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Número de publicaciónUS2565454 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación21 Ago 1951
Fecha de presentación20 Sep 1947
Fecha de prioridad20 Sep 1947
Número de publicaciónUS 2565454 A, US 2565454A, US-A-2565454, US2565454 A, US2565454A
InventoresAndrews Glenn E, Mackenzie Kenneth W
Cesionario originalRaytheon Mfg Co
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Electrostatic smoking device
US 2565454 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

1951 K. w. MHCKENZIE EIAL ,565, 54

ELECTROSTATIC SMOKING DEVICE Filed Sept. 20, 1947 3 Sheets-Sheet l SOURCE OF DIRECT +VOL TAGE FROM SMOKE To EXHAUST GENERATOR Q 51.0 wen M Qv lzwsurons KENNETH wMAckmz/E GLENN E. ANDREWS sv z gii;

1951 K. w. M KENZIE ETAL 2,565,454

ELECTROSTATIC SMOKING DEVICE Filed Sept. 20, 194"! 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 FROM SMOKE GENE/FA TOR BLOWER lnvsumks 'KslvusmwMAckelvzle GLENN E. AND/25m;

ZBL% Air Fig. 5.

Patented Aug. 21, 1951 ELECTROSTATIC SMOKING DEVICE Kenneth W. MacKenzie,

Glenn E. Andrews, And Raytheon Manufact Newton Highlands, and over, Mass., assignors to uring Company,

Newton,

Mass., a corporation of Delaware Application September 20, 1947, Serial No. 775,266

11 Claims. (Cl. 99-261) This invention relates to electrostatic smoking devices, and more particularly to apparatus for electrostatically depositing or precipitating smoke particles ontothe surfaces of masses of food, such as meat or fish, which it is desired to smoke.

An object of this invention is to devise apparatus for smoking food, by the use of which food may be smoked in a very much shorter time than with prior smoking equipment, with no sacrifice of quality.

Another object is to devise a smoking device by the use of which a very uniform and sufficiently dense deposit of smoke may be produced on the food articles being smoked.

A further object is to provide an electrostatic smoking apparatus which requires only a relatively low voltage.

A still further object is to devise electrostatic smoking equipment which ispractical, eflicient, and simple in design.

The foregoing and other objects of the, invention will be best understood from the following description of some exemplifications thereof, reference being had to the wherein:

Fig. 1 is a vertical section through a complete ionizer and collector cell assembly of one type of electrostatic smoker constructed in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the ionizer and collector cell assembly of Fig. 1 but with the shelf unit removed;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the shelf unit of Fig. l;

Fig. 5 is a vertical section through a modified accompanying drawings,"

, mediate the tubular electrodes 8,

form of smoking apparatus according to the invention; and

Fig. 6 is a section Now referring to the drawings. ticularly to Figs. 1-4 thereof, the numeral I generally designates the active or smoke-precipitating portion of an electrostatic smoking apparatus. said portion consists of an ionizing structure 2 and a collecting structure I.

The structure 2 is an ionizer of the construc tion disclosed and claimed in the copending' application of Kenneth W. MacKenzie, Ser. No. 678,145, filed June 20, 1946, now abandoned. Structure 2 comprises a rectangular frame of metal providing side walls 4 and 5 and upper and lower end walls Ii and 1, respectively. A'plurality of substantially horizontal tubular electrodes 8 are secured in spaced parallel relation through the side-walls l and 5. A plurality of horizontal fine wire electrodes 9 are supported in spaced parallel relation to the tubular electrodes 8 by a grill or high voltage framework indicated generaltaken along line 6 90f and more ar-- 'tions of said rods.

crossbar 23, parallel to bars I5 and I6, welded to 'being parallel to the ly at Ill. The metallic framework I 0 and the ionizing wires 9 supported thereby are insulated Two of the insulators II are secured by bolts I2 to one of the tubular electrodes 8 adjacent one end of the structure 2, and a second pair of insulators II are secured by similar bolts to another of the tubular electrodes 8, preferably at the opposite end of the structure 2.

The outer ends of the insulators II each have an inwardly-curving channel iron I3 suitably secured thereto, as by a bolt I4. The inner end of each of the channel irons I3 is welded to the framework ID, in this instance to the angle irons I5 and I6 forming the upper and lower horizontal crossbars of the framework.

