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Número de publicaciónUS3160984 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación15 Dic 1964
Fecha de presentación22 Abr 1964
Fecha de prioridad22 Abr 1964
También publicado comoDE1478564A1, DE1926669U
Número de publicaciónUS 3160984 A, US 3160984A, US-A-3160984, US3160984 A, US3160984A
InventoresRyan John W
Cesionario originalRyan John W
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Motor simulating sounding toy
US 3160984 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

Dec- 5, 96 J. w. RYAN 3,160,984

MOTOR SIMULATING SOUNDING TOY Filed April 22, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet l H415 INVENTOR. 754 u/ BMW Dec. 15, 1 J. w. RYAN 3,160,984

- MOTOR SIMULATING SOUNDING TOY Filed April 22, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. .Jwv M inf V United States Patent 3,163,984 MGTOR SEMULATENG @UUNDENG T0?! John W. Ryan, 688 Nimes Road, Bel Air, (Iaiif. Filed Apr. 22, 1964, Ser. No. 361,653 4 tllaims. (Cl. id-232) In general, the present invention relates to a control means for a toy motor sound device. More particularly, the present invention involves a control means adapted to regulate the sounds of a toy motor sound device to reproduce the usual operational cycle of a motor.

Customarily, the toy motor sound devices utilized by the prior art involved a direct mechanical connection with a rotating member, such as a wheel axle. Thus, when the wheel turned, the motor sound was emitted and the sound could not be controlled independently of the wheel motion. Furthermore, such operation does not, of course, correspond to the actual operation of a motor on a vehicle, such as a motorcycle. For example, both during starting and when the motor is idling, the motor operates although the wheels of the vehicle do not turn. In addition, the lack of control means on prior art toy motor sound devices prevented realistic reproduction of such features of motor operation as utilizing a key to turn the motor on and a throttle to regulate the motor speed to the desired level.

Consequently, an object of the present invention is a toy motor sound control means adapted to regulate the sounds of a toy motor sound device to reproduce the usual operational cycle of a motor.

Another object of the present invention is a toy motor sound control means which requires an externally removable key connection to regulate the sounds of the toy motor sound device.

Still another object of the present invention is a toy motor sound control means which is adapted to reproduce the usual operational cycle of a motor by rotation in a single direction.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent from the following description and drawings which illustrate a preferred exemplary embodiment of the present invention.

In general, the present invention involves a toy motor sound device operated by an electric motor powered by an electric power source. The intensity and rapidity of repetition of the sounds produced by the motor sound device are proportional to the input voltage to the motor from the power source. Such input voltage is varied by regulator means to reproduce the usual operational cycle of motor sounds from said motor sound device. The regulator means, in turn, is operated by actuator means which include an externally removable key joiuing the actuator means to the regulator means.

In order to facilitate understanding of the present invention, reference will now be made to the appended drawings of a preferred specific embodiment of the present invention. Such drawings should not be construed as limiting the invention which is properly set forth in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a partial cross-sectional and partial perspecti-ve View of the toy motor sound control means of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the regulator means and the-actuator means portions of FIG. 1 when mounted on the handlebars of a bicycle;

FIG. 3 is a front view of FIG. 2 taken along line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional'view of FIG. 2 taken along line t4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a partially exploded perspective view of a portion of the regulator means of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. 5 taken along line a e of FIG. 5 showing the o1 position of a portion of the regulator means;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. 5 taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 5 showing the off position of another portion of the regulator means;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 6 showing the start position of the regulator means;

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 7 showing the idle, cruise and full power positions of the regulator means; and

FIGS. 10a, b, c, d and e are schematic diagrams illustrating the operation of the regulator means in various operating positions.

As illustrated in FIGS. 1-9, the present invention involves a toy motor sound control means as including a motor sound device 21 operated by an electric motor 39 powered by an electric power source 31. The input voltage to the electric motor 3t) from the electric power source 31 is varied by a regulator means "id. The regulator means 70 in turn is operated by an actuator means 110.

