Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS2788161 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación9 Abr 1957
Fecha de presentación1 Jul 1955
Fecha de prioridad1 Jul 1955
Número de publicaciónUS 2788161 A, US 2788161A, US-A-2788161, US2788161 A, US2788161A
InventoresJohn Kemper Robert
Cesionario originalPreferred Product Features Inc
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Dripless pouring device
US 2788161 A
Imágenes(2)
Previous page
Next page
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

R. J. KEMPER April 9, 1957 DRIPLESS POURENG DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 1, 1955 April 9, 1957 2,788,161

R. J. KEMPER DRIPLESS POURING DEVICE Filed July 1, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. Robe/'7 J- K P ECKHOFF 72: SLICK ATT RNEYS A MEMBER OF THE FIR United States 2,788,161 DRIPLESS POURING DEVICE Robert John Kemper, Los Altos, Calif., assignor to Preferred Product Features, Inc., a corporation of California Application July 1, 1955, Serial No. 519,562

3 Claims. (Cl. 222-571) This invention relates to a dripless pouring device and particularly to an improved construction of the structure disclosed in my Patent 2,521,523 of September 5, 1950.

The invention will be particularly described as it has been applied to the neck of a bottle, but it will be obvious that the invention can be applied to the outlet of any similar container.

Completely dripless pouring (including any residual portions on the sealing surface) is always directly related to the surface tension of the particular liquid being poured. Thus, the lower the surface tension of the liquid, the more difficult it is to obtain completely dripless pouring performance. Hence the need for improvements and refinements in functional structural features, shaping, dimensioning and positioning. In placing the construction disclosed in my aforementioned patent into commercial application, it was found that dripless pouring of a liquid from a container could be further assured if certain additional structural features were included and it is in general the broad object of the present invention to teach how such added structural features should be incorporated.

In general, the objects of the present invention are achieved by providing two or three concavities formed into the neck of the bottle as is hereinafter set forth in detail.

-In the drawing:

Figure l is a side elevation, partly in section, of the upper portion and neck of a bottle embodying the present invention.

'Figures 2 and 3 are half sections taken through the neck portions of bottles embodying the present invention.

' Referring to the drawing and particularly to Figure 1, I have shown a fragment of a bottle 6, this having a tubular neck 7 upon which may be provided screw threads 8 for application of a closure or sealing member to be carried concentrically with respect to the neck. The closure can be provided by a threaded cap or by a compression cap. Referring to Figure 2, the neck 7 is provided with a pouring surface, generally indicated at 10, and including a first concavity 9 forming a part of the generally annular inner surface of the neck adjacent to the pouring lip, generally indicated at 11.

In accordance with this invention, a second concavity 12 is provided about the pouring lip of the neck and between the lip 11 and the upper end of the first concavity. The second concavity is provided upon a different radius from that of the first concavity and of a slightly larger diametenfor example, in one successful bottle, the first and large concavity was formed on a radius of 0.375, as measured from the intersection of the central axis of the neck, generally indicated by line 14, and a plane extending across the upper edge of the pouring lip 11, indicated by line 15. This first and large concavity 9 terminates at a plane extending across the lower edge of the second and small concavity 12 indicated by line 16. The true diametral plane of the first and large concavity 9 is "ice indicated by line 15; hence, the plane indicated by line 16 intersecting at the termination of the radius of 0.375 is below its true diametral plane. Thus, a line drawn from the intersection of the central axis of the neck 14 and the true diametral plane 15, and tangent (at the termination) to the 0.375 radius of the concavity 9, is about 56 below horizontal of the true diametral plane and the concave curvature is flared upwardly and outwardly by a similar degree from the vertical. If the radius 0.375 of concavity 9 were to be extended until it became tangent at the true diametral plane indicated by line 15, the degree of upward and outward flare of concavity 9 would gradually diminish to zero at the tangential intersection. During formation of the soft glass when the plunger is retracted and the air stream blows by, this zero degree tangential edge is deformed, moving inwardly and downwardly, causing a negative degree of unwanted shrinkback, inferior dimensional characteristics and a reverse of conditions necessary for shaping the inside edge so that an unsevered, retractable stream-flow can be caused and directed with 56 of positive flare or pitch and increased stream velocity.

