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Número de publicaciónUS2734667 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación14 Feb 1956
Fecha de presentación8 May 1951
Número de publicaciónUS 2734667 A, US 2734667A, US-A-2734667, US2734667 A, US2734667A
InventoresFred Conklin
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Grout pump
US 2734667 A
Resumen  disponible en
Imágenes(4)
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

Feb- 14, 1956 Filed May 8, 1951 4 Sheetssheet l r* ,/i) ,E 7,? l

fa /75 y' f l 49 f? .i fa l Z7 ff /9 fa 46 1 ji I 5"? f5 5,5

ff y //Z i 4 I' t ya 4f .29,a a I y0 25] a9 if 2a k \\\r fw( [fn n i? 2; 26 a l* 59 i7 if 2i Ish f2 af 42 42 j; 42 ff 4f j; f; A l

Flew 0N/(LIN,

INVENTOR,

f i/J j F. CONKLIN GROUT PUMP Feb. 14, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 8, 1951 FRED CON/(LIN,

INVENTOR.

BY Q MQ un ATTORNEK F. r-ONKLIN GROUT PUMP Feb. 14, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet. 3

Filed May 8, 1951 FRED 60N/(l. IN,

IN VEN TOR bua/ QZZMQ ATTORNEY.

Feb. 14, 1956 F. coNKLlN 2,734,667

GROUT PUMP Filed May 8, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 l/7x INVENTOR.- /76 FRED 60N/L IN.

A T7' ORNE K United States Patent GROUT PUMP Fred Conklin, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application'May'8,.1951, SerialNo. 225,222 14 Claims. (Cl. zzz-255) This invention relates to vapparatus `for handling Egrout or other semi-liquid .mixtures `containing solid materials in granular form such as sand, and more particularly pertains to apparatus for conveying .such l.a mixture -rby -pump action. The'present application is a .continuation- .infpart `of .imy copending prior application YSerial eNo.

135,276, filed December27, A1949, now abandoned. y

The vhigh cost fof handling materials :by hand onconstruction jobs has led Ato various suggestions for conveying grout and like .mixtures by conduit to points of use. There still'exists, however, :a-,need Vfor :a isimple, practical, .and relatively ,inexpensive -conveying system vthat `may be set .up quickly on-a -job and may be dependeduponfor service .when `needed Vwithout requiring special kvattention or expensive maintenance.

-An .ideal `system would scomprise .a simple vpump Io- ;gether with conduit means for conveying .the .mixture wherever needed, preferably 4conduit lmeans 'inthe form of ,flexible .tubing that may be ereadly .shifted from Aone terminal point of :use .to another. ,Certain-.troublesome problems and diftcultiesin pumpy construction fandfopena tion must be overcome, however, .tomake fsueh .a system practical, `especially in -a system .actuated by .a reciprocating pump.

Most of these problems arise from the ffact .thatfsuch a mixture is heavy andslug-gish .rather han ifreefflowing, is highly abrasive, and under manvconditions.foundzin yconventional pump .arrangement tends .to pack finto 2a semi-solid mass. Becausetofithese characteristics y.of the :material tobe handled, .it lis diicult to.achiev.e.the effective valve action requiredffor eicientpumpingi operation. Too often .the zpump valves stick, ,pack, `wearexcessively, or otherwise'fail toop'eratesatisfactorllyffor anyfreasonable Aperiod of 1 time. Theproblem fisfmadefmoreadiicult because any l.valve;str1.1oture:employed :for :this zpmtpnse shoul'dibe:relativelyfsimple` andfmustbe :readily-accessible, not only because fsuch Ia :system must -be :thoroughly `cleaned vafter each -period 'of use but also fbecause'the abrasive action of the :semiifiuidmixturelmakesitnecessary to get intofthe-pump toirepla'ce lparts from'timeto time.

In 4general the choice isbetween some Atype of 'check vlve' that operates inresponsetoV the movement and'preslsure of thesemilfluid mixture'itself or "some'type 'of-valve lthat is operated mechanically in a positive manner. A fluid-responsive checkvalve has obvious advantages, .'rbut l.in practice check valves,.as heretofore vconstructed,.'llave been foundvtoioperate ineficiently .and unreliably. Usuallyvthe operationds ,so .sluggishasto.reducethe eiective displacement of the.l pump to an .intolerablylow volume To avoid the defects of conventionall checkisvalvesand .especially .the`lagging-.operation ofcheek-fvalves of ;the iusual rt'ype iin .a fgrout rmixture, .those skilled in .the vert ihave 4.been :forced to try various :mechanically operated ivalves, .f notwithstanding :.the f. fact; that mechanically voper- .,ated valves rare l'much moretcomplica-ted, .lare i subiect fito 2,734,667 .Patented Feb. 14, 1956 "2 mechanical 'failure by jamming, and are much .harder to clean, and are subject to rapid abrasion.

An important feature o'f .the present 'invention is the discovery Iof certain principles and relationships that 5 make it Apossible to construct a fluid-responsive valve .that

. will operate as eiliciently as apositively driven. mechanical valve.maintaining the same level of output, and yet will offer all the simple advantages of a check valve.