At their left and right ends the crossbars I5 and I6 have welded thereto left and right vertical bars I! and I8, respectively. The bars I1 and I8 have secured therethrough a plurality of paired aligned supporting rods I9 which are of suflicient strength to support the fine wire electrodes 9 therebetween with great rigidity, but which are sufficiently flexible to maintain the wire electrodes under tension. The rods or pins I 9 are spaced to support the fine wire electrodes 9 at points interand in parallel relation thereto.

An intermediate vertical bar- 20, parallel to bars I! and I8, carries a plurality of spaced rods 2| which terminate in hooked portions 22. The rods .2I are positioned in alignment with coacting pairs of left and right pins I9 to contact the fine wire electrodes 9 at points intermediate their length to prevent vibration thereof. Rods 2| are of such length that wires 9 pass through the hooked por- An intermediate horizontal the outer vertical bars I! and I8 and the intermediate vertical bar 20, may be provided to give the supporting framework In a greater rigidity.

I The rods I9 are attached to the left and right bars I! and I 8 in any suitable manner, for example in the manner described in the aforementioned MacKenzie application. The ends of the fine wire electrodes 9 may be secured to rods I 9 in any suitable manner, such as that disclosed in the MacKenzie application above referred to.

A plurality of spaced horizontal parallel metal-- lic plates 24 are mounted on the ionizer high voltage framework Ill. These plates are made of rather thin metal, and are rectangular in outline, with the major dimension of each rectangle wires 9' and to the longitudinal axis of tubular electrodes 8. A-sufiici'ent number of plates are provided to substantially fill the entire space between opposite channel irons I3, the spacing between the adjacent plates being determined as described more in detail hereinafter. Plates 24 are preferably secured to frame In by flanging said plates at one side and welding the flanges to the bars l1, l8, and 20. Collector plates 24 are mounted on that sideof bars 11, I8, and 20 which is opposite from wire electrodes 9; said plates are therefore mounted externally of the ionizing structure 2; the said plates are a component of the collecting structure 3. Plates 24 preferably have a length somewhat greater than that of wire electrodes 9.

A food-supporting shelf assembly, consisting of a plurality of spaced horizontal parallel metallic shelf plates 25 mechanically joined together by a pair of opposite vertical metallic transverse end wall members 26, constitutes the grounded portion of the collecting structure 3. Shelves 25 are rectangular in outline and have substantially the same length and width as plates 24. The shelves 25 are so spaced that, when the shelf assembly or unit is in operative position with respect to plates 24, the shelves 25 will be located intermediate the said plates; the shelf assembly is movable with respect to the remainder of the apparatus from the operative meshed position shown in Fig. 1 to the loading position shown in Fig. 4, in which position said shelf assembly is entirely separated from the rest of the apparatus and is in a position enabling masses of food to be placed on and removed from the shelves without danger.

The food to be smoked, shown as fish in metal cans 21 only by way of example, is placed on the shelves 25 and is supported thereby, sincesaid shelves are horizontal when the apparatus is being used for smoking. Plates 24 are mechanically and electrically connected to the high voltage frame ill of the ionizer 2, and are therefore at the same potential as said frame. The frame I0 is connected, by means of a cable or lead 28, to the positive terminal 29 of a suitable source 30 of high direct voltage, the negative terminal 3| of which is grounded as at 32. Therefore, wire electrodes 9 and plates 24 are at a high p itive potential with respect to ground, on the order of 12,000 volts, for example. The frame 4-1 is grounded at 33, so that the tubular electrodes 8 are also at ground potential. The, end wall members 26 of the shelf assembly are grounded as at 24, so that shelves 25, and the metal cans 21 of food thereon, are at ground potential.

As stated above, the unit consisting of the shelves 25 is removable so that it can be loaded with cans of fish and then slid into place, as shown in Fig. 1, for the smoking process. In use, the apparatus is mounted so that the wire electrodes 9 of the ionizer extend substantially horizontally and perpendicular to the paper in Fig. 1. It is to be understood that the unit I is mounted in a suitable grounded enclosure, preferably made of metal,- and smoke-laden air is supplied to the enclosure and is caused to flow therethrough inQthe direction of the arrows in Fig. 1, so that such air passes between the electrodes 8 and 9 before passing between the electrodes 24 and 25. The smoke generator and exhaust blower for producing this flow of smoke-laden air are not shown.

