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Número de publicaciónUS2955726 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación11 Oct 1960
Fecha de presentación12 Nov 1957
Fecha de prioridad12 Nov 1957
Número de publicaciónUS 2955726 A, US 2955726A, US-A-2955726, US2955726 A, US2955726A
InventoresFeldman Daniel J, Peter Zizan
Cesionario originalFeldman
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Apparatus for dispensing liquid concentrates from their original containers
US 2955726 A
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

1960 D. J. FELDMAN EI'AL 2,955,726

APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING LIQUID CONCENTRATES FROM THEIR ORIGINAL CONTAINERS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 12, 1957 INVENTO DANIEL J. FELOMAN (NO F: 1-52 WATEe SUPPLY T4 are A r-ro ENEY 1960 D. J. FELDMAN ETAL 2955726 APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING LIQUID CONCENTRATES FROM THEIR ORIGINAL CONTAINERS Filed Nov. 12, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. DANIEL J. Fewmnu Aura srsz 2/ ZAH THE/E A rrozuer DISPENSING LIQUID CONCENTRATES D. J. FELDMAN ET AL 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 APPARATUS FOR FROM THEIR ORIGINAL CONTAINERS Filed NOV. 12, 1957 w W. 4,. m m 0 MN 0 E H W M w A 5 A CG 0 W0 2 I l I I I .i m i= mm s w H mm a. T E A m 0 5% 74 sauna: SWITCH #Danin JaEeldman, Pittsburgh, and Peter Zizan, Wilkinsburg, Pa.; said Zizan assignor to said Feldman Filed Nov. 12, 1957, Set. No. 695,65'6 -16 Claims. (Cl. 222--'-76) This ihvehtion'relates generally to coined controlled apparatus for dispensing liquids such as drinks, soups gandthe'like and more particularly to the dispensing of -1i'quids from their original containers together with contfolsffor"aiitorriatically switching from an empty original Coiittine'rto a full original container Withoutservice interruption. i i

Oheof theproblems in conjunction with the dispensing er 7 liquids is use of special containers made specifically 1 for the dispenser which requires cleaning and sterilization before it'canbe refilled and transported to the dispensing niachin'e. These special containers when refilled frequently retiuire refrigeration during their transportation to the dispenser. This mode is costly as well as being difiicult'to perform and even with the greatest precautions contamination can occur which not only destroys the bateh but'may'also lead toloss ofcustomer's, I

Thisjii'oblem is answered in part by vast changes in thed'esign'bfthellispensing machine so thatthepriginal s'yriip 6r 6ohcentrate containen canned and-sealed when filled by the manufacturer is delivered to the dispensing nia'g'ihihe, then punctured and placed in service. This original syru can needs no refrigeration and its' lid is til'e anedfbefo're being punctured and placed in service. since his no t refrig'erated, it should be cooled before 'Bin" hispensed as a cold drink. Thus two or more such 'originalcans are-"employed to serve the same drinkaii'd "while oh'e is being emptied through the dispensing mac'hine'th'e others are being cooled. This necessitates an automatic t'ransfer of the dispensing apparatus from one original-can to the other Without interruption'of service which is an important object of this invention.

"Another object i sthe provision of mountingjmeans for supporting the original cans from whichthe'liq'uidsfare dispensed. These mounting means medicines-assumes to apply initial pressure 'to'the sealing-cap enclosin'g the pressure'and dispe'nsihg'lines passing into the cans.

Another object is the provision of the cap fdrn'circling and sealing the punctured entrance tothe canaiidTo-r carrying the pressure and dispensing lines tothe can. This cap maybe 'a me'tal co'net'o the nd-of thehanor a cap with an "annular seal to seal around'the punctured =hole. =Both kinds of caps'require pressure to hold them in sealed relation which is preferably a mechanicahmeans such as fixed *abutr'n'ent's or a wedge or screw 'to apply initial sealing pressure between the 'cap and oan. The finalspressur'e may be obtained by the dispensing fluid pressure. I

A'nother'obje'ct is the provision of an'iniprovedpihch valve to collapse aflxiblehose and thus controlthe flow of 1 liquid therethrough.

