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Número de publicaciónUS2986352 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación30 May 1961
Fecha de presentación4 Jun 1958
Fecha de prioridad4 Jun 1958
Número de publicaciónUS 2986352 A, US 2986352A, US-A-2986352, US2986352 A, US2986352A
InventoresDean Dumbauld Lewis
Cesionario originalDeluxe Coils Inc
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Winding machine
US 2986352 A
Resumen  disponible en
Imágenes(5)
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

May 30, 1961 Filed June 4, 1958 L. D. DUMBAULD WINDING MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

LEWIS D. DUMBAULD MWgW ATTORNEYS L. D. DUMBAULD WINDING MACHINE 2 w H 6 w W m m M D 0 L .M. B D W w l W C Y 1. w

a I I M 6 w 0 II 6 ll '1' 6 3 II I 7 D 9 .w w m m I I 6 I. 6 6 3 6 3 av P/ 6 I 6 2 'Jm M 5 :u..[ H F May 30, 1961 Filed June 4, 1958 y 1961 L. D. DUMBAULD 2,986,352

WINDING MACHINE Filed June 4, 1958 5 51 3 u fimmmmgkm u a E 5: i i h! VII- l 6 M35 13352 H 5 I (4% wmmmmi.

IN VEN TOR.

LEWIS D. DUMBAULD ATTORNEYS y 1961 L. D. DUMBAULD 2,986,352

WINDING MACHINE Filed June 4, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN V EN TOR.

LEWIS D. DUMBAULD BY Z v g ATTORNEYS y 1951 L. D. DUMBAULD 2,986,352

WINDING MACHINE Filed June 4, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG-I2.

:m 4 1NVENT0R.

LEWIS D.- DUMBAULD BY 1 TMZM' 1,! M 5 93 -Q I FlG. |2A ATTORNEYS United States Patent WINDING MACHINE Filed June 4, 1958, Ser. No. 739,886

8 Claims. (Cl. 24235.5)

This invention relates to apparatus and methods for the winding of coils.

Coil winding is normally effected on winders having a single powered head; with some winders a single coil is wound while on others a number of coils may be wound simultaneously on a shaft driven by the single head. With such operations operator time loss is frequently considerable resulting in high unit cost per coil even when an operator services more than one winder.

This invention contemplates the provision of apparatus which mounts a plurality of winding heads for rotation in order that the heads may be presented to an operator of the apparatus for effecting necessary work thereon. Most suitably in the apparatus the spindles of the winding heads are driven from a common source to thus eliminate the expense of individual motorized units.

The invention further contemplates the provision of coil winding apparatus having a plurality of winding heads in which the spindles of the heads are driven from a common source and which source is automatically disconnected from a spindle upon attainment of a predtermined number of turns on a coil being wound on the spindle.

The invention also contemplates as an important feature winding apparatus, the speed of which is readily controllable in order that the winding heads may be presented to an operator at such a rate as to utilize the full capabilities of the operator.

The invention contemplates as a particular feature the provision of winding apparatus in which a plurality of winding heads are driven in an orbit and the spindles of the heads are driven in rotation while passing through the orbit, the spindle speed being variable through the orbit.

The invention contemplates in addtion the provision of a novel method for the winding of spools on a mass production basis with elongated material such as magnet wire, ribbon and tape.

In the practice of the invention winding heads are mounted on a rotatable mount and means are provided to drive the mount through an orbit or closed path. A spindle projects from each head and moves with the head through the closed path. In addition, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, the spindles are each arranged to be driven from a common source such as a friction disc.

Wheels carried by the spindles describe a path eccentric to that of the closed path of the winding heads and provide for varying spindle speed and consequently varying rotational speed of a bobbin carried on the spindle.

Elongated material such as magnet wire is drawn from a supply reel to a bobbin and the wire is wound on the bobbin at a speed determined by the spindle speed. The supply of elongated material rotates with the winding heads through the closed path.

A counter is provided in conjunction with each winding 'head and this counter is pre-set to limit the number of turns applied to the bobbin. Such counters are known; in the practice of this invention when the bobbin has completed the predetermined number of turns, the spindle is automatically lifted from the spindle drive to stop further winding.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention to be described more fully hereinafter a considerable plurality-twelve-of winding heads are driven through the closed path. Initially to produce a winding an operator simply passes a start wire from a supply to the bobbin in a manner to cause the wire to be retained by the bobbin; for example, the start wire 'may be inserted into the hollow core of the bobbin or taped to the bobbin. This may be done while the head and spindle which will wind the bobbin rotate past the operator. With the bobbin on the spindle and the wire secured the spindle is lowered into contact with the friction disc, either automatically or by the operator.

In the preferred embodiment the wire or other elongated material is first wound on the bobbin slowly to prevent undue pull on the wire and wire breakage; this is accomplished by lowering the wheel carried on the spindle into contact with the friction disc at a point close to the center of the disc where the feet per minute speed of the disc is low.

As the head carrying the spindle and wheel rotate, due to the eccentric relationship of the path of the head and the path of the wheel described on the friction disc the speed of the spindle in rotation increases to a maximum and then decreases as the head approaches the end of the closed path. Thus the spindle decreases in speed as the winding nears completion and less chance of breakage of the wire is present. As already noted when the appropriate number of turns have been applied the winding operation of the bobbin ceases due to the raising of the spindle from the disc.

Also in the preferred embodiment the wire extending to the bobbin from the supply is automatically cut and the finish end sealed to the bobbin, as with a hot wax application.