Themost stubborn problem is .to make a check valve close suiciently promptly `to nprevent. appreciable .reverse liow. Ithasbeen 'fountlthatgin agrout mixture .the impact of the reverse ow takenalone willnot act .fastenough on .a conventional check valve. The `check valve must Abe designed for highly sensitive ,response to the impact .of

reverse flow and some additional'boosting force should be provided. The use of ,a sp1-'ing .for theextra :boost proves undesirable becauseo'f the `charactertofthe ,semifluid mixture. Gravity can be relied uponlo ,reinforce the closing action of the check valve, but the use `of gravity 'to boost the .closing action .of .the .valve would .regu'ire that `the'mixture How through .the pump counter Lto gravity andsuch .uphill jliow wouldrcreate even .more

diicult l problems.

,In the tpresent invention .the .s emiyuid g-rout .flows 4downward into and .through `thepump .with .all the,.ad

vantages of gravitational assistiti eedingand 4drivingjthe pump, and .the .required boosting Yaotionfor .closing `the yvalve Aisrprovided by using@ 'buoyant .valvemember that tends stronglyto 'float upward to closedposition .Such

a 'highly buoyant valve memberhas .been found to .be

eicient and `effetvtflwi when certain .requisites ...are .met to make the valve member extremely.Sensitive to ,thereverse .movement of thefluid. 'Theserequisites willbe explained later .in .the detailed description .0f .thev invention.

,Ingeneral the .contemplated embodiments .of ,the in- `,vention .are o'f two types, both of .which .employ .a .reciprocating wall or5pjiston -meniherior ,the .pump action. In one 'type the movable wall, whichmayfhe ai-piston, is. in the 1path of 'uidiiow anda feature ,offsuch .an

40 yembodiment'.is'hovvthe newly developed -lprinciples .may

be incorporated in a'pjston .egllipped with v.aheck valve.

The second itype of Eembodiment `employs .stationary .check valves with .the removable .Wall ,positioned away :from the pump stream an'd an ,important vadvantage of vthistype is lthat litmaybepnstructed .without any relatively sliding `parts whatsoever.

further feature .of 4the `inumtion .is .that ...it .may be embodied .in .a simple, compact, singlezacting Ipump mounted .on la suitable platform as -a `funit .that may .be

conveientlLpoxzta'ble remplace to .place ,and.may.be

ltEigur-e .2 fis :fan fenla'rged, long'itu'dinal vsectional -view rof la piston 'fin Figure il; I l

"Figure'f isfa 1viewfpartlyein planjan'd'partly'in section 'taken'asinicatet by the=1 line ofiFigureLZ; Y Figure i4iisfa'bottorn view 'o'f "-thej,piston shown in.'E i g Figure ,5 'is .an enlarged fragmentary section ktaken .as .,indicatedgbydhehie-15 Qf'ligura y Y .Figure 6is.a .vertical sectional .viewnf tasecond .em-

bodiment ofgthednvention;

@Eigure isasyerticalssectionaltviewffa thirdzembodimentoftthetinventiom Figure 8 is a transverse section taken as indicated by the line 8--8 of Figure 7; and

Figure 9 is a fragmentary view partly in side elevation and partly in section taken as indicated by the line 9-9 of Figure 7.`

Figures 1 to 5 show, by way of example, the construction of a single-acting 2 cylinder pump arrangement for taking grout or a like mixture from a hopper, generally designated 10, for conveyance through a conduct 11 to a remote point of use. The conduit 11 may be rigid metal pipe or may at least include sections of flexible tubing. In the particular arrangement shown the hopper is mounted on and supported by two vertical pump cylinders 12 to which are connected two discharge tubes 13, the two discharge tubes leading to the conduct 11.

The hopper 10, which may be of heavy sheet metal construction, is formed with two bottom openings defined by circular anges or skirts 16 and is formed with sloping walls 17 for gravitational flow of the grout to these two openings. For support of the hopper 10, each of the two pump cylinders 12 carries at its upper end a threaded collar 18 which is embraced by the corresponding circular ange 16 of the hopper and is formed with an outer annular shoulder 19 to abut and support the circular flange. Each of the two pump cylinders 12 is supported in turn by threaded engagement with a lower collar 20 which may be integral with a platform 21 as shown.

Preferably each of the pump cylinders 12 is provided with a replaceable liner 24. Below the liner is an enlarged member 25 having threads 25' for threaded engagement with the previously mentioned collar 20 and may have suitable peripheral recesses 26 for engagement by a spanner wrench (not shown). It will be noted that the upper end of the liner 24 abuts and is protected by an overhanging shoulder 27 of the upper collar 1S. Preferably the member 25 is formed to serve also asl a valve seat member and for this purpose is restricted in internal diameter at its lower end to form a valve seat 28 having a circular valve seat passage 29. The entrance to the valve seat 28 from above is formed by a concial wall 30, while the entrance from below includes an inclined shoulder 31. This shoulder 31 may be made of elastomeric material such as rubber to assist in avoiding caking therebelow between the chamber wall and shoulder.

Any suitable valve member may be provided to cooperate with the valve seat 28, for example, Va ball member 35. This ball member should float on the material being pumped and preferably Awill float on water, and for best results should be as light as possible consistent with a structure capable of withstanding the pressure, preferably having an average density of less than about half the density of water, for example, ,20-25% the density of water. The ball member 35, which is buoyant in the semi-fluid mixture handled by the pump, may be a hollow metal ball but preferably is made of rubberlike material, or at least is covered with such material, which is highly resistant to the abrasive effect of the grout mixture.

