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Número de publicaciónUS2776139 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación1 Ene 1957
Fecha de presentación18 Feb 1954
Fecha de prioridad18 Feb 1954
Número de publicaciónUS 2776139 A, US 2776139A, US-A-2776139, US2776139 A, US2776139A
InventoresBlamey Jr William F, Mullany David N
Cesionario originalBlamey Jr William F, Mullany David N
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Game ball
US 2776139 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

1957 w. F. BLAMEY, JR. ET AL 2,776,139

I GAME BALL Filed Feb. 18, 1954 lNvEN'ToRs 20a ZZurmEBIame JP ATTORNEYS GAME BALL William F. Blarney, Jr., Stratford, and David N.

Mullany, Fail-field, Conn.

Application February 18, 1954, Serial No. 411,010

10 Claims. 01. 273-60) This invention relates to a ball and more particularly to that type of ball coming within the class known as game or playing balls.

In the playing of games wherein a hall is struck by a hat, or the like, :a disadvantage has often been encountered in respect to the limitations of space in certain areas where the game is played. In addition, because of the construct-ion of the ball itself, with which these games are played, injury to property and persons are sustainable. Further, such games are oftentimes not able to be played by younger children or by persons, who, [because of the limited space available or for other reasons, do not desire to run in participating in the game. It is therefore desirable to provide a ball of such construction as to be limited in its flight but still having features which would necessitate the use of skillin the use of and play with the same.

It is an object of the present invent-ion to provide a game ball which is so constructed as to be able to withstand great impact :an-d forcewhen struck by a hat or the like without injury to the ball itself.

Lt is a further object of the present invention to provide .a game ball which will not travel any relatively long distance after being struck.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a ball whose path will vary in flight when thrown and when struck.

A still further object of -the presentinvention is to provide .a game ball having all of the aforementioned advantages which is nevertheless inexpensive to, manufacture and easy to construct Other objects and advantages are set forth in greater detail in the accompanying specification as illustrated by the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. -1 is a top view of the game ball of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a side view looking in the direction of the ornew 2 of Fig. l; p

Fig. 3 is a section taken along the lines 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a top view of a modified form of the game ball;

Fig. 5 is a top view of another modified form of the game ball; and

Fig. 6 is :a top view of still another modified form of the game ball.

In the drawings the game ball 10 comprises a hollow spherical shell 11 of substantially the same size as a standard baseball. While this size is disclosed for the purposes of this description, it will be understood that the ball may be of any suitable size, as for example, the size of a soft ball or the like. The shell 11 is preferably made of plastic material, such as polyethylene or the like for reasons hereinafter set forth, and is molded of the desired shape. The shell 11 is provided with a series of apertures 12. According to the present invention, the apertures 12 do not extend over the entire surface of the ball but instead the ball has an imperforate portion 13. The apertures 12 themselves may be provided for in a hired States Patent 0 inch from the equatorial line 15 of the ball.

Patented Jan. 1, 1957 number of ways, as for example, by simply cutting them out of the finished ball or within the molding process itself. I have found that the ball having the apertures 12 and the imperforate portion 13 has surfaces of different air resistance and when thrown or struck, will follow a curved path when spinning in flight. The curved path itself can be a very unsteady one, wherein the ball will curve to the right and left and upward and downward during the same flight. Thus, the curving path of the ball when in flight necessitates the exercise of skill to meet the same with means to strike it, as for example a hat or the like. In addition, skill will have to be exercised in catching or fielding the ball after it is struck, for the reason that the differing air-resistant surfaces also cause the ball to curve after it has been struck.

The ball of the present invention will not travel for any relatively long distance despite the force with which it is struck and, in fact, cannot be thrown for any relatively long distances despite the force exerted. As a consequence, there is no necessity for the provision of a large playing area when using this ball and games may be devised with the use of the ball which eliminate the necessity of a great deal of running in connection therewith.

The ball is constructed of a hollow, lightweight, spherical shell and will not cause injury to persons using the same even if they are struck thereby. In addition the construction prohibits damage to property, such as windows or the like, if struck in the area in which the ball is used.

The spherical molded shell 11, comprising the ball, is preferably provided of sufficient thickness so that it may be struck, or strike other objects with great impact without damage to the ball. The material preferably used in the construction of the ball is plastic, such as for example, polyethylene or the like and has structural strength inherent therein. In addition, the preferred location of the apertures in the surface of the ball as hereinafter set forth, eliminates weak spots.

As shown in Fig. 1, the game ball of this invention is preferably so constructed that one-half of its surface presents an imperforate semi-sphere 13. Apertures 12 are provided on the other half of the ball. It is to be noted as shown in the drawing, .that the apertures 12 are in staggered relation to each other. This structure adds to the inherent strength of the ball wherein weak spots, which might exist if the apertures were not staggered, are eliminated.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, and using as an illustrative example, a ball having a 2% inch diameter, it is preferable to begin the row of apertures 14, about 7 of an It is also preferable that the apertures be quadrilateral in shape and each V2 inch in length and A1 inch in width and that eight apertures equidistant from each other he provided in the row of apertures 14 closest to the equatorial line 15 of the ball. In the next outer row of apertures 16, six apertures are provided, also equidistant from each other and of the same width and length as the apertures in the row 14 hereinabove described. In the following outer row of apertures 17, three apertures are provided, also equidistant from each other and the same width and length as the apertures in the row of apertures 14. At the pole of the ball, an aperture 18 is provided which is preferably 7 of an inch in diameter. Each row of apertures is preferably equi-distant from its next adjacent row. While this construction has been described in great detail and results in the most preferable action of the ball with regard to maximum curvature aspects, maximum structural strength and maximum flight potential, it will be understood that other sized apertures may be used in different relationship to each other which would nevertheless provide a ball which will have the features desired as aforesaid.