The speed of rotation of both the winding heads and .the friction disc may be controlled separately to provide for a considerable variation in winding speed. Thus the speed of the friction disc may be increased to occasion an increase in the number of turns wound on the bobbin while the rotational speed of the head may be maintained constant at that capacity which is readily handled by a given operator. Conversely the speed of the head may be altered to provide the bobbins more or less quickly to the operator to accommodate the operators skill.

To inhibit against slippage of the drive wheels of the spindles and to provide for accurate positioning of the winding heads a torsion bar extends from each winding head to a center mount on the shaft which supports the friction disc. This torsion bar takes the strain and permits free rotation of the drive Wheel of the spindle, providing for accurate winding.

The invention will be more fully understood by reference to the following detailed description and accompanying drawings wherein:

Figure l is an elevational view with parts broken away and in section illustrating a preferred embodiment of the apparatus of invention;

Figure 2 is a schematic plan view illustrating the arrangement of the winding heads and stations as well as the eccentric relationship of the path traversed by the winding heads and the path traversed by the drive wheels of the spindles;

Figure 3 is an enlarged and fragmentary view illustrating the arrangement of the center mount shown in Figure 2;

Figure 4 is an enlarged elevational view partially in section illustrating the arrangement of the winding head on the rotatable mount;

'with the shaft.

amount which supports the Winding heads;

Figure 9 is a fragmentary and perspective view of details of the apparatus;

Figures 10, 11, 12 and 12A illustrate schematically electrical arrangements for the control of the apparatus;

Figure 13 is a view of the center mount arrangement for the torsion bars; and

Figure 14 is a fragmentary and elevational view illustrating the drive shaft arrangement for the winding head of Figure 4.

In general the embodiment described comprises:

(a) A frame or base for providing a rotatable support;

(b) A mounting plate carrying winding heads and a supply of elongated material as well as supplementary equipment mounted for rotation on the base;

A source of driving power for the winding heads, which source is independent of the mounting plate drive means;

(d) A counter of conventional construction'for presetting the number of turns to be wound on the bobbins;

and

(e) An arangement for supplyingpower to thevarious mechanisms for the driving thereof.

In the detailed description which follows similar numerals, where practicable, have been 'ntilizedto designate corresponding parts. 7

Referring first particularly to Figures land 8, a'supporting base is indicated generally at "1 formed 'ofangle irons including uprights 2 'and connecting members '3 welded or otherwise suitably secured together to format rectangular support having open sides.

The base 1 supports a pair of variable speed drives indicated generally at 4 and5. Forthe mounting of a first one 'of these drives, 4, there is provided on the base alow intermediate transverselyextending member 6.havfing thereon an upright 7 to "which there is "secured a bracket 8. Bracket 8 journals the end of a screw 9. A motor base 10 supports motor 11 and is mounted on screw 9 for longitudinal movement "between 'bracket '8 and ascrew retainer 12. Additionally,'apair of :bars 9a extending parallel with the screw provide support for the motor.

Screw retainer 12 is carried on an outer upright 13 of the base. The retainer 12 with bracket 8'fixes the screw 9 against longitudinal movement. Screw retainer 12 is provided with a hand wheel 14 for "effecting rota- 'tion of the screw and consequently movement of the motor base 10 and the motor '11. Motor shaft 15 of motor 11 is provided with a variable speed pulley 16 over which passes a variable speed belt 17 to a pulley 18 fixed on a vertically extending shaft 19 for rotation Accordingly rectilineal movement of the motor 11 on the screw 19 provides for fixing the riding position of the belt 17 'in' the pulley 16 and therefore determines the rotational speed of pulley 18 and shaft 19.

Shaft 19 is supported in a self-aligning bearing 20 mounted on a transverse member 21 of the base and which member extends parallel to the member 6. Transverse member 21 is positioned eccentrically (Figure 8) and consequently the vertically extending shaft 19 is disposed eccentrically to the base, but is fixed substantially centrally of the length of the member 21. The-cccentrio relationship of shaft 19 is indicated in'Figures 2 and 8, and will be referred to moreparticularlyhereinafter.

The second variable speed drive 5 has a motor base which is movable on a screw 22 (Figure '8) to position the motor 23; motor 23 has a variable speed pulley 24 carried on the shaft thereof. The screw 22 is mounted in the retainer 25a and the motor, and its pulley, are positionable on the screw by actuation of a hand Wheel 26 on the retainer 25a.

Variable speed belt 27 passes over a pulley 28 on the shaft 25 of gear box 29, which 'gear box is mounted on the tnansversemember 21 of the base. The gear box .29 carries .on its outputshaft a sprocket 30 over which a roller chain 31 drives to a sprocket 32; idler 33 supported from the base '1 in any convenient manner maintains tension on the roller chain. The sprocket 32 is secured on a vertically extending shaft 34 which is mounted in spaced pillow blocks 35 supported from the base 1.

Accordingly, the vertical shafts 19 and 32 are each drivable through their separate variable speed drives at pro-selected speeds.

Rectangular base 1 .has secured to its upper side a cast ring 36 which isof a greater diameter than the base width and accordingly projects beyond the base (Figure 8). The center of this ring 36 is coaxial with the intersectionof the horizontal diagonals of the rectangular base and the ring -36 .has a cross-section of channel shape (Figure l).