Another object is the provision of an electrical control circuit initiated by fluid pressure to control the'di'spensing operation and the transfer from an empty 'ca'nto another can without interrupting and so on'without inter- 'rupting' the dispensingservice.

followingdescription and claims,

Pa t 'i'ice 2 The accompanyingdrawin gs show for the purpose of -eiren'1plificatiohwithout limiting the invention and claims thereto, certain practical embodiments of the invention wherein:

Fig. 1 is a schematic view of the fluid pressurediseharge from twoori'ginal'cans serving the same liquid 'to be dispensed. I

Fig. 2 is a viewin side elevation showing the cans'in a refrigerator hooked up'for service. H

Fig. 3 is a'circuit diagram that cooperates with 'the structureof'Figs. 1 and 2 'to control the operation of "beef flavor, chocolate and the like to be dispensed are in *ordinary "gallon cans and their contents Weight approxirria'tely' seven or eight pounds. These cans have ends "that arepressed in circular steps as indicated at 3 which are 'fo'un'd onniost cans and are flexible. it is often said that if'the can e'ndbulges outwardly when thecan has not otherwise been damaged, the contents are'probably spoiled creating fermentation and producing-a gas pressur'e suiiicien'tl y strong to expand the can end. Thus the can when heririeticallysealed can expand whensupplied with fluid pressurewhich principle ofexpansion is cin- ';r' loyed' to 1ock'the original cans in place in the dispenser and to "aid in "maintaining the seal. The se'al is in the fo'rin'bf the "cap '4 which has attached thereto the annular elastomer 5 that may be a washer of suitable "dii'rie'nsions that seals with theca n end Sand the cap}! and is preferably 'pla'ced o'nthe center and inner flat'ring'of thg cgan erid 3 surrounding the punctured opening 6 to Other objects and advantages appear hereinafter in the '-sal the "sa'lme'wlien embraced by abutments. The can 'moliiiting"abutments einployed as exemplary m'e'mbersin this disclosure are thethahrielihmbers 7 and the angle Iiiel'nbr 8. The cap 4 hasthe long dispensingtube 10 fwhi'ch is preferably astifr stainless steel tube but may 'h'ave' afie'xible hottom whippiiig'e'nd. The cap'4 is also proviaedwithe small nipple '11 to connect'iiuid pressure t'othe interior'of'the cans as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. p

The outlet'or liquid'dis'pensing pipe nnas'eonnec'ted ther'eto'the line 12fwhich line is preferablya flexible rub- "ber 'hos'e which passes down through the fixed and movable abutments "13 and '14 respectively of'the discharge cdntr'olipinch valves. Each pinch'valve has a base 1'5 with upwardlyxtendingtends. One end forms the stationa'ry-abutment 13 and is provided with the Wings "16 each having aligned round holes to receive the tubes 12. For convenience'the holes are slotted at the top as shown at 18 to permit the tube to be inserted between the abut- .me'nts without threading it through the holes. These hoses '12 "continue to a common manifold junction 20 .where hot or cold Water is supplied Withthe selected-concentr ate to produce the hot soup or the cold drink.

As'shownfin Fig. 2 the smaller enclosure 21 is a refrigerator having a back or door 22 that seals against fthe perimeter seal 23. The junction 20 has an insulated boar-d 2j4 with thefdelivery tubes 25 that protrude thereem. The deer 2 2's notched at 26 to Seal on the board -24 and *leave -th'e'de'livery tubes undisturbed.

'Below the refr'ig'erator the dispenser cabinet 27, that -is -rep'r"es'ent'e'cl "by the large enclosure, is provided with the water heater 28. The delivery tubes '25 ektend throgh the open 3|) in the hooded recess 3 1'whe're the "rs insert their p'ap'erciips to receive the drink marshes have selected, which structure is oh theback of the large door 32 that closes the large cabinet 27. A waste pail 33 hangs under the refrigerator to catch any dripping from the hooded recess 31.

