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Número de publicaciónUS2780223 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación5 Feb 1957
Fecha de presentación17 May 1955
Fecha de prioridad17 May 1955
Número de publicaciónUS 2780223 A, US 2780223A, US-A-2780223, US2780223 A, US2780223A
InventoresHaggland Paul B
Cesionario originalHaggland Paul B
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Fracture plate
US 2780223 A
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

P. B. HAGGLAND 2,780,223

FRACTURE PLATE Feb. 5, 1957 Filed May 17, 1955 INVENTOR I Paul 5.17% Zzuuf United States Patent 0 FRACTURE PLATE Paul B. Haggland, Fairbanks, Territory of Alaska Application May 17, 1955, Serial No. 508,889 6 Claims. (Cl. 128-92) This invention relates to surgical appliances, and in particular to fracture plates adapted to engage and stabilize fractured bone ends.

A principal object of the invention is to provide an improved fracture plate of novel shape and configuration, adapted for multi-plane fixation of a bone.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fracture plate adapted to effectively engage and stabilize secondary bone fragments. A related object is the provision of a fracture plate configured to position the bone screws used therewith in offset or spaced relationship, longitudinally, laterally and angularly.

Still another object is to provide a fracture plate ideally suited to coapt bone grafts at the fracture site. Further objects will be in part evident and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention and the novel features thereof may best be made clear from the following description and the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure l is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the invention, applied to a fractured bone;

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 22 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3--3 of Figure l, and

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of Figure 1.

Referring to the drawings in detail, Figure 1 illustrates a femur shaft 10, fractured at 12. The fracture plate comprises a sheet 14, constructed of stainless steel or similar corrosion-resistant material, generally diamond shaped in form and centrally branched into side bands 16 and 18, which enclose a central opening 20. The central opening, preferably, is also diamond shaped, its sides being parallel to the outer edges of the sheet, whereby the side bands are of uniform width throughout their length. To rigidify the structure, the sides of the sheet and opening may be outwardly ribbed or beaded, as at 22.

The sheet 14 is curved cylindrically about a longitudinal axis parallel to it but spaced somewhat therefrom, whereby it is adapted to fit closely about and partially enclose the bone 10, as best illustrated in Figures 2 to 4. At its widest central point, the device may extend about, for example, one third of the circumference of the bone, of subtend an arc of 120. The inner surface of the sheet is preferably smooth, as shown.

The sheet 14 is provided with a plurality of longitudinally extended screw receiving slots 24, spaced more or less evenly along its length. As an outstanding feature of the invention, each slot is also spaced laterally with respect to adjacent slots, being arranged preferably in two rows coinciding at their ends but diverging therebetween in substantial parallelism to the sheet sides. The slot rows, as will be apparent, follow the side bands 16 and 18, and the overall effect is a unique, staggered slot pattern.

In applying the device, the bone ends must be manipu- 2,780,223 Patented Feb. 5, 1957 lated into apposition, and an incision made to the bone. The plate may then be positioned as shown in Figure l, with its center coinciding substantially with the fracture, whereby the device extends an equal distance in both directions therefrom. It will be noted that the device can be placed easily, since it isnarrow at both ends and widest in the middle, where the incision can be retracted most easily and to the greatest extent; I v

A bone screw 26 may next be inserted through eacli slot 24 into the bone, each screw being directed through the central axis of the bone, or in direction generally normal to the sheet portion surrounding the involved slot. By reason of the slot pattern, each screw is angularly offset with respect to adjacent screws, whereby the bone ends are transfixed in a plurality of angularly diverse planes. This is illustrated in Figures 2, 3 and 4, and it will be seen that the side bands 16 and 18 are disposed in planes substantially at right angles to each other. This is highly advantageous since any secondary fragments present are likely to be engaged by one or more screws. Any tendency of the bone ends to rotate axially relative to each other is precluded, and a large number of screws may be utilized without danger of cracking or splitting the bone. The screws being offset longitudinal, ly, there is no possibility of conflict in insertion.

The cylindrical curvature of the device and its wide coverage at the fracture site adapt it to coapt-bone grafts. The curvature also contributes to stiffness, and cooperaes with the beads 22 to resist longitudinal bending. The curvature may be altered upon application to fit bones of different diameters, or the pull of the screws 26 may be relied on to conform the curvature to the bone.

The central opening 20, as will be evident, may be oval rather than diamond shaped, or otherwise shaped or omitted altogether. By way of specific example, the fracture plate may be 8" in overall length, and subtend an are at its center of 120. The slots 24 may be .175" x .5", and the sheet 14 may be .10 thick and .15" thick through the beads 22. The diameter of the cylinder of curvature may be 1.25".

