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Número de publicaciónUS2419018 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación15 Abr 1947
Fecha de presentación3 Ene 1942
Fecha de prioridad3 Ene 1942
Número de publicaciónUS 2419018 A, US 2419018A, US-A-2419018, US2419018 A, US2419018A
InventoresRay W Gudie
Cesionario originalPauline E Wood, Ralph F Thacker
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Connector
US 2419018 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

April 15, l947- R. w. GUDIE 2,419,018

CONNECTOR Filed Jan. 5, 1942 Patented Apr. 15, 1947 CONNECTOR Ray w. Guaie, Los Angeles, cant., assignor of one-third to Pauline E. Wood and one-third to Ralph F. Thacker Application January 3, 1942, serial No. 425,504

7 Claims.

This invention relates to electrical connectors and relates more particularly tc connectors for facilitating the connecting and disconnecting of electrical circuits in aircraft, radio equipment, and the like. A general object of this invention is to provide an electrical connector of the character referred to which materially reduces the labor and time required in connecting or assembling the connector in the circuits.

The electrical connectors employed. in military and naval aircraft usually embody a receptacle and a plug each-of which usually carries a number of contacts, the contacts of one being socketV contacts and the contacts of the other being plug contacts. The contacts are often quite small and close together and are secured in phenolic inserts. It has been the universal practice to either mold the contacts in the phenolic inserts or to provide the contacts with external flanges which are clamped between sections of the inserts. These modes of fixing the contacts in the inserts make it necessary to secure the wires to the contacts after the contacts are secured in their inserts. It is a diicult tedious operation to solder the plurality of wires to the individual closely positioned contacts and in the event of error it is impossible to remove the individual contacts to correct the error. With the contacts preassembled in the connector, as has been the universal practice, it is impossible to crimp the contacts onto their wires and it has always been necessary to resort to the slow dimcult soldering operations.

Another and important object of this invention is to provide a connector suitable for use on aircraft, in radio circuits, etc., and embodying contacts that may be installed in the receptacle or plug, as the case may be, after having been secured to their respective wires. The connectors of the present invention may be constructed to fully meet the United States Army and Navy specifications for electrical aircraft connectors and are characterized by contacts which may be secured to their Wires by soldering, crimping, or other means and then installed in their respective inserts. The contacts of the present invention may be secured to their wires independently of the connector, for example, they may be secured to the wires at a bench or on a mass production basis by any approved means such as soldering or crimping, and merely inserted in the openings in the inserts of the connectors to complete the assembly, following the pulling of the wires through the conduits, etc. This entirely eliminates the diillcult time consuming operations of individually soldering the wires to contacts already xed in close proximity to one another in the connector assemblies.

Another object of this invention is to provide a connector of the present invention in which the individual contacts may be readily removed from their connector inserts in the event of error, breakage, or the like.

Another object of this invention is to provide a connector of the character mentioned in which the contacts are approximately the same diameter as theirwires so that they may be readily run through the conduits on the Wires thus further simplifying the installation procedure.

Another object of this invention is to provide a connector of the character referred to, embodying novel lock means or retaining means which automatically engage and lock the contacts when they are inserted in the openings of the inserts. The automatic lock or retaining means is dependable and sturdy and capable of effectively resisting removal or displacement of the contacts. The lock means or retaining means of the invention offers resistance to removal of the contacts far in excess of the requirements of the United States Army and Navy specifications.

A further object of this invention is to provide a connector of the character mentioned in which the inserts, contacts and contact retaining means are simple and inexpensive and adapted for use in standard receptacle and plug shells.

The various objects and features of my invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of typical preferred forms and applications of my invention, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a central longitudinal detailed sectional view of the receptacle assembly of one form of the invention. Fig. 2 is a. central longitudinal detailed sectional view of the plug assembly of this form of the invention. Fig. 3 is an end view of the receptacle, being a view taken as indicated by line 3 3 on Fig. 1.` Fig. 4 is a side elevation of one of the plug contacts prior to its' connection with the Wire. Fig. 5 is an enlarged perspective view of the contact retaining spring. Fig. 6 is an enlarged perspective viewsof the rear section of one of the Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of one of the connector assemblies illustrating the spring member. Fig'. 8 is a 4view similar to Fig. l illustrating another form of the invention. Fig. 9 is an enlarged elevational view of the contact retaining ring of the structure illustrated in Fig. 8 and Fig.'10 is a view similar to Fig. 1 illustrating still another form of the invention.