The top of the cabinet carries the pump or compressor members 34 of which there may be several to supply fluid under pressure which is preferably air to each of the cans 1, 2 and 2 containing the concentrate to be dispensed. A pressure regulator 35 is provided for each group of cans which may be divided in groups of one, two, three or more for each group. If only one pump is provided then the regulator 35 must also have a check valve. If a pump or regulator is provided for each can then the regulator 35 need not have a check valve. In any event a single pump is shown and each regulator 35 supplies one group of cans with air under pressure. The air passes from the pump 34 to the regulator 35 through the line 36. The pump may be provided with a pressure control 37 to regulate the motor 38 operating the compressor 34. p

'The line 40 carries the air under pressure from the regulator 35 to each of the cans of the group which in Fig. 1 are the two cans 1 and 2. The line 40 is in each instance connected to the check valve 41 and on the opposite side of the check valve is connected by a transparent tube that connects to the outer end of the nipple 1-1 in the cap 4. When each can is inserted between the abutments or rails 7 and 7 or 7 and 8 which are gauged from each other so that the mere insertion of the can between these rails is sufficient to seal the cap. The flanges of the rail are cut away at 43 to receive the tubes 12 and 42. The pressure of air admitted past the check valves 41 to the cans thus expands their ends against the abutments 7 or 8 and the intervening cap 4 to lock the cans in place. They are exceedingly difiicult to remove when they have been expanded by air under pressure. The concentrate in the can under pressure replaces the air in the discharge tube 12 and the air reservoir remains in the top of the can.

The pinch valve 44 comprises the base 15 in the fixed abutment 13 and the movable abutment 14 which is mounted on the armature 45 having a stem section 46 and lateral projections 47. The stem 45 extends into the hollow center 48 of the field coil 50. A C-shaped core member 51 is also mounted on the base 15 and has inwardly projecting ends 52 that correspond to the lateral wings 47 on the armature 45. Insulation strips 53 are inserted in each end of the core 51 and the field coil is inserted therebetween. The coil has a square hollow center 54 to receive a tube 55 of the same shape. The armature stem 46 is also of the same cross section and slides in the tube 55. The core and stem of the armature are bored out at 56 and 57 to receive the helical spring 58 which forces the armature 45 outwardly when the coil 50 is not energized. The spring 58 has sufficient strength to cause the movable abutment 14 to pinch the line 12 and completely seal ofi the line 12 by this pinch valve action against the fluid pressure pumped into the can. The armature 45 has an extension 59 that passes through the abutment to permit one to mechanically release the pinch valve 44 when testing or drawing the line. i

The air line 36, from the pump 34 to the regulator 35, is also connected to bellows switch 60 as shown in Fig. 3. The bellows switch 60 comprises the bellows member 61 that engages the button 62 that pushes the movable arm of the switch 63 to open the back contact 64. If there is no air pressure the switch 63 is closed. In actual practice this switch is usually a micro-snap action switch. If the can of concentrate that is being dispensed becomes emptied the air rushes out of the can through the discharge line 12 and the corresponding pinch valve which suddenly depletes the air pressure in the line. This depletion of air pressure relaxes the bellows 61 drawing it away from the button 62 and thus permitting closing of 4 the circuit passing through the back contact 64 of the pressure switch 63.

The circuit extends from the source of supply indicated at the line 65, the main switch 66, the fuse 67 and the line 68 that is connected to the moving element of the switch 63 that closes to the back contact 64 which is defined as that contact that is opened when the bellows are energized with fluid under pressure.

The back contact 64 is connected to the line 70 that is connected to one side of the operating coil 71 of the thermal time delay relay, the other side of which is connected to the line 72 thence to the fuse 73 and the line 74 and opposite side of the power supply indicated by Although and indicate the power supply and ordinarily refer to a DC. supply, this current supply may be AC. and the and indicate the opposite sides thereof. The time delay thermal relay will open the circuit of its back contact 75 when energized by the depletion of air from the bellows pressure switch 63.

A selector switch 76 is manual and is actuated by the customer in selecting one of four different drinks. This switch 76 has three independent circuits which are fed by the line 77 from the front contact 75 of the relay 71 and the line 68 of the positive source of supply. To feed these three circuits the switch 76 has three contact hands 80, 81 and 82. The contact hand 80 is connected to the line 77 and the contact bands 81 and 82 are both connected to the line 68. Each of the three hands connect to three different circuits. The first group of circuits selected by the hand 80 connect the step relays RLl to RL4 for energization through the contacts 64 and 65. Each of the respective step relays are connected by the separate lines 83, 84, 85 and 86 selected by the hand 80. The other side of these step relays RLl to RL4 are connected together by the line 87 which in turn is connected by thefront contact 88 of the timer 89 that is energized by the coin controlled switch for operating the dispenser.