The motor sound device 21 is described in applicants copending application, Serial No. 313,285 filed October 2, 1963, entitled Motor Sounds. As described therein and shown partially in FIG. I, the motor sound device 21 includes a resonator 22 adapted to emit an internal combustion motor sound when struck and a rotatably mounted impeller 25 having at least one lug mounted on its periphery and adapted to strike the resonator 22 during the rotation of the impeller 25. More specifically, the resonator 22 comprises a flexible membrane 23 mounted on a frame 24. Similarly, the impeller 25 comprises a plurality of lugs 26 mounted around a spindle 27 which is rotated by the electric motor 38. The electric motor 3% is a DC. motor so that the rate of rotation of the spindle 27 is proportional to the input voltage to the elecric motor 3% Consequently, the intensity and rapidity of repetition of the sounds produced by the motor sound device 21 is proportional to the input voltage to the electric motor Ell.

The electric motor 3t is connected to the power source 31 directly by a first lead wire 32 and indirectly by a second lead wire 33 which is connected to the regulator means 70. The regulator means '7ll is in turn connected to the power source 31 by a third lead wire The power source 31 includes a compartment 35 formed within the motor casing Stl which is described below. The compartment 35 contains at least one battery 36 having one electrode contacting a metal lug 37 which is attached to the lead wire 32. The other battery electrode is braced against a metal clip 38 mounted on the outer wall 39 of the compartment 35 and attached to lead wire 34. The battery 36 is enclosed and supported by an inner wall as and an outer wall 39 which is secured to a removable cap 41 by latching means 42. The cap 4-1 permits access to the battery as for purposes of periodic replacement.

The motor sound device Zl and the electric motor 3i) are enclosed in the motor casing 5b which simulates the outer construction of an actual motor and is adapted to be mounted on a frame, such as a bicycle or tricycle frame. Thus the motor casing 59 includes a rounded lower wall 51 in which is formed a chamber 52. The chamber 52 is partially enclosed by the compartment 35 whose outer wall 39 and cap 41 form part of the casing 56. The chamber 52 is also partially covered by a top wall 53 and a cylinder wall 54 mounted thereon which simulates an actual air-cooled motor cylinder wall. Mounted on the casing 5d are a plurality of ears 55 having apertures 56 therein which are adapted to mount the CD casing 51) on a frame. The cylinder wall 54 is surmounted by a head wall 57 which has a simulated spark plug 58 mounted thereon. The spark plug 58 is connected to a simulated distributor cap 59 mounted on the compartment cap 41 by a spark Wire 6% to further simulate the appearance of an actual motor.

As noted above, the electric motor 30 is connected to the power source 31 through the regulator 71). The regulator means 71) is adapted to vary the input voltage to the electric motor 311 to reproduce the usual operational cycle of motor sounds from the motor sound device 21. Also, since the regulator means 70 is connected to the electric motor 31) and the power source 3 1 solely by lead wires 33 and 34, it may be substantially spaced therefrom. Thus, the regulator means 711 may be mounted on the handlebars of the bicycle or tricycle. The regulator means '70 comprises a housing 71 including a bottom wall '72 and a rear wall '73 from which extends rearwardlya circular flange 74. The flange 74 has an aligned pair of notches 7 which are adapted to receive the handlebar 76 of a bicycle or tricycle. Within the flange 74 is a serrated recess 77 in the rear wall 73 which is also adapted to receive the handlebar 76 which is clamped therein by a flexible band 78 (FIG. 2). The band '78 is inserted through holes 7? in the rear Wall 73 and secured around the handlebar 76 by a nut and bolt 811. The housing 71 also has a front wall 81 which is attached to the rear wall 73 by a rearwardly extending flange 32 which is seated on shoulders 83 and 84 formed in the rear wall 73 and the bottom wall 72, respectively, and by a rearwardly extending socket 35 which receives an interior boss 86 formed on the rear wall 73. The front wall 81 encloses a chamber 37 within the housing 71.

Mounted in the chamber 87 of the housing 71 is a support panel 90 having a spaced pair of holes 91 through which are inserted screws 92. The screws 92 are threaded into posts 93 extending inwardly from the front wall 31 to attach the support panel 91 to the front wall 31. In addition, the support panel 91) is held in position by struts 94- which extend rearwardly from the front wall 81 and are braced against the support panel 99. Joined to the support panel 90 are a spaced pair of lead strips 95 which have a resistance coil 96 extending therebetween. Also between the lead strips 95, a base plate 97 is joined to the support panel 90. The base plate 97 includes a substantially circular rim 98 adjacent the resistance coil 96. The rim 9'8 has a notch 99 adjacent the end of the resistance coil 96 to which the lead wire 34 is attached and an extension 99 adjacent the opposite end of the resistance coil 96.