The frame 4-1 is preferably directly mounted in and electrically connected to the grounded enclosure, with the .wire electrodes 9 extending horizontally. Plates 24, being parallel to wires 9. are therefore also horizontal. The shelf unit. when loaded with the food to be smoked, is slid into place with the shelves 25 meshing between plates 24 and extending horizontally, the lower ends of the end members 26 resting on the lower 4 interior wall of the enclosure in order to ground shelves 25 and to support them in position,

Each of the grounded elements 25 of the collecting structure 3 is positioned between a pair of adjacent positive collector plates 24, as shown. The spacing between adjacent shelves 25, and also between adjacent plates 24, is made such that, taking into account the magnitude of the voltage between plates 24 and 25, the depth of cans 21, and the velocity of air fiow through the enclosure, there will be a maximum precipitation of smoke on the fish and at the same time no short-circuiting discharge will occur between any of the adjacent plates 24 and 25. If source 30 produces 12,000 volts, it has been found that a distance on the order of inch or greater, between the top of each can 21 and the bottom of the plate 24 next thereabove, and between the top of each of the inner plates 24 and the bottom of the shelf 25 next thereabove, is satisfactory.

There is a high voltage between the wire electrodes 9 and the tubular electrodes 8 of the ionizing structure 2, and these pairs of adjacent electrodes cooperate with each other, by means of the ionizing discharge therebetween, to charge, with a potential which is positive with respect to ground or the negative terminal of the source 30, the finite particles of sol d matter, or smoke particles, in the atmosphere within the enclosure around the ionizing structure 2.

As these ionized smoke particles travel on through the ionizing structure 2, they enter the region of the collecting structure 3. In this region, the electrostatic field between adjacent plates 24 and 25, together with the polarity of the charge on the particles, causes said particles to move to and be deposited upon the grounded elements of the collecting structure. The fish to be smoked, being in the metal cans 21 which are in contact with the metal grounded shelves 25, become in turn grounded elements; the smoke particles move to the fish and are deposited thereon.

It has been found that, by the use of the electrostatic smoking apparatus of this invention, food may be smoked in a very much shorter time than when prior art equipment is used, with no sacrifice of quality of the smoked product. For example, the smoking time may be reduced from approximately eight hours to approximately twenty minutes.

By using the configuration of ionizer and collector cell disclosed herein, with the positive collector plates mounted directly on the ionizer high r voltage frame, the distance from the ionizer 2 to the cell 3 is minimized and the positively charged smoke particles lose almost no charge in traveling the very short distance from the ionizer t0 the collector plates. Therefore, the apparatus of this invention utilizes the smoke very efilciently. and a very dense and uniform deposit of smoke may be produced on the food.

It is within the scope of this invention to utilize, as the grounded electrodes, wire screen for the supporting shelves instead of imperforate pieces of metal. By so doing, and if the cans 21 are eliminated, uncanned fish can be placed on the screens and smoked on both sides, Large fish can be smoked in this way, since the grounded elements of the collector cell are perforate in thiscase so that smoke can be deposited on the bottom surfaces of such fish.

Now referring to Figs. 5 and 6, these figures show a modified form of electrostatic smoking apparatus, by means of which meat, such as bacon, ham, or sausage, for example, may be smoked in a continuous manner. In these figures, partssimilar to those in Figs. 1-4 are given the same reference numerals; Figs. 5 and 6 show the apparatus on an enlarged scale.

A chamber or enclosure 35, having open upper and lower ends, is supplied with smoke-laden air through its lower end and is exhausted through its upper end, so that smake flows upwardly through said chamber. The smoke generator and exhaust blower for producing this flow of smokeladen air are not shown. The flow of smoke through enclosure 35 is in the direction of the arrows in Fig. 5.

An ionizing structure 2, which is quite similar to that of Fig. 1 except that the plates 24 are omitted from high voltage framework l8 and except that the sets of angle irons I5, I6, 23 and I1, i8, 28 are interchanged with respect to each other from their positions in Fig. 1, is mounted horizontally in the lower end of chamber 35 by any suitable means, as by means of a plurality of supporting irons 36 fixed to the interior walls of said chamber, the main outer or grounded frame of the ionizing structure resting on said irons. The ionizing structure is preferably mounted so that the insulators H extend downwardly from the main outer or grounded metal frame.