The second and small concavity 12 is an effective means for retaining an adequate 5 6 of upward and outward flare or curvature of the first and large concavity 9. The dimension and positioning of the radius of the second and small concavity 12 is so related to the first as to repeat in miniature the principle previously described and prevent such portions of the curvature of the first and large concavity 9 (radius 0.375) otherwise having less than 5-6 upward and outward flare to be substituted and additionally extended by the second and small concavity 12. Thus, when the second concavity was formed on a radius of 0.072", centered similarly above the diametral plane indicated by line 15 and pos-itioned at about a 60 angle so that plane, the increased flare, slightly larger diameter and slight annular depression immediately adjacent the pouring lip, as in Figure 2, caused substantially improved results in bottles made and tested for both dimensional stability and pouring performance. Although the structural change so made may appear slight, the lip of conjunction between the internal and external surfaces of a bottle is extremely critical and responsive to both the flow of soft glass during manufacture and liquid during pouring. For example, when bottles of the same construction shown in Figure 2 were tested with an insert plug gauge similarly contoured and dimensioned, the differences in diameters at the lip line 11 between the largest and smallest were less than .001", which is small enough to make press-fitted inserts and adapters fit accurately. By comparison, on long production runs it is usually the practice on conventional bottles to set the inside diameter tolerance at about .025 .030" because of dimensional instabilities encountered in manufacturing. In addition to reducing shrink back, the second and small concavity 12 was found on repeated tests to hold the liquid stream-front and drops closer to the lip and higher up on the inside surface of the neck during pouring and cut off, thus retracting an unbroken stream more effectively than when the amount of shrink back is small or large. Further, this small concavity 12 traps and prevents any run-down over the side of the bottle neck in the event an auxiliary surface treatment or coating is applied to increase the degree of performance. In this connection, it is mentioned that application of certain surface coatings to the surface of the neck and the second concavity aids in controlling the pouring of certain liquidsand the second concavity aids in holding such a coating in the correct location, either alone or in combination with another concavity on the exterior rim surface, such as is indicated at 26 in Figure 3. Additionally, the second concavity provides a secondary or false lip which, when a coating is applied within the small concavity 12, causes the liquid to break away and take off from the inside edge with air pocketed under the issuing stream of liquid. Further, the concavity 12. serves to trap,- any excess coating fluid if a coating is applied and to prevent such material from running into the bottle.

In that form of the device shown in Figure 3, the in side of the neck is provided with a third concavity 21 adjacent the lower edge of the second concavity, this third concavity also being relatively small in size and being taken about a radius of about 0.015" in the aforementioned bottle. The third concavity is usefui in preventing shrink-back following molding; it increases the dimensional stability of the neck, enabling closer adherence to dimensional tolerances at surfaces farther down in the bottle. but nonetheless undesirable (choker-s prevent the free entry and retraction of filler tubes in high speed automatic operations).

Referring again to the structure shown in Figure 3, it will be noted that the lower portion 22 of the neck is relatively straight for a substantial distance. This portion of the neck can be concentric or slightly tapered inwardly to the end that the directional velocity of the issuing stream of liquid is increased and the liquid is caused to pitch out further from the take-01f point on the inside edge, enabling the liquid to clear the rim in a sealing surface area and makes breaking of the adhesion between the liquid and the outer surface area of the pouring lip easier so the liquid stream breaks away further up on the rim or sealing surface or actually, at maximum takeoff from the inside of the bottle.

The size of the concavities and their relation to one another in different diameters of bottle necks is substantially as follows when measured by reference to the mean or average diameter of each of the comics providing the respective concavity. The diameter of the first concavity being taken as. unity 1.00 for reference, it should be centered at the intersection of the central axis of the neck, generally indicated by the line 14, and its horizontal diametral reference plane extending across the upper edge of the pouring lip 11, indicated by line 15. The termination of the upper end of the first concavity on a radius of M; of 1.00 diameter is made at such distance vertical to the diametral reference plane 15 as will cause the terminal point of said radius to be tangent to a line drawn from the center of the diametral reference plane to a point below said plane and sufiiciently to reduce the shrink-back to zero or a negligible degree. This upper terminal point for the radius .50 which provides the first concavity 9 is generally such that a line drawn tangent from said terminal point to the center of the diametral reference plane will be 3-8 off and below the horizontal diametral reference plane at the point of termination, as shown in Figure 2.

The small second concavity 12 should have a diameter from 1.02 to 1.16 times that of the first large concavity 9. The diametral reference plane for the small second concavity 12 should be located above the diametral reference plane of the first large concavity 9. Further, any chord drawn between the upper terminal points of each of the several concavities is always to some degree, however small, less in length than the true diameter of that concavity chord which is always located by a diametral reference plane, which is always above its shorter chord.

The small third concavity 21 in Figure 3 should be about 0.015" in radius for a bottle in which the diameter of the large concavity is 1.00 and proportionally smaller in smaller sized bottle necks. The diameter of the third concavity at its upper terminus should be about .80 to .95 that .of the first concavity.