The embodiment of the invention illustrated in Figs. l to 7, inclusive, may be said to comprise, generally, a receptacle i0, an insert in the receptacle having contact receiving openings, pins or contacts I2, and means |3 for retaining or locking the contacts |2 in theopenings; and a plug i4 comprising a shell i5, an insert I6 in the shell having contact receiving openings, sockets or contacts to be inserted in the openings, and means i8 for locking or retaining the contacts in the openings.

The receptacle and plug structures or assemblies may be varied to adapt the connector for different uses and installations. In the drawings I have shown a typical form of general plug and receptacle assembly, it being understood that the invention is not to be construed as limited or restricted to the specific form or details herein described but is to be taken as including features or modifications that may fall within the scope of the claims.

The receptacle i0 includes a shell i9 of aluminum alloy, or the like, adapted for rigid attachment to a support or the like. The shell I9 is an elongate tubular member provided between its ends with an external flange having openings 2| for receiving securing elements, not shown. The interior of the shell i3 is formed or shaped to hold the insert and to receive a portion of the plug i4. An inwardly projecting annular flange 22 is formed in the shell |9 substantially midway between its ends. The portion of the shell i9 inwardly or forwardly of the flange 22 is adapted to receive the entering portion of the plug |4 while the outer or rear part of the shell occurring behind the flange 22 contains or carries the insert One or more spaced longitudinal ribs or keys 23 are provided in the forward plug receiving portion of the shell i9. The rear or outer portion of the shell i9 which carries the insert has a similar rib or key 24 extending rearwardly from the flange 22. The keys 23 and 24 are preferably, though not necessarily, fiat sided.

The insert l is provided to receive or carry the contacts |2. The insert is formed of phenolic material or other effective dielectric suitable for the purpose. In accordance with the invention, the insert is sectional, comprising an insert body 25 and aplate or disc 26 at the outer end of the body. The body 25 and disc 26 are cylin rical and proportioned to rather accurately fit in the shell I9 and have grooves 21 for receiving the key 24. The inner corner of the insert body 25 has an annular groove 28 for receiving the flange 22. The flange 22 limits inward movement of the insert ii and the end of the insert body 25 may be flush with the forward face of the flange 22. Means is provided for removably holding or locking the insert body 25 and disc 2B in the shell i9. This means comprises a split spring ring 29 snapped into a groove 30 formed in the shell i9 adjacent its outer end. The spring ring or snap ring 29 holds the disc 26 tightly against the face of the body 25 and holds the insert body 25 in close engagement with the flange 22.

The insert consisting of the insert body 25 and disc 26, is provided with longitudinal or axial openings for receiving the contacts |2. The number and disposition of the openings 3| vary with different connectors. In the case illustrated there is a central opening 3| and a circular series of spaced openings 3| surrounding the central opening in spaced-relation thereto. The openings 3|'are spaced apart to the best advantage to obtain the greatest surface leakage areas between adjacent openings and are spaced substantial distances from the shell I9. The several openings 3| are shown identical in size and shape but in many instances the openings are of diiIerent diameters to receive contacts of different current carrying capacities. For the present purpose it will be assumed that the openings 3|, as initially formed, extend completely through the insert that is, they extend completely through the body 25 and disc 26.

The openings 3| are'stepped or shouldered to receive the contacts I2 and` to house the means i3. Sockets 32 are formed in the rear or outer ends of those portions of the openings 3| which pass through the insert bodies 25. The openings 3| are reduced in diameter in a plane spaced forwardly from the sockets 32 to have rearwardly facing shoulders 33. The openings 3| are further reduced in diameter in a plane spaced forwardly from the shoulders 33 to have second shoulders As best illustrated in Figs. l and 7 of the drawings, the disc 26 has bosses 35 for fitting the sockets 32. The sockets 32 and the bosses 35 increase the surface leakage distances between the adjacent openings 3|. The portions of the openings 3| which pass through the disc 26 and its bosses 35 are of substantially the same diameter as those portions of the openings 3| located between the shoulders 33 and 34 so that the ends of the bosses 35 constitute annular shoulders 36 on the walls of the openings which oppose the shoulders 33.