The step relays have two or more contacts depending upon the number of cans in the group they control. RL1, RL2 and RL3 each have only two contacts each as indicated at RLlA and B, RL2A and B and RL3A and B Whereas RL4 has three contacts A, B and C. When the coils of a selected RL relay is energized the alternate contact or B is made and the other contact or A is broken. If this relay is again energized due to the depletion of air in can 1, contact A closes and B opens. After the time delay period, the relay 71 will open its contact 75 and prevent any further switching of the cans until after the air pressure is restored in the system and the bellows 60 again expands to open the circuit to the time delay relay 71. Thus the step relay having only two contacts merely alternates from one can to the other.

RL4 has three contacts and this step relay will open A and close B on the first step. The next time it is energized it opens B and closes C and the third time it is energized it opens C and closes A and steps in this sequence. Such a control relay as RL4 would be used for a very popular concentrate that would require two or more cans as compared with one can of concentrate in another group.

The contacts of the RL relays are supplied with their separate circuits by the lines 90, 91, 92 and 93 and each contact of a respective step RL relay represent a can of concentrate and thus must be provided with a corresponding pinch control valve the coils 40 of which are designated as V1 to V9 and are connected by lines 94 to 102 respectively. The opposite end of these electromagnetic field coils 40 are connected by a common line 103 which in turn is connected through the contact 104 to line 72 to complete the circuit to 74.

Thus the group of RL relaysserved by the hand 80 corresponds to the group of their contacts served by the hand 81. The hands 80, 81 and 82 are rigidly mounted to move in unison so that the corresponding RL relay and its contacts are associated with the control circuit at the same time.

The contacts served by the hand 82 must also be mechanically mounted to correspond to the same selection as hands 80 and 81. However since hand 82 energized only the soup water valve coil 105 and the chocolate water valve coil 106 and there are three'groups of soup concentrate cans then three of the contacts connected by hand 82 may be joined by the same line 107 to supply the soup water valve coil 105. The other contact is connected to the line 108 to supply current to the chocolate water valve coil 106. Both the coils 105 and 106 are connected together at their other ends by the line 109 and the contact 110. to the line'72, the contact 110 being actuated by a cam operated by the same timer motor 89 as the contacts 88 and 104.

. When step relay contacts RLA and B are serving from one or successively from two full original can's' 1 and'2 both cans are refrigerated and are supplied with air under pressure to hold them in place and dispense the concentrate consecutively therefrom.

Ifthe original can 1 of concentrate is being used and is controlled by step relay RL1 and specifically contact RLlA which is closed to complete the circuitto the electromagnet valve V1 and the manual selector 76 is set as shown at Fig. 3 and a coin'is inserted to actuate the timer89 to close all timer contacts 88, 104 and 110, current flows from 65, switch 66, fuse. 67, line 68 where itbranches two ways. Since air is in can 1 the bellows 61 is expandedand no current flows through contact 64. Current flows from 68 to hands 81, line 90, contact RLlA, line 94, the electromagnet pinch valve V1, line 104, line 72, fuse 73 and return supply 74. Hand82 takes current from line 68 to 'line 107an d soup water valve 105, line 109, contact 110, line 72, fuse 73 and return supply 74. Every time a coil circuit is energized when can 1 is selected a portion of its concentrate flows through the pinch valve V1 until the timer motor completes its cycle and shuts off the concentrate and the hot water. When original. can 1 is emptied air discharges rapidly through the discharge line 12 collapsing the bellows and energizing RL1 causing it to open contact RLlA: and close RLIB to energize electromagnetic valve V2 controlling can 2. The fluid pressure having'been main{ tained in can 2 by reason of the check valve 41 thereis a sufiicient amount of air in can 2to dispense the liquid for a short period of time. The dispensing continues through" the usage ofcan 2 and by this time can 1 has been replaced by a fullcan and the next time that the RL circuit is interrupted,'the control circuit shifts back to can 1 and can 2'may then be replaced.

If three or more cans are provided in thesame group for-dispensing the same concentrate then the RL step relay must have an additional contact to make and break, using a series of three independent contacts as illustrated for RL4A, B, and C.

