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Patentes

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Número de publicaciónUS3059368 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación23 Oct 1962
Fecha de presentación28 Nov 1960
Fecha de prioridad28 Nov 1960
Número de publicaciónUS 3059368 A, US 3059368A, US-A-3059368, US3059368 A, US3059368A
InventoresSylvan Wortman Dennis
Cesionario originalSylvan Wortman Dennis
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Wild fowl decoy
US 3059368 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

Oct. 23, 1962 D. s. WORTMAN WILD FOWL DECOY mmam 4 rm ,m 2. km n W ,A w W m 7 05 .B 09w, V

United States Patent This invention relates to decoys, and more particularly to decoys simulating the movements of wild fowl feeding.

An important object of the invention is to provide a decoy of this character embodying movable head and tail sections actuated by manually controlled means whereby the movements of the head and tail sections will have the appearance of live fowls such as geese, ducks or the like.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a decoy which by action of weighted mechanism will imitate the actual movements of a duck or goose in a realistic manner.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a weight controlled mechanism wherein the weights may be removed and replaced to vary the movements of the head and tail sections of the decoy to effect a variation in the movements of the component parts of the decoy to meet various weather and water conditions.

With the foregoing and other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention consists of certain novel details of construction and combinations of parts, hereinafter more fully described and pointed out in the claims, it being understood that changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the spirit of the invention as claimed.

Referring to the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a decoy, constructed in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 2. is a front elevational view thereof.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 4--4 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a side view of the upper neck portion.

Referring to the drawing in detail, the body portion of the decoy is indicated generally by the reference character 5 and comprises a pair of similar body sections 6 and 7, respectively, each section having a rearwardly extended portion '8 which when the body sections are secured together, simulate the folded wings of a goose or duck.

The forward ends 9 of the sections 6 and 7 are curved in a formation simulating the breast of a fowl. The body sections 6 and 7 are secured together in spaced relation in a manner later described. A simulated neck section 1.1 is positioned between the spaced curved end sections of the body portion of the decoy by means of a pivot pin 10 extending through an enlarged circular end section 12 of the neck 11 and through aligned open ings in the curved end sections of the body portions 6 and 7.

The neck section 11 is formed to simulate the neck of a :goose. However, it is to be understood that by changing the general configuration thereof the character of the decoy may be changed to simulate a duck, in the event that a decoy is to be used in duck hunting.

A notch =13 is formed in the edge of the enlarged circular end portion 12 of the neck section 11 and receives a weight 14 which is frictionally held therein. The notch is formed diametrically opposite the upwardly extending neck section 11.

A line :15 is secured at one end to the peripheral edge of the enlarged circular end section 12 and resides within a groove 16 formed in the periphery thereof. The line extends a distance below the body portion 5 of the decoy and has secured at its free end a weight 17 which acting with weight 14- serves to maintain the neck section 11 in an upright position as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawing. As illustrated in FIG. 6, the upper end of the neck section 11 is curved slightly forwardly and terminates in an enlarged portion 18 circular in configuration. The side surfaces of the circular end 18 of neck '11 are recessed whereby the cross-sectional dimension thereof is substantially less than the cross-sectional dimension of the neck section 11. A head 19 is shown pivotally secured to the upper end of neck 11. The head 19' is provided with a recessed portion adapted to receive the enlarged portion 1-8 of neck :11 and is pivotally secured thereto by a pin extending through aligned openings in the head and an opening aligned therewith in the enlarged portion 18.

The head section 19 is provided with a notch at its lower edge in which is received a weight 21 frictionally held therein whereby the head and bill portion of the decoy are normally maintained in a horizontal position. Referring to FIG. 3, there is shown the manner in which the sections *6 and 7 of the body 5 are held in spaced relation. Blocks 22 are secured to the inner surfaces of the sections 6 and 7 and so disposed that they contact when the sections are secured together during the assembly of the decoy spacing the sections apart to provide the space at the forward portion of the decoy for the reception of the enlarged end 12 of the neck section 1 1 and the forward reduced end 23 of a tail section 24. A pivot pin 25 extends through aligned openings in sections 6 and 7 and through an opening in the reduced portion 23 of tail section 24 whereby the tail section is pivotally mounted.

In addition to providing pivots for the neck section 1 1 and tail section 24, pins .10 and 25 also provide the means by which the body sections 6 and 7 are secured together.

A control line 26 is connected at one end to the bill 27 of head 19 and at its other end to the weight 17 as shown in FIGURE 1. A second control line 28 is secured at one end to Weight 17 for reasons to be later described. A third control line 30 is secured by one end to control line 26 intermediate the ends thereof. Control lines 28 and 30 extend to a point remote from the decoy so that the same can be manipulated by a hunter from a blind or the like.

When it is desired to have the decoy simulate a swimming fowl, the control line 30 is pulled slowly by the hunter. To cause the decoy to simulate a feeding fowl, the control line 30 is sharply pulled to overcome the bias of weights 14 and 17 and pivot the neck 11 about pin 10. The head 19 is also pivoted against the bias of weight 21 mounted in the head 19 due to the connection of control line 30 to control line 26 which is secured to bill 27. It will be readily seen that the control line 30 when sharply pulled causes both the head 19 and the neck 11 to pivot relative to the body and to each other. The control line 28 can be used to retrieve the decoy.

