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Patentes

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Número de publicaciónUS3246281 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación12 Abr 1966
Fecha de presentación15 Abr 1960
Fecha de prioridad15 Abr 1960
También publicado comoDE1172337B
Número de publicaciónUS 3246281 A, US 3246281A, US-A-3246281, US3246281 A, US3246281A
InventoresCunningham James D
Cesionario originalDeutsch Co
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Electrical connector
US 3246281 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
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April 12, 1966 J. D. CUNNINGHAM 3,246,281

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Filed April 15, 195o 2 sheets-'sheet 1 I lfm IUI INVEN TOR. @fi/wm [wwwa/MM April 12, 1966 J. D. CUNNINGHAM ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April l5, 1960 INVENTOR. C/P/WES CUN/V//VHM [im Z f? mf ZZ lUnited States Patent 3,246,281 ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR James D. Cunningham, South Pasadena, Calif., assignor,

by mesne assignments, to The Deutsch Company, Electronics Components Division, Los Angeles, Calif., a

corporation of California Filed Apr. 15, 1960, Ser. No. 22,475 8 Claims. (Cl. 339-176) This invention relates to electrical connectors and, more particularly, is concerned Iwith a multiple contact connector having snapan contacts.

The use of multiple contact connectors for connecting and disconnectinga large number of electrical circuits in laircraft, communications, and the like is well known. In the interest of saving space, the contacts are arranged in very lclose relationship and supported by a `block of insulating material. Because it is difficult to solder or otherwise connect electrical leads to such closely spa-ced contacts, connectors have been devised in which the contacts snap ginto position. Thus the contacts can be lirst secured to the associated electrical lead before they are snapped into position in t-he insulating block of the connector.

In the past, the cost of manufacturing connectors having these snap-in contacts has been substantially greater than the cost of ordinary connectors in which ythe contacts are permanently molded into the insulating Iblock. Not only have snap-in type connectors been considerably more costly heretofore, but they have not provided a snap-in contact which could be easily removed yfrom the insulating block once the contact had Ibeen snapped into position. Generally, if removable'at all, snap-in contacts could 'be removed only -by disassembling the entire connector assembly.

By the present invention, an improved multiple contact connector yis provided in which the contacts are snapped into position `and securely held. The individual contacts can be removed Lby means of a simple tool and independently disassembled from the rest of the connector assembly. The present invention provides a connector |which utilizes contacts which conform to military standards, which standards prescribe the exact shape and dimensions of the contacts.

In brief, the present invention provides a connector assembly including an insulating block having a plurality of holes for receiving contacts. Each hole is formed fwith a retainer member of spring material with a split sleeve portion and a plurality of integrally attached axially projecting sprin-g lingers. The outer surface of the split sleeve portion has an lannular recess which is arranged to engage the shoulders formed by the reduced diameter section of the ybore to lock the retainer member in the insulator block. Each of the spring dingers is arranged to slope inwardly away from the sleeve portion with the outer ends of the `fingers again daring outwardly. A shoulder is formed where the spring yfingers start .to dlare outwardly. A contact member is inserted in the retainer member and is provided with a first portion of diameter larger than the linside of the sleeve, `and a reduced diameter portion for engaging .the shoulder of the lingers.

lFor a more com-plete understanding of the invention, reference should 'be had to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

ice

FIG. l is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of the connector showing the snap-in contact assembly for both the plug and receptacle;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view, partly in section, of the retainer member;

FIG. 3 is an end view of the retainer member; and

IFIG. 4 is a side elevational View showing the manner in which the snap-in contact is removed.

Referring to FIG. 1 in detail, the two halves of the connector include insulating blocks and y12. These blocks may be mounted in metal jackets forming a receptacle and plug which are arranged to lbe threaded together in the manner of conventional connector design. The block 10 is provided with a plurality of openings or bores extending through the block, such as indicated at l '14. The bore 14 includes a reduced diameter region 15 forming a pair of spaced shoulders 18 and 20 in vthe central region of the block.