Above structure 2 is mounted a plurality, here shown as three in number, of parallel spaced metallic plates 31. These plates are thin and Fig. 1, since plates 31 are located in the path of.

to be smoked, in a continuous manner'between adjacent pairs of plates 31 in the direction of the arrows 43. In order to allow for passage of the food and the conveying means through chamber 35, while at the same time permitting continuous loading and unloading of the food from the conveyor, a pair of apertures 50 are provided through each opposite end wall of chamber 35, these apertures being of suflicient size to permit the passage therethrough of the conveyor loaded with food, these four apertures being arranged in two oppositely-disposed aligned pairs, one pair of apertures being aligned with each of the chains 5|.

Two spaced parallel endless chains 5| are provided, both chains being preferably of the flex-, ible roller link type. Each of said chains is I driven by a pair of oppositely-disposed sprocket wheels 52, the wheels of each pair being mounted for rotation at opposite ends of chamber 35, outside the same and inside the projections of the sides of the corresponding paired aligned apertures 50. The two sprocket wheels at one end of chamber 35 are secured to a common shaft 53 and are rotated at any suitable speed by a motor (not shown), through a drive pulley 54 are mounted vertically, said plates having a length substantially equal to that of the ionizing structure. The plates 31 are mounted in chamber 35, the two outer plates being supported therein by means of a plurality of horizontallyextending insulators 38 each secured to one end to one of the inner side walls of chamber 35 and each secured at its opposite end to one of said two outer pla'tes31. In order to maintain the central plate 31 in position in chamber 35 and to maintain plates 31 properly assembled and spaced with respect to each other, a plurality of metallic tie rods 39 are provided near the bottom edges of plates 31, each tie rod passing through all three plates by means of suitable aligned apertures provided therethrough, andpreferably being secured to all three plates. A plurality of tubular metallic spacing members 40 are provided, each surrounding a corresponding portion of one of the tie rods and each member 40 having its opposite ends bearing against, and secured to, a pair of adjacent plates. Thus, members 40 function to properly space the central plate 31 from the two end plates 31, while rods 38 hold the assembly together. Plates 31 are all of equal "area, and have their upper and lower ends positioned in the same horizontal plane.

Plates 31 are insulatingly mounted in chamber 35 by means of insulators 38, as above described, and are connected, as schematically indicated in Fig. 5, by means'of a lead 4|, to the positive or ungrounded terminal 42 of a high voltage direct current source 43,, the negative terminal 48 of which is grounded at 45. Chamber 35 is ordinarily grounded, as are the tubes 8 of the ionizing structure 2, as by means of lead 45, while the fine wires 9 of structure 2 are connected to lead 4| and positive source terminal 42. The lower ends or edges of plates 31 are located just slightly above the upper edge of ionizing structure 2 and, with said plates connected to the positive ungrounded terminal 42 of the source, function similarly to the collecting plates 24 of mounted on said shaft.

A plurality of outwardly-projecting hooks 55 are secured, as by riveting, to each of the chains 5| at uniform intervals therealong. Although a hook is shown in the drawin as being fastened I to each and every link of the chains, it is to be understood that the hooks may be spaced any desired number of links apart.

The paired sprocket wheels for each chain are positioned, from left to right in Fig. 6, substantially midway between the corresponding pairs of adjacent plates 31. The chains 51 are spaced any suitable distance above plates 31, and hooks 55 have a length such that, when the masses of food 48 are hung' thereon, said masses will be so horizontally positioned that theywill be conveyed by one of the chains 5| through chamber 35 between adjacent pairs of plates. A separate line or series of food masses may be hung on each chain 5| at the left end of the chamber in Fig. 5, and the two separate lines of food are V sprocket wheels 52.

then passed simultaneously through chamber 35, each line passing between its corresponding adjacent pair of plates 31, after which the lines may be removed from the hooks at the right end of the chamber in Fig. 5. a

Food masses 48, such as hams, sides of bacon,

or strings of sausages, for example, are hung by means of metallic supporting means from metal hooks 55. so that said masses are electrically connected to chains 5| and therefore also to grounded as at 55, so that masses 43 are connected to the grounded or negative terminal 44 of the high voltage source 43.