In most instances it will be preferred to initially form the openings 3| completely through both the insert body 25 and disc 26. In some cases, however, it may be desirable to leave the extreme forward ends of the openings 3| or of some of the openings 3| closed to be broken or drilled out when it is determined how many openings and which of the openings are to be required.

The contacts i2 are elongate elements of a selected or required conductive material, The receptacle I0 may be equipped with either pin type or socket type contacts, In the particular case illustrated the receptacle l0 is provided with pin type contacts |2. The active portions of the pin contacts 2, which project from the inner face of the insert body 25, are plain cylindrical parts with rounded forward ends. Each pin or contact i 2 has two spaced annular enlargements or flanges 3`| and 38. The flanges 31 are adapted to engage against the shoulders 34 and when engaging the shoulders 34 their rear faces are flush with the shoulders 33. This is illustrated in Fig. l. It will be observed that the flanges 31 engaging with the shoulders 34 limit the forward or inward movement of the contacts |2. The enlargements or flanges 38 ilt those portions of the openings 3| which pass through the disc 26. The forward ends of the flanges 38 lie flush with the shoulders 36. The contacts |2 further have rear end parts which project from the disc 26. These parts are formed for ready connection with the wires W. They may be formed for crimping, soldering or modes of connection with the wires. In the case illustrated, I have shown the rear parts of the pins or contacts |2 formed with solder cups 39, Fig. 1 of the drawings shows how the bared portions of the wires W may be soldered in the cups 39. It will be observed that the contacts |2 are simple readily formed elements.

The means I3 are important elements of the invention. In the form of the invention being described the means I3 comprise simple spring lock members 40 which freely allow the introduction of the pins or contacts I2 into the openings 3| and which positively prevent the rearward withdrawal of the contacts from the openings. The lock members 40 are tubular or annular generally cylindrical elements arranged in the openings 3| between the shoulders 33 and 36. The lock members 40 are proportioned so that their opposite ends cooperate with the shoulders 33 and 36 with little or no clearance. The rear ends of the members 40, that is, the ends of the members 40 which cooperate with the shoulders 36 are plain and are adapted to effectively cooperate with the shoulders. The forward end portions of the lock members 40 have spaced pairs of slits or cuts 4I and the stock or material between the adjacent cuts 4I are turned or bent inwardly to form flexible resilient fingers 42, The fingers 42 slope inwardly and forwardly, See Figs. 1, 5, and '1. The portions of the members 40 between the spaced fingers 42 are plain or cylindrical and, as above described, the forward ends of the members 40 cooperate with the shoulders 33. The spring members or lock members 40 are formed to expand through their inherent resiliency to closely hug the walls of the openings 3| between the shoulders 33 and 36. With the members 40 thus .engaged against the walls of the openings 3| their fingers 42 project inwardly and forwardly for cooperation with the fianges 31 of the contacts I2.

The lock members 4.0 are assembled in the openings 3| when the insert II is assembled and secured in the shell I9. When a pin or contact I2 has been crimped or soldered to its wire W it may be introduced into its opening 3|. The contact is merely pressed forwardly into the opening. The contact is proportioned to freely move forwardly through the opening 3| and as the contact moves forwardly the flange 31 comes into engagement with the spring fingers 42. The entering end of the flange 31 cooperates with the sloping inner surfaces of the spring fingers 42 and this engagement fiexes the spring fingers outwardly. Thus, the spring lingers 42 are flexed outwardly to allow the fiange 31 to move forwardly to its position against the shoulder 34.

When the contact l2 has been pushed forwardly to engage the flange 31 with the shoulder 34, the spring fingers 42 automatically snap inward- 1y behind the flange 31. The spring fingers engaging the rear side of the flange 31 latch or lock the contact I2 against outward or rearward movement. In this connection it will be observed that the spring fingers 42 and the member 40 operate under compression to prevent the rearward movement of the Contact I2 and are thus able to offer high resistance to rearward movement of the contact I2. The spring fingers 42 engage inwardly against the body of the contact I2 and are thus prevented from springing inwardly. A rearward force on the Contact I2 may tend to force the spring fingers inwardly but, as just ,desciibed, this movement is impossible. There is no tendency for the spring fingers to flex outwardly under an outward or rearward pull on the contact I2 The lock member 40 forms a strong dependable means for automatically latching the contact I2 against rearward displacement and is automatically operative when the contact is merely inserted to its final position in its opening 3|, It is to be understood that each of the several openings 3| is equipped with a 6 lock member 4II and that the contacts I2 may be automatically locked in the insert I I in the manner just described by merely inserting them forwardly into their openings 3|.

