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Número de publicaciónUS2818919 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación7 Ene 1958
Fecha de presentación29 Mar 1956
Fecha de prioridad29 Mar 1956
Número de publicaciónUS 2818919 A, US 2818919A, US-A-2818919, US2818919 A, US2818919A
InventoresSylvan Joseph
Cesionario originalSylvan Joseph
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Window frame and sash assembly
US 2818919 A
Imágenes(4)
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

WINDOW FRAME ANDY SASH ASSEMBLY 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 29, 19561 ELL IN VEN TOR.

JOSEPH 672 Vfl/V 6 5m 6 Fade/t ATTOAAIA'VS Jam. 7, 1958 .J. SYLVAN 2,818,919

WINDOW FRAME AND SASH ASSEMBLY 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 IF-5E1 4 Filed March 29, 1956 TE- 36 3a 1 E1 30 so 90 34 e6 -46 IN VEN TO JOJA-Pf/ 5/4 rmv Jan. 7, 1958 J. SYLVAN' 2,818,919

WINDOW FRAME AND SASH ASSEMBLY Filed March 29, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN TOR.

dOdfP/l 6 V1 V19 A r Teen/fr;

Jan. 7, 1958 J. SYLVAN WINDOW FRAME AND SASH ASSEMBLY.

4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed March 29, 1956 M M 6 J J 8 1 h 4 n a 4 6 8 M A rro/wvzrs i United States Patent WINDOW FRAME AND SASH ASSEMBLY Joseph Sylvan, Birmingham, Mich. Application March 29, 1956, Serial No. 574,734 2 Claims. (Cl. 16091) This invention relates to an improved window frame and sash assembly.

An object is to provide a window frame and sash assembly wherein a sash is disposed within opposed runways for slidable movement and the runways and the sash are so fashioned that at one position of the sash within the runways it may be moved laterally deeper into one runway to permit its opposite edge being completely swung out of the opposite runway.

Another object is the provision of a window frame and sash assembly as defined hereinabove wherein one runway channel for the sash is provided with a bottom recess adapted to receive a projection on the slide rail of the sash to permit shifting of the sash to facilitate its removal from or placement in the runways.

Another object is the provision of a window frame and sash assembly as hereinabove set forth wherein the opposed slide rails of the sash are provided with oppositely projecting parts adapted to be received within recesses in the bottoms of the runway channels. One of these runway channels is deeper than the other and the slide rail projecting part of the sash within such deeper runway channel is receivable within the bottom. recess of said channel so as to permit sufficient movement of the sash laterally within the runway channel to facilitate removal of the sash from the window frame or placement of the same therein. The projecting part of the opposed side rail of the sash is receivable within each of a plurality of recesses provided in the bottom of the runway channel within which such slide rail is disposed to position the sash at adjusted positions within the window frame.

This invention is shown as embodied in a window frame wherein a plurality of vertically slidable sash are supported for slidable movement. Each sash has its two side rails provided with projecting parts preferably disposed at adjacent diagonally opposite corners of the sash and which parts are adapted to be received within recesses in the bottoms of the runway channels when disposed opposite such recesses. The projecting part on one side rail of the sash is longer than the projecting part on the opposite side rail and is disposed within a deeper runway channel and when received within the recess of the bottom of such runway channel, it permits swinging of the sash for removal from or placement within the runways. The projecting part on the opposite side rail of the sash is adapted to be received within each of a plurality of recesses formed in the bottom of itsrunway to support the sash at different positions within the runway.

A meritorious feature is that the transverse dimension of the sash including the opposite side rail projecting parts is greater than the transverse distance between the bottoms of the opposed runway channels within which the sash is mounted so that the sash can only be withdrawn from or placed within the runways when the determined side rail projecting part of the sash is received within a recess within the bottom of its runway channel. In this construction slidable movement of the sash within the runways tilts the sash slidably so that it rides upon its Patented Jan. 7, 1958 diagonally opposed slide rail projections within the runways. When one of the slide rail projections is received within its recess in the bottom of its runway, the sash can be brought to an upright squared position.