The channel shaped ring 36 supports a first plurality of cam rollers, some of which are indicated at 37 (Fig ure 1). These rollers 37 have vertical axes of rotation; the ring 36 also supports .a second plurality of rollers, one of whichis indicated at 38 (Figure l) and which vrollers 38 have horizontal :axes .of rotation. Preferably the rollers 37 and .38 are alternately disposed about the vring .36; rollers 37 are guides and rollers 38 are :sup-

ports as noted hereinafter. It vwill be understood that a .suflicient number of rollers are provided to effect the desiredfunctions.

Since .the mounting-arrangement of all .rollers 37 and all rollers 3.8:is similar, reference is .made in detail only .to one :roller arrangement ,of each. As shown in Figure lroller 37 is ,rotatably .mounted' on .a vertical shaft 39 supported at its lower end in a bracket 40; bracket 40 is secured to a horizontal ibrace 4.1 which is welded to the interior of the channel shaped ring 3.6. The roller 37 is then positionedinwardly and upwardly of the ring.

Roller .38 is rotatably mounted on a horizontal shaft 42 and .is carricd-onia bracket combination 43, which is itself welded to the interior of ring 36. The roller 38 lies-above the .ringi36 and extends over the ring.

The ring 36 also carries across member 44.disposed ofi the centerof the ring and extending above the transverse member 21. .Supported .on the .cross member 44 is a self-aligning bearing 45a whichjournals vertically 'extending .shaft'19. Such cross member 44 could also be supported by the basel.

An annular mounting plate 45 is bolted on a circular mounting plate support 46 which is channel shaped in. cross-section. Support 46 is mounted for rotation on rollers 38 which .engage the lower side of the support. Therollers 37 engage thesupport interiorly and guide the support in its rotation. For these purposes the lower side of hte support which contacts the rollers 38 and the edge which contacts rollers 37 are machined smooth.

'The mounting plate "45 is of'slightly greater diameter than the support 46 and is concentric therewith and also with ring'36. As may beseen from Figure l the mounting plate 45 projects beyond the support 46, and support 46 carries onitsouter-periphery a friction material covering 47 (Figure 4) preferably of rubber. A timer belt 48 (Figure 4) engages over the friction material, passes around the periphery (Figure 8) of the support. and over a sprocket 49 secured on the upper end of :shaft 34. Thusthexsupport 46 and the plate 45 are'drivable. at a predetermined rotational speed.

Idlers 50, 51 and adjustable idler 52 (Figure 8) serve to maintain tension on the timing belt.

The vertically extending shaft 19 projects above the mounting plate 45 (Figure 1) and is eccentric thereto (Figure 2). Welded adjacent an upper end of shaft 19 and rotatable with the shaft 19 is a circular friction disc 53.

The shaft 19 at its upper end (Figures 3 and 13) is of reduced diameter to provide a shoulder 56 for a hub nut 54 which threadedly engages a hub 55, the hub and nut being rotatably mounted on the shaft 19, the shoulder 56 of the shaft 19 supporting the hub and hub nut. At its upper extremity the hub (Figure 3) is enlarged at 57 and provides a seat 58 for a bearing 59 which ro tatably supports the shaft 19.

Between the hub enlargement at 57 and the nut 54, the hub 55 furnishes a peripheral bearing surface which receives a plurality of vertically superposed yokes or center mounts 60 (Figures 3 and 13). These yokes encircle the hub and are rotatable about the hub with torque bars 61 of circular cross-section and to which reference will be made more particularly hereinafter.

Referring now to Figures 1 and 2, the mounting plate 45 is shown to carry a plurality of winding heads indicated generally at 62, which heads are shown in greater detail in Figures 4, and 6. In the embodiment illustrated the winding heads 62 are twelve in number (Figure 2). The positions traversed by the winding heads in the rotation of the mounting plate 45 are indicated by the letters A to L in Figure 2, and each winding head is indicated as being in a specific position in the figure.

Since the winding heads are similar only one will be described in detail. Thus referring first to Figure 4 a base member 63 receives a stud 64 which is threaded into the mounting plate 45, but which journals the base member 63 for pivotal movement in a horizontal plane on the mounting plate. The base member 63 is of generally rectangular configuration in plane view, but is provided with a curvature at its inner end 65. A retainer block 66 having at 67a a curvature complementary to that of the base member at 65 is secured to the annular mounting plate 45 on the inner periphery thereof by studs as at 68 in Figure 4. Block 66 has a lip 69 which projects over the base member 63 and inhibits raising of the base member during apparatus operation.

Secured somewhat rearwardly on the base member 63 is a bracket 70 (Figure 7) which extends upwardly and transversely of the base member 63. Bracket 70 has a transverse base portion 71 from which arms 72 and 72a extend upwardly; a cross-member 73 serves to strengthen the bracket.

The bracket 70 provides support for the principal elements of the winding head. Thus a spindle link 74 provided with extending yoke-like arms 75, terminating at one end in bosses 76, is journaled on trunnions 77 in. opposed apertures of arms 72 and 72a (Figures 5 and 7). The arms 75 which are of substantially rectangular cross-section extend from a hub 78 at the other end of the link. A spindle housing 79 is secured to and projects from the hub 78 inwardly of the mounting plate 45. A spindle 80 is rotatably mounted within the housing and projects also inwardly of the mounting plate 45 over the friction disc 53; as illustrated in Figure 2 the spindles are so arranged that their rotational axes are directed toward shaft 19, the rotational axis of the friction disc 53.

In this embodiment the spindle 80 is restrained against longitudinal movement in the housing 79 by mounting the spindle 80 with a press fit in roller bearings seated at either end of the housing as at 7911 in Figure 14.

