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Número de publicaciónUS2529711 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación14 Nov 1950
Fecha de presentación27 May 1948
Fecha de prioridad27 May 1948
Número de publicaciónUS 2529711 A, US 2529711A, US-A-2529711, US2529711 A, US2529711A
InventoresSmith Arthur L J
Cesionario originalRca Corp
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Method of making a zinc oxide phosphor
US 2529711 A
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

Nov. 14, i950 A. L. J. SMITH 2,529,711

METHOD 0F MAKING A ZINC OXIDE PHOSPHOR Filed May 27, 1948 7000 /gaa Zmventor Ann-m3 L T. SMITH El! M i Gtorlleg Patented Nov.. 14, 1950 UNITED lSTATES PATENT .OFFICE METHOD'OF MAKING A ZINC OXIDE PHOSPHOR Arthur L. J. Smith, Lancaster, Pa., assignor to f Radio-Corporation of America,` a corporation of Delaware Application May 27, 1948, Serial N0.`29,577

14 Claims.

. 1 This invention relates to lmaterialsv that fluoresce upon excitation'by cathode rays, light and :ultra-violet waves, X-ray, andotherfforms of energy.

lIn someapplications 'of a fluorescent phosphor screen, it isgre'atlydesirable to utilize the ultraviolet emissioninstead of'the visual emission of -the phosphor. Fory example, in va flying spot yscanning kinescope using a zinc'oxide phosphor screen, Tit has been recognized that the ultraviolet'outp'ut ofthe phosphor has a shorter decay time than the visible component.. For such apfplications,` it is thereioredesirable toluse a zinc oxidephosphor having a high eiiiciency in ultraviolet regions of the spectrum.

"An objectY of my inventionis to provide an improved crystalline `inorganic f phosphor having high efiiciency of luminescence inthe ultra-violet regions of then spectrum.

A further object-ofthe invention is to provide Yan improved ycrystalline inorganic phosphor having very short persistence of'decay.

Another object is vto'prepare a more elicient zinclioxide phosphor,l particularly. for comparatively low vvoltage and high current density cathode ray excitation.

A further objectof my invention'is to provide an easily controllable methodtof preparing a zinc Y oxidev phosphor.

rAnother Vobject of myv invention is to provide Y a method of preparing zinc oxide phosphor whose characteristics are determined' by Vcontrollable steps inthe method.

Other. objects4 will appear KYin the' following description, reference'being had to the drawing, which is a graphical representation of the'emissionfcharacteristics of three zincv oxide phosphors jprepared according. to my invention. Y

. I have found that luminescent 'zinc oxide phosphorl Ahavingl goodv `characteristics can `rbe pre, pared by,4 firing the'zinc'oxide Ain a reducingatla furnace. andtredt between 940 C. and 1000 C.

vfor 60' minutes-in ra reducingcarbon monoxide l atmosphere.

This Y1lringstep is followed by a second firing of thematerial in a nitrogenat- -mosphere containing from 0.01% to 0.3% of oxygen Yfor Vi'lve to twenty minutes at 'y 940 to 1000 C. The phosphor material is then cooled in this mildly oxidizing atmosphere,

The f above-described procedure of producing zinc oxidelphosphoris one ywhich produces consistently -good'phosphor material having` high efciencyfin the ultraeviolet. The process is also zone which can be easilycontrolled. The time of the first firing in CO isnot critical. Good phosvphor'mat'erial may be` produced for shorter `and longerrperiods of time than the sixty minutes.

However,'the sixty'minute ring in CO results inthe most eilicient material. A less efficient phosphor material'isfobtained'when the material `isriredin CO for more than or less than the sixty minute optimumf ringtime. f