Another meritorious feature is that in a window frame and sash assembly as defined, the slide rail projections may be in the form of springs receivable within recesses in the bottom of the runway channel within which such slide rail is disposed to permit removal or placement of the sash, but such springs exert a tension upon the sash during its slidable movement tending to hold it toward the bottom of the opposite runway channel so that the projection provided on its opposite slide rail will tend normally to enter the positioning recess in the bottom of said opposite runway channel.

Another object is the provision in a window frame and sash assembly as called for above of shiftable plates carried by the meeting rail of one sash adapted to be shifted out of position to permit lateral shifting of the sash as desired for removal or placement but adapted to be shifted into a position to prevent such lateral movement of the sash and to guide the sash in its vertical slidable movement.

Another object of the construction herein set forth and described in the immediately preceding paragraph is the provision of such shiftable plates so as to be swung to lock the two sashes together or to release the two sashes for independent slidable movement.

A further object as defined in the hereinabove two preceding paragraphs is the provision of such shiftable lock plates so associated with the meeting rails of the two sashes as to close gaps between the ends of such meeting rails beyond provided interengaging sealing lips on the meeting rails.

Another object is the provision in a construction as hereln defined of a sash here shown as a screen sash which is so supported within the outer pair of runway channels as to be elevated slightly and then swung outwardly at the bottom to provide an opening through which a dust mop or the like might be moved but which screen sash is held in position at top and bottom when closed but is normally free along its side rails other than at the top or bottom for movement outwardly but held agamst movement inwardly.

Various other objects, advantages, and meritorious features will more fully appear from the following description, claims, and accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is an inside elevation of a window frame and sash assembly embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is an outside elevation of a Window frame and sash assembly embodying the invention;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary perspective at one end of the meeting rails showing the lock cover guide plate associated therewith;

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 44 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line 55 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 6 is a rear elevation showing parts of the window frame and sash structure broken away;

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of Fig. 5 showing the two sashes closed and locked together;

Fig. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken on the same line as Fig. 7 but showing the lower sash elevated to a ventilating position;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken on the same line as Fig. 7 and partly broken away showing the upper sash in a position to which it has been slidably moved but not at'a fixed position of elevation;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary view showing a sash embodying the invention but of a modified construction as com- .3 pared withasssh. s'tshas .hown nth fi s n e fi r of the drawing; i

Fig. 11 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line .1'1-11 ofFig.-6;

Fig. 12 is averticalsectional fragmentary'view taken ona line similar to that of. Fig. '7;-;butshowing a sash at a position ofinsertioninto or removal-from the window frame runways;

Fig. 13 is-a side elevation of-the ,sa shmodiiied slightly as to constructionas compared withasash of the first nine figures of the drawing or the sash of Fig. 110;

Fig. 14 is a .sideelevationpf a sash modifiedwslightly .as to construction as compared with the sash of Fig. 13 orof the preceding figuresof the drawingsnand Figure 15 ,isa sideelevationofia sash installed within broken-away runwaymembers and; showing a sash of Y slightly modified construction as cornptu'ed with the sash of Figs. 13 and 14 an d of theaprecedingfigures.of the drawing.

This invention is illustrated as embodied'inthe window frame and sash assembly wherein two window sashes and a screen sash are supportedforindependent slidable vertical movement within ametal window frame. Such a three-sash assembly .is, shown in the cross sectional views of Figsn4, 5, and 11. ,The window frame is of the usual rectangular shape and is illustrated as made up ofsimilar metal extrusions secured together at the corners. There are similar jamb portions secured together in spacedapart relationshipat the -bottom by a sill portion 22 and at the top by a header portion 24. The cross sectional shape of the sill and header portions is best shown in Fig. 4- and the cross sectional shape of the jamb portions 29 is best shown in Figs. 5 and 11. These extrusions, it will be seen, are substantially identical, .which is for the purpose of economy. The manner in which the extrusions may be secured together at the cornersis illustrated in my copending application Serial No. 572,947 filed 'March 21, 1956. Each of these frame sections is shown as provided with three sash-receiving channels. .There is an inner window sash-receiving channel 26, an outer window sash-receiving channel 28, and a ,screen channel 30 as illustrated particularly in Figs. 5 and 11. .In the inner window sash-receiving channel 26. there is a relatively wide insert 32 on one side of theframe and a relatively shallow insert 34 on the opposite side of the frame. These inserts are channel-shaped in cross section, being formed of metal channels, and areseated within the runway channels of the frameso that the bottoms are opposed to the side rails of the sash. Within the outer window sash runway there :are provided corresponding inserts 32 and 34 likewise of diiferent widths. Within each screen sash runway there is disposed an insert 36.