Fixedly retained by the arms 72 and 720 by bracket 70 above the spindle link 74 is a torque tube structure 81. The structure 81 (Figure 7) comprises a cross-beam member 82 which is threaded on its opposite ends to receive through the arms 72 and 72a retaining screws 83 (Figures 4 and 5). Centrally (Figure 7) the cross-beam portion 82 is apertured to provide for receipt of the torque tube proper 61a. The torque tube 61a is suitably welded to the cross-beam portion 82 to provide a rigid structure.

The torque bar 61, referred to hereinbefore, is receivedslidably within the torque tube 61a for longitudinal movement in the torque tube.

Bracket 70 (Figures 5 and 7) is provided with a protuberance 84 formed as a bearing housing and rotatably receiving a shaft 85. The shaft 85 carries a sprocket 86 and a somewhat smaller sprocket 87, the latter being posi-' tioned at the forward or outer end of the shaft (Figure 5 A timer belt 88 passes around the sprocket 89 (driven from spindle and then around the sprocket 86 to provide for the driving of shaft a second timer belt 90 passes around sprocket 87 to a sprocket 91 carried on a rotatable shaft 92 of a counter 93 which is mounted atop the bracket 70. Counter 93 is itself of a standard construction, commercially available, and serves to indicate the rotations and the number of turns made by the winding head spindle. For this purpose it is provided with a dial 94, a re-set arm 95 and a lock lever 95a. A counter frame 96 is suitably bolted to the bracket as at 97.

Adjacent the counter 93 on the bracket 70 is a control box 98; control box 98 has on the front thereof a manual switch 99 and a pilot light 100. This control box mounts interiorly a panel 101 (Figure 4) through which electrical connection is made to the components of the box (Figure 10). As indicated power is supplied through cable 102 via plug 103 to the circuitry which includes a solenoid 104 (Figures 4 and 10) in parallel with the pilot light 100. An on-olf switch 105 (Figures 5 and 10) mounted on the side of the box controls the application of power to the components of box 98; the manual switch 99 on the front of the control box permits the energization of the solenoid 104 at the election of the operator of the apparatus when the switch 105 is in the on position.

Referring now to Figure 10 it -will be seen that switch 106 is closed by cam 106a of the counter when the preset count is attained; this applies power from the line through switch 105, panel lug 2, switch 106 and panel lug d to'the line. in Figure 10 the representation is schematic and for convenience some connections are illustrated through conductors rather than the panel lugs.

The solenoid core indicated at 107 is secured to one end of the chain 108 (Figure 4) which serves as a latching connection and passes over a guide idler 109 and is provided at its lower end with a pivot member 110. Member 110 is journalled on a stud 111 and is retained by a stud collar 112; the stud is itself fixed in the lateral side of the hub 78.

The guide idler 109 is rotatably carried on stud 113 which projects from a vertically extending lever 114 pivoted on a stud 116 secured in the bracket 70 (Figure 4) and retained in position by a collar 117 on the stud and by the bracket 70 itself.

The upward vertical limit position of lever 114 is adjusted through the screw 118 passing threadedly and horizontally through the bracket projection 119 to abut the lever and provide a stop. Lever 114 is cut out to provide for engagement with the screw 118.

Energization of the solenoid 104 therefore causes the spindle link 74 to pivot upwardly on the trunnions 77 and to raise the spindle upwardly. For biasing the spindle downwardly there is provided a spring 121 which is seated on the hub 78 and which abuts at its upper end a knurled nut 122 on screw 123, the screw 123 being retained on the bracket by nut 124 on the upper end of the screw and bearing against the bracket. A limit block is indicated at 125 to limit solenoid armature movement.

Outwardly on the base member 63 a casing 126 is supported in fixed position; a shaft 127, shown in the drawings (Figure 6) as of rectangular cross-section at its extremity, extends through the casing and projects outwardly thereon to receive a bobbin 128. ,Bobbin 128 rotates 7 thesh'aft 1257:. Shaft 127 is flexibly coupled to. the.

spindle sun (Figure 14).. and iszdriven by the-spindle; the-spindle and; shaft together form the drive shaft means for the winding head. Flexible coupling 129 is of any suitableconstructionsuch as a flexible tube having splined end caps for receipt of the coupled. shafts in splined rela tionwith the shafts. The. spindle, shaft 127 and the coupling, for-1n rotary winding means of the winding head.

Internally of the'casiug gearing (not shown) driven by the shaft 127 effects. motion of stud shaft 130* carrying a spur gear 131. A gear train comprising the gear 131 and gears 132, 13.3- and 134 actuates. a cam. 135, which cam is carried on shaft 136 and. is arranged to contact a follower 137 (Figure 6).

This gearing arrangement forms a part of the traversing. mechanism indicated generally at 138. Mechanism 138 includes. a. frame 13-9 having upstanding legs 140 and 141 through. apertures of which a rod 142 slidably passes. A. collar. 1.43 on rod 142 provides an adjustable limit stop for rod traverse. Rod 142 has at its outer endta carrier 144 for a guide 145 which is itself adjustably mounted on. a screw 146 supported in any convenient manner on an upstanding member 14-7. Member 147 projects from and above carrier 144.

A spring 148 having one end fastened to the frame leg 141 and the other to carrier 144 biases the carrier inwardly and consequently biases the follower 137 into contact. with the cam 135. Accordingly as cam 135 rotates the guide 145 is caused to traverse inwardly and outwardly relative to the shaft 12-7 and the bobbin 128 on the shaft.

