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Número de publicaciónUS3149897 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación22 Sep 1964
Fecha de presentación29 Ago 1961
Fecha de prioridad29 Ago 1961
Número de publicaciónUS 3149897 A, US 3149897A, US-A-3149897, US3149897 A, US3149897A
InventoresHans G Martineck
Cesionario originalHans G Martineck
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Printed cable connector
US 3149897 A
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

Sept. 22, 1964 H. G. MARTINECK 3,149,897

PRINTED CABLE CONNECTOR Filed Aug. 29, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 HANS G. MARTINECK INVENTOR.

FIG. 6 BY A T TORNE YS Sept- 2 1964 H. G- MARTINECK PRINTED CABLE CONNECTOR Filed Aug. 29, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,149,$97 PRKNTED CABLE CONNECTGR Hans G. Martinech, Huntsville, Ala, assignor to the United States of America as represented by the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Filed Aug. 29, 1961., Ser. No. 134,782 2 Ciaims. (Cl. 339-176) (Granted under Title .35, US. Code {1952), see. 266) The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.

This invention relates generally to electrical connectors.

More specifically, the invention relates to a connector for electrically connecting printed cable to printed cable .or printed cable to printed board.

Since the advent of the printed cable and printed circuit, that is, a cable or circuit printed on or imbedded in an insulation material, .a pressing need has arisen for an electrically and mechanically reliable connecting. means which is relatively light in weight, strong, durable, and resistive to shock and vibration, yet which is simple to manufacture and use. Much time, money, and effort have been expended in endeavoring to perfect such devices, but until the present invention, no truly satisfactory device has been developed.

The devices of the prior art have, in general, been subject to disadvantages which materially limited their usefulness and efficiency. One such deficiency was a liability to deformation .on insertion of a plug within the connector, since the plug pushing down on one side or end of the clip contacts resulted in a corresponding raising of the clip contacts on the other end, with the result that when a second plug was inserted in the opposite end the clip contact would be permanently deformed. 'In addition, the electrical contact elements of many of the prior art devices were subject to sliding or displacement in the longitudinal direction when the plug was forced into the connector. The tolerances which were required between the elements of the prior art were also, on the whole, relatively quite small so that precision in manufacture was a prerequisite, adding greatly to the manufacturing costs. Moreover, in the known devices of the prior art, the contact elements of the connector member had a relatively great deflection in relation to their length, thereby creating a non-uniform contact pressure and contact resistance and when too stiff a consequently greater amount of wear on both the plug and connector.

Other disadvantages inherent in the known prior components included difficulty in mounting the plug on an associated electrical component housing and the inability of such prior art connectors to retain the plugs when subjected to vibrations, dynamic loads or inadvertent disconnecting forces. These failings were of particular disadvantage in the application of such circuitry to space vehicles.

It is a general object of this invention to provide an electrically and mechanically reliable connector for employment with printed cables and circuits.

It is a further general object of the invention to provide an electrically reliable connecting device which is resistive to shock and vibration.

It is a further object to provide such a device which is simple to manufacture and use.

It is a more specific object of this invention to provide a connector for a printed conductor cable in which the elements thereof are not subject to deformation upon the application of the cable plug.

It is an additional object of this invention to provide such a connector wherein the contact elements are'not subject to being displaced on the application of a plug, and wherein the contact elements are preloaded.

According to the present invention, the above and other objects are achieved by providing a body member having .an elongated rectangular opening therein, the body member retaining curved spring contact elements for electrical contact with conductors in an associated plug, which spring contact elements are provided with hooked ends and an internal foot mating or interfitt-ing with the internal configuration of the connector housing whereby the contacts resist deformation and displacement on insertion of plug members.

In addition, the connector housing is provided with plug retaining means preventing accidental displacement of the plug on the application of dynamic loads, plug positioning means preventing improper insertion .of the plug and thereby avoiding short circuits, dust seals, and incorporates a means for mounting the connector to the surface of another element.