The plug I4 is adapted to be plugged into or introduced into the receptacle I0 to complete the several electrical circuits. 'I'he shell I5 of the plug I4 is an elongate tubular member of aluminum alloy, or the like, and its forward end portlo-n is proportioned to enter the shell I9 of the receptacle I0 with suitable clearance. The forward portion of the shell I5 has one or more grooves 43 for receiving the ribs or keys 23 to prevent relative turnin-g between the shells of the receptacle and plug when the connector is made up. The rear portion of the shell I5 has an internal rib or key 44. A rearwardly facing annular shoulder 45 is provided in the shell I5 between its ends.

The plug I4 is provided with suitable means for making a threaded connection with the receptacle I0 and for connecting with a conduit or other fitting. IIn the particular case illustrated, a coupling nut 46 surrounds the forward portion of the shell I5 and is rotatably connected with the shell lby a lock ring or spring ring 41 engaged in registering grooves 48 in the nut and the rear portion of the shell which is enlarged in external dia-meter. 'Ihe nut 46 is freely rotatable with respect to the shell I5. The forward portion of the nut 46 has an internal thread 49 for mating with an external thread 50 on the forward portion of the receptacle shell IS. It will be readily seen how the nut 46 may be employed to make up or connect the receptacle and plug. The rear portion of the plug I4 may be equipped with a swivel coupling means including a sleeve 5I rotatably connected with the shell I5 by a spring ring 52 engaged in registering grooves 53 in the shell and sleeve. An adaptor 54 is threaded in the rear portion of the sleeve 5I and has an external thread for engagement with a conduit or fitting. The forward end of the adaptor 54 has engagement with the rear end of the shell I5 and these engaging surfaces may be knurled.

'The insert I6 receives or carries the sockets or contacts I1 of the plug I4. The insert I6 is formed of phenolic material or other appropriate dielectric and is similar to the insert II of the receptacle I0, being a sectional element comprising a body 55 and a rear section or disc 56. The insert body 55 is a cylindrical part which occupies the major portion of the shell I5. The forward face of the insert body 55 is flush with the forward end of the shell I5 and the body 55 has a forwardly facing shoulder' 51 engaging with the shoulder 45 to hold the insert against forward movementv in the shell. The disc 56 may be identical with-the above described disc 26 and is engaged against the rear end of the body 55. A spring ring 59 is removably eng-aged in an internal groove in the rear portion of the shell I 5 and cooperates with the dise 56 to hold the insert IB against rearward movement. The insert body 55 and disc 56 have a longitudinal groove for receiving the key 44 whereby the insert is held against turning in the shell I5.

The sectional insert I6, just described, has longitudinal openings 60 for receiving the contacts I1, The openings 6|) .are all identical and have the same spaced relationship as the openings 3| to be in alignment therewith when the connector is made up. It is to be undertsood that in many cases the openings 3| are of different diameters to receive contacts of different current carrying capacity. Each opening 60 has a. rearwardly facing annular shoulder 6I adjacent its rear end and a rearwardly facing annular shoulder 62 spaced forwardly from the shoulder 6I. Further, each opening 60 has a rearwardly facing annular shoulder 63 adjacent its forward end. The disc 56 has bosses 64 similar to or identical with the bosses 35 and these bosses enter the rear portions of the openings 60 to engage with the shoulders 6I. The forward ends of the bosses 64 constitute shoulders which are in spaced opposing relations to the shoulders 62. The enlarged rear portions of the openings 60 and the bosses 64 provide increased surface leakage or creepage areas between the spaced openings 60.