Elongated material is-fed to the bobbin 128 over guide 145. from above the winding: head. For this purpose, as shown in Figure 1, a deck in the form of. an annular ring; 149 is; supported from the mounting plate 45 by a plurality of angleiron structures 150; thus deck 149 rotates with the mounting plate 45 and forms a portion of carrier means for the supplyof elongated material. Fixed in. position on the deck 149 are a plurality of de-reeling devices indicated generally at 152,. one for eachwinding head. The. de-teeling devices 152 are in themselves similar,, but for the. purpose of providing as many as possible withina given. spacing, they are in vertically stag red relation forming an upper tier and a lower tier. The devices of the upper tier (Figure 1) are mounted on vertically extending bent bars 153, while those of the lower tier are mounted on shorter bent bars 154 as shown. The.- rotary winding means of each head. is in general alignment with the carrier means. for the supply to provide for drawing and winding, of the elongated material.

Each de-reeling device 152 comprises a base element 155, a cone 156 of transparent material, and a supply reel of wire 157 secured onthe base element within the cone. Wire is withdrawn from reel 157 through a series of felt covered fingers indicated at 158 over a spring loaded tension device pulley 159 carried on an arm 160. The arm 160 extends along the cone from the base element 155 to above the upper open end of the cone. The wire indicated at 161 in its course passes downwardly over the guide 145. to the bobbin 128. Rotation of bobbin 128 with shaft 127 provides the pulling force, occasioning the wire to be drawn from the reel.

Suspended from the deck 149 by brackets 162 is a circular sheet metal pan 163 forming a sub-deck which itself. has a depending. shield 164 in the form of a canvas sheetriveted thereto. A cable conduit 165 extends around this sub-deck.163 and is provided with electrical outlets 166, one for each Winding; head. Each outlet 166 is adapted to receive a plug 103. (Figure 4) of the cable 102, which cable is mechanically supported by the clip 167 on the control box 98- (Figure4).

For supplying power to the winding head through the outlets 166 a box 168 houses a slip ring 169 (Figure 12A) and the box is itself supported on a cross-beam 170 page.

fed from supply line leads. 171 through contractor-172 and slip ring 169 to the outlets 166 and then to. the winds ing heads, as the mounting plate 45, the deck 149 and the. sub-deck 162 rotate in unison.

Returning now to Figures 4 and 6, it will be noted that the spindle carries on its inward end a drive wheel 173. Drive wheel 173 has a hub 174 which is set screwed to the spindle 80. As shown in Figure 4 drive wheel 173 is in contact with the friction disc 53 and accordingly rotation of friction disc 53 will cause rotation of wheel 17 3 as well as spindle 80. In the embodiment shown the friction disc and wheel have a diameter ratio. of 13:1; this ratio maybe chosen to provide greater or lesser torque to facilitate winding of heavier or lighter magnet wire.

As already noted the winding head spindle 80 in this embodiment is fixed against longitudinal movement relative to the spindle housing and the winding head and accordingly wheel 173 will describe on the friction disc 53 the orbit, a portion of which is indicated in Figure 2 by the dot-dash line 175; the positions of wheels 173 in Figure 2 outline this orbit. Thus the wheel and spindle speed will increase from station A to station G and decrease from station G to station L (Figure 2); at station A the spindle speed is low while it is a maximum when a head is positioned as indicated at G;

It is to be noted, however, that, as set out more particularly hereinafter, in a preferred mode of operation the wheel is lifted from the friction disc 53 by actuation of the solenoid prior to reaching the station L and upon completion of a winding, in the usual course of operation.

To. position the winding heads and to insure of accuracy of operation the torque bars 61 are provided to take the strain from the wheel 173 and to inhibit wheel slip- These torque bars 61. are slidable in the torque tubes 61a, as already noted. Further, the pressure of the wheels on the friction disc is controlled; the springs 121 serve this purpose.

Referring, however, to Figure 3, it is to be noted that the torque bar 61 extends into a depending boss 176 of the torque bar center mount or yoke 60. The bosses vary in. dimension from one to another (Figure 13} in order to compensate for their positioning on the hub and to provide that each of the torque bars will lie on the same center line.

Thus the boss 176 of the uppermost yoke (Figure 13) is larger. in its dimensions than the boss of the lowermost yoke; the remaining bosses are similarly appropriately dimensioned and thus the torque bars carried by the yokes all. lie in substantially the same horizontal plane.

For the purpose of forming on the apparatus a completed commercially acceptable wound bobbin there is provided adjacent the terminal stations A and L equipment for applying to the wound bobbin a small amount of hot wax; there is also provided equipment to cut the wire extending from the supply reel as the winding head advances toward station L. The hot wax which is applied before the cutting of the wire extends over only a small portion of the winding periphery and serves to retain the cut finish wire end on the bobbin.

Thus as the winding head approaches the station L in the direction indicated by the arrow (Figure 2) the wire 161 is directed by finger guide 178 (Figure 9) into the jaws. of a clipper 179 mounted on a fixed support 180. Such support 180 may be suitably mounted from the frame 1,. for example.

As. the casing 126 traverses beneath the movable contact arm 181 the contact arm is biased to a closed position to supply current to the clipper causing the clipper to snip the wire 161. Projecting over the mounting plate 45 and beneath the bobbin 123 is a pot 182 of molten beeswax to apply wax to the bobbin winding just prior tothe entry of the wire to the clipper.