In the particular construction shown in the drawings, each of the two pump bodies represented by the vertical cylinders 12 is completed by a cylindrical extension 37 having a radial ange 38. Suitable bolts 39 secure each of the cylindrical extensions 37 to the under side ofthe pump platform 21 with a suitable sealing gasket 40 interposed between the radial ange 38 and the platform to make the joint fluid tight. Each of the cylindrical extensions 37 has a lower conical portion 41 communicating with the corresponding discharge tube 13. A primary function of the cylindrical extension 37 is to serve as a cage for the ball member 35 and for this purpose the cylindrical extension may be equipped with a plurality of inwardly directed radial pins 42 to limit the downward movement of the ball member from the valve seat 28.

It will be noted that the ball member 35 together with the valve seat 28 and the radial pins 42 constitute a check valve of extremely simple construction that may be readily cleaned after each period of service. While satisfactory operation may be obtained in accordance with my invention with ball members 35 merely light enough to float on grout, it is preferable to make these ball members of such average density that they will also float on water so that the apparatus can be used for pumping water to clean out the pump mechanism as Well as to ush out the discharge tubes 13 and the conduit 11. As stated above the ball members 35 by preference have abrasion-resistant surfaces of rubber or like material. Sponge or soft rubber is preferred for better valve seating and sealing. Ball members of wood or plastic may be employed if desired.

Slidingly mounted in each of the upright pump cylinders 12 is a suitable piston, generally designated 45, which may, with advantage, be constructed as best shown in Figures 2 to 5. Each piston 45 includes a spider 46 having three legs 47 and a central bore 48 threadedY to receive the threaded end of a connecting rod 49, the threaded connection being made secure by a suitable lock nut 5G. Three short rods 53 connect the three legs 47, respectively, with an upper retaining ring 54 of the piston, the lower ends of the three rods being threaded into the retaining ring and the upper ends of the pins being permanently mounted in the legs of the spider in the manner shown in Figure 2. Preferably the upper ends of the rods 53 are bonded to the spider legs 47 by welding as shown at 55.

The upper retaining ring 54 cooperates with a lower retaining ring 56 to grip suitable sealing means which preferably comprises two cup members 57 of rubberlike material positioned back to back. Preferably the cup members 57 are made of material known to the trade as Neoprene. To hold the described parts of the piston in assembled position, suitable means may be employed to inter-connect the two retaining rings 54 and 56. in the particular construction shown three special screws 58 with three special nuts 59 are provided for this purpose, the nuts having diametrical slots 60 so that they may be conveniently tightened by a screw driver. The releas- Vably interconnected retaining rings 54 and 56 together with the associated cup members 57 may be termed a sealing assembly.

In this first embodiment of the invention each of the pistons 45 is in the path of the ow of the grout and therefore each of the pistons incorporates a check valve to carry out the required pumping action. For this purpose the described sealing assembly is suitably formed and apertured to provide a valve passage and a down wardly presented valve seat. In the construction shown the sealing assembly has a central cylindrical passage 63, the lower end of which serves as a valve seat and the upper end of which is enlarged by a series of inwardly inclined channels 64 to favor ow into the valve passage.

The preferred form of valve member for cooperation with the described valve seat is again in the form of a ball member 65 of the character heretofore described, the ball member 65 being covered with a layer of abrasion resistant rubber-like material 66. To confine the ball member 65 and limit movement of the ball member away from the valve seat provided by the passage 63, the ball member is vconfined by a Suitable cage that is carried by the piston and extends downward from the lower working face of the piston. Y

In the preferred practice of the invention, the cage comprises simply three wire-like members 67 that are equally spaced around the ball 65 and are centrally bonded together at their lower ends by brazing or welding. Such a valve cage is of extremely open construction for maximum exposure of the surface of the ball member 65 to the action of the surrounding semi-fluid grout. Inside the cage the ball is free to move sidewise toward the cylinder wall. The radiusV of the ball is greater than the distance from the wall to the periphery of the valve seat, and this relationship assures that the ball will not lodge japanese 'between the Wall of 'the cylinder and 'the 'periphery of the valve seat :but lwill 'always tend to rdll up "into vrthe valve seat. The 'ball is free 'in 'this 'ca'ge "tofloat on Athe grout. Its vertical 'movement is 'restricted onlyby vthe cage Tand itis Confined vl'l'orizontally 'only bythe 'inside Ywall df 'the chamber. The ball is `free 'to 'll'o'at o'n the grut and is guided to the valve seat by :the `chamber 'wall and the bottom of the piston head. It .i's apparent that such 4a cage will be subject to abrasive action by Vthe mixture and it is therefore desirable to s'o construct :the ca'g'e 'that it inlay be readily replaced when necessary. 'In this reg'a'rd a feature of the construction shown is that the three wir'elik'e members 67 are 'individually brazed or welded to the :lower ends of the .previously mentioned special screws 58. Thus the special screws :58 -Abecome a 'part of Ithe cage structure-and a worn cage may be quickly removed for replacement by "loosening the special nuts 59. Preferably the upper ends of ithe wire-like member 67 slope inwardly, as shown at "67' in Figure 2, to enable fastening to the piston head as shown.