The regulator means '71 particularly comprises the resistance coil 96 and contact means 1% adapted to electrically connect the electric power source 31 to the electrio motor 5@ and to vary the input voltage to the electric motor 319 by varying the position of the contact means 1% along the length of the resistance coil 96. Specifically, the regulator means 70 is adapted to reproduce the usual operational cycle of motor sounds from the motor sound device by rotation in a single direction. The contact means 111%) comprises a disk 1111 rotatably mounted by a rivet 101 on the base plate 17. The disk 191 has a first prong 102 and a second prong 105 adapted to contact the resistance coil 96 in a set sequence determined by their contact with the base plate 97 during the rotation of the disk 1111. The first prong 1112 has a boss 1113 adapted to ride on the base plate 97 during rotation of the first prong 1132 and to drop into the notch 99 of the base plate 97 after a predetermined amount of rotation of the first prong 102. Extending from the first prong 1112 adjacent the resistance coil 96 is a ridge 104 which is held spaced from the resistance coil $6 by the boss 163 when the boss 1113 rides on the base plate 97 (FIG. 7) and contacts the resistance coil 96 when the boss 103 drops into the notch 99 (FIG. 8). The second prong 1115 has a ridge 1116 adapted to ride on the extension 99' of the base plate 97 during rotation of the second prong 105 and to drop off the extension 99 after a predetermined amount of rotation of the second prong 105. The ridge 1% extends adjacent to the resistance coil 96 and is held spaced therefrom when the ridge 106 rides on the extension 9? of the base plate 97. When the ridge 1196 drops off the extension 99', it contacts the resistance coil 96. In summary, the regulator means 71) includes a base plate 97 and contact means 1% comprising a disk 1111 rotatably mounted on the base plate 97 and having two prongs 102 and T95 adapted to contact the resistance coil 96 in a set sequence determined by their contact with the base plate 97 during the rotation of the disk 101.

The regulator means 7 l is operated by actuator means 1111 which includes an externally removable key 128 joining the actuator means 116 to the regulator means 70. The actuator means 119 includes a scale 111 set in a recess 88 in the front wall 81 of the regulator means 70 and a knob 112 having a pointer 113 mounted thereon and adapted to indicate on the scale 111 the angular position of the knob 112. The knob 112 also has :1 lug 114 extending therefrom to facilitate its rotation. The knob 112 is rotatably mounted on the front wall 81 of the regulator means 7% by an internal, inwardly extending sleeve 115 which is inserted in a port 89 in the front wall 81. The sleeve 115 has a collar 116 mounted about the exterior of its inner end with the collar 116 adjoining the sides of the port 89 and extending within the chamer 87 of the regulator means 71). Mounted on the exterior of the collar 116 and riding on the inner surface of the front wall 81 are lugs 117 adapted to engage the actuator means 119 with the regulator means 70. Also, lugs 117, by contact ng the posts 93 and struts 94, limit the rotation of the knob 112 so that pointer 113 is maintained on scale 111.

Rotatably mounted within the sleeve 115 is a key shaft 12% by means of a spindle 12 slidably inserted in the rivet 1111 on the panel board 90. Fixed to the key shaft 120 is a block 122 having a channel 123 formed therein and opening inwardly. The channel 123 engages the ears 107 formed out of disk 101 whereby the rotation of the key shaft 120 causes rotation of the disk 101. Along the central portion of the key shaft 120 are a spaced pair of outwardly extending circular flanges 124 and 125 whose rims are adapted to ride on the inner surface of the sleeve 115. Longitudinal movement of the key shaft 121i is prevented at the inner end of the sleeve 115 by an inwardly extending rim 118 on the collar 116 and at the outer end by a similar inwardly extending rim 119 on the sleeve 115. The key shaft 120 has a longitudinal slot 126 formed therein which extends to and is adapted to be aligned with a corresponding hole 127 in the rim 119. Thus, by insertion of the key 128 in the hole 127 and slot 126, the sleeve 115 becomes mechanically engaged with the key shaft 1211. Consequently, the knob 112 can be connected to the regulator means 70 by the key 128, since, as noted above, the key shaft 120 is adapted to rotate the disk 1&1.