The inserts 32 disposed Within the runways of one jamb portion of the window frame have such a height that a window sash may be slidably supported therein but the inserts 34. within the opposite portion of the window frame being more shallow, inserts may have such a .height that a window sash may be slidably moved as shown in Figs. 5 and 11 thereinto sufiiciently to permit the opposite edge of the sash tobe moved out of the opposite runway channel. The insert 36 within. the screen sash runway 30has aheight substantially equal to the depth of the runwayso that a screen sash rests thereupon freely and is not tucked into the runway. It will be. noted that the outer side wall of the .outer window sash channel identified by the numeral 38 has a greater depth than any other runway side walls.

A lower window sash L is mounted for vertical slidable movement within the inner window sash runway 26. ,An upper windowsash U is. mounted for vertical slidable movement within the outer. window sash runway 28. A screen sash S is mounted for vertical slidable movement for limited extent and for swingablemovement asv hereinf. e ess b d with nzth s easashrunw ym Ih s t nq iont lrptsth win o tramet ro d Cit 1-insta ls-pret ens.s de

with sash-receiving channels which form continuations of the iamb runwaychannels. The header portion 24 of the window frame is provided with sash-receiving channels which form continuations of the jamb runway channels all as shown in Fig. 4. The two jamb portions and the header portion and sill portion are provided with inwardly projecting channel sections 40 as shown particularly in Figs. 4 and 5. These channel sections are adapted to receive frame elements 42 which may be jambelements or header or sill elements of the dry-wall frame about the window opening in the building. This opening is indicated in Fig.4 as defined by a headerassembly 44 and a sill assembly 46. The margins of the runway channels and of the sash-receiving channels .ofthe header and sill and even the margins of the channel sections 40 are shown as ball peen margins. This construction is more particularly described in my copending application supra.

The upper and lower-window, sashes are supported-for free vertical slidable movement within their -provided runways. The sash and the window frame runways are so formed that thesashmay be inserted :into the runways or removed therefrom by lateral ,slidable angular, movement. Figs. 7, 8, 9, and 12 show the position of different sashes at ditferenthlocations between the jamb runways of thewindowframe-withthe frame cutawayin a longitudinal section. Fig. 12, which illustrates an upper sash, perhaps best illustrates themanner of the introduction of the sash into position within the opposed runways. Theinserts 34,.which arethe shallow inserts, are provided with cutouts or openings A8 as s hown in Fig. 12. Such opening might be formed by-aspacebetween two insert sections or by cutting-out the bottom of an insert. In

such Fig. 12 the window sash U ,is shown as provided adjacent to the upper end of a slide rail with a projecting screw or the like 50. Adjacent to the lower end of the opposite slide rail-isa projectingscrewor thelike52. Other figures of the drawings such as 10, 13, 14, and 15 show different forms of projections but theyall answer the same purpose.

In inserting the Window sashinto place, the upper corner carrying the screw 50 (which, it will be noted, is longer than the screw 52) ,is first inserted into the ,runway channel and the screw itself is received within the opening 48. When the screw is enteredinto theOPeningAS the sash is received sufficiently farintothe runway that the opposite edge of the sash clears .the side walls of the opposite runway channel so that the sash may be swung into a Pla po i n-within t wisdowf smea show in Fig. 12. Thetransverse dimension of the sash, including both the screws v 5t) and 52, is greater than the transverse dimension of the window framerneasured between the bottoms of the runway channels as such runway channels are determined by theinserts 32 and 34. This is apparent from the view of Fig. 9. Fig. 9, tho ugh it shows the upper sash, illustrates how such sash maybe raised and lowered.

During its raising and lowering, the heads of the screws ride upon the bottoms of the runways, or ratherupon the bottomsof the runwayinserts 32 and 34, but to do this the window sash itself has to be tiltedas shown. Forthe i sas t o c p nu r s t sq r pc t .,o of the screws must be received within an opening in the bottom of its runway channel. The opening 48heretofore referred to in the bottom of the deep runwaychannel is solely forthepurposepf permitting the insertion or removal of a sash frorn the window framebut it will be noted that the opposed runway channel has an opening 54 at its lower end.