While the invention has been described in its preferred embodiment, modifications and variations will become apparent to those skilled in the art. However, such modifications and variations are considered to be within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a decoy, a body portion, a neck section pivotally secured to one end of said body portion, a weight secured to the lower portion of said neck section, a head pivotally secured to said neck section at the free end thereof, a weight secured to the lower portion of said head, a tail section pivotally secured to the other end of said body portion, the said weights adapted to maintain said neck and head sections in a position normal to that of a live swimming fowl, a first control line connected to said head and neck section, a second control line secured 'to said first control line whereby tension applied thereto section pivotally secured to the free end of said neck sec tion, a tail section pivotally'secured in the other of said slots, weights on said neck section and said head section to maintain said head and neck in a position simulating a live swimming -fowl, afirst control line connecting said head section and said -neck section, a second control line secured to said first control line whereby tension on said second control 'li'neis'transmitted to said second'control line to cause pivotal movement of said head and neck sections relative to eachother and relative 'to'the body portion. V V V 3. Ina decoy, a body portion comprised of a pair of similar sections having spacing blocks secured "to conf fronting surfaces thereof in aligned relation, said'se'ctions joined together with said spacing blocks in mutual engagement, wall portions of said sections defining an enlarged slot adjacent one end of said body, a neck section pivotally secured in said enlarged slot, 3. head section pivotally secured to the free end'of said neck section, a rear section pivotally secured between said body sectionsrat the end opposite the neck section defining a simulated tail, weights secured to said neck and head a a 4 sections to maintain the same in a position simulating a swimming fowl, and means connecting said head and neok section to cause said sections to pivot relative to each other and relative to said body portion.

4. In a decoy as defined in claim 3, said neck section having an enlarged substantially circular end portion residing in said enlarged slot, a peripheral groove in said circular portion, a line secured to said circular portion residing in said groove and having a free end extending below said body portion, a weight secured to the free end of said line, the opposite end of said neok section having an enlarged substantially circular end portion and a head section pivotally secured thereto.

5. In adecoy as defined in claim 4, a weight in the periphery of said enlarged circular portion of the neck section residing in said'slot and below the pivot axis thereof, said head section having wall portions defining a slot in which the free end of said neck section resides, and a weight in said head section below the pivot axis thereof. 7

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Popular Mechanics, page 93, November 1954.

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Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US717790 *29 Mar 19026 Ene 1903Frederick Henry YorkeDecoy-duck.
US811036 *11 May 190530 Ene 1906Walter Warren CramDecoy.
US1468979 *7 Ene 192225 Sep 1923American Cartridge CompanyDecoy
US1782042 *4 Feb 192918 Nov 1930Kunkel Victor VToy bird
US2174211 *17 Jun 193926 Sep 1939Hutaff Jr George HDecoy
US2434335 *6 Nov 194513 Ene 1948Signalness Alfred MDecoy
US2457295 *14 Ene 194428 Dic 1948Woodhead John ADuck decoy
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3115721 *26 Abr 196231 Dic 1963John StoryDuck decoy
US4340192 *14 Mar 198020 Jul 1982Burris Iii James OReel for anchoring wild fowl decoys
US4965953 *10 Jul 198930 Oct 1990Mckinney Richard HRemote controlled turkey decoy
US5459958 *3 Feb 199424 Oct 1995Reinke; Darrell D.Decoy mechanism for adaptation to create vertical movement and coincident vocalization
US649398026 Jul 200117 Dic 2002American Plastics Inc.Duck decoy with quick release, foldable wings
US6560912 *12 Dic 200113 May 2003Achepohl Gary RHunting decoy
US670844014 Ago 200223 Mar 2004Von E. SummersTurkey decoy
US7117628 *23 Ene 200410 Oct 2006Russell D. BaileySelf-righting waterfowl decoy with integrated anchor and locking mechanism
US7225579 *8 Sep 20055 Jun 2007Patrick HaleyWing structure for a waterfowl decoy
US7272905 *3 Oct 200625 Sep 2007Horton Albert ETurkey decoy system
US7287352 *23 Sep 200430 Oct 2007Kirby Richard CDecoy with movable head and/or tail portions
US7493723 *21 Sep 200624 Feb 2009Hess Keith ADecoy apparatus
US8291634 *16 Abr 200923 Oct 2012Ralph WhiteMotion decoy system
US9635850 *26 Nov 20142 May 2017Brett BourletFloating pneumatic stabilized rotation device
US20040194365 *22 Mar 20047 Oct 2004Summers Von ETurkey decoy
US20040250461 *10 Jun 200316 Dic 2004Dryer Mark A.Remotely operated expandable and automatically contractible strutting tale decoy
US20060053675 *15 Ago 200516 Mar 2006Glenn LindamanDecoy and support therefor
US20070051030 *8 Sep 20058 Mar 2007Patrick HaleyWing structure for a waterfowl decoy
US20070062093 *21 Sep 200622 Mar 2007Higdon Motion Decoy Systems, Inc.Decoy apparatus
US20080010892 *13 Abr 200717 Ene 2008Patricia Kay GoebelField Decoy System
US20100064569 *12 Sep 200818 Mar 2010Wyant Richard ABase for Providing Motion to Decoys
US20110179691 *16 Abr 200928 Jul 2011White Ralph MMotion decoy system
US20120198752 *6 Feb 20129 Ago 2012James Lee SteinhausenDecoy Locomotion and Movement Device
US20160143265 *26 Nov 201426 May 2016Brett BourletFloating pneumatic stabilized rotation device
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.43/3
Clasificación internacionalA01M31/00, A01M31/06
Clasificación cooperativaA01M31/06
Clasificación europeaA01M31/06