Referring to Fig. 4, it will be noted that the circuit illustrated is only the initial portionof-the circuit as shown in Fig. 3 wherein the thermal time delay relay 71 has been omitted from the circuit and the front contact 64 is connected directly to the line 77 thence to theselector switch 76 together with the line 68. This modification merely illustrates that is it not necessary for the operation of the circuit to have the thermal time delay relay in the circuitof Fig. 3.

to one. of four step relay circuits indicated'at 83, 84, 8'5 and 86 as shown in Fig. 3. However, the circuit 83 in this" instance is connected to two step relays ST1A and;ST1B that "are connected in multiple through the line 112 the? pushbutto'n113 and the line 87 which in turn isconnected to the contact that is closed by the cam switch 114. The cam switch 114 is connected directly to thepressure switch 63 which when closed connects the'line 87- through the contact 88, cam switch 114, to the pressure contact 64' and the line 72 which represents the opposite side of the power line as indicated in Fig. 3. The pressure switch 63' is actuated by the bellows member 115 which is connected by the line 116 which line is connected to the junction block member 20 as shown in Fig. 1. In like manner ST2A and ST2B are connected from line 84.

If it is desired to manually step the step relay ST1B,the

pushbutt-on 113 may 'be depressed which connects the line 112 directly with the line 72 thus bypassing the cam switch 114 and the pressure switch 63' when theselector is connected with the line 83.

The selector arms 80 and 82 swing together and thus connect the same circuitswhen placed in any. selected of the four positions shown and the circuits of the selector 80 indicated by the lines 84, 85 and 86 wouldbe duplicates of those shown. in regard to circuit 83L By the same token the circuit connected with the arm 81- as indicated at 90 would also be duplicated for each of the positions indicated by the lines 91, 92 and 93.

The step relay ST1A is a relay that when energized by consecutive impulses will energize alternate contacts.- This relay STlA is provided with two contacts indicated at 1 17 and 118. As shown the contacts 117 and 118 are connected to their respective front contacts 119 and 120 and their respective back contacts 121 and 122 would be connected when the step relay STlA was energized by one impulse and at the same time open the contacts -11 8-and 119 respectively. This contact would remain until the relay was againen'ergized by an impulse. Thus each impulse energizing the coil of the STlA step relay connects the alternate contacts 119, 120 and 121 and 122. 1 I The step relay ST1B has two contacts 123 and 124 which function the same as contacts 117 and1 18- ofstep relay STlA. However, STlB is also provided withanother type of contact illustrated at 125 which normally is open but on the next consecutive three impulses will close and remain closed and the fourth impulse willagain. This type of steprelay is provided.

open this contact. with a ratchet wheel energized by an electromagnet to step a cam shaft on which-one cam having four circular ment maintains the contact 126 open for one impulse but a it permits the same to be closed to contact 125 for. the next consecutive three impulses while the other cam element is merely alternating the front and backcontacts of the contactmembers 123 and 124.

Contact 117 of step relay STIA is connected to energize either one of the pinch valves V1 or V2 in the lines switch 63 in the circuit of Fig. 3. In the circuit of Flg. 5 p

the line 116 is connected directly to the outlet of the junction block '20 and when a can such as the can 1. is emptied, air will be supplied through'its line -12 to 94 and 95, the opposite side of these pinch valve windings being connected by the line 183 to the front contact 104 of the cam contact 105 and thence to the line 72. Thus the pinch valve V1 will remain energized-and open all the while can number 1 has material to be dis pensed therefrom and when this can is emptied and step relay ST1A is energized, the contact 117 connects with the back contact 121 and thus energizes pinch valve V2. can is closed by the deof the full can 2 while the empty energization of the pinch valve V1. 7

This completes the circuit insofar as the step relay and pinch valves are concerned. However, the operation? of the fluid pressure switch 63 is somewhat diiferent inthe circuitof Fig. 5 than that of the fluid pressure the manifold of the junction block 20 and is thus efiective 7 through the line 116 to the bellows 115 to close the pressure switch 63 and thus permit the step relay ST1A'to be provided with an impulse. The step relay STIB is also provided with an impulse at the same time that these relays are in multiple with each other.

The air when subjected of the manifold of the junction block 20 is effective to expand the bellows 115 and close the pressure switch 63' but when liquid occupies the manifold of the junction block 20, it is not efiective to expand the bellows 115. Thus the operation of the bellows '115 by air from the manifold in the junction block 20 can only occur when there is air passing through an empty can to this manifold in the junction block. This provides a good check to determine whether or not any one of the selected cans is empty.