Any suitable means Vmay be employed .to reciprocate 'the two pistons 45 in an alternating manner either by hand or by power. In the arrangement 'shown in `Figure 1, by way of example, the two y connecting rods 49 that carry the,pistons 4S are connected by pivotpins .i7 0 to Vthe opposite ends of -a walking beam A'71 that is Yxedly :mounted on `a central'operating s'hafftf72. 'The operat- 'ing shaft 72, -which is journaled in suitable bearings 173.i's

driven by a rockergarrn 74 whichin turnisactuatedby ya r long connecting rod 75. The -lower 'end-ofthe connecting 1rod 75 is shown connected toa crank pin 76 'on the ily wheel 77 of a suitable prime mover, generally designated 78.

The -manner in which this `rst embodiment of wthe invention operates may be readily understood Afrom .the `foregoing description. The rocking of the walking'bearn *71 by the motor 7S causes the two pistons 45..to..recip .rocate in opposite .respects .for -the ldesired mingle-acting .pump operation, one piston .moving :upward While nthe other .piston simultaneously moves xdownward. Upon initiation of each upwardmovement of-apiston'45, the lower Vball member 35 ,promptly moves Yupward to closed-positionin response tothemomentary reverse flow of the fluid mixture, `the closing Vmovement of the ball being boosted `by the buoyancy of .the Aball y since the ball is'light enough lrelative tothe -specicfgravityof vthelisemiyuid mixture to have an lever-effective tendency to .move upward through the mixture. During thisfupwardfmovement of the piston 45, `the grout ithat has entered the Aupper-end ofthe pump cylinder 12fromithe hopperfl `flows through the vpreviously mentioned valve -passages' `in the "piston and holds the yuppenball -imember rlSSydownwardly yspaced from its yvalve .seat. lhe grout flows readily Tthrough the -upwardlvmoving piston #l5 notfon1y becauseeof gravity, but also -becauseiof the einertiafof .the heavy grout -mixture Pin the :face fof =th'e =rapid f-upwar movement'of the 1Vpiston. r v z AAs soon as 'the piston 45 :reachesLitsfupperflimitrposi- .t-ion lto reverse The rdirection of its mov-ement, :there :tis momentary Areverse u'pward ow of fthe Tsemifiluid -mixture rthrough the rpiston, but the flipper Viball member r65 .quickly `moves :to closed position beca-use f-the fimpadt `ot tlre reverse zflw fon the :ball :member --is reinforced rby the strong =tendency of the 'buoy-ant lball :to :float tupward. With the upper ball member 65 --closing the fpassage Athrough -thedownwardlylmoving piston, thespistonacts 4asa ram totorce thergrout .in-therpump cylinderl downward,\this action of the Vdownwardlyfmoving f.pistonbeing assistedi by gravitational tlowf the `grout. and the .lower lball member 35'ispromptly-moved out o`f'its seat 4-to permit the ,entrapped grout to"ilovt"i1ito"thecorrespondling discharge 'tube '13. Thus, the ytivo duplicate fpump mechanisms `operate inwinnen deliver alternate 'trarges 'ofgrout udderpressurero thecoifduitl'l.

As previously smentioned, a buoyant valve -Jrirember en; prompt closingfmovern'entfoftlreball intorthevalve sean.

sage

has b'een "Tourrd lto'be efficient if :certa-in lrequisites are linet tofmake the rvalve rne'rriberproperly sensitive 'to the 'movement-of lthesemi-uid 'grout "These requisites, .which -are -'inco`r porated and inherent in the ldescribed construction, may now he understood in their `full signiiicance.

l'On'edf the 'requisites is to provide maximum exposure of the valve 'member tothe semi-fluid stream and this is achieved 'by Iusing a 4loose 'valve member in a ca'ge of exceptionallyeopen construction so 'that the valve member maybetcompletely'surrounded with the fluid, the cage 1being'rea'c'lily penetrated by the ui'd in all directions. In `the lower stationary 4*check valve the plurality of radial 1pins4`2'consttutefsuch afcage; while in the upper moving Jcheck"valveca'rried Y"by the piston 45, the required exposure of the valve member to the semi-fluid grout is provided by the three lwire-like members 67 constituting `the travelingcage 1'for-the valve member.

A second requisite for prompt closing action on the part of the 'ball-or other Aform of valve member is to keep the travel of 'the ball member relative to the valve seat within moderate bounds. 'This is accomplished partly by the dimensioningof the cage -that limits the travel of the valve member away from the valve seat, and partly by 'sizing-the valve member :relative to the valve seat. The desired operation Eis obtained when the diameter of the lva'lvemember ison `theorderof 1A to 1A. larger than 'the diameter vo"r"thef'pas'sa'gefrormed by or through ythe valve seat. An vadvantage 'isthat it is not necessary for a valve member of "such relatively vlarge diameter to move far in'to the seat for completely lcutting olf flow and, of course, the larger the diameter of the valve member fthe 'largerthecrossese'ctional area of the valve member for effective 'responseto reverse vflow of the semi-duid material.