A spring retainer member 2.2, preferably made of beryllium-copper, is positioned in each bore in the block 10, the retainer mem-ber being shown in detail in FIGS. 2 and 3. The spring retainer member is cylindrical in shape and includes a sleeve portion 24 having an internal opening or bore 26. The sleeve portion is split along one side Iby a slot `28. The outside surface of the sleeve portion 24 is provided with an yannular groove 130, forming a pair of spaced shoulders 32 and 34. The end of .the sleeve portion is lbeveled on the outer surface, as indicated at 36.

The balance ofthe spring retainer member may -be considered as comprising two spring lingers 38 and 40 formed by two slits `411 and 42 located diametrically opposite each other. The slit 41 is coextensive with the slot @8, while the slit 42 terminates at the sleeve portion 24. The inner and outer surfaces of the spring lingers conform to the cylindrical cross-sectional shape of tne slee-ve portion. However, in the longitudinal direction, the inner surface of the spring members tapers away from the sleeve portion in an inwardly Idirection, the inwardly tapered portion 'being indicated at 44. The inwardly tapered portion ends abruptly in a shoulder 46. The inner surface formed by the spring ingers then tapers outwardly to the end of the Ilingers, the outwardly tapered portion bein-g indicated at 48.-

;Referring again to FIG. l, it lWill be seen that .the spring retainer member 22 is positioned in the bore 14 Iby means of the annular groove 30 which engages the shoulders 18 and 20 `formed by the reduced diameter section 16. IBy means of the tapered portion 36 of the spring retaining member, it can be guided through the vreduced diameter portion 16 from the front face of the block 10. By virtue of the slot 28, the spring retaining member can 'be reduced in diameter sufficiently to pass through the reduced diameter section of the |bore, the split sleeve portion springing loutwardly when the reduced diameter portion 16 engages the annular groove 30.

After a retainer member is secured in position in each of the :bores in the block 1l?, pin members such as indicated at 5t) may be snapped into position from the back side of the block 10. Each pin member includes a solid cylindrical portion 52 having an integral collar X54. The cylindrical portion IS2 is of such diameter that it slides into the bore 2a in the retainer member 2.2. The pin member further includes a tapered portion 56 which forms a shoulder 58. The .tapered portion 56 and shoulder 58 are positioned such that when the collar 54 engages one end of the retainerrmember 22, the shoulder 46 on,

fingers until they snap back into position Ibehind the shoulder 58.

The companion block 12 is similarly provided with a plurality of bores 60, each having reduced diameter section 62` by means of which a spring retainer member 64 is held in position in the bores. Socket members, such as indicated at 66, are snapped in position in the retaining member 64 in identical fashion to the pin member 50 described above. Normally the socket members are set below the surface of the front face of the block 12. Wire leads are secured to the back ends of both the pin member 50 land socket member 66v by soldering or crimping in conventional manner.

Removal of either a pin member 50 or a socket member 66 can be affected by a special tool in the manner shown in FIG. 4. The tool, indicated at 70, has a handle 72 and a long hollow shank 74 secured to the handle. The end of the shank is beveled, as indicated at 76. The hollow shankY fits around the projecting pin 50 and engages the flaring inner surface 48 of the spring fingers 38 and 40. This spreads the fingers sufficiently to permit the shoulder 46 to clear the shoulder 58 on the pin member. The pin member 50 can then be withdrawn out of the back of the insulator block 10.