The energization of the circuits of the soup water line 107 and the chocolate hot water line 108 are the same or function the same as that described with reference to Fig. 3.

The step relay ST1B is inserted in the circuit in combination with an indicating check relay 130 together with the lights L1 and L2 for the purpose of indicating by pilot lights which cans are empty. There is a light for each can. Thus the light L1 is for can number 1 and the light L2 is for can number 2 controlled by their respective pinch valves V1 and V2. One side of the lights L1 and L2 is connected to the line 68 and the other side of L2 is connected by means of the line 131 to the contacts 120 and 129; whereas the light L1 is connected through line 132 to contacts 122, 123 and front contact 133. Contact 118 which alternately connects with front contact 120 and back contact 122 is connected by line 134 to the heel 125, the back contact 126 of which is connected to line 72.

Ann 79 of selector switch connects line 68 through the energizing coil of indicating relay 130, line 135 to any one of the lines 136, 137, 138 and 139. As shown the selector 79 is connected to line 136 which is connected directly to the heel 124 of ST1B the front contact of which is 133.

Let it be assumed that both cans 1 and 2 are filled with liquid to be dispensed and the step relays STlA and STlB are set in accordance with the showing in Fig. 5. When selectors 79 to 82 are each connected to the first position, then the circuit is set up to energize pinch valve V1 for the time period of the timer 89 that controls the cam switches for dispensing the liquid from can 1. When this can becomes emptied, air is admitted through the pipe line 12 to the manifold of the junction 20 and thus energizes the bellows 115 to close the switch 63' and exert an impulse of both of the step relays STlA and STlB owing to the fact that the cam switch 114 is closed by the timer and both of these switches step their cams to the second position as indicated by their cam diagrams below the contacts. Upon immediately stepping cam switch ST1A, the heels 117 move to the opposite position and thus energize pinch valve V2, line 90, heel 1'17, contact 121, line 95, pinch valve V2, line 103, contact 104, heel 105 to line 72. When STlB was energized, its heel 125 closes with contact 126 for positions 2, 3 and 4 of cam 150, thus completing the circuit from 68 through light L1, line 132, contact 122, heel 118, line 134, heel 125, contact 126, to line 72 as previously stated, thus lighting lamp L1 which will indicate that can 1 is empty. If an attendant changes can 1 to a full can before can 2 is empty, then the attendant may by means of the pushbutton 113 step the step relay STIB to the position as shown in Fig.5.

Let it be assumed that the attendant did not replenish can 1 in time and can 2 becomes empty allowing the air under pressure to again enter through pipe 12 to the junction block 20 and thus be effective and again expanding the bellows 115 to close the switch 63'. This impulse steps the switch STlA back to the position as shown in Fig. 5 and it also steps the step relay ST IE to the second position wherein the heels 123 and 124 are up but the heel 125 remains closed with contact 126. Cams 148, 149 and 150 all move to position 3 where heels 117, 118, 123 and 124 are all up. Under this setup, current flows from line 68 through both lamps l and 2, and lines 131 and 132 are connected together through heel 123 and contact 128. The current from both lights thus continuing through lines 131 and 132, contact 120, heel 118, line 134, heel 12S, and contact 126 to line 72. Thus both lines remain lighted.