This opening 54 may be a space below thelower end of the insert. 1 Such opposed runway also has openings 56 located at intervals throughout its.length as shown' in Figs- 7, 8, and 9. T his is true of boththe innerj and I outer runway channels. Itis understood,.alsohthat the Presse w r. w ndow. Sash a ssshasrovided wi h the 5Qts '15 'i nsashi stance the pins 50 of greater height are located adjacent to the upper corners of the upper sash and the pins 52 are located diagonally opposite adjacent the opposite and lower corners of the window sash. Pins 52 are adapted, as stated, to be received within openings 56 in the bottom opening 54 to support the sash at adjusted positions.

When the pin 50 is inserted into its runway opening 48, the sash can be moved sufficiently into such runway to permit its opposite edge clearing the opposite margins of the opposite runway channel to permit insertion or removal of the sash. When a pin 52 is moved into the bottom opening 54 or into any intermediate opening 56 as shown in Figs. 7 and 8, the sash may be straightened up within the runways but its opposite margin does not clear the opposite margins of the runway channels so as to permit removal of the sash. The transverse dimension of a sash including both pins 50 and 52 is therefore greater than the transverse dimension between the bottoms of the runways within which the sash is mounted. The transverse dimension of the sash including only the pin 52, which is the shorter pin, is less than the transverse dimension between the bottom of the deep runway and the margin of the inner side wall of the opposite runway as shown in Fig. 12. The transverse dimension of the sash, including the longer pin 50 but not including the short pin 52, is greater than the transverse dimension of the frame between the bottom of the shallow runway and the margin of the opposite runway as shown in Figs. 7 and 8.

It is therefore apparent that either sash may be removed from its runway channel or inserted thereinto by bringing it into position so that its long projection 50 is received within the bottom recess 48 of its runway. For slidable movement of the sash, such projection 50 is withdrawn from such recess and the sash is canted so as to be raised or lowered. When the projection 52 comes into position opposite a recess 54 or 56, it may be moved thereinto and the sash supported at such position. Generally throughout the specification and claims the openings 48, 54, and 56 in the bottoms of the runways are termed recesses because it is obvious that a recess would serve the same purpose as the opening. Generally, also, the projections on the slide rails, indicated heretofore by the numerals 50 and 52 as defining screws,

are termed projections because in Figs. 10, 13, and 14, projections other than screws are shown as hereinafter appears.

of the slide rails 50 and 52 are shown as screws provided with heads. The heads of these screws will seat within the recesses, overhanging the same, so as to prevent the sash from being accidentally displaced. In Fig. 13 a sash is illustrated as provided with a relatively long pin 58 adjacent to the upper corner and a shorter pin 60 adjacent to the lower corner. These pins are shown as bent slightly downwardly so that they would answer the same purpose as the head of the screw. They possess an advantage over the screw in that the pins would tend to cam themselves out of the recess when the sash was raised.

In Fig. 13 the projections are shown as being formed integrally with the upper and lower rails of the sash. The upper and longer projection is indicated by the numeral 62. The lower and shorter projection is indicated by the numeral 64.

In Fig. the sash is shown as having a spring 66 secured to its upper corner in lieu of the screw 50 or the pin 58. The opposite and lower corner is shown as provided with a pin such as 60. In such Fig. 10 it will be seen that the opening 48 formed in the insert disposed within the deep runway is of such a size as to receive the spring 66. The spring is received within such opening without compression sufficiently to permit insertion or removal of the sash. It also may be observed in this figure that the recess in the opposite runway within which the pin 60 is received is formed as a dimple re cess rather thanan. opening such as the openings 54 and 56 shown in Figs. 7, 8, and 9. Fig. 10 also shows a 'second spring 68. These two springs serve when the sash is being moved up and down to hold the opposite edge of the sash against the bottom of the opposite runway so that when a pin or projection 60 comes into position opposite a recess, it will be moved thereinto and held therein to maintain the sash releasably at such elevated position.