The sockets or contacts I'I are elongate elements adapted to be connected with their respective wires W and adapted to be inserted in the openings 60 to be locked therein by the means I8. Where the receptacle I carries pin contacts, as above described, the contacts I1 of the plug I4 are -socket contacts. The socket contacts I1 are formed of selected or approved conductive material and their forward ends are formed to receive and grip the exposed forward parts of the pin contacts I2. The forward portions of the contacts I I have longitudinal sockets or openings 6l for receiving the pin contacts I2 and have spaced longitudinal slots 65 leaving spring fingers 66. The openings 61 are proportioned to closely receive the forward parts of the contacts I2, the spring fingers 66 fiexing from their bases when the sets of contacts are engaged. The spring ngers 66 engage the contacts I2 with sufficient gripping force to maintain the required engagement. The contacts II are formed with rearwardly facing annular shoulders 68 which lie in the same planes as the shoulders 62 and have collars or nanges 69 which occupy the openings in the bosses 64 to have their forward ends flush with the forward ends of the bosses. The rear portions of the contacts Il which project beyond the disc 56 are formed for ready connection with the wires W. In the case illustrated the rear parts of the contacts Il have solder cups 10. The contacts II may be crimped or soldered on their respective wires W prior to introduction into the connector assembly and, therefore, may be applied to their wires at a bench or in a machine remote from the connector.

The means i8 for locking or retaining the contacts Il in the plug I4 are identical with the means I3 comprising lock members 40. The lock members 4D employed in the plug I4 being identical with the lock members 40 above described are provided with corresponding reference numerals. The lock members 46 are arranged in the openings 60 to have their plain rear ends engage with the forward ends of the bosses 64 and to have their forward ends engage with the shoulders 68. The lock members 40 are formed to hug the walls of the opening 60 by reason of their resiliency. When a contact II is inserted forwardly into its opening 60 the forward portion of the contact freely passes through the boss 64 and into the lock member 40. The entering end of the contact Il engages the spring fingers 42 and flexes the fingers outwardly. The contact is readily pushed forward until its forward end engages the shoulder 63 at which time the shoulder 62 comes coincident with the shoulder 68. This allows the spring fingers 42 to snap inwardly into engagement with the shoulder 62. Thus, the contact I1 is locked in its opening 60.

The pin and socket contacts I2 and I'I shown 8 are of the type employed in the approved Army and Navy connectors. It is to be understood that the connector of the invention may embody other types of contacts as required or as made necessary by installation conditions.

It is believed that the operation of the connector illustrated in Figs. 1 to '7, inclusive, will be readily understood from the foregoing detailed description. The receptacle I0 and plug I4 are preferably supplied to the user completely assembled except for the contacts I2 and I1. The contacts I2 and I1 are supplied separately in order that they may be applied to their respective wires W. It is important to note that the free independent contacts I2 may be readily secured to their wires by soldering. crimping, or other appropriate means entirely independent of the connector and these operations may be performed at a bench or in a machine.

When the contacts I2 are to be engaged in their receptacle I0 and plug I4 they are merely passed forwardly through their openings 3| and 60, as above described. When this is done th'e lock members 40 automatically lock the contacts in the inserts I I and I6. In the event there has been an error or if for any other reason it is desirable to withdraw a contact, the spring ring 29 or 59, as the oase may be, is disengaged from its groove permitting the rearward removal of the entire isert I I or I6 and permitting the rearward movement of the disc 26 or 56. Upon rearward movement of the disc with respect to the insert body 25 or 55 the contact is moved rearwardly carrying with' it the lock member 40. The lock member 40, upon disengagement from the opening 3I or 60, springs open and drops from the contact, permitting free disengagement of the contact. Thus, one or more of the contacts may be easily and quickly removed from the connector without difficulty and without breaking any of the parts.

Figs. 8 and 9 of the drawings illustrate an embodiment of the invention having a modified or alternative form of lock means for retaining the contacts in their inserts. The connector assembly illustrated in Figs. '7 and 8 is a receptacle having a shell I9 similar to or identical with the sh'ell I9, an insert I I* similar to the insert II and a contact I2. The insert I I* includes a body 25* and a rear section or disc 26* removably engaged against the rear end of the body. The insert is held in the shell I9* by a spring ring 30 engaged in a groove in the shell. The insert I I* is formed of phenolic material, or the like, and has one or more longitudinal openings for receiving the contacts I 2*. These openings 3|* may be of selected disposition and spacing. The several openings 3I pass completely through the body 25 and disc 26* of th'e insert IIB. Each opening 3|* has a rearwardly facing annular shoulder I0 bctween its ends and the rear portion of each opening is enlarged in diameter to receive the boss of the disc 26.