AThe optimumring' time of sixty minutes reffduces the :f zinc voxide to: produce the ldesired amount fof zincmetal. kFiring for a longer time -crystalline ZnO` Vphospho-r 'which is undesirable. '.The secondfiring Vin the nitrogen atmosphere tends to use yup the base material. The -temperaturerangeof'this' CO ring is such that rbelow 940 C. the reaction is too slow andV also the desiredv reaction will not take place below the vvboilingpoint. of zinc at 907 C. Above 1000 C.,

the ring'in CO produces a too rapidr growth of containingatrace of oxygen provides a controlled reoxidation ofthe zinc produced in the first :ring step. *When the. zinc oxide is fired, as described above;fonten'minutes in themixed atmosphere ofV nitrogen-and oxygen, the resulting phosphor will have higher eciency-in the ultra-violet and lowerfefciencynin fithevisual region of the spectrum than'if Vthefr-ing in the mixed atmosphere were continuedffor twenty minutes. This fact is graphically shown in the figure in which curve -was'fortwenty minutes.

i0"-repres'ents'the emission characteristics of a Yzincoxide phosphor, produced by the method described, lin which the second iiring was continued for ten minutesin the mixed atmosphere.

Curve l2"represents thefemission characteristics of-a zinc oxidev phosphor produced bythe same process butin which'the mixed atmosphere firing If the second firing is less thanlten minutes or'greater than twenty minutes a less eilicient phosphor is obtained.

Also, the temperature of the second firing will "determine the' optimumring time, since `firing at a higher temperature requires a shorter optimum firing time and likewise a lower firing temperature requires a longer optimum ring time. A trace of oxygen in the cooling atmosphere tends to reduce the ultra-violet efficiency, but increases the efficiency of the visual emission.

The reactions taking place, during the preparation of the zinc oxide phosphor described above, are undoubtedly, first, a reduction of some of the zinc oxide to form free zinc metal within the batch, and secondly, a diffusion, volatilization, or reoxidation of the excess metal. It is not clear just what the function of this zinc metal is, yet it is thought to be an activator. Zinc oxide phosphor has only been produced successfully by ring the material in the presence of zinc metal. By ring the zinc oxide material 60 minutes with a reducing CO atmosphere, zinc metal is formed in an amount in excess of that necessary to produce a vgood phosphor. The excess amount of free zinc metal, produced in the reduction step, determines the time required to drive off or oxidize this excess metal in the second stage of firing. It might be possible to determine the actual time required for the reduction ring of zinc oxide for any particular sized ,.1

batch in order to produce the exact amount of zinc metal required for activation, however, the control of the firing time and ring atmosphere would be so extremely critical, that the process would be unmanageable from the standpoint of reproducibility. It is desirable that the particle size of the zinc oxide material used be as small as possible to prevent the forming of a grainy screen, as during the firing of the zinc oxide material, the particle size of the crystals tend to grow. This may be partially controlled by not using higher firing temperatures than those given above. No attempt is made to mechanically reduce the particle size of the phosphor formed, as such a step lessens its efficiency.

Luminescent zinc oxide having good emission vin the visual region of the spectrum has been prepared in the past by firing the zinc oxide material in hydrogen followed by cooling in air. In this process, zinc metal is produced in the reduction ring step and any excess zinc metal is eliminated by reoxidation during the cooling in air. This process is difcult to control, as the ring time must remain short and hence is extremely critical. The cooling condition is also extremely diiiicult to control to produce a useful phosphor. The air, present during cooling, tends to reoxidize the zinc metal so rapidly that control of the process is lost. Methods of producing zinc oxide phosphors, where there is an f -an inert gas containing no oxygen. The phosphor material is then cooled in the mixed nitrogen-oxygen atmosphere or in the inert atmosphere containing no oxygen. Although the preparation of zinc oxide phosphor by a hydrogen reduction firing is normally hard to control, the method given here is not as critical, when the hydrogen firing is followed by the firing in a controlled oxidizing medium. Cooling of the zinc oxide phosphor in air after a reduction ring, as previously practiced by others, is dicult to control due to the too rapid reoxidation of the zinc metal.

In the controlled oxidation ring of zinc oxide material in mixed nitrogen and oxygen, a greater proportion of oxygen will speed the reaction while a smaller proportion of oxygen will slow down the reaction. Also, the mixed nitrogen-oxygen firing may be followed by a third ring of the phosphor material at 940 C. to l000 C. in pure nitrogen to increase the ultraviolet emission at the expense of the visual emission. I have found, that after the rst reduction ring of the zinc oxide material, by appropriately varying the times of firing in the mixed atmosphere of nitrogen and oxygen and of firing in pure nitrogen, I can produce a zinc oxide phosphor having a desired ratio of ultra-violet emission to Visual emission.