It will thus be seen that there has been provided by this invention a structure in which the various objects hereinbefore set forth, together with many practical advantages, are successfully achieved. As various possible embodiments may be made of the mechanical features of the above invention, all without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter hereinbefore set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative, and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A fracture plate comprising an enlarged central portion and narrow ends joined thereto by longitudinally extending portions decreasing in width from the central portion to said ends, said plate being curved cylindrically about a longitudinal axis parallel to but spaced from said plate, whereby the plate is adapted to fit about and partially enclose a bone, and a plurality of longitudinally and transversely spaced openings in said plate, said openings being arranged in said plate to define two rows diverging from each of said ends toward said central portion.

2. A fracture plate as defined in claim 1 wherein the rows coincide at the ends of the plate.

3. A fracture plate comprising a diamond shaped sheet curved cylindrically about a longitudinal axis parallel to but spaced from said sheet, whereby the sheet is adapted to fit about and partially enclose a bone, and a plurality of longitudinally and transversely spaced screw openings in said sheet, said openings being arranged in rows defining a diamond outline generally paralleling the shape of the sheet.

4. A fracture plate comprising a diamond shaped,

centrally branched metal sheet curved cylindrically about a longitudinal axis parallel to but spaced from said sheet, whereby the sheet is adapted to fit about and partially enclose a bone, and a plurality of longitudinally extended screw slots in said sheet, said slots being spaced from each other in both longitudinal and transverse directions and defining a diamond outline generally parallel to and substantially coextensive with the outer sides of said sheet.

5. A fracture plate comprising a diamond shaped, centrally branched metal sheet curved cylindrically about a longitudinal axis parallel to but spaced from said sheet, whereby the sheet is adapted to fit about and partially enclose a bone, and a plurality of longitudinally extended screw slots in said sheet, said slots being longil5 tudinally spaced from each other and arranged in rows paralleling the sides of the sheet.

6. A fracture plate as defined in claim 5, wherein said sheet is outwardly beaded along its sides to rigidity the 5 structure.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 10 2,133,859 Hawley Oct. 18, 1938 2,443,363 Townsend et a1 June 15, 1948 2,580,821 Nicola Jan. 1, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 590,290 France Mar. 13. 1925

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US2133859 *31 Mar 193818 Oct 1938Louis J PadulaBone setting
US2443363 *13 Abr 194215 Jun 1948Gilfillan Charles WBone plate
US2580821 *21 Oct 19501 Ene 1952Toufick NicolaSpring impactor bone plate
FR590290A * Título no disponible
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3593709 *28 Oct 196820 Jul 1971William X HalloranAngular compression plate for bone fractures
US3710789 *4 Dic 197016 Ene 1973Univ MinnesotaMethod of repairing bone fractures with expanded metal
US4503848 *25 Mar 198212 Mar 1985Aesculap-Werke AktiengesellschaftOsteosynthesis plate
US5139498 *13 Oct 198918 Ago 1992Astudillo Ley Freddy RDevice for closing sternum in heart surgery
US5364398 *21 Sep 199215 Nov 1994Pfizer Hospital Products Group, Inc.Modular femoral fixation system
US5735850 *30 Ene 19967 Abr 1998Protek AgFastening system for pedicel screws
US5772662 *6 Dic 199630 Jun 1998Howmedica Inc.Femoral fixation system
US6093188 *10 Nov 199725 Jul 2000Murray; William M.Adjustable bone fixation plate
US6336927 *29 Dic 19988 Ene 2002Chaim RogozinskiApparatus, method and system for the treatment of spinal conditions and fixation of pelvis and long bones
US659929017 Abr 200129 Jul 2003Ebi, L.P.Anterior cervical plating system and associated method
US720483724 Jul 200317 Abr 2007Paul Kamaljit SSpinal plate assembly
US725569924 Jul 200314 Ago 2007Paul Kamaljit SSpinal plate assembly
US752764022 Dic 20045 May 2009Ebi, LlcBone fixation system
US788757030 Abr 200915 Feb 2011Ebi, LlcBone fixation system
US790985926 Oct 200522 Mar 2011Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc.Bone plate system and methods
US79429138 Abr 200417 May 2011Ebi, LlcBone fixation device
US795536421 Sep 20057 Jun 2011Ebi, LlcVariable angle bone fixation assembly
US81728855 Feb 20048 May 2012Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc.Bone plate system
US822147613 Abr 200717 Jul 2012Paul Kamaljit SSpinal plate assembly
US823603313 Ago 20077 Ago 2012Paul Kamaljit SSpinal plate assembly
US828753814 Ene 200916 Oct 2012Conventus Orthopaedics, Inc.Apparatus and methods for fracture repair
US836112627 Ago 200829 Ene 2013Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc.Bone plate system
US86230193 Jul 20087 Ene 2014Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc.Bone plate system
DE3114136A1 *8 Abr 198128 Oct 1982Aesculap Werke Ag"osteosyntheseplatte"
EP0618785A1 *8 Sep 199312 Oct 1994Danek Medical, Inc.Anterior thoracolumbar plate
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.606/280
Clasificación internacionalA61B17/80, A61B17/68
Clasificación cooperativaA61B17/80
Clasificación europeaA61B17/80