What is, claimed is: t

1. A snap-in electrical connector assembly comprising a block of insulating material having at least one circular bore` extending through theblock, aportion of the bore intermediate the ends being reduced in diameter, a retainer member of spring material including a split sleeve portion and a plurality of integrally attached axially projecting spring fingers, the outer surface of the split sleeve portion having an annular recess region, the retainer member being secured axially within the bore of the insulating block by the reduced diameter portion of the bore engaging the annular recess region on the outer surface of the split sleeve portion, each of the spring fingers having an inwardly sloping inner surface portion adjacent the sleeve portion and having an outwardly sloping inner surface portion adjacent the projecting end of the finger, each finger having a surface substantially perpendicular to the axis of the retainer defining a shoulder between the inwardly and outwardly sloping portions opening tow-ard the projecting end of the finger, the ends of the fingers being disposed within the bore and spaced from the walls thereof, and a contact memberinsertable in the retainer member having a first portion of diameter larger than the inside diameter of the sleeve portion of the retainer member and a second portion adjacent the first portion of diameter less vthan the inside diameter or' the sleeve portion of the retainer member, a shoulder between the first and second portions adapted to engage the end of the sleeve portion of the retainer member remote from the spring fingers Within the bore, the second portion of the contact member being recessed in one region to provide a shoulder positioned to engage the shoulder formed on the inner surface of each of the spring fingers, whereby the spring fingers lock the contact member in inserted position in the retainer member to secure the contact member from axial movement relative to the retainer member, wherein the outwardly sloping inner surface portions of the spring fingers provide means for disengaging the finger shoulders from the shoulder of the contact member for removal of the contact member without removal of the retainer member from the bore.

mediate the ends being reduced in diameter, a retainer member of spring material including a split sleeve portion and a plurality of projecting spring fingers, the outer surface of the split sleeve portion having an annular recess region, the retainer member being secured axially within the extent of the bore of the insulating block by the reduced diameter portion of the bore engaging the annular recess region on the outer surface of the split sleeve fportion, each of the spring fingers having an outwardly sloping inner surface portion adjacent the projecting end of the finger, the fingers being disposed within the extent of the bore and spaced from the Walls thereof, each finger having a shoulder opening toward the outwardly sloping surface portion and a contact member insertable in the retainer member having, a first portion of diameter larger than the inside diameter of the sleeve portion of the retainer member, and a second portion adjacent the first Vportion of diameter less than the inside diameter of the sleeve portion of the retainer member, a shoulder. betweenthe first and second portions adapted to engage the end ofy the sleeve-portion of the retainer member remote from the spring fingers, the second portion being recessed in Yone region to provide a shoulder positioned to engage the shoulder formedV onl the inner surface of each of the spring fingers, whereby the, spring fingers lock the contact member in inserted position in the retainer member, and whereby the outwardly sloping inner surface portions of the spring fingersV provide means for disengaging the finger shoulders. from the contact member shoulder for removal of the contact memberfrom the bore without removal of the retainer member from the. bore.

3. A snap-in connector assembly comprising a block of insulating material having a plurality of circular bores extending through the block, a portion of each bore intermediate the ends being reduced in diameter, retainer members of spring material eachincluding a split-sleeve portion and a plurality of projecting spring fingers, the outer Vsurfaces of the split-sleeve portions having annular recess regions, the retainer members being secured axially within the insulating block by the reduced diameter portions lof the bores engaging the annular recessed regions of the,r split-sleeve portions each of the spring fingers having an inwardly sloping inner surface portion adjacent the sleeve portion and having an outwardly sloping inner surface portion adjacent the projecting end of the finger, each finger having a shoulder between-the inwardly and outwardly vsloping portions, and contact members insertable in the retainer niembers having first portions of-a diameter larger than the inside diameters of the sleeveI portionsvof the retainer members and second portions adjacent the rst portions 2. A snap-in connector assembly comprising a block of diameter less than the insidel diameters of the sleeve portions of the retainer members, a shoulder between the first and second portions of each contact adapted to engage the end of the sleeve portion of the corresponding retainer member remote from they spring fingers, the second portions of the contact members each being recessed in one region to provide a shoulder positioned to engageV the shoulderl formed on the inner surface of each of the spring fingers, wherein the retainer members are secured to the insulating block prior to insertion of the contact members into ythe retainers` and the spring fingers lock the contact members in insertedv position in theretainer members, but wherein the spring fingers provide surfaces for disengaging the finger shoulders from the recesses of ythe contact members for removal of the contacts from Vthe retainers. Y