The grounded masses of food, together with the high voltage plates 31, function as a collector cell for the ionizedv smoke particles which are provided in the space above ionizing structure 2. The smoke particles are charged positively by the ionizing structure 2, then passing upwardly into the field between plates 31 and rounded food masses 48, which field causes such particles to move to and be precipitated on the The sprocket wheels aregrounded or negative food masses 48. Therefore,

- when the apparatus is in operation, two lines of chains on which they are hung causing movement of said masses through the collector cell region of the smoke precipitatingapparatus; the smoked food may be removed from the hooks at the right end of the chamber in Fig. 5.

In order to support the weight of the loaded chains, and to properly guide the food masses between the adjacent pairs of plates 31, two spaced parallel elongated guiding tracks or channels 51 are utilized, each having a length substantially equal to that of the chamber 35, each extending through the interior of said chamber, and each being longitudinally aligned with the lower sweep of a corresponding one of the chains Each of the tracks 51 is supported from an adjacent inner side wall of chamber 35 by a separate supporting member 58. Each of the tracks 51 is substantially of inverted U-shape, but each has a pair of opposed horizontal inwardly-extending flanges at its lower end, on the upper surface of which the corresponding chain slides throughout the travel of the lower sweep of such chain through chamber 35. The spaced ends of the horizontal flanges of each track in effect provide a longitudinal slot therebetween through which the hooks 55 extend. Each of the tracks 51 is open at its ends to allow entry of the corresponding chain thereinto and egress of such chain therefrom. The interior of each track is of suflicient size to accommodate the corresponding chain 51 therein; with such chain contacting only the bottom wall of the track, or the upper surface of the horizontal flanges thereof.

If desired, rollers could be provided inside the tracks 51 or on the chains, to provide rolling rather than sliding contact between the chains and the corresponding tracks. It is to be understood that each grounded mass of food 48 passes between a pair of high voltage positive plates; said mass acts as the negative collector electrode and is smoked. It is desired to be made clear that the showing in Figs. 5 and 6 is on a greatly enlarged scale, the distance between the positive plates 31 and the food 48 actually being approximately inch.

Of course, it is to be understood that this invention is not limited to the particular details grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the other frame to charge with a predetermined polarity finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including a grounded electrode and a high voltage electrode, said high voltage electrode being mounted on said high voltage frame externally of said ionizing structure and said grounded electrode comprising at least in part means adapted to support a mass'of food to be smoked. v

2. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the other frame to charge with a predetermined polarity finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including a plurality of spaced grounded electrodes and a plurality of spaced high voltage electrodes intermediate said grounded electrodes, said high voltage electrodes being mounted on said high voltage frame externally of said ionizing structure.

3. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the other frame to charge with a predetermined polarity finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including a plurality of spaced grounded electrodes and a plurality of spaced high voltage electrodes intermediate said grounded electrodes, said high voltage electrodes being mounted on said high voltage frame externally of said ionizing structure, said grounded electrodes being adapted to electrically contact said masses of food.

as described above, as many equivalents will suggest themselves to' those skilled in the art. For example, different voltages could be used for ionization and collection if desired, in which case the collector plates 24 would be insulatingly mounted on the high voltage frame I0. Also. the ionizer 2 could be turned around if desired, in which event the collecting structure 3 would be supported separately. In addition, the plates 24, instead of being parallel to shelves 25, couldibe inclined in the direction of air flow in such a way that the space between adjacent plates and shelves would decrease as one proceeded along thedirection of air flow, this being done, if desired to give a more uniform precipitation of smoke. Other variations will suggest themselves. It is accordingly desired that the appended claims be given a broad interpretation commensurate with the scope of this invention within the art.

What is claimedis:

1. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure said ionizing structure including a 4. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, each of said frames havingelectrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the other frame to charge with a predetermined polarity finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound: said collecting structure including a plurality of spaced grounded horizontally-mounted plate electrodes and a plurality of spaced high voltage horizontally-mounted plate electrodes intermediate said grounded electrodes, said high voltage electrodes being mounted on said high voltage frame externally of said ionizing structure, said grounded electrodes being adapted to have the masses of food to be smoked rested thereon.

5. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded ,metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the other frame to charge with a predetermined polarity finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including a plurality of spaced grounded horizontally-mounted plate electrodes and a plurality of spaced high voltage horizontally-mounted plate electrodes intermediate said grounded electrodes, said high voltage electrodes being mounted on said high voltage frame externally of said ionizing structure, said grounded electrodes being mechanically joined together as an assembly of food supporting shelves which is movable with respect to said high voltage electrodes.

6. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, said high voltage frame being connected to the positive side of a high voltage source the negative side of which is grounded, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the other frame to charge positively with respect to ground finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including a grounded electrode and a high voltage electrode, said high voltage electrode being mounted on said high voltage frame externally of said ionizing structure and being electrically connected to said high voltage frame, said grounded electrode being adapted to contact the mass of food to be smoked.

7. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, said high voltage frame being connected to the positive side of a high voltage source the negative side of which is grounded, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the other frame to charge positively with respect to ground finite particles of solid mattter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including a plurality of spaced grounded electrodes and a plurality of spaced high voltage electrodes intermediate said grounded electrodes, said high voltage electrodes being mounted on said high voltage frame externally of said ionizing structure and being electrically connected to said high voltage frame, said grounded electrodes being adapted to support the masses of food to be smoked.

8. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, said high voltage frame being connected to the positive side 01' a high voltage source the negative side of which is grounded, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the-other frame to charge positively with respect to'ground finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including a plurality of spaced grounded horizontally-mounted plate electrodes adapted to support said food to be smoked and a plurality of spaced high voltage horizontally-mounted plate electrodes intermediate said grounded electrodes, said high voltage electrodes being mounted on said high voltage frame externally of said ionizing structure and being electrically connected to said high voltage frame.

9. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, said high voltage frame being connected to the positive side of a high voltage source the negative side of which is grounded, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the other frame to charge positively with respect to ground finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including a plurality of spaced grounded horizontally-mounted plate electrodes and a plurality of spaced high voltage horizontally-mounted plate electrodes intermediate said grounded electrodes. said high voltage electrodes being mounted on said high voltage frame externally of said ionizing structure and being electrically connected to said high voltage frame, said grounded electrodes being mechanically joined together as an assembly of food supporting shelves which is movable with respect to said high voltage electrodes.

10. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which cooperate with those of the other frame to charge with a predetermined polarity finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including at least one pair of spaced high voltage verticallymounted plate electrodes and including also means for supporting a grounded mass of food intermediate said pair of electrodes.

11. Apparatus for smoking masses of food, comprising an ionizing structure and a collecting structure; said ionizing structure including a grounded metallic frame and a high voltage metallic frame insulatingly mounted on said grounded frame, each of said frames having electrically connected thereto electrodes which 00- operate with those of the other frame to charge with a predetermined polarity finite particles of solid matter suspended in the atmosphere therearound; said collecting structure including at least one pair of spaced high voltage verticallymounted plate electrodes and including also means for passing a grounded mass of food between said pair of electrodes.

KENNETH W. MACKENZIE. GLENN E. ANDREWS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,483,668 Little Feb. 12, 1924 1,719,354 Alsop July 2, 1929 2,225,677 White Dec. 24, 1940 2,425,652 Starkey Aug. 12, 1947 2,463,422 Ransburg et a1 Mar. 1, 1949 Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,565,454

KENNETH W. MACKENZIE ET AL.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows:

Column 5, line 9, for smake read smoke; column 7 line 50, for inch read inch; column 9, line 16, for mattter read matter;

and that the said Letters Patent should be read as corrected above, so that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Oflice.

Signed and sealed this 11th day of December, A. D. 1951.

August 21, 1951 THOMAS F. MURPHY,

Assistant Commissioner of Patents.

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.99/451, 99/358, 96/65, 99/474, 426/235
Clasificación internacionalB03C3/04, A23B4/056, B05B5/08, A23B4/044, B03C3/12
Clasificación cooperativaB05B5/08, A23B4/056, B03C3/12
Clasificación europeaB05B5/08, A23B4/056, B03C3/12