Another zinc oxide phosphor having high ultra-violet emission may be produced by a first reduction firing of zinc oxide material in pure carbon monoxide for l0 to 60 minutes at a temperature between 940 C. to 1000 C., or in hydrogen for '10 to l5 minutes at 970 C. to 1000D C. This is then followed by a second neutral ring of the material in a pure nitrogen atmosphere for l0 to 60 minutes at 970 C to 1000 C. Alternatively, the range of ring temperature for this step may be 940 C. to 1000 C. The phosphor is then cooled in the pure nitrogen atmosphere. The time of the reduction firing is not critical and efficient phosphor material can be produced by shorter firing times. Again, the first firing determines the time required for the second ring. In this method it is presumed that the excess zinc is removed by volatilization. The second neutral ring step may be omitted if the phosphor material is cooled in a pure CO or pure N2 atmosphere immediately after the first firing in CO. However, the use of the second ring in N2 will produce more consistently phosphors of high eiciencies in the ultra-violet than those which use only a cooling step in CO or N2 after the first reduction firing step because, as mentioned previously, the amount of zinc cannot be controlled adequately by only a reduction firing. In the gure, curve I4 represents the emission characteristics of a zinc oxide phosphor produced by the method including the second step of ring in pure nitrogen. It can be seen that the phosphor represented by curve I4 has essentially the same efiiciency in the ultra-violet as curve l0 but a lower visual efiiciency.

While I have indicated and described several systems for carrying my invention into effect, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that my invention is by no means limite'd to the particular organizations shown and described, but that many modifications may be made without departing from the scope of my invention.

What I claim as new is:

1. The method of making a zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, firing zinc oxide material between 940 C. and 1000o C. in a reducing atmosphere between 10 to 60 minutes, and ring the above red material between 940 C. and 1000 C. in a nitrogen atmosphere containing the equivalent of from 0% to 0.3% of oxygen.

2. The method of making a zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, firing zinc oxide material between 940 C. and '1000 C. in a reducing atmosphere between 10 to 60 minutes, ring the above fired material between ,940 C. and 1000 C. in a nitrogen atmosphere containing the equivalent of from 0% to 0.3% of oxygen, and cooling the twice red phosphor in a nitrogen atmosphere containing the equivalent of from 0% to 0.3% of oxygen.

3. The method of making zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, ring zinc oxide at 940 C. to 1000 C. in a reducing atmosphere, firing the fired zinc oxide between 940 C. and 1000 C. in an atmosphere of nitrogen containing 0.01% to 0.3% of oxygen, cooling the red zinc oxide in the atmosphere of nitrogen containing 0.01% to 0.3% of oxygen.

4. The method of making zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, firing zinc oxide between 940 C. and 1000 C. in a reducing atmosphere of carbon monoxide for at least minutes, firing the red zinc oxide in an atmosphere of nitrogen containing 0.01% to 0.3% of oxygen at 940 C. to 1000 C. for five to twenty minutes, and cooling in an atmosphere of nitrogen containing 0.0'1% to 0.3% of oxygen.

5. The method of making zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, firing zinc oxide between 940 C. and 1000 C. in a reducing atmosphere of carbon monoxide for at least ten minutes, firing the iired zinc oxide in an atmosphere of nitrogen containing 0.01% to 0.3% of oxygen at a temperature of 940 C. to 1000 C. for ve to ten minutes, and cooling the twice fired zinc oxide in an atmosphere of nitrogen containing 0.01% to 0.3% of oxygen.

6. The method of making zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, firing zinc oxide in a reducing atmosphere of hydrogen at 940 C. to 1000 C. for at least five minutes, ring the red zinc oxide in `an atmosphere of nitrogen containing 0.01% to 0.3% of oxygen at a temperature of 940 C. to 1000" C. for at least ten minutes, and cooling the twice red zinc oxide in an atmosphere of nitrogen containing 0.01% to 0.3% of oxygen.