4. A snap-in electrical connector assembly comprising a unitary block of insulating material having a hole therethrough, a retainer member made of spring material positioned Within the'hole, the retainer member including a split sleeve portion having projection means substantially circumferentially thereof which split sleeve portion expands within the hole whereby the projection means engage the block to secure the retainer axially of the hole, the retainer member further including a pair of cantilevered spring fingers projecting from the split sleeve portion, the spring fingers being spaced at a point adjacent the projecting ends thereof a distance smaller than the internal diameter of the sleeve portion, the spring fingers each having an outwardly flaring inner surface between said point and the projecting end, the projecting ends of the spring lingers being disposed within the hole and spaced from the walls thereof, and a contact member removably secured by the retainer member previously secured in the hole, the contact member extending through the sleeve portion and the spring fingers of the retainer member, the contact member having a reduced diameter portion engaged by the spring fingers at said point of minimum spacing for securing the contact member in position, the outwardly flaring inner surfaces of the fingers providing means for wedging the fingers apart and away from the contact member to disengage the fingers from the contact member for removal of the contact member from the hole separate from the retainer, the contact member being secured to an electrical conductor at a location spaced from the reduced diameter portion, the conductor extending from the connector at the end thereof opposite from the spring fingers.

5. A snap-in electrical connector assembly comprising a block of insulating material having a hole therethrough, the hole having a central reduced diameter portion to provide enlarged diameter recesses at opposite ends of the hole, a retainer member made of spring material positioned wholly within the hole, the retainer member including a split sleeve portion having longitudinal spaced apart projections exteriorly thereof, which sleeve portion expands within the reduced diameter portion of the hole whereby the projections extend into the recesses for securing the retainer axially of the hole by engaging the reduced diameter portion at opposite ends thereof, the retainer member further including at least a pair of cantilevered spring fingers projecting from the split sleeve portion into one of the recesses, the spring fingers being spaced apart at a point adjacent the projecting ends a distance smaller than the inner diameter of the sleeve portion, a shoulder formed in each finger at said point adjacent the projecting end, the shoulders opening to the free ends of the lingers, the fingers aring outwardly to their ends from the shoulders, the flaring ends of the fingers being spaced from the walls of the recess, and a contact member removably secured by the retainer member from axial movement in the hole, the contact member extending through the sleeve portion and the spring fingers of the retainer member from the end of the retainer opposite from the spring fingers, the contact member having a reduced diameter portion engaged by the spring fingers at said point of minimum spacing for securing the contact member in position axially of the hole, the fiaring portion of the spring fingers providing a means for wedging the fingers apart within the one recess for removing the contact member.

6. A snap-in electrical connector assembly comprising a block of insulating material having a hole therethrough, a retainer member made of spring material positioned within the hole, the retainer member including a split sleeve portion having projections extending exteriorly therefrom, the split sleeve portion expanding within the hole so that the projections engage the block to secure the retainer member from movement axially of the hole, the retainer member further including a pair of cantilevered spring fingers projecting from the split sleeve portion, the spring fingers being spaced apart from each other at a point adjacent the projecting ends a distance smaller than the inner diameter of the sleeve portion, the spring lingers defining opposed outwardly Haring surfaces between said point of minimum spacing and the cantilevered ends of the fingers, the cantilevered ends of the spring fingers being spaced from the walls of the hole,

`and a contact member removably secured by the retainer member, the contact member extending through the sleeve portion and the spring fingers of the retainer member, the contact member having a reduced diameter portion engaged by the spring fingers at said point of minimum spacing for securing the contact member in position, the flaring surfaces of the spring fingers providing means for wedging the fingers apart for removing the contact member.