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference characters designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in FIGURE 1 an exploded isometric View of the device of the invention and the associated plug;

FlGURE 2 is a sectional View of the associated plug element for orientation;

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of the connector and associated plug of this invention;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view of the device of the invention taken along the line IV-IV of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a rear view, with the dust cover removed, of the connector;

FIGURE 6 is a side elevational View of the spring contact element; and

FIGURE 7 is a cross-sectional view of the contact element taken on the line VIIVII of FIGURE 6.

Referring first to FIGURES 1 and 4 for purposes of orientation only, there is shown a flat cable 145 having electrical conductor elements 150 therein which cable has secured at one end of a modifiedplug element 149, basically the same as, and more fully disclosed in application Serial No. 169,789, filed May 12, 1961, by Wilhelm Angele and Hans G. Martineck. This plug is adapted to be inserted into the connector 19 as most clearly shown in FIGURE 4 and more specifically set forth hereinafter.

Having reference now specifically to FIGURE 2 Wherein the plug is shown in detail, it is seen that this plug in general comprises a T-shaped body 142 having 'a ridge portion 143 and an insert portion 144 formed on the terminal portion of the flat electrical cable 145. The electrical contact surfaces 146 and 147 of the plug are formed by the outermost surfaces of the raised offset port-ion-s 148 and depressed offset portions 14$, respectively, of the flat conductors 159 imbedded in the cable 14-5. The ridge portion 143 of the T-shaped body 142 encircles and confines the cable adjacent one side 151 of the offset portions 148 and 149 at the end of the cable 145, and the insert portion 144 confines the cable between the ridge portion 143 and terminus 152 whereby the electrical contact surfaces 146 and 147 are adjacent or flush with the upper surface 153 and lower surface 154, respectively, of the insert portion 144. The raised offset portions 148 and lowered offset portions 149 are alternated between adjacent conductors, whereby current leakage between the electrical contact surfaces 146 or 147 is held to a minimum.

The ridge portion 143 of the plug 142 serves as astop which limits the extent of insertion of the insert portion 144 into the receiving mating receptacle or connector 10,

3 as more fully described hereinafter, and also serves as a means by which the plug 142 may be manually grasped. The insert portion 144 of the plug 142 is provided with polarizing keys 155 and 156 (as best seen in FIGURE 1), located respectively on the upper left side and upper right side of the plug insert portion 144. The operation of the polarizing keys 155 and 156 will be described more fully hereinafter in conjunction with the connector element 10.

In addition, the plug element 1413 is provided on the T-shaped body 142 with lugs 141 (as best seen in FIG- URE 1), these lugs 141 being disposed one on each end of the ridge portions 143 for cooperation with a locking means 51 formed on the body of the connector 19, as more fully explained below.

As seen with reference to FIGURES l and 35 and, with particular reference to FIGURE 3, the connector element of this invention comprises a substantially rectangularly shaped device, indicated generally by the numeral 10, which is formed by substantially U-shaped top and bottom elements 11 and 12, respectively (see FIG- URE secured together by rivets 13 or their equivalent, which securing means pass through and bear against a mounting flange 14 as shown in FIGURE 3. This mounting flange 14 extends around the connector element It) so that it presents an upstanding flange having a face 15 on each side of the rectangular body portion, which permits the connector to be readily mounted on the wall 31 of a housing. The mounting flange 14 is provided on the mounting face with a mounting flange seal 16, formed of a resilient compressible sealing material, and in addition forms a bearing surface for contact between the top 11 and bottom 12 on securement or assembly of the connector components. The opposing surfaces of the connector elements 11 and 12 define, when the elements are secured together, a generally rectangular transversely and laterally elongated opening 17, as seen most clearly in FIGURE 4, which receives the insert portion 144 of the plug body 142.

A plurality of electrical spring contacts 22 extend longitudinally within the opening 17. Each electrical contact 22 is of a generally C-shaped configuration having inwardly turned hook ends 23 and a projecting ridge portion 24 midway between its ends. The electrical contact 22 slopes outwardly or upwardly from its ridge portion 24 into a crest and then inwardly or downwardly to said hook ends. The crest is located substantially nearer to the hook end, about one-third the distance, relative to the ridge portion 24.