In the modification shown in Fig. 4, the apertures 14 cover substantially of .the gameball with the remaining A of the ball being imperforate. A ball of this construction may also be used and will follow a curved pathwhen spinning in flight.

In the modification shown in Fig. 5, the apertureslZ only cover A of the surface of theball with the remaining of thesurface being imperforate. While the ball thus presented does not have the maximum curvature aspects when spinning in flight, it nevertheless may be advantageously used.

In Fig. 6, another modification of the game ball of the present invention is shown in which relatively large apertures 12 are presented on /2 of the surface of the game ball with small apertures 19 on the other surface. It will be understood that the differing air-resistant surfaces provided by the large apertured surface as against the small apertured surface, will also enable this ball to follow a curved path when spinning in flight.

The game ball of the present invention is advantageous in its preferred form and in all its modified forms, in that there is provided a non-injurious, non-damaging ball having structural strength and which will follow a path curving in many directions when spinning and. in flight so that the exercise of skill is required in playing the game in which it is used.

While the invention has been described in some detail, it will be understood that variations and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A game ball comprising a hollow, lightweight, spherical shell, said shell having a substantially imperforate portion, the remainder of the shell having a plurality of closely spaced perforations extending therethrough and providing a perforated zone characterized by surface openings, all said perforations and openings being grouped in one portion of the ,ball surface to cause the windresisting characteristics of the surface of the ball to vary unsymmetrically whereby the ball when spinning in flight will follow a curved path.

2. A game ball comprising a hollow, lightweight spherical shell, said shell having an imperforate portion covering at least one-quarter of its surface, the remainder of the shell having a plurality of closely spaced perforacovering at least one-half of its surface, the remainder of the shell having a plurality of closely spaced perforations extending therethrough and providing a perforated zone characterized by surface openings, all said perforations and openings being grouped in one portion of the ball surface to cause the wind-resisting characteristics of the surface of the ball to vary unsymmetrically whereby the ball when spinning in flight will follow a curved path.

4. A game ball comprising a hollow, lightweight spherical shell, said shell having an imperforate portion covering at least three-fourths of its surface, the remainder of the shell having a plurality of closely spaced perforations extending therethrough and providing a perforated zone characterized by surface openings, all said perforations and openings being grouped in one portion of the ball surface to cause the wind-resisting characteristics of the surface of the ball to vary unsymmetrically whereby the ball when spinning in flight will follow a curved path.

5. A game .ball comprising a hollow, lightweight spherical shell, said shell having a substantially imperforate portion covering at least one-quarter of its surface, the remainder of the shell having a plurality of closely spaced staggered perforations extending therethrough and providing a perforated zone characterized by surface openings, all said perforations and openings being grouped in one portion of the ball surface to cause the wind-resistingcharacteristics of the-surface of the ball to vary unsymmetrically whereby the ball when spinning in flight will hollow a curved path.

..6. The inventionasdefinedin claim 5 in which the openings are quadrilateral.

7. A game ball comprising a hollow, lightweight spherical shell, said shell having an imperforate portion covering at least one-half of its surface, the remainder of the shell having three rows of closely spaced perforations extending .therethrough and providing a perforated zone characterized by surface openings, all said perforations .andopenings being-grouped in one portion of the ball surface to cause the wind-resisting characteristics of the surface of the ball to vary unsymmetrically whereby the ball when spinning in flight will follow a curved path.

8. The invention as defined in claim 7 in which the row of apertures next adjacent the equator of said shell consists of eight apertures; the next adjacent row of apertures comprise six apertures and the next adjacent row of apertures. comprise three apertures.

9. The invention as defined in claim 8 in which an aperture is providedrat the pole of the spherical shell.

10. A game ball comprising a hollow, lightweight spherical shell, approximately 2% inches in diameter, said shell having an imperforate portion covering at least onehalf. of its surface on one side of the equator of said shell, the remainder of the shell having closely-spaced rows of closely-spaced quadrilateral perforations extending therethrough and providing aperforated zone characterized by surface openings, all said perforations and openings being grouped in one portion of the ball surface to cause the wind-resisting characteristics of the surface of the ball to vary-unsymmetrically, .whereby the ball when spinning in flight will follow a curved path, the row of ,aperturesnext adjacent the equator being approximately of an inch from said equator, and each of said apertures being approximately /2 inch long and A inch wide.

References Cited .in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US465507 *9 Ene 189122 Dic 1891 Indoor base-ball
US837147 *30 Abr 190627 Nov 1906Cassius M ThomasReturn-ball.
US1483165 *4 May 192212 Feb 1924Libbey Eaton WashingtonPractice golf ball
US1684557 *3 Feb 192718 Sep 1928Spalding & Bros AgGame ball
US1873221 *3 Ago 193123 Ago 1932George SennBaseball
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.473/613
Clasificación internacionalA63B43/00
Clasificación cooperativaA63B2208/12, A63B43/00, A63B2043/001
Clasificación europeaA63B43/00