The contacts I2* are elongate members of conductive material and, in the case illustrated, are pin contacts, it being understood that they may be socket contacts. Each contact I2* is provided between its ends with an enlarged portion 1I having a tapered forward end 12. An annular groove I3 is provided in each enlarged portion 1 I. The grooves 13 are located to occur between the shoulders 'I0 and the forward ends of th'e bosses 35. The rear portions of the contacts I2* which project rearwardly from the insert II* are formed for ready connection with their wires, for example, they may have solder cups 14.

The lock means of the structure illustrated in Figs. 8 and 9 comprises split washers or spring rings 15. The rings 15 are arranged in the openings 3| between the shoulders 10 and the forward ends of the bosses 35. Th'e rings 15 are resilient and are constructed to normally assume a diameter which closely engages in the grooves 13.

In employing the structure illustrated in Figs. 8 and 9 the contacts |2a are secured to their respective wires and when they are to be installed in the coupler assembly they are merely pushed forwardly through the openings 3|. The reduced forward portions of the contacts |2it freely pass through the rings 15. When the tapered surfaces 12 engage the rings 15, the rings are spread so that the enlarged contact portions 1| may enter the rings. When the contacts 1| reach their nal positions the lock rings 15 snap into the grooves 13. The engagement of the rings 15 in the grooves 13 effectively lock the contacts l2 in place. The spring rings 15 engage in the grooves 13 and project outwardly to have engagement with the shoulders and the ends of the bosses 35B. These engagements dependably secure the contacts |2R in place. The contacts I2a may be removed from the receptacle by releasing the spring ring 3U*L and withdrawing the disc 26".L rearwardly to expose the spring rings for disengagement from their contacts.

It is to be understood that the complementary section or assembly of the connector may have its contacts secured in the insert in the same manner as the contacts |22.

Fig. l0 of the drawings illustrates still another form of the invention for retaining or locking the contacts in the connector assembly. The structure of Fig. 10 includes a, shell I9b similar to the shell I9, an insert I|b and contacts |2b. The insert ||b includes a body 25b and a rear disc 2lib both of phenolic material, or the equivalent. The insert 25b engages forwardly against a shoulder 22b on the interior of the shell I9b and a spring ring b is engaged in an annular groove in the shell to hold the insert against rearward movement. The insert ||b has one or more openings 3|b for receiving the contacts l2". The several openings 3 |b pass completely through the insert. The major rear portions of the openings 3lb are enlarged in diameter providing rearwardly facing annular shoulders 80 adjacent the forward ends of the openings. The openings 3| b are enlarged or iiared as at 8| at the rear surface of the insert body 25h. y

The contacts l2b are substantially the same as the contacts I2 being elongate members of conductive material designed to be, inserted in the openings 3lb and provided with collars or enlarged portions 82. These enlarged portions 82 are designed to occupy the enlarged rear portions of the openings 3|b and the forward ends of the enlarged portions 82 are engageable with the shoulders 88 to limit the forward movement of the contacts. Each enlarged contact portion 82 has an annular groove 83.

The contact retaining means of the structure illustrated in 10 comprises a sheet or plate 84 of flexible resilient material engaged and held between the insert body 25b and the disc 2Gb. The disc or plate 84 is formed of synthetic rubber or other approved flexible resilient material. Openings 85 are formed in the plate 84 to register with the openings SI1. The openings 85 are considerably smaller in diameter than the rear portions of the openings 3|b. When a, contact |2b is inserted forwardly into its opening 3|h the reduced front end of the contact freely passes through the openings 3|b and 85. The enlarged contact portion 82 is considerably larger in diameter than the opening and when the portion 82 engages the plate 84 the adjacent portion of the plate is flexed forwardly into the flared opening part 8|. The forward end of the enlarged contact portion 82 is bevelled and may be forced through the reduced opening 85 by applying forward pressure to the contact. 'Ihe contact I2b is pushed forwardly until the forward end of the portion 82 engages the shoulder 80 at which time the groove 83 receives the flexible resilient plate 84. The material of the plate 84 springs into and occupies the groove 83, as illustrated in the drawings. Thus, the plate 84 forms a lock or retainer for preventing rearward withdrawal of the contact |2b.

Having described typical preferred forms and applications of my invention, I do not wish to be limited or restricted to the specific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any variations or modifications that may appear to those skilled in theI art or fall within the scope of the following claims.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. In an electrical connector, a body of dielectric material having an opening, a contact to be inserted in the opening, cooperable shoulders on the wall of the opening and the contact for limiting movement of the contact in one direction, opposing shoulders on the Wall of the opening and the contact and spaced apart longitudinally of the contact, .and a longitudinally split flexible resilient sleeve member normally held in the opening between the last named shoulders and acting to positively retain the contact in the opening when it is introduced into the opening.