The operation of the motor sound control 20 is initiated by the insertion of the key 12% into the hole 127 of the knob 112 and the slot 126 of the key shaft 120. Without such key connection, the knob 112- rotates freely without affecting the regulator means 70. The cycle of operation of the motor sound control 20 is illustrated in FIGS. 10a and 1112 with the corresponding positions of the contact means 1% shown in FIGS. 6-9. Initially, when the regulator means 71) is in an off position (FIG. 10a), the ridge 1154 of the first prong .1112 is held away from the resistance coil 96 bythe boss 1113 riding on the base plate 1 7 (FIG. 7) and the ridge 1th: on the second prong 1115 is held away from the resistance coil 96 by its engagement with extension 99' of the base plate 97 (FIG. 6).. As the knob 112 is then turned in a counterclockwise direction, the pointer 113 indicates the start position on the scale 111. Concurrently, the disk 101 is rotated so.

arouses that the boss 103 drops into the notch 99 in the base plate 97 and the first prong 102 contacts the resistance coil 96 (FIG. 8) adjacent the lead wire 34 (FIG. 10b). Because of the short length of resistance coil 96 in the electric circuit, the input voltage to the electric motor is high so that intense, rapid motor sounds are produced corresponding to the starting of a motor. As the knob 112 is tien turned further in a counterclockwise direction, the pointer 113 successively indicates the idle, cruise and full positions on the scale 111. Concurrently, the disk ltll is rotated so that the boss 193 again rides on the base plate 97 and the first prong 102 again is held away from the resistance coil 9(. Also, the ridge 1% drops off the extension )9 of the base plate 97 and the second prong 105 contacts the resistance coil 96 (FIG. 9). The initial contact of the second prong 1% and the resistance coil 96 (idle position) is remote from the lead wire 34 (FIG. 100) so that a long length of the resistance coil 96 is in the electric circuit and the input voltage to the electric motor 30 is low. Consequently, soft, slow motor sounds are produced corresponding to the idling of the motor. Further counterclockwise rotation of the knob 132 maintains the contact of the prong MS with the resistance coil dd while successively reducing the length of the resistance coil 96 in the electric circuit (FIG. 10d and 10a). Consequently, the motor sounds get more intense and rapid corresponding to the cruising and full-speed operation of a motor. Thus, by rotation of the knob 112 in a single direction, the usual cycle of motor sounds is achieved.

There are many features in the present invention which clearly show the significant advance it represents over the prior art. Consequently, only a few of the more outstanding features will be pointed out to illustrate the unexpected and unusual results attained by the present invention. One feature of the present invention is not only the control of the motor sounds produced, but, also, its regulation over the usual operational cycle of motor sounds. Still another feature of the present invention is the operation of the motor sound control by rotation in a single direction. Still another feature of the present invention is the use of a key to connect the throttle knob with the regulator means so that they may be disconncctcd, when desired, by the operator.

It will be understood that the foregoing description and examples are only illustrative of the present invention and it is not intended that the invention be limited thereto. All substitutions, alterations and modifications of the present invention which come within the scope of the following claims or to which the present invention is readily susceptible Without departing from the spirit and scope of this disclosure are considered part of the present invention.

I claim:

1. A motor simulating device comprising: a casing configured to simulate an internal combustion engine and adapted to be removably mounted on a wheeled vehicle; a vibratory diaphragm means in said casing; a rotary member adjacent said diaphragm means and having spaced striker elements thereon adapted to strike said diaphragm means upon rotation of said member to produce sound simulating an internal combustion engine sound; electric motor means for driving said rotary member independently of movement of said vehicle; control means for said electric motor means for starting and stopping the same and varying the speed thereof, said control means including a rheostat means and a manually operable member for actuating said rheostat means, outside said casing.