Current also flows from line 68 through the energizing coil of relay 130, line 135, arm 79, line 136 through heel 124, front contact 133 to line 132 and as soon as lines 132 and 131 are connected by heel 123 engaging contact 129, the circuit of relay is completed through front contact 120, heel 118, line 134, heel 125, contact 126 to line 72. The completion of this circuit functions only when all of the cans in the first position of the selector switch 76 are empty and relay 130 then becomes energized to close its heel 140 with the contact 141 and thus energize the light 142 to line 72 which line stands behind a sign at the selector switch indicating to the operator that the material in that group is completely dispensed and that they should make another selection. Relay 130 also opens the heel 143 from the back contact 144 to cut the supply current from line 68 to line 145 into the coils 1'46 and 147 in multiple; thence to line 72 to deenergize the coils for the purpose of permitting the mechanical fingers to be slid back into position then in the coil slot so that any coins dropped in the machine when the selection switch 76 is set at a position indicating that the material is completely dispensed will cause the coins to immediately return to the customer. When relay 130 is deenergized, the heel member 143 closes the back contact 144 to energize the coils 146 and 147 so as to withdraw the blocking fingers. The coil 146 when energized functions to withdraw the blocking fingers for five and ten cent pieces when in the coil control mechanisms; whereas the coil 147 functions to withdraw the blocking finger for the twenty-five cent coins in the coin control mechanism. Then when cans 1 and 2 are empty and the selector arms 79 to 82, which are all connected as a unit, are set to the first position the relay 130 will be immediately energized to return the coin and the lights 1 and 2 will be turned on together with the light behind the message informing the purchaser that this selection is empty and that they should make another selection. The circuits completed by the selector arm 82 through the arms 107 and 108 to the hot and cold water electrically operated valve coils 106 and 105 function in the same manner as that previously described in conjunction with Fig. 3. The same being supplied through the water supply as illustrated in Fig. 1. From thence it flows to the mixing manifold 20 and thence to the dispenser indicated by the outlet 25.

As shown in Fig. 5 the step relays ST2A and ST2B are connected in the same manner as that previously described and a pushbutton 113' is provided in the same relative position and for the same purposes as that for the pushbutton 113. Step relays ST2A and ST2B also are provided with the same type of cam actuated switches as indicated. However, these switches including their contacts and heel members together with their cam members are given the same numbers with the exception that they have a prime added thereto and the lines 3 and 4 are employed to indicate cans 3 and 4 that are mounted in the chest as indicated in Fig. 2.

We claim:

1 A liquid container for a liquid dispensing machine having a container-seal carrying a fluid pressure inlet line and a valve controlled outlet line that extends to the bottom of the container, characterized in that said container is an original can holding the liquid to be dispensed and having a punctured passage thereinto, and said contamer-seal is a cap embracing said can around said punc- T39 tured passage. and supporting .in sealed relation' said inlet and outlet lines-extendingto.theinteriorofvsaid can, and a clamp abutmer'it'to engage said cap and the opposite side of'said can to permit a sealing pressure to be exertedbetween the-cap and said can to seal the same.

2. The original liquid container dispensing machine of claim 1-characterized in that said clamp abutment engages-said captoresist the flexture of said can due to pressure supplied through saidinlet line to dispense the liquid therefrom'and'to locksaid can in said clamp abutment.

3. The original liquid container dispensing machine of claim 2 characterized in that said clamp abutment includes an annular elastomer engaging between said cap and can around the punctured opening in the latter to provide resilience for sealing said cap.

4. The original liquid container dispensing machine of claim 1 characterized in that said cap has an annular elastomer to engage said can and close around the punctured passage in sealed relation.

5. The liquid dispenser of claim 4 characterized in that said original can stands upright and the punctured passage is in the one end of the can and the cap with its inlet and outlet passage lines and annular elastomer engaging said can to seal over said punctured passage and one of said clamp abutment members has clearance for the entry of said lines passing through said cap.

6. The original liquid container dispensing machine of claim 1 characterized in that said cap is a frusto conical lid to engage the rim of the can to seal around the punctured passage.

7. The original liquid container dispensing machine of claim 1 characterized in that said clamp abutment includes a pressure wedge means to engage said cap and apply sealing pressure thereto.

8. The original liquid container dispensing machine of claim 1 characterized in that said container comprises a plurality of groups of original cans each having its cap, an air pump with a pressure regulator connected through independent check valves to each fluid pressure inlet line of each original can of a group containing the same liquid to be dispensed, and a fluid pressure responsive means actuated by a pressure to switch the operation to a valve controlled outlet of another original can.

9. A liquid dispensing machine comprising a plurality of groups of original cans holding the same type of liquid to be dispensed and each can having a punctured passage thereinto, a seal cap embracing each can around its punctured passage and supporting therein a fluid pressure inlet line and a valve controlled outlet line tothe exterior of each can, said outlet line extending to the bottom of eachcan, a clamp abutment means engaging each cap to permit sealing pressure to be exerted between each cap and its respective can, an air pump with a pressure regulator connected through independent check valves to each fluid pressure inlet, a fluid pressure responsive means actuated by a pressure drop to switch the operation of the dispensing machine from the valve controlled outlet of an empty can to the valve controlled outlet of a full can, said fluid pressure responsive means includes a step relay, a thermal time delay relay and a first switch actuated by a pressure bellows to energize said thermal time delay relay the front contact of which completes a circuit from said first switch to the operating coil of said step relay, successive contacts on said step relay to complete a second circuit through the valved outlet of an original can of a group that is not emptied.