A 'th'rdrequisite is "that the vball diameter lbe propor- 'tioned 'relative to the diameter of the surrounding uidconfining 'walls to A`impede the return ow of the semifluid suiciently for'sen's'itive response of the ball to the return flow without, however, detrimentally 'restricting normal ow 'in the opposite direction. The 'relationship `"desired'there maybe-expressed toinclude the second men- 3tionel requi's'itebystating thatwithfthe valve lmember on the Order of j1/2, -tof1/z vllargerin diameter than the passage :through 'the'valve seat, the passage surrounding the Valve 'member should befonthe order of twice vthediameterof TA{hel-valveseatpass'age.

l'When these 'dimensional relationships are followed,-the cr'os's='seetiorlal area for fluid `flow in the annular space surroundingfthe valve v4memberi'son the order of 13/4 to '12% 1timesfhe cross-sectional area of the valve seat pas- 'Phe-'effectivefcrossrsectional area of the stream between the ball Varrdflthe'va'lv'e seat at the maximum -open lpo'sitionol theiball-may be any farea larger ythanthe V'area f'o'f the-'valve'seatfpassageup to twicethe areavofv the valve v'seat' passage, and Ipreferably is nearly 'as -large as l'the rols'sisectionalffareafof the annular space surroundingthe Itiisbelievedltlratfthe progressive expansionof the normal 'stream "'o'wing through -the vopen valve and, `more important, tlre progressive restriction o"f 'a v reverselv flow- `ingstream, .fas -providedsby these dimensional 'relation- `ships, :are :highly .fsignican't in accounting for th-e 'suc- =cessfu1 operation :of 5.the valve-"or rmaintainingpump 'elliyciency. Ilhus, n:the :stream issui'ng ifrom v'a valve seat lex- "pandsifasdtfrnoveseigainstithe'tball, expands againftolabout :I3/:fito 22% for :approximately 'twice-fits orginal Vv'crossfsectionalfarea as fthe fstream rfiows 'around the balland rnally Athe A:stream :'rexpands :to about f4 times `its original area as it clears the ball. Conversely, reversefl'ow oontracts tlre istream approximately by lhalf as fthe `stream .attempt-s ltofpasslaroundthefball and the consequent ac- 5cetttratio'n 'off 'the timpa'ct fforce Yof the reverse Vstream Vency of the ball to float upward results in exceedingly :answer In Figure 6 showing a second embodiment of the invention, many of the working parts are similar to those already described. The grout flows from an upper supply hopper 90 through an upper stationary check valve, generally designated 91, into an upright pump cylinder 92 and through a lower check valve, generally designated 93, into a discharge tube or conduit 94. In the particular construction shown, the hopper 90 is mounted on an upper colar 97 which in turn is threaded onto the upper end of the pump cylinder 92 and cooperatestherewith to grip the radial flange 9S of a valve seat member 99 that has the features heretofore described. Just below the valve seat member 99 a cooperating ball member 1120 is shown in closed position, and off of a plurality of radial pins 101.

The lower end of the pump cylinder 92 is shown threaded into a collar 1114 integral with the pump platform 105 and a valve seat member 106 is also threaded into the collar. Below the valve seat member 166 a cylindrical extension 1117 is anchored to the platform 105 by suitable bolts 168, as heretofore described, and is provided with a plurality of radial pins 109 to limit the downward movement ot a lower ball member 110.

Extending to one side from the upright pump cylinder 92 and in communication therewith is a lateral cylindrical chamber 111 having a movable wall in the form of a piston 112. 1n the construction shown the lateral chamber 111 has a cyiindrical liner 113 that abuts at its inner end an annular shoulder 114 and is engaged at its outer end by the inner radial flange 115 of a threaded collar 116.

The piston 112, which is mounted on the end of a suitably actuated connecting rod 120, comprises two retainer discs 121 that cooperate to secure a pair of rubberflilte cup members 122 positioned back to back. This sealing assembly comprising the two retainer discs together with the two cup members is held together by a pair of nuts 123 carried by the connecting rod 120.

The lateral chamber 111 in combination with the upright cylinder 92 forms what may be termed a pump chamber the volume of which is varied by reciprocation of the piston 112. As the piston 112 moves to the right in Figure 6 to expand this pump chamber, the lower ball member 111i is drawn upward to closed position and the upper ball member 160 drops to open position to permit grout in the hopper 9i? to ow into the upright cylinder 92. The intiow of the grout from the hopper 90 is the result both of gravity and or" the pressure differential created by the rightward movement of the piston 112. On the return leftward movement of the piston 112, the upper bali member 1% moves upward to closed position in the manner and for the reasons heretofore described and the lower ball member 11% drops to open position to permit downward tlow of the grout through the lower check valve. Here again the downward flow of the grout is caused both by gravity and by the pressure differential created by the lettward movement of the piston.

This second form of the invention shown in Figure 6 has certain advantages over the rst described embodiment of the invention. In the first place, the structure is f of relatively short vertical dimension with the supply hopper 9i) at a relatively low level. In the second place, the piston 112 reciprocates to one side of the path of ow -of the grout, and, therefore, is not subject to the abrasive action of the grout. In the third place, the connecting rod for operating the piston does not extend upward through the hopper 90 to interfere with the downward flow of the grout and to prevent the use of agitating means in the hopper.

Since the two check valves 91 and 93 are both construeted in accord with the principles heretofore s et forth, they operate promptly, especially in their closing action, and thereby maintain the operation of the pump at high efficiency. A d

TheV third form of the invention, shown in( Figures 7 .8 to 9, is a double-acting pump arrangement in which grout from a hopper passes downward through twin passages 131 to a laterally extending conduit 132.