The electrical contacts 22 are arranged in a vertically staggered relationship within the opening 17 so that no two contacts are in the same vertical plane. To retain the electrical contacts 22 from any significant movement along its length, a transverse notch 19 is recessed into the top and bottom elements 11 and 12 which notch receives the ridge portion 24 of the electrical contacts 22.

Each of the electrical contacts 22 are positioned substantially along its length within a separate longitudinal slot 18 within the internal surface of the rectangular opening 17. The slots 18 extend from the opening, as shown in FIGURE 4, to the adjacent surfaces of the top and bottom elements 11 and 12 so as to form a plurality of shoulders 21 which the hook ends 23 of the electrical contacts 22 extend behind. Only a short portion of each electrical contact 22 adjacent its crest extends above the longitudinal slot 18 so as to contact the electrical contacts 146 and 147 of the plug 140.

The portion of the slot 18 which forms the shoulder 21 allows the hook end 23 of the electrical contact spring 22 to be depressed on insertion of the plug portion 144 into the opening 17 without deformation of the contact element 22. This, together with the notch 19 and ridge portion 24 relationship permits the ends 23 of the electrical contact 22 to function independently of one another. Thus, insertion of a plug member 144 in one end of the connector will not cause the other half of the electrical contact to rise or shift so as to cause overstressing and permanent deformation when another plug (not shown) is inserted into the other end.

The electrical contacts 22 are spring loaded so as to urge its outersurface against the electrical contacts of a plug 140. They are prevented from rising or pivoting further than that shown about the ridge portion 24 by their hook ends 23 which engage the shoulders 21.

An internal dust seal 26, formed of any suitable resilient material, is positioned Within the notch 12, and is provided with cutouts 25 to permit passage of the contact spring 22 therethrough. Thus it is seen that the spring contact element 22 is positioned at its mid-portion within the notch 19 by the spring foot 24, extending outwardly therefrom each end and having hooked ends 23 fitting around the hookshaped lug 20 so that when they are snapped in place, the spring contact end 23 is retained by abutment with the shoulder 21 yet has limited vertical movement. The connector 10 may be, in addition, provided with resilient, deformable external dust caps 27 having a plug receiving slot 28, the dust cap 27 being fitted around the ends 29 and 30 of the assembled connector, only one of which caps is shown. The connector opening 17 is provided with polarizing keyways 40 and 4-1, which keyways lie, as best seen in FIGURE 5, in the same plane, so that they need be formed only on one element 11 or 12 of the connector 10. These keyways 4t and 41 receive the keys and 156 of the plug element 144 (see FIGURE 1), thus preventing insertion of the plug in any but the proper attitude, consequently obviating short circuits without requiring time to inspect or determine polarity.

On one side of the connector element 10 is provided a retainer clip 50 which is, as best seen in FIGURES 1 and 3, of a generally L-shaped configuration comprising a rectangular spring-like body 51 having a short leg 52 extending at right angles thereto for engagement with the flat facing portion 32 of the extension or mounting flange 14, the extreme end of the retainer clip 50 angling outwardly as at 53 to facilitate insertion of the plug member 142. Obviously, the leg 52 may have a pre-formed aperture 54 therein for reception of a mounting screw 55 whenever desired. Extending inwardly from the top and bottom edges of the spring-like body 51 is a U-shaped spring retaining means 60 having a downwardly turned lip 61 at the end thereof, which lip is positioned in a rectangular slot or notch 62 (see FIGURE 1) formed in the surface of the connector elements 11 and 12. A shallow slot 63 may likewise be formed in these surfaces as an aid in positioning the spring clip retaining means 60.

While the retainer clip 50 has been described with reference to only one side of the connector element 10, it is apparent that the other side, if desired, could be provided with the same retainer clip.

Referring now to FIGURES 6 and 7, it is seen that the spring contact elements 22 are provided with curved contact surfaces 42 so that the electrical contact will always be in the center portion of the spring. This is advantageous in that it decreases or minimizes wear on the plug and contact spring, while at the same time it permits greater tolerances in the manufacture of component parts, yet still obtains a good electrical contact surface. In addition, it should be noted that the contact springs 22 have a relatively long length in comparison to the amount of deflection which is imparted on insertion of the plug 140, which relationship results in a more uniform contact pressure.

