear, and interchangeably removable and replaceable heel means rotatably secured to the said fixed heel means, the said removable and replaceable heel means adapted to receive limited and intermittent rotation imparted to it by a wearer equipped with the said device when walking, the said removable and replaceable heel means provided with arcuately shaped lubricant transfer recesses.

3. In a device of the character described comprised of fixed heel means and interchangeably removable and replaceable heel means rotatably secured to said fixed heel means, lubricant transfer means intermediately disposed between the said fixed heel means and the said'removable and replaceable heel means, comprising, a plate member rotatably mounted and provided with perforated means adapted to pass a lubricant between respective adjacently contacting surfaces of said fixed heel means and said interchangeablv removable and replaceable heel means.

4. A device of the character described comprising, xed heel means secured to foot wear, interchangeably removable and replaceable heel means adapted to receive limited and intermittent rotation imparted to it by a wearer equipped with the said device when walking, and lubricant transfer means interchangeably disposed? between the said xed heel means and the said prised of fixed heel means and interchangeably removable and replaceable heel means rotatably secured to said fixed heel means, spring urged locking slide means slidably secured to the said xed heel means and adapted to hold rotatably and releasably the said removable and replaceable heel means.

6. A device of the character described comprising, xed heel means secured to foot wear, interchangeably removable and replaceable heel means adapted to receive limited and intermittent rotary motion imparted to it by a wearer equipped with the said device when walking, and spring urged locking slide means slidably secured to the said xed heel means and adapted to hold rotatably` and releasably the said removable and replaceable heel means.

EDWARD E. LEU.

Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
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US2908983 *19 Sep 195820 Oct 1959Berke AaronSelf-rotatable and replaceable heel
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.36/39, 36/36.00R
Clasificación internacionalA43B21/433, A43B21/00, A43B21/47
Clasificación cooperativaA43B21/47, A43B21/433
Clasificación europeaA43B21/433, A43B21/47