7. A snap-in connector assembly comprising a block of insulating material having a circular bore extending through the block, a portion of the bore intermediate the ends being reduced in diameter, a retainer member of spring material including a split-sleeve portion and a plurality of projecting spring fingers, the outer surface of the split-sleeve portion having an annular recess region, the retainer member being secured axially within the insulating block by the reduced diameter portion of the bore engaging the annular recessed region of the splitsleeve portion, each of the spring fingers having an inwardly sloping inner surface portion adjacent the sleeve portion and having an outwardly sloping inner surface portion adjacent the projecting end of the finger, each finger having a shoulder between the inwardly and outwardly sloping portions, and a contact member insertable in the retainer lmember having a first portion of diameter larger than the inside diameter of the sleeve portion of the retainer member and a second portion adjacent the first portion of diameter less than the inside diameter of the sleeve portion of the retainer member, a shoulder between the first and second portions of the contact adapted to engage the end of the sleeve portion of the retainer member remote from the spring fingers, the second portion of the contact member being recessed in one region to provide a shoulder positioned to engage the shoulder formed on the inner surface of the spring fingers, wherein the retainer member is secured to the insulating block prior to insertion of the contact member into the retainer and the spring fingers lock the contact member in inserted position in the retainer member, but wherein the spring fingers provide surfaces for disengaging the finger shoulders from the recess of the contact member for removal of the Contact from the retainer.

8. A snap-in connector assembly comprising a block of insulating material having a circular bore extending through the block, a portion of the bore being reduced in diameter, a retainer member of spring material including a split-sleeve portion and a plurality of projecting spring fingers, the outer surface of the split-sleeve portion having an annular recess region, the retainer member being secured axially within the insulating block by the reduced diameter portion of the bore engaging the annular recessed region of the split-sleeve portion, each of the spring fingers having an inwardly sloping inner surface portion adjacent the sleeve portion and having an outwardly sloping inner surface portion adjacent the projecting end of the finger, each finger having a shoulder between the inwardly and outwardly sloping portions, and a contact member insertable in the retainer member having a first portion of diameter larger than the inside diameter of the sleeve portion of the retainer member and a second portion adjacent the first portion of diameter less than the inside diameter of the sleeve portion of the retainer member, a shoulder between the first and second portions of the conta-ct adapted to engage the end of the sleeve portion of the retainer member remote from the spring fingers, the second portion of the contact member being recessed in one region to provide a shoulder positioned to engage the shoulder formed on the inner surface of the spring fingers, wherein the retainer member is secured to the insulating block prior to insertion of the contact member into the retainer and the spring fingers lock the contact member in inserted position in the retainer member, but wherein the spring fingers provide surfaces for disengaging the finger shoulders from the recess of the contact member for removal of the contact from the retainer.

UNITED References Cited by the Examiner STATES PATENTS 5 Leeman 724-217 X strahan 339-258 X Ryder 24-217 X AAntony et al. 339-89 X Gudie v 339-2111 X 10 8 Morris 339-91 X Adams 339-217 Watts 339-217 Narozny 339-217 Londell 339-91 Jackson et a1. 339-217 JOSEPH D. SEERS, Primary Examin'er.

P. A. CLIFFORD, Assistant Examiner.

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Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3325773 *14 Dic 196413 Jun 1967Clyde R PryorConnector
US3366921 *5 May 196630 Ene 1968Deutsch Co Elec CompElectrical connector
US3390376 *3 Mar 196725 Jun 1968Pyle National CoHigh performance collet for electrical connectors
US3409863 *11 Oct 19665 Nov 1968Deutsch Co Elec CompElectrical junction device
US3478305 *26 Sep 196611 Nov 1969Bunker RamoElectrical connector
US3648213 *24 Abr 19707 Mar 1972Amp IncElectrical housing member
US4293180 *29 May 19796 Oct 1981Bunker Ramo CorporationResilient biasing means
US4508417 *11 Abr 19832 Abr 1985Leviton Manufacturing Company, Inc.Plug-in wire terminal system
US5575691 *5 May 199519 Nov 1996Elcon Products InternationalApparatus for front or rear extraction of an electrical contact from a connector housing
US631907316 Dic 199920 Nov 2001Amphenol CorporationHybrid submarine streamer connector
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.439/682, 439/744
Clasificación internacionalH01R13/426
Clasificación cooperativaH01R13/426
Clasificación europeaH01R13/426