From the above specification, it will be seen that an improved connector for printed circuits and cables has been provided which overcomes most of the difiiculties of the prior art, and in conjunction with the improved plug attains results vastly superior to those of the known devices, and is of particular importance in miniaturized component technology because of the stability and rug gedness of the connection resulting therefrom. Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced other than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. An electrical double ended socket, comprising:

(a) a housing having an opening extending therethrough;

(b) a plurality of elongated electrical contacts extending longitudinally within said opening;

(0) each said electrical contact having inwardly turned hook ends and a projecting ridge portion midway between its ends;

(d) each said electrical contact sloping outwardly from said ridge portion into a crest and then inwardly to said hook ends, said crest located relatively nearer the hook ends than the ridge portion;

(e) each said electrical contact having its transverse surface outwardly curved;

(f) said internal surface defining said opening having a transverse notch substantially midway of said opening which receives the ridge portion of said electrical contacts;

(g) each said electrical contact being positioned substantially along its length within a separate longitudinal slot within the internal surface defining said opening;

(h) said longitudinal slots extending from the opening to the adjacent surfaces of the housing so as to form a plurality of shoulders which the hook ends of the electrical contacts extend behind; and

(i) a portion of each said electrical contact adjacent its crest extending above its longitudinal slot within the internal surface so as to contact the electric contacts of a plug adapted to be inserted with said opening.

2. An electrical double ended socket, comprising:

(a) a housing having a rectangular opening extending therethrough;

(b) a plurality of elongated electrical contacts extending longitudinally within said opening;

(0) each said electrical contact having inwardly turned hook ends and a projecting ridge portion midway between its ends;

(d) each said electrical contact sloping outwardly from said ridge portion into a crest and then inwardly to said hook ends, said crest located substantially nearer said hook ends relative to the ridge portion;

(e) said electrical contacts being arranged in a vertically staggered relationship within said opening so that one electrical contact is positioned along one longitudinal surface formed by said rectangular opening and the other electrical contact is positioned along the opposed longitudinal surface formed by said rectangular opening;

(1) said one longitudinal surface having a transverse notch substantially midway of said opening which receives the ridge portions of said electrical contacts along that surface, and said other longitudinal surface having a corresponding notch which receives the ridge portion of said electrical contacts along that surface whereby the crest portions of each said electrical contacts will function substantially independent of each other and to prevent any appreciable movement of the electrical contact along the direction of its length with respect to the housing;

(g) each said electrical contact being positioned substantially along its length within a separate longitudinal slot within the internal surface formed by said rectangular opening;

(h) said longitudinal slots extending from the opening to the adjacent surfaces of the housing so as to form a plurality of shoulders which the hook ends of the electrical contacts extend behind; and

(i) a portion of each said electrical contact adjacent its crest extending above its longitudinal slot within the internal surface so as to contact the electrical contacts of a plug adapted to be inserted within said opening.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,569,869 McIntosh Jan. 19, 1926 2,175,245 Brockman Oct. 10, 1939 2,265,341 Borchert Dec. 9, 1941 2,296,454 Schauer Sept. 22, 1942 2,383,926 White Aug. 28, 1945 2,440,279 Larkins Apr. 27, 1948 2,619,515 Doane Nov. 25, 1952 2,699,534 Klostermann Ian. 11, 1955 2,760,174 Burtt et a1 Aug. 21, 1956 2,765,450 Richardson Oct. 2, 1956 2,802,188 Badders Aug. 6, 1957 2,875,425 Gilbert Feb. 24, 1959 2,925,537 Winkler Feb. 16, 1960 3,090,028 Hall et al. May 14, 1963

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.439/494, 439/272, 439/281, 439/495, 439/357, 439/680, 439/631
Clasificación internacionalH01R12/24, H01R13/64, H01R13/02
Clasificación cooperativaH01R12/774, H01R13/64, H01R12/78, H01R13/025
Clasificación europeaH01R12/78, H01R12/77D4