Rotatably mounted. in the pot 182 in contact with the spanning deck. 149. As shown in Figure 12A power is 75 beeswax is a brush 183 carried on shaft 184 of motor mass 9 185. Suitably the pot has a heating element (not shown) therein. Motor 185 is itself carried on a standard 186 from which struts 187 extend to support the pot 182.- An air blast nozzle 188 is conveniently positioned adjacent station L and is utilized by the operator to blow the start wire from the core hole of the bobbin.

Operator controls for the apparatus are provided as indicated in Figures 11, 12 and 12A. Thus there is provided at 189 an indicating light, preferably red, which shows when the apparatus is in operation. An emergency stop button is provided at 190.

For providing 115 volt, 60 cycle, single phase power to the winding heads through the outlets 166 operator button switch 191 is provided on box 192 (Figure 11) and is shown schematically in Figure 12A; stop button switch 193 which is normally in a closed position (Figure 12A) provides for breaking the circuit to interrupt the power supplied to the outlets 166 through contactor 172.

On box 192 button switch 194 (Figure 12) controls the application of power to contactor 195 and switch 196 provides for opening of the circuit at the election of the operator. Closure of 194 provides power to drive motor however, button switch 194 is interlocked with button switch 197 and power cannot be applied to motor 10 until the motor 23 has been energized and has set the friction disc 53 in motionthis prevents any tendency of the drive wheels 173 to scuff the friction disc. Contactor 198 provides for the application of 220 volt 3- phase power to motor 23 and button switch 199 provides the control for stopping the flow of power to motor 23.

M ode of operation In the operation of the device an operator positioned between stations A and L (Figure 2) places bobbins to be wound on the spindle shaft 127. When effecting this operation the operator attaches the start wire from the supply reel to the bobbin; one convenient way of doing ,this is to simply insert the lead end of the start wire into the hollow core of the bobbin. Any other suitable manner of retaining the wire on the bobbin may be employed.

The operator then, assuming the apparatus is not in operation, with counter 93 clear, sets the counter to the desired number of turns to be formed on the winding. Switch 105 is set to the on position and accordingly the drive wheel of the winding head is positioned on the friction disc 53. At this time the cam 106:: is in the position shown in Figure 10 and switch 106 is open. Re-set arm 95 is effective to clear the counter and set the circuit to the condition of Figure 10 as indicated by the dotted lines in Figure 10.

Power is preferably applied first to the winding head control box 98 through outlets 166 by closing button switch 191; button switch 197 is then closed to set motor 23 (Figure 12) in operation and to drive friction disc 53; then switch 194 is closed to energize motor 10 and start the travel of the winding heads.

With the supplying of power a bobbin at position or station A in Figure 2 would commence to wind very slowly since bobbin rotation is controlled by the speed of drive wheel 173 which is well inwardly of the friction disc at station A. As the winding head is moved with the plate 45 to succeeding positions to station G the drive wheel speed and consequently the bobbin speed and winding speed increase as the orbit of the drive wheel approaches the friction disc periphery. Also the winding head pivots on stud 64 (Figure 4) as may be clearly seen from the winding head positioning in Figure 2. As the winding head moves from station G toward station L the speed decreases. The winding speed and the number of turns are suitably predetermined such that the required number of turns is applied to the bobbin prior to reaching the operator adjacent station L.

As the head rotates through the closed path the head pivots on the mounting plate under the influence of the torque structure and the spindles maintain an alignment 10 such that they are directed toward shaft 19. The torque bar structure telescopes to provide for length change in the torque bar structure; however the spindle projection from the heads remains constant in length.

Thus cam 106a will close switch 106 to cause energization of solenoid 104 and pick up of the drive wheel 173 from the friction disc as the winding head is adjacent position K, for example. This stops the winding completely, but it is to be particularly noted that the winding speed has gradually slowed and accordingly the stopping action is a smooth one. I

It is to be noted further that the tension of the wire 161 is effective to bring the drive wheel to a stop abruptly upon removal of the wheel from the friction disc. With the stopping of the rotary winding means the wire extending from the source of supply tends to slacken.

The wound bobbin is waxed on the periphery, the wire 161 now in a slack condition is cut, the bobbin removed, and the start wire is blown from the core of the tube as already described, and the winding operation is complete.

Each bobbin in succession follows the outlined process and the bobbins are fed from the. supply of elongated material supported by the carrier means for the supply on the mounting plate.

The operator in the continuous operation of the apparatus then positions a bobbin to be wound on the winding head shaft as a completed bobbin is removed. The operator merely attaches the start wire and trips the re-set arm to lower the drive wheel to the friction disc as the winding head passes the operator station between A and L positions.

The structure of the invention has proved thoroughly efficient in the attainment of the ends for which it is designed. The plurality of winding heads mounted for rota tion in a closed path provides for the presentation of the winding heads to an operator at good speed and at a rate commensurate with the skill of the operator, sub stantially eliminating waste time. The plurality of functions performed as the heads move through the closed path such as winding, waxing and cutting of the wire improves economy of operation as well as providing a favorable space factor as to equipment. 7

The provision of the driving shaft means for the heads such that the shafts are driven at a gradually increasing and then decreasing speed inhibits against wire breakage-the utilization of means such as the friction disc as a common drive source for the heads is advantageous in reducing original equipment cost.

It is to be noted in this connection that the friction disc may be rotated in either direction to provide for winding on the head in either direction. Also as will be apparent other operations could be performed in this rotation of the winding heads if such be desired.

Further the diameter of the drive wheel 173 in the preferred embodiment may be chosen to provide for a given speed ratio between the friction disc and the wheel, thus adding considerable flexibility to the apparatus arrangement.