Each of the two passages 131 is provided by an upright cylinder 133 having a radial ange 134 at its upper end. The radial flange 134 is shown attached by bolts 135 to a companion ilange 136 with a suitable sealing gasket 137 in between. The companion flange 136 is in turn threaded onto a nipple 138 that is mounted on the bottom of the hopper 130.

The lower end of the cylinder 133 is threaded into a collar 140 integral with a platform 141 and a cylindrical extension 142 is bolted to the platform from below in the manner heretofore described, the two cylindrical extensions leading to the conduit 132.

Each of the two upright passages 131 is provided with an upper check valve, generally designated 145, comprising a valve seat member 146, a ball member 147, together with radial pins 14S, and a lower similar check valve generally designated comprising a valve seat member 151, a ball member 152, and radial pins 153.

Extending to one side from each of the passages 131 between the upper and lower check valves 145 and 150, is a lateral chamber formed by a bowl-shaped wall 156 having a circular rim flange 157 formed with spaced ears 158 to provide ample metal around holes that are bored to receive suitable bolts 159. A suitable diaphragm 160 of rubber-like material forms the outer wall of each lateral chamber 155 and is held in place by a suitable retainer ring 161 that is tightly secured by the previously mentioned bolts 159.

It is apparent that each of the lateral chambers 155 combined with the corresponding upright passage 131 constitutes a pump chamber that may be expanded and contracted by reciprocation of the corresponding diaphragm 160 which constitutes a movable wall causing the grout to move through the pump chamber by its reciprocation. To provide for such reciprocation one diaphragm is attached to an operating rod 162 and the other diaphragm is connected to a second operating rod 163. In the construction shown each of the operating rods extends through suiatble retaining discs 164 on opposite sides of the diaphragm with nuts 165 threaded onto the connecting rod on opposite sides of the pair of discs.

The two lateral chambers 155 are shown extended in opposite directions so that the two diaphragms 166 may be interconnected for operation in unison but in opposite respects in the sense that one diaphragm will move in a direction to contract the corresponding pump chamber while the other diaphragm moves in the direction to expand` the other pump chamber. While any suitable means may be provided to actuate the two diaphragms 160 by hand orv by some prime mover, Figure 7 shows a manually operable actuating lever 171) which is con nected to the operating rod 162 by a pivot pin 171.

Any suitable means may be provided to operatively connect the driven operating rod 162 with the second operating rod 163 on the other side of the duplex pump. By way of example, as best shown in Figure 8, a rectangular frame may be employed for this purpose, the frame comprising two cross bars 174 and two longitudinal bars 175. Each of the two cross bars 174 isprovided at its ends with reduced threaded portions 176 that extend through bores 177 in the longitudinal bars 175 and are provided with nuts 178 for engagement with the longitudinal bars. .y

The operating rod 162 extends through one of the cross bars 174 with a collar 180 on one side of the cross bar and a sleeve 181 on the other side. The collar 180 is anchored to the operating rod 162 by a suitable cross pin 182 and the sleeve 181 serves as a spacer between the cross bar and the corresponding nutl 164 for the diaphragm 160. Thus the sleeve 181 and the collar cooperate to immobilize the cross bar with respect sto the operating rod 162. On the other side of the apaffrettati? ,paratus, theoperating rod 4153 extends 'through 'the 'c'orresponding cross bar 17'4 and is anchored thereto by a spacer 183 and collar v18445` and to 'an Aarm A1'86. 4

The operation of this third embodiment of theinve'ntion may be readily understood since the principle of operation is the same as that in the operation of the second embodiment of the invention.Y yThe -various check valves operate in the manner heretofore described. ne advantage over 'the second embodiment of the 'invention is, of course, the single 'acting d2 cylinder pump operation, but a more -iiiipotant 'advantage -is Y'theffa'c-t AJthat this third embodiment has no sliding parts whatsoever. Since no sliding parts are involved, f"tlie'ii1ners1- faces that are exposed 'to 'the abrasive 'atin'of the grout'may be covered with 4a 'cating'of "rbb'r-like'liaterial. Thus, Vall 'the intr'er l'rhetal surfaces maybe covered with al1 'abrasin resistant 'coating 184.

It will be apparenttliattlie apparatus fniy invention, although particularly designed 'tdi piiniping Lgrunt and ether-nuidmixture's fabresiveniateialjs, 4is also adapted top'u'mp mixtures containing aggregates `lr`ger`than sand, 'depending on th'e'size of tlfepump. Tn 'gener'ahthe aggregates 'may be 'as ylarge `as "about "one .sixth "the 'diameter V'of the valve openings. .y l n while I have illustrated kamrdescribed jthre'e emboditne'nts of my invention jin detail, it is te :be understand that varieu's 'changes 'may bernrede li'yjtliose skilled in `die art without ldeparting freni 'the spint df the linven- 'tidn as defined in the appended-'claims l. Apparatus -of tite "har'e'eter ldescribed "for handling 'grout and like semi-:fluid mixtures, rconip'r'ising'; "an up- `right `cylinder, 'e `iidlrp'er fte feedjsai'd mixture 'into the upper "end of the Vvcylinder,"ajchec'k valve :to 'ottrol o'w out of thelower'fendfof'tliecylindieigfaiid avalve-f'equi'pped piston adapted te reciprocate Ain `sai'dpassage, said valve- :equipped piston including apetu'red sealing tir'eansubetween -two rvape'rturel 1-retaini'ng "nier'ribe'rs, ai cage extending downward from the lower retaining meniber, afbuo'yant ball member conned by said cage yto cut off said apertures on the down-strbkeof lthe piston, and "means to releasably interconnect said twolretainifng-members, said cage being Vanchored to said interconnecting means `Where- Vby the cage `may be removed for replacement -by rloosen- =ing-said interconnecting means.