Fig. 15 is similar to Fig. 10 in that it is provided with the pin 60 on the lower corner of the sash and the spring 66 on the diagonally opposite corner of the opposite side rail but it is not provided with the second spring 68. Otherwise this modification resembles the modification of Fig. 10. The foregoing relates to the construction of the sash and window frame assembly which permits the insertion and removal of the sash from the window frame, the slidable movement of the sash within the window frame, the support of the sash at adjusted positions of elevation, and the several modifications of the sash, all of which function to accomplish the above objectives.

Another feature of importance is that which relates to the locking of the two sashes together when they are closed and the sealing of gaps at the ends of the meeting rails. This is illustrated best in Figs. 3, 4, and 5. There is a lock plate 70 pivoted by a pin 72 to the top rail of the lower window sash L as shown in Fig. 3. This lock plate 70 has a lug 74 thereon which is adapted to be received within the cutout 76 formed in the bottom rail of the upper sash. This cutout 76 is shown in Fig. 3. The lug is shown received therein in Fig. 4. Fig. 5 shows a second and somewhat similar plate 78 pivoted at 80 adjacent to the opposite end of the top rail of the lower sash but this plate 78 is not provided with a lug 74 because the lower rail of the upper sash opposite the plate is not provided with the cutout 76. Obviously it could be provided with a cutout and the plate 78 could have been provided with a locking lug if it were felt desirable to provide a lock at each end of the meeting rails of the upper and the lower sashes. It is apparent that when the plate is swung to the position shown in Fig. 4, the two sashes are locked together. It is likewise apparent that when the plate is swung to the position shown in Fig. 3, the sashes are released for slidable movement.

These plates serve a second purpose, viz: the meeting rails of the upper and lower sashes are provided with overlapping interengaging sealing lips 82 as shown in Fig. 4. This construction of these overlapping inter'engaging sealing lips is not new in this application, having been shown in earlier applications of this applicant such as the application supra and application Serial No. 546,143 filed November 10, 1955, which is now abandoned. These sealing lips are formed as integral parts of the extrusions. Therefore the sealing lips 82 are integral parts of those extrusion sections which form the meeting rails. Therefore these sealing lips do not extend across the ends of the slide rails of the sash but terminate at the ends of the meeting rails. For this reason the sealing lips terminate spaced from the margins: of the runway channels. This is shown in dotted outline in Fig. 5. This would normally leave a gap at the ends of the sealing lips at the meeting rails adjacent the two runway channels. These plates, when swung to the closed position, fill such gap.

The plate 78 also serves an additional function. When it is disposed as shown in Fig. 5, it bears against the margin of the outer side wall of the inner runway channel and serves to position the window for its slidable movement.

The foregoing has been directed to the upper and lower window sash and their mounting and support within the window frame. It should be said, however, that the upper window sash is shown as provided with stop pins 84 depending below the lower rail. These serve to hold the upper window sash from dropping down on the fingers 1;. I fionelowering itfand alsov space itslightly from thesill "when .it is lowered.

sThescreen, which is iIIustratedin FigsLZ, 4, 5, 6, and

. ;l l,.may.,be,either a halfscreen asshown in such figures, ,ors-it may be,a .fullscreen. Figs. 5, 6, and 11 show this tscreen as. beingone which has a width such that it can :normallylbe moved into position laterally between its rrunwaysa30 and seatednpon the inserts 36 provided in such runways as shown particularly in Fig. 11. The

lower rail of the. screen has laterally projecting pins 86 ,as shoWn ,in :Figs. .4 and 11 which are adapted to limit the downwardmovement ofthe screen and also afford a hand, grip for engagingthe screen from inside the build- ;ing. ';-The top railof thescreen has aweatherseal strip :88 shown.in-Fig. 4 which is adapted toengage the bottom .rail. of the upper window-.sashasshown in Fig. 4.

:To hold; the,-screen;in position, the side rails of the screen. arev provided adjacent to their upper ,ends with ,laterally projecting pins;.9,0 adapted to be received with :recesses 92 formed. in the screen runway inserts 36. as shown in Figsand 6. .When these pins are received v within the slots 92, the screen may be raised and lowered the lengthof the slots, andthe top of the screen is held in placeby the location of the pins within the slots. ;.,\flhen -the screen is moved to its lowered position, the .pide rails of'thescreen, whichside rails, project at their lower-ends asat- 94 beyond the bottom rail 96 of the screen, as, shownin-Eig. 6, .are received within the ,sill channel as shown in Figs. 4 and 6.