In overall length, the first concavity is again taken for reference. The vertical depth to the base of this concavity, measured from the plane extending across the upper edge of the pouring lip 11, indicated by line 15, is best between .217 min. and .250 max. in finished glass, while about .230 to .240" shows more indications of being the optimum range in the finished glass. In the plunger, these depths can be reduced to about .875-.940 times the dimensions in finished blow glass to allow for some extension of the depth of this large concavity due to blow by of the air stream. This extension should be reduced by the use of the third small concavity 21 and proficiency in this new manufacturing technique. In other sizes of bottle necks the depth of the first large concavity is substantially the same as described hereinabove rather than proportional.

The lip 11 may take the form of a slight counterset recess, as is shown in Figure 3.

It has also been found desirable to provide a fourth concavity, indicated at 26, about the outside rim of the neck to reduce the vertical thickness and radius of the edge and to serve to pocket air under the stream and to catch any coating fluid or film which maybe applied above this recess.

From the foregoing, I believe it will be apparent that I have provided improvements which enable dripless pouring to be effected from containers.

I claim:

1. A dripless pouring bottle comprising a substantially uniform annular vertically extending bottle neck adapting said bottle for closure, by a sealing member to be carried concentrically with respect to said neck, a pouring surface formed at the upper end of said neck, said surface comprising a first relatively large concavity forming a part of the inner surface of said neck adjacent the pouring lip of the neck, and a second relatively small concavity provided about the pouring lip of the neck and between the lip and upper end of the first concavity said second concavity providing an upward and outward flare from the first concavity.

2. A dripless pouring bottle comprising a substantially uniform annular vertically extending bottle neck adapting said bottle for closure by a sealing member to be carried concentrically with respect to said neck, a pouring surface formed at the upper end of said neck, a first relatively large concavity forming a part of the inner surface of said neck adjacent the pouring lip. of the neck, a second relatively small concavity provided about the pouring lip of the neck and between the lip and upper end of the first concavity said second concavity providing an upward and outward flare from the first concavity, and a third concavity provided about the neck at the lower end of the first concavity.

3. A dripless pouring bottle comprising a substantially uniform annular vertically extending bottle neck adapting said bottle for closure by a sealing member to be carried concentrically with respect to said neck, an inner pouring surface formed at the upper end of said neck, a first relatively large concavity forming a part of the inner surface of said neck adjacent the pouring lip of the neck, a second relatively small concavity provided about the pouring lip of the neck and between the lip and upper end of the first concavity said second concavity providing an upward and outward flare from the first concavity, a third concavity provided about the neck at the lower end of the first concavity, and an upwardly tapered neck portion extending immediately below the third concavity.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,416,309 Tunnicliff May 16, 1922 2,549,225 Moy Apr. 17, 1951 2,704,174 Uxa Mar. 1'5, 1955

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US1416309 *15 Nov 192116 May 1922Frank TunnicliffPouring spout
US2549225 *5 Abr 194817 Abr 1951Arthur MoyNondrip dispensing bottle stopper
US2704174 *8 Ene 195315 Mar 1955Eduard HaasDrop catching device for pouring liquids
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3881622 *20 Ago 19736 May 1975Phillips Petroleum CoGripping end of parison to form bottle having plurality of grooves at neck end
US4493427 *8 Jun 198315 Ene 1985Stericric SaFlask for sterile liquids
US6609639 *16 Mar 199926 Ago 2003John GenthonDrip prevention apparatus
US675835715 Jun 20016 Jul 2004Grillo NicoloGlass bottle with an antidrip neck
US6997336 *16 Sep 200314 Feb 2006Graham Packaging Company, L.P.Plastic cafare
US20090212060 *10 Mar 200627 Ago 2009Kabushiki Kaisha Yakult HonshaPackaging Container
US20130220964 *19 Feb 201329 Ago 2013The Coca-Cola CompanyMetal beverage container with improved finish geometry
WO1989007553A1 *20 Feb 198924 Ago 1989Stoelzle Oberglas AktiengesellMouth of a container for flowing materials
WO2001098156A1 *15 Jun 200127 Dic 2001Grillo NicoloGlass bottle with an antidrip neck
WO2004026699A2 *16 Sep 20031 Abr 2004Denner JohnPlastic carafe
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.222/571, 215/41, 215/44
Clasificación internacionalB65D23/06, B65D23/00
Clasificación cooperativaB65D23/06
Clasificación europeaB65D23/06