Thus, for example, if heavy wire is to be drawn a larger drive wheel may be employed to provide higher torque. Also the eccentricity and the spindle length may be pre-selected for specific winding purposes.

With respect to the speed it is generally desirable to adjust the speed of the plurality of winding heads and the mounting plate to substantially the capabilities of the operator. The speed of the friction disc is adjusted to wind the required number of turns of wire while yet permitting the operation of winding to be completed after a decelerating period and such that other operations, e.g. cutting, may be performed prior to the complete movement of the winding head through the closed path.

The feature of infinitely variable speed is an important feature in connection both with operator operation and the nature of the elongated material to be wound. Mag- 11 net wire, for example, varies widely in diameter and flexibility, and accordingly it is desired to be able to provide for the, pulling of, the wire underoptimum conditions of torque and speed; the apparatus of this invention serves this purpose.

Normally the drive means for the rotary winding means of the heads will rotate at a greater rotational speed than the mounting plate since in general the coils wound will have a great many turns. However, coils of. only very few turns may be suitably wound, as will be apparent and the rotational speed of the winding means may be low.

It will be understood that this invention is susceptible to modification in order to adapt it to different usages and conditions and accordingly it is desired to comprehend such modifications within this invention as may fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A method of producing coils which comprises the steps of providing a plurality of winding heads, each having rotary winding means, with the winding heads in substantially planar, peripherally spaced relation and driving the winding heads in a closed path unintermittently and successively past a work station, manually applying a bobbin, to be wound with. elongated material, to each rotary winding means as the winding heads pass the work station, passing elongated material to each bobbin as the winding heads to rotate through the closed path, driving the rotary winding means and the bobbins thereon individually at a gradually increasing rotational speed to a maximum speed and then a gradually decreasing rotational speed from the maximum rotational speed as the winding heads rotate through the closed path to wind elongated material on, the bobbins and to form a coil on each bobbin, stoppingthe rotation of each wound bobbin as the rotational speed of the bobbin is decreasing from the maximum speed and as the wound bobbin approaches the work station, manually removing the wound bobbin and replacing the wound bobbin with a bobbin to be wound.

2. In coil winding apparatus in which elongated material is de-reeled from a source of supply of the elongated material, in combination: a base; a mounting plate rotatably supported on the base for rotation in a closed path about an axis which extends perpendicularly to the mounting plate; carrier means for a supply of elongated material and a plurality of winding heads supported by the mounting plate for rotation together and with the mounting plate, the winding heads being in peripherally spaced relation; means for driving the mounting plate in rotation; rotary winding means included in each winding head and aligned with the carrier means for de-reeling elongated material to be wound and each rotary winding means extending inwardly of the mounting plate; and a common drive source inwardly of the mounting plate engageable with each, of the inwardly extending rotary winding means for imparting rotation to each of said rotary winding means whereby elongated material is de-reeled and wound on the rotary winding means as the winding heads and carrier means rotate in the closed path, said common drive source having an eccentric driving relationship to the said rotary winding means to cause the speed of each of the winding means and hence the de-reeling of the elongated material to increase to a maximum and then decrease to a minimum in the rotation of the winding means in the closed path.

3. In coil winding apparatus in which elongated material is de-reeled from a source of supply of. the elongated material, in combination: a base; an annular mounting plate rotatably supported on the base for rotation in a closed path about an, axis which extends perpendicularly to the mounting plate; carrier means for a supply of elongated material andv a plurality of winding heads supported by the mounting. plate. for rotation together and with the mounting plate, the winding, heads being, in peripherally spaced relation; means for driving the mounting plate: in rotation; rotary winding means included in each winding head and aligned with the carrier means for de-reeling elongated material to be wound and each rotarywinding means, having a spindle extending from the winding head inwardly of the annular mounting plate; a drive wheel fixed on, each spindle; a friction drive element inwardly of the mounting plate engageable eccentrically'with each of the drive wheels for imparting a varying speed of rotation to each of said rotary winding means at a speed gradually increasing to a maximum and then gradually decreasing from the maximum whereby elongated material is de-reeled and wound at varying speed on the rotary winding means as the winding heads and carrier means rotate in the closed path; and means to rotate the friction drive element.

4. In coil winding apparatus in which elongated mate. rial. is de-reeled from a source of supply of the material and wound in coils, in combination: a friction drive element rotatable on a first axis which extends perpendicularly to the element; means to drive the friction drive el'e ment in rotation about the first axis; carrier means for a supply of the elongated material and also a plurality of winding heads in peripherally spaced relationship supported for rotation together in a closed path about the first axis on a second axis eccentric to the first axis and substantially parallel to the first axis, both axes extending substantially perpendicularly to the closed path; means to drive the carrier means and winding heads in the closed path; rotary winding means included in each winding head aligned with the carrier means for de-reeling elongated material to be wound, said rotary winding means of each head, extending from the head toward the said axis of the friction drive element; a friction drive wheel on each rotary winding means for rotation with the rotary winding means and engageable with the friction drive element to describe an orbit on the friction drive element eccentric to the closed path of the winding heads; a plurality of pivot means extending perpendicularly to the closed path substantially parallel to the, first and second axes and disposed peripherally about the closed path, each pivot means retaining a winding head for pivotal movement as the head traverses the closed path, and means to pivot each head in its traverse of the closedpathtto-maintain the rotary winding means directed to the axis of the friction drive element.