7. The method of making a zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, firing zinc oxide material in a reducing atmosphere, at a temperature of `at least 907 C. ring the above-fired material in an inert atmosphere at a temperature of at least 907 C., and cooling the fired material in an inert atmosphere.

8. The method of making a zinc oxide-phos phor comprising the steps of, firing zinc oxide in a reducing atmosphere between 940 C. and 1000 C. for at least 10 to 60 minutes, ring the above-said red zinc oxide in an inert atmosphere between 940 C. and '1000 C. for at least 10 to 60 minutes, cooling the fired material in an inert atmosphere.

9. The method of making a zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, ring zinc oxide in a reducing atmosphere between 940 C. and 1000 C. firing said red zinc oxide in an inert atmosphere of pure nitrogen between 940 C. and 1000 C. and cooling the red material in an inert atmosphere.

10. The method of making zinc oxide phosphor comprising thel steps of, firing zinc oxide in a reducing atmosphere of carbon monoxide between 940 C. and 1000 C. for at least 10 to 60 minutes, firing the red zinc oxide in a neutral atmosphere of pure nitrogen at 940 C. to 1000o C. for at least 10 to 60 minutes, and cooling the fired material in a neutral atmosphere of pure nitrogen.

11. The method of making zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, ring zinc oxide in a reducing atmosphere of hydrogen at 940 C. to '1000 C. firing the red zinc oxide in an atmosphere of pure nitrogen at940 C. to 1000 C., cooling the said iired material in an atmosphere of pure nitrogen.

12. The method of making a zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, ring zinc oxide material at a temperature of at least 907 C. in a reducing atmosphere, firing the above red material at a temperature of at least 907 C. in an atmosphere consisting essentially of a neutral gas and containing the equivalent of from 0% to 0.3% of oxygen, and cooling the twice red phosphor in an atmosphere consisting essentially of a neutral gas and containing the equivalent of from 0% to 0.3% of oxygen.

13. The method of making a zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, ring zinc oxide material between 940 C. and 1000 C. in a reducing atmosphere, ring the above red material at a temperature of 940 C. to 1000 C. in a substantially neutral atmosphere selected from the group consisting of an inert atmosphere and an atmosphere consisting essentially of an inert gas containing the equivalent of from 0% to 0.3% oxygen, and cooling the twice fired phosphor in a substantially neutral atmosphere selected from the group consisting of an inert atmosphere and an atmosphere consisting essentially of an inert gas containing the equivalent of from 0% to 0.3% oxygen.

14. The method of making zinc oxide phosphor comprising the steps of, firing zinc oxide at a temperature of at least 907 C. in a reducing atmosphere, firing the red zinc oxide at a temperature of at least 907 C. in a substantially neutral atmosphere selected from the group consisting of an inert atmosphere and an atmosphere consisting essentially of an inert gas containing the equivalent of from 0%,` to 0.3% of oxygen, and cooling the twice red material also in an atmosphere selected from said group.

ARTHUR L. J. SMITH.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS- Number Name Date 1,355,904 McKee Oct. 19, 1920 1,422,485 Lewis Jan. 16, 1923 1,838,359 Brinker Dec. 29, 1931 2,408,475 Nickle Oct. 1, 1946

Citas de patentes
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US1355904 *19 Oct 1920 Baeph h
US1422485 *12 Oct 192011 Jul 1922Harry ShephardPower indicator for internal-combustion engines
US1838359 *21 Oct 192629 Dic 1931Frederic A BrinkerProducing fumed zinc oxide from zinc sulphate solution
US2408475 *18 Jul 19411 Oct 1946Gen ElectricFluorescent zinc oxide
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US2887632 *16 Abr 195219 May 1959Timefax CorpZinc oxide semiconductors and methods of manufacture
US3534211 *3 Oct 196713 Oct 1970Westinghouse Electric CorpCathode-ray device which incorporates high-speed phosphors
US4181627 *19 Feb 19751 Ene 1980Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyDopes, heat treatment, zinc, zinc sulfide
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.252/301.60R
Clasificación internacionalC09K11/54, C09K11/00
Clasificación cooperativaC09K11/00, C09K11/54
Clasificación europeaC09K11/00, C09K11/54