2. In an electrical connector, a body of dielectric material having an opening, a contact to be installed in the opening, cooperable shoulders on the wall of the opening and the contact for limiting inward movement of the contact, opposing shoulders on the wall of the opening and the con.. tact, and an elongate split sleeve-shaped spring member normally frictionally carried in the opening for cooperating with said opposing shoulders, when the contact is inserted in the opening and acting under longitudinal compression to prevent outward movement of the contact the said member being confined against displacement from the contact when in the opening.

3. In an electrical connector, a body having an opening, a resilient longitudinally split sleeve lock member normally confined in the opening and having fingers normally sloping forward and slightly inward, a contact to be installed in the opening, and an enlarged part on the contact for limiting inward movement of the contact into the opening and adapted to be moved inwardly past said fingers by delecting them radially, said part presenting a rear surface engageable by the ends of said fingers to prevent rearward movement of the contact.

4. An electrical connector assembly comprising a shell, an insert of dielectric material in the shell having an opening, the insert comprising a body, and a plate removably held at one end of the body, spaced opposing shoulders on the wall of the opening, one shoulder being on the body, the other being on the plate, an elongate sleeve-shaped spring lock member normally frictionally carried in the opening between the shoulders, a contact to be installed in the opening and a. part on the contact engaged by said member so that said member acts under longitudinal compression to retain the contact in the opening.

5. An electrical connector assembly comprising a shell, an insert in the shell having an open ing, the insert comprising a body, and a plate removable from the body, spaced opposing shoulders on the wall of the opening, one shoulder ybeing on the body, the other being on the plate, a spring lock sleeve member normally frictionally carried in the opening and held between the shoulders, a contact to be installed in the opening and a part on the contact engaged by said member whereby said contact is retained in the opening, the lock member being longitudinally split and tending to expand so that'it disengages from the contact when removed from the opening.

6. An electrical connector assembly comprising a shell, an insert in the shell having an opening, the insert comprising a body, and a plate removably held at one end of the body, a boss on the plate entering an enlargement of the opening at one end thereof, the inner end of the boss forming a shoulder on the wall of the opening, there being a second shoulder on the wall of the opening opposing the rst named shoulder and spaced therefrom longitudinally of the opening, an elongate tubular spring lock member held between said shoulders and having a spring finger radially inward of the shoulders, and a contact to be installed in said opening and having a collar part engaged by said finger to lock the contact in the opening.

7. An electrical connector including, a body having two separable sections normally held to- 12 gether as a unit. there being an opening in the body with opposed shoulders one on each section of the body, a longitudinally split spring tubular member normally frictionally carried in the opening between the shoulders and having a longitudinally disposed spring tongue facing the inner end of the opening, and a contact to be inserted in the opening and having a shoulder to be moved past the tongue by defiecting it radially and cooperating with the tongue to prevent withdrawal of the contact from the opening.

RAY W. GUDIE.

REFEBEN CES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATEN'IS Number Name Date 1,940,666 Diamond Dec. 26, 1933 2,249,977 Penfold July 22, 1941 2,231,124 Joseph Feb. 11, 1941 2,188,530 Del Camp Jan. 30, 1940 1,952,141 Parker Mar. 27, 1934 2,095,254 Holiday Oct. 12, 1937 2,090,761 Lewyt Aug. 24, 1937 2,032,501 Reynolds Mar. 3, 1936 2,089,844 Anderson Aug. 10, 1937 2,229,211 Koi'engold Jan. 21, 1941 2,295,214 Jackson Sept. 8, 1942 2,265,341 Borchert Dec. 9, 1941 1,753,317 Rothen Apr. 8, 1930 1,871,839 Carter Aug. 16, 1932 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 537,968 British July 15, 1941 411,849 British June 8, 1934 641,843 French Apr. 23, 1928

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FR641843A * Título no disponible
GB411849A * Título no disponible
GB537968A * Título no disponible
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.439/744, 439/595, 439/905, 174/21.0JS
Clasificación internacionalH01R13/426
Clasificación cooperativaH01R13/426, Y10S439/905
Clasificación europeaH01R13/426