,Such sill,channel,is indicated in Fig. 4 as 98. It is .formed ,by a sill channel in thesill portion of the window frame and-an insert 100. is shown in Fig. 4 as disposed .therein. outer channel wall as well astshown inFig, 4. A weather ,plate 104.is ,.secured to the sill portion of the window ,frame overhanging such drain opening also as shown in This insert 100 has a drain opening 102 in the ltis noted that the sill channel forthe screen is very g shallow so that the end portions of thejside rails of the .s creen project thereinto but a slight distance. 'When the, screen is lifted slightly by moving the pins.90 upwardly ,within the slots 92, the bottom ofthe screen may be swung outwardly so as to extend a dust mop orthe like therethrough for cl eaning.

.ilnstead of providing a halfrlengthscreen just described,

.a-.fu ll.-len gth screen maybe provided as shown in the ,,upper. .corner of section 6. This full-length. screen is therein indicated by. the numeral 106. Such screen is vided-jadjacent the upperends of its side .rails with jthe,laterally projecting pins 108. Such .pins are received ,within recesses .or openings 110 formed in the inserts 36 attheir upper-ends as shown in Fig. 6. The length of such openings, orthe space above the upper ends of the" ,inserts issuch tha th screen may be lifted sufiiciently towithdraw the lower ends of its side rails from the sill channel .so that the bottom of such full-length screen may be swung outwardly as heretofore described in connection with ,the; half-length screen and in the same manner.

.What I claim is:

1.,A window frame and sash assembly comprising, in combination, a window frame provided with a plurality of pairs of opposed channel-shaped runways, a sashsupported for slidable movement within each pair of chan- ..n el-,shaped runways, opposed runway channels ofthe outer pair of runways having their outer side walls of less height than theirinner ,side walls and with the sash mounted in said outer pair of runways having .a transverse dimension greater than ,thetransverse distance between the margins ,of theinner side walls but less than the transverse distance of theirouter sidewalls, said sash having opposite .side rails provided with projections disposed Within slots extending lengthwise of the bottoms of the runways during travel/therethrough, said runways provided with said .slots, said sash having side rails projecting at the bottom beyond the bottom rail of the sash, and said frame having .a sill portion. provided with a recess adapted to receive the ends of the sash side rails.

2. A window frame and screen sash assembly comprising, in combination, a window frame having opposed jamb portions provided with opposed runways and a sill portionprovidcd with a sillchannel in line with said .runways, said runways provided with opposed linearly extending recesses in the bottoms of the runways, a screen sash disposed within said runways and having side rails provided with projecting portions disposed within the runway recesses for slidable movement therethrough to permit slidable movement of the screen, said screen side rails having projecting portions at their lower ends depending below the bottom rail of the screen and receivable within thesill channel to position the bottom of the screen. References Cited in the file of this patent ,UNITED STATES PATENTS

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US69575137 Nov 200225 Oct 2005Newell Operating CompanyIntegrated tilt/sash lock assembly
US70136037 Nov 200221 Mar 2006Newell Operating CompanyIntegrated tilt/sash lock assembly
US70702117 Nov 20024 Jul 2006Newell Operating CompanyIntegrated tilt/sash lock assembly
US748147015 Nov 200527 Ene 2009Newell Operating CompanyIntegrated tilt/sash lock assembly
US76072628 Jun 200427 Oct 2009Newell Operating CompanyIntegrated tilt/sash lock assembly
US797607726 Jul 200612 Jul 2011Newell Operating CompanyIntegrated tilt/sash lock assembly
US802090426 Jul 200620 Sep 2011Newell Operating CompanyIntegrated tilt/sash lock assembly
US813236925 Sep 200913 Mar 2012Newell Operating CompanyIntegrated tilt/sash lock assembly
US820592028 Abr 200826 Jun 2012Newell Operating CompanySash lock with forced entry resistance
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.160/91, 49/460, 49/63, 49/453, 49/449
Clasificación internacionalE06B3/44
Clasificación cooperativaE06B2003/4492, E06B2003/4453, E06B3/5063, E06B3/44
Clasificación europeaE06B3/50G2, E06B3/44