2. A motor simulating device comprising: a casing configured to simulate an internal combustion engine and adapted to be removably mounted on a Wheeled vehicle; a vibratory diaphragm in said casing; a rotary member adjacent said diaphragm means and having spaced striker elements thereon adapted to strike said diaphragm means upon rotation of said member to produce sound simulating an internal combustion engine sound; electric motor means for driving said rotary member independently of movement or" said vehicle; control means for said electric motor means for starting and stopping the same and varying the speed thereof, said control means including a rheostat means and a manually operable member for actuating said rheostat means, outside said casing, said rheostat means including a plurality of arms for separate control of electric current to said motor to effect said variation of speed and being operable by said manually operable member.

3. A motor simulating device comprising: a casing configured to simulate an internal combustion engine and adapted to be removably mounted on a Wheeled vehicle; a vibratory diaphragm means in said casing; a rotary member adjacent said diaphragm means and having spaced striker elements thereon adapted to strike said diaphragm means upon rotation of said member to produce sound simulating an internal combustion engine sound; electric motor means for driving said rotary member independently of movement of said vehicle; control means for said electric motor means for starting and stopping the same and varying the speed thereof, said control means including a rheostat means and a manually operable member for actuating said rheostat means, outside said casing, said rheostat means being separate from said casing and provided with means for mounting the same on said vehicle at a location remote from said casing.

4. A motor simulating device comprising: a casing configured to simulate an internal combustion engine and adapted to be removably mounted on a wheeled vehicle; a vibratory diaphragm means in said casing; a rotary member adjacent said diaphragm means and having spaced striker elements thereon adapted to strike said diaphragm means upon rotation of said member to produce sound simulating an internal combustion engine sound; electric motor means for driving said rotary member independently of movement of said vehicle; control means for said electric motor means for starting and stopping the same and varying the speed thereof, said control means including a rheostat means and a manually operable member for actuating said rheostat means, outside said casing, said rheostat means comprising a rotary control element; said manually operable member being normally freely rotatable about the axis of rotation of said control element; and removable key means keying said manually operable member and control element together for simultaneous rotation about said axis.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,57 L489 2/26 Morihata.

2,731,769 1/56 Holt 46-243 2,968,123 1/61 Hadden 46--232 3,120,716 2/64 Orenstein 46232 X DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner.

RICHARD C, PINKHAM, Examiner,

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US1571489 *25 May 19252 Feb 1926Morihata MatsusukeToy vehicle
US2731769 *21 Ago 195024 Ene 1956Holt Ralph DToy aircraft and launching device therefor
US2968123 *19 Jun 195917 Ene 1961Hadden Stanley ERicochet sound producing toy
US3120716 *19 Feb 196211 Feb 1964Luxe Reading Corp DeSimulated automobile dashboard and control means
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3271898 *1 Feb 196513 Sep 1966Marvin Glass & AssociatesSound making device
US3274729 *17 Jun 196427 Sep 1966Clodrey Polyflex EtsDoll having photocell-actuated sounding means
US3315407 *14 Jul 196425 Abr 1967Marx & Co LouisElectric motor driven noise simulator
US3391489 *30 Mar 19669 Jul 1968Marx & Co LouisMotor simulator and horn unit
US3735529 *22 Dic 197129 May 1973Schuco Spielwaren SchreyerNoise producing device
US3875696 *2 Ene 19748 Abr 1975Nat Acceptance Company Of AmerToy device for simulating the sound of a motor vehicle
US4016674 *18 Mar 197612 Abr 1977Lesney Products CorporationMiniature toy vehicle launcher for launching a toy vehicle under the influence of gravity
US4219962 *28 Ago 19782 Sep 1980Scienco, Inc.Toy vehicle
US4701750 *6 Ago 198420 Oct 1987Audio Science Investors Limited PartnershipMotorcycle sound simulator for non-motorized vehicle
US4946416 *1 Nov 19897 Ago 1990Innova Development CorporationVehicle with electronic sounder and direction sensor
US5045016 *25 Jul 19903 Sep 1991Innova Development CorporationToy vehicle with electronic sounder and direction sensor
US641638115 Ago 20009 Jul 2002The Little Tikes CompanyMotion induced sound and light generating system
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.446/397, 340/390.1, 340/392.2, 338/74, 340/384.3, 116/60
Clasificación internacionalA63H17/34, A63H17/00
Clasificación cooperativaA63H17/34
Clasificación europeaA63H17/34