2. Apparatus of thevcharacter described for thandling 4grout -and -like semi-tluid mixtures, comprising; lan upright cylinder, a hopper to feed-said Imixture fintov'the yupper `end-of the cylinder, aA check valve to control -flow outof'thelower end of the cylinderfandfa valve-equipped piston adapted to reciprocate in said passage, said valveequipped piston including apertured sealing means between two apertured retaining members, a cage extending downward from the lower retaining member, a buoyant ball member confined by said cage to cut olf said apertures on the down-stroke of the piston, means to releasably interconnect said two retaining members, said cage being anchored to said interconnecting means whereby the cage may be removed for replacement by loosening said interconnecting means, and a plurality of threaded means to releasably interconnect said two retaining members and in which said cage is formed of wire-like members individually anchored to said threaded means.

3. Apparatus of the character described for conveying grout and like semi-fluid mixtures, comprising: a hopper to receive the mixture, a housing forming a pump chamber below the hopper with an upper inlet port communicating with the hopper and a lower outlet port directly below said inlet port and said chamber having a straight, free, upright passage for said grout between the inlet port and said outlet port, said chamber having a movable wall, means to reciprocate said wall to expand and contract said chamber, a conduit communicating with said outlet port to convey the mixture to a point of use, a check valve to control flow litil through sa'id endet pon, and'va'lve means' te eentrl new through said inlet port, said valve means including a circular valve seat v"and ^a bujdyant vbail rnenibe'r on the 'arder of ene-third to iene-half 'larger vvin diameter than 'the inner diameter tif 'the jvalve Yseat, "said buoyant "ball member being 'positioned 'below the 'v'al've seat "to be sure exerted through tlie 'valve Yseat and to be 'heidi-in open position by the `impact of the stream :from 4:the valve seat, said buoyant b'all `member 'havingfa density of atleast v20% of that 'of water so as to aeilitate upward closing Vr'novemeiit of the b'all iniember'when lsaid predominance teri'ninates. v

4. Apparatus f the I'character described `for conveying grout and Llike semi-fluid mixtures, "comprising: an upright Ycylinder'having a lower v'outlet port, -a hopper above said cylinder A'to feed 'said vmixture `irto tliefupper -end of the cylinder, a conduit communicating with said "outlie'ttpo'rt 'to convey the mixture Ito a pointofuse, a check vlvet'o control "the flow lthrough-'said ioutlet port, 'a piston 4adapted t'o 'reciprocate vup and down in said cylinder, `said piston 'having a passage therethrough forming a downwardly directed valve's'eat'on'the lower `working lface 'of the'p'iston, la 'buoyant ball member positioned below the working face of the piston Vto be moved to op'enpositionl by predominant downward `fluid pressure through said valve "seat wlien the piston finit'ially moves upward 'and to be held in open position `bythe impact -of'the stream "from th valve seat as the piston continues `it's upward movement, saidbuoya'nt ball meinberfha'vingan average 'density of less than the density of watervso as Yt'cffa'cilita'te upward elo'singmovement pt t'hevalve when `the subsequent down 'ward mevementjof the piston Zisfi'nitiated, and a 'cagefor Vsaid Abuoyant bell extending downward from the werking 'face of 'the pistonI to limit the'movernent 'of `the"buoya'n"t 'ball away fremsaidvalveseat. l

'5. Apparatus of the h'aracter described rfor Y'handling grout and like 'semi-fluid mixtures, comprising: 'an' upright cylinder, a hop'p'er "t'o feed "said'inixture into'th'e upper' end of the cylinder, a checlcvalve to control ilovv ou't ofithe Ytower 'end 'di 'the cylinder, and 'a valve-equipped pieten 'adapted to reeiprdcatein saidpassagas'aid valve-equipped `pieten 'inlnding ap'er'tnred ceiling "meansfbetween `t'wje 'apertur'ed'retainingiiembeis, "a 'cage extending 'downward "from the lower `#retaining niemeer and afbtioyant "ball inrriber confinedby said ca'g'e "to ct 'ol 'said apertures on jtlie` downstrke "of 'the jpiston, said buoyant ball Tnieniber hing an 'average vdensity of 'less y'than the density 'f "Water,

A"6. pp'artus of "the "character described --for handling grut Aan'd`lik'e semifluid mixtures, comprising, a vhousing forming a pump chamber having a movable wall, said chamber having an inlet port and an outlet port directly below said inlet port for downward flow of semi-fluid mixtures through said chamber, means to reciprocate said movable wall to expand and contract said chamber, said chamber including a substantially straight, free upright passage for said mixture between said ports, a check valve to control the ow of said mixture through said outlet port and valve means adjacent said inlet port to control ow to said chamber, said valve means including a valve seat and a buoyant ball member, supporting means disposed beneath said valve seat for freely supporting said buoyant ball member beneath said valve seat, said buoyant ball member being movable to open position by the impact of the stream of said mixture moving downwardly through said valve seat, said buoyant ball member having a diameter greater than the diameter of said valve seat, said buoyant ball member having an average density of less than the density of the mixture being pumped so as to facilitate upward closing of the valve means by seating of said ball member upon said valve seat.