5. In coil winding apparatus in which elongated material is de-reeled from a source of supply of the material and wound into coils, in combination: a base; an annular mounting plate in a horizontal plane supported rotatably on the base; pivot pins projecting from the mounting plate upwardly and disposed around the periphery of the mounting plate; a plurality of winding heads supported on the mounting plate for rotation therewith and one head engaged on eachpin for pivotal movement on the plate relative to its pin; carrier means for a supply of the elongated material on the mounting plate for rotation with the mounting plate; means for driving the mounting plate in rotation; a main shaft journalled in the base extending substantially vertically above the mounting plate and eccentric to the rotational axis of the mounting plate; a friction, drive element secured on the main shaft above the mounting plate for rotation with the main shaft means to drive the main shaft and friction drive element in rotation; rotary winding means included in each winding head and aligned with the carrier means for de-reeling elongated materialv to be wound, said rotary winding means of each head extending from the head toward the. said main shaft and the said. friction drive element; a. friction drive wheel fixed onieach rotary winding means for. rotation with the rotary winding means, and engageable. with the friction drive, element to be driven by the friction drive element, and a telescoping torque bar structure of each winding head fixed to the winding head and jour- 13 nalled on the main shaft pivotally moved on the mounting plate as the Winding heads and the mounting plate rotate.

6. In coil winding apparatus in which elongated material is de-reeled from a source of supply of the material and wound into coils, in combination: a base; an annular mounting plate in a horizontal plane supported rotatably on the base; pivot pins projecting from the mounting plate upwardly and disposed around the periphery of the mounting plate; a plurality of winding heads supported on the mounting plate for rotation therewith and one head engaged on each pin for pivotal movement on the plate relative to its pin; carrier means for a supply of the elongated material on the mounting plate for rotation with the mounting plate; means for driving the mounting plate in rotation; a main shaft journalled in the base extending substantially vertically above the mounting plate and eccentric to the rotational axis of the mounting plate; a friction drive element secured on the main shaft above the mounting plate for rotation with the main shaft means to drive the main shaft and friction drive element in rotation; rotary Winding means included in each winding head and aligned with the carrier means for de-reeling elongated material to be Wound, said rotary winding means of each head extending from the head toward the said main shaft and the said friction drive element; a friction drive wheel fixed on each rotary winding means for rotation with the rotary winding means and engageable with the friction drive element to be driven by the friction drive element, and a torque bar structure secured to each winding head for imparting pivotal movement to the winding head as the mounting plate rotates, each torque bar structure comprising a torque tube secured to the winding head fixedly and a torque bar slidable but nonrotatable in the torque tube, said torque bar being pivotally connected to the said main shaft for rotary movement about the shaft.

7. In coil winding apparatus, in combination: a mounting plate; a winding head on the mounting plate having a base member pivotally supported for movement on the plate; a bracket having upstanding arms and supported on the base member; a housing pivotally supported bewhereby each winding head is i tween the said arms for movement in a vertical plane, rotary winding means included in the head and comprising shaft means projecting from one end of the head, a spindle rotatably mounted but fixed against longitudinal movement in the said housing projecting from the housing in an opposite direction from the shaft means, and a flexible connection outside of the housing securing the shaft means to the spindle for rotation together and whereby the spindle and housing are movable in a vertical plane relative to the shaft means; a torque tube projecting above the housing and secured to the bracket fixedly; a torque bar slidable and non-rotatable in the torque tube; means to drive the mounting plate in rotation in a closed path about an axis which extends perpendicularly to the path, a main shaft on the said axis, and means carried by the outer extremity of the torque bar rotatably engageable with said main shaft whereby said head is constrained to follow the mounting plate in the path, a friction drive element on the main shaft, means to drive the main shaft and the friction drive element in rotation, and a drive wheel on the extremity of the spindle and engageable with the friction drive element to be driven thereby.

8. Coil winding apparatus, as claimed in claim 7 and in which said winding head includes a counting device connected to said rotary winding means, a solenoid having an armature mechanically coupled to said housing and arranged to move said housing vertically when said solenoid is energized, and electric circuit means including control means in said counting device operable upon attainment of predetermined number of turns of said rotary means to energize said solenoid to thereby move said housing vertically.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 966,827 Gustave Aug. 9, 1910 2,021,031 Swanson Nov. 12, 1935 2,263,371 Tolnai Nov. 18, 1941 2,670,149 Perry Feb. 23, 1954 2,714,271 Stratton Aug. 2, 1955

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US966827 *15 Ago 19079 Ago 1910Western Electric CoReeling-machine.
US2021031 *17 Ago 193212 Nov 1935Universal Winding CoWinding machine
US2263371 *4 Mar 194018 Nov 1941Gerh Arehns Mek Verkst AbDriving means
US2670149 *3 Oct 195223 Feb 1954Abbott Machine CoWinding machine
US2714271 *5 Sep 19512 Ago 1955Stratton Harry CPower driven fishing reel
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3433423 *22 Ago 196718 Mar 1969Ppg Industries IncMachine for end finding of strand
US3784119 *22 Feb 19728 Ene 1974Claghorn FApparatus for fastening yarn winding tails
US4540029 *28 Nov 198410 Sep 1985Grumman Aerospace CorporationWire coil production system
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.242/474.3, 242/486.7, 242/484.9, 242/476.1, 242/486.8, 242/487.1
Clasificación internacionalB65H63/08, B65H54/02, B65H63/00, B65H54/22
Clasificación cooperativaB65H63/08, B65H54/22
Clasificación europeaB65H63/08, B65H54/22