10. The original liquid container dispensing machine of claim 9 which also includes a manually controlled dispensing selector switch to connect said second circuit that pertains to a group selected to be dispensed.

11. The valved outlet line of the structure of claim 1 characterized in that said line is a flexible hose and said valve includes aw-fixed and a -spring. loaded \"movable to be dispensed and'each can having a punctured passage thereinto, a seal cap embracing eachcan around its punctured'passage and supporting therein a fluid pressure inlet line and a valve controlled outlet line to the exterior of each can, said outlet lineextending to'thebo'ttom of each can, a clamp abutment means engaging each cap to permit sealing pressure to be exerted between each cap and its respective can, an air pump with a pressure regulator connected through independent check valves to each fluid pressure inlet, a fluid pressure responsive means actuated by a pressure drop to switch the operation of the dispensing machine from the valve controlled outlet of an empty can to the valve controlled outlet of a full can, said fluid pressure responsive means includes a fluid actuated switch, closed by the fluid pressure when a container is emptied, and a first and a second step relay the energizing coils of which are connected in multiple'with each other and in series with said fluid actuated switch to energize the same when a container is emptied, said first step switch having two heels each with at least a front and a back contact, said second step switch having one heel with at least a front contact, a cam to actuate the heels of both step relays to alternately connect front and back contacts upon successive impulses, a third heel and a corresponding back contact on said second step relay actuated by a cam to open said back contact on every fourth successive impulse, said valve controlled outlets including a spring biased pinch valve for each original liquid container having an energizing coil, said pinch valve coils being connected alternately through said front and back contacts of said first step relay, and a light corresponding to each of said original containers and connected through said other contacts on said first and second step relays, the circuit of each of said lights being completed only when the corresponding can is emptied.

13. The structure of claim 12 chraacterized in that said second step relay has a second heel with at least one front contact in phase with its said other front contact, and a relay energized by the closing of said front contacts when said lights are lit to return coins when the original containers are empty.

14. A liquid dispensing machine comprising a common manifold junction with a dispensing discharge, a plurality of containers holding the liquid to be dispensed, means for supplying fluid under pressure to said co-ntainers, a valve for controlling the feeding of liquid from each container to said cornmon manifold junction, means for simultaneously feeding water to said common manifold junction to mix with the liquid before discharge, a transfer relay for selectively determining from which container the liquid is to be dispensed by selectively operating its corresponding valve, and fluid pressure op erated means actuated by the pressure in said common manifold junction to actuate said transfer relay upon the depletion of the liquid contents in a selected container.

15. The structure of claim 14 which also includes a time delay relay to interrupt the operation of said transfer relay until after the pressure has been restored after the depletion of said container.

16. A liquid dispensing machine comprising a common manifold junction with a dispensing discharge, a plurality of groups of original cans. holding the same type of liquid to be dispensed and each can having a punctured passage thereinto, a seal cap embracing each can around its punctured passage and supporting therein a fluid pressure inlet line and a valve controlled outlet line to the exterior of each can, said outlet line extending t0 the bottom of each can, a clamp abutment means engaging each cap and the opposite sides of said cans to permit sealing pressure to be exerted between each cap and its respective can, an air pump with a pressure regulator connected through independent check valves to each 5 fiuid pressure inlet, and a fluid pressure responsive means actuated by a pressure drop from said common manifold junction to switch the operation of the dispensing machine from the valve controlled outlet of an empty can 10 to the valve controlled outlet of a full can.

UNITED STATES PATENTS Richtmann Nov. 11, Samaia Apr. 15, Grontkowski May 24, Epstein Feb. 21, Jordan Aug. 1, Bowman Feb. 15, Little Nov. 11, King July 12,

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.222/129.1, 251/7, 222/6, 222/400.7, 222/144.5
Clasificación internacionalG07F13/06
Clasificación cooperativaG07F13/065
Clasificación europeaG07F13/06B