7. An apapratus as set forth in claim 6 wherein the cross-sectional area of the space for ow around said ball member is one and three-quarters to two and one-quarter t 1 times the cross-sectional area of the passage through said valve seat.

8. Apparatus of ,the character described for conveying grout and like semi-fluid mixtures, comprising, an upright cylinder having a lower outlet port, a hopper above the cylinder to feed said mixture into the upper end of the cylinder, a conduit communicating with said outlet port 'to convey the mixture to a point of use, a check valve to control tlow through said outlet port, a piston adapted to reciprocate in said cylinder, said piston having a passage therethrough, a valve seat disposed on the lower surface of said piston, a buoyant ball member beneath said valve seat, supporting means disposed beneath said valve seat for freely supporting said buoyant ball member beneath said valve seat, said buoyant ball member movable to open position only by predominant downward pressure of said mixture passing through said valve seat when the piston initially moves upward and free to be held in open position only by the-impact of the stream of said mixture moving downwardly through the valve seat as the piston continues its upward movement, said buoyant ball member having a density of at least twenty percent of the density of water so as to facilitate upward closing movement of the ball member when the subsequent downward movement of the piston is initiated.

9. An apparatus as set forth in claim 8 wherein said ball member is one-third to one-half larger in diameter than the inner diameter of said valve seat.

10. An apparatus as set forth in claim 9 wherein the inner diameter of said cylinder is twice the inner diameter of said valve seat.

l1.. Apparatus of the character described for conveying grout and like semi-fluid mixtures comprising, a housing forming a pump chamber having a movable wall, said chamber having an inlet port and an outlet port directly below said inlet port for downward ow of semi-fluid mixtures through said chamber, said pump chamber including a substantially straight, free upright passage for said mixture between said ports and a laterally extending passage located between said ports, said movable wall disposed within said laterally extending passage, means to reciprocate said movable wall to expand and contract said pump chamber, a check valve to control the flow of said mixture through said outlet port, and valve means adjacent said inlet portto control flow to said chamber, said valve means including a valve seat and buoyant ball member, supporting means disposed beneath said valve seat for freely supporting said buoyant ball member beneath said valve seat, said buoyant ball member being movable to open position by the impact of the stream of said mixture moving downwardly through said valve seat, said buoyant ball member having a diameter greater than the diameter of said valve seat, said buoyant ball member having an average density of less than the density of the mixture beingA pumped so as to facilitate upward closing of the valve means by seating of said ball member upon said valve seat.

12. The apparatus as set forth in claim l1 wherein said movable wall is a piston.

13. Apparatus of the character described for conveying v grout and like semi-uid mixtures comprising, a housing forming a pair of pump chambers, each of said chambers having a movable wall, each of said chambers having an inlet port and an outlet port directly below said inlet port for downward ow of said semi-fluid mixture through said chambers, each of said chambers including a substantially straight, free upright passage for said mixture between said ports, a conduit communieating with said outlet ports to convey the mixture to a point of use, means to reciprocate said movable walls to expand one of said chambers while simultaneously contracting the other chamber, a check valve to control the ow of said mixture through each of said outlet ports, and valve means adjacent to each of said inlet ports to control ow to said chambers, said valve means including a valve seat and a buoyant ball member, supporting means disposed beneath said valve seat for freely supporting said buoyant ball member beneath said valve seat, said buoyant ball member being movable to open position by the impact of the stream of said mixture moving downwardly through said valve seat, said buoyant ball member having a diameter greater than the diameter of said valve seat, said buoyant ball member having an average density of less than the density of the mixture being pumped so as to facilitate upward closing of the valve means by seating of said ball member upon said valve seat.

14. An apparatus as set forth in claim 13 wherein each of said movable walls is a rubber-like diaphragm disposed between the inlet port and outlet port of its respective pump chamber.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 156,279 Clark Oct. 27, 1874 169,974 Engle Nov. 16, 1875 1,648,587 Moore Nov. 8, 1927 1,871,655 Bond Aug. 16, 1932 1,991,342 Ball Feb. 12, 1935 2,295,774 Corydon et al Sept. 15, 1942 2,461,332 Leonard Feb. 8, 1949 2,609,966 Henry Sept. 9, 1952

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.222/255, 222/380, 222/450, 417/568, 222/207, 222/383.1, 222/383.3, 417/900, 417/529
Clasificación internacionalF04B53/12, F04B1/02, F04B43/02, F04B53/10, F04B15/02, F04B53/00, F04B9/02
Clasificación cooperativaF04B43/026, Y10S417/90, F04B53/1005, F04B1/02, F04B9/02, F04B15/023, F04B53/126, F04B53/00
Clasificación europeaF04B43/02P3, F04B9/02, F04B1/02, F04B53/12R2, F04B15/02B, F04B53/10B4, F04B53/00