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Número de publicaciónUS3300931 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación31 Ene 1967
Fecha de presentación15 Sep 1964
Fecha de prioridad17 Sep 1963
También publicado comoDE1484307A1
Número de publicaciónUS 3300931 A, US 3300931A, US-A-3300931, US3300931 A, US3300931A
InventoresLutze Gunter
Cesionario originalLutze Gunter
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Prefabricated roof construction with foamed plastic joining means
US 3300931 A
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

Jan. 31, 1967 LUTZE 3,300,931

PREFABRICATED ROOF CONSTRUCTION WITH FOAMED PLASTIC JOINING MEANS Filed Sept. 15, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 III! i Jan. 31, 1967 LUTZE 3,300,931

PREFABRICATED ROOF CONSTRUCTION WITH FOAMED PLASTIC JOINING MEANS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 15, 1964 In ven for: G 12w 4d 12'- 9 N mE Jan. 31, 1967 e. LUTZE 3,300,931

PREFABRICATED ROOF CONSTRUCTION WITH FOAMED PLASTIC JOINING MEANS Filed Sept. 15, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Fig. 4

In ventor:

GLENN LLZILLEV Jan. 31, 1967 a. LUTZE 3,300,93l

PREFABRICATED ROOF CONSTRUCTION WITH FOAMED PLASTIC JOINING MEANS Filed Sept. 15, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 United States Patent PREFABRICATED ROOF CONSTRUCTION WITH FOAMED PLASTIC JOINING MEANS Giinter Liitze, Untere Steigstrasse 32, Reutlingen- I Ohmenhausen, Germany Filed Sept. 15, 1964, Ser. No. 396,583

' Claims priority, application Germany, Sept. 17, 1963,

L 45,873 Claims. (Cl. 52-309) The present invention relates to prefabricated buildings in general, and more particularly to an improved prefabricated roof which may be used in prefabricated houses and other types of building constructions.

It is an important object of the present invention to provide a very simple, comparatively inexpensive, lightweight and compact prefabricated roof whose component parts may be assembled in the manufacturing plant or at the locale of actual use.

It is another object of the invention to provide a prefabricated roof which is a highly satisfactory insulator against heat or cold, which may be used in very hot or very cold climates without damage to its parts, which is constructed and assembled in such a way that its ceiling panel or panels are not likely to accumulate condensate water, wherein the ceiling panel is not likely to buckle in response to substantial dilferences between outside temperature and room temperature, which may serve as a carrier for an overhead heating system, and wherein at least some parts may consist of synthetic plastic or similar comparatively inexpensive materials.

A further object of the invention is to provide a prefabricated roof which is capable of withstanding very high torsional, compressive and/ or bending stresses, which may be manufactured in many different sizes and/ or shapes, which may be put to use in many types of prefabricated buildings, which may accommodate and is then capable of supporting flexible or rigid conduits, conductors, tubes, sheaths and similar elongated elements to convey electric current, gases or liquids in a prefabricated home or another type of dwelling, which may be provided with composite or one-piece ceiling panels or roof skins, and wherein a ceiling panel is automatically held at a requisite distance from the roof skin while being at the same time held against curling, buckling, cracking, and other types of damage and/or deformation.

A concomitant object of the invention is to provide a novel skeleton frame which may be utilized in a prefabricated roof of the above outlined characteristics.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a novel method of assembling a prefabricated roof of the above outlined type and of constructing the skeleton frame of the roof in such a way that it may properly support highly resistant metallic ceiling panels as well as much more sensitive ceiling panels of plaster or the like.

A further object of the invention is to provide the component parts of the skeleton frame with improved connectors which may contribute to retention and proper positioning of one or more ceiling panels and/or skins in a prefabricated roof of the above outlined characteristics.

Another object of the invention is to provide a prefabricated roof which embodies a skeleton frame of the just outlined type and wherein the position of connectors with Patented Jan. 31, 1967 ice reference to each other and with reference to the elements of the skeleton frame may be adjusted prior to, during and following the assembly of the frame.

Briefly stated, one feature of my invention resides in the provision of a method of producing a prefabricated roof which comprises the steps of assembling a pair of longitudinal and a pair of transverse U-bars or similar metallic frame members with a series of spaced metallic ceiling joists in the form of I-bars or otherwise profiled stock to form a rigid rectangular skeleton frame wherein the joists are disposed intermediate and in substantial parallelism with one pair of frame members, placing a one-piece or a composite ceiling panel of plaster, sheet aluminum or the like onto a rigid horizontal support, providing at least some of the joists (and preferably also the one pair of frame members) with downwardly extending adjustable spacer elements of identical height, placing the spacer elements onto the ceiling panel so that the frame members are located in a plane which is parallel with the plane of the ceiling panel, filling in at least the larger ones of any such openings which might be present between the ceiling panel and the frame members to form a shallow tray-shaped mold wherein the ceiling panel constitutes the bottom portion, and introducing into the mold a hardenable liquid plastic bonding material which fills the mold up to a level high enough to insure that the spacer elements are at least partially surrounded by the plastic layer which is obtained upon hardening of bonding material whereby the layer adheres to the ceiling panel to connect the panel with the remainder of the thus obtained prefabricated roof.

In accordance with an important feature of my invention, the upper flanges and/or the lower flanges of the joists (and referably also of the frame members which are parallel to the joists) are provided with elongated T-grooves which receive T-shaped beads of the spacer elements so that each spacer element is held against separation from the respective joist or frame member but is freely slidable in the longitudinal direction of the respective groove. This enables the ersonnel to distribute the spacer elements in such a way that they protect the roof from buckling and take up the weight of the plastic layer. The layer is preferably a hard body of foamed light-weight plastic material which is a good insulator of heat and may but need not be at least slightly elastic.

The novel features which are considered as characteristic of the invention are set forth in particular in the appended claims. The improved prefabricated roof itself, however, both as to its construction and the mode of assembling and mounting the same, together with additional features and advantages thereof, will be best understood upon perusal of the following detailed description of certain specific embodiments with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a skeleton frame which is constructed and assembled in accordance with a first embodiment of my invention and wherein the lower flanges of the joists and transverse frame members carry rows of aligned L-shaped spacer elements or connectors;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of the skeleton frame and further illustrates a portion of a ceiling panel which abuts against the undersides of the connectors as well as a flexible conductor which is led through the vertical flanges of certain connectors;

FIG. 3 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary bottom plan view of the skeleton frame shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary vertical section through one of the transverse frame members and through a portion of the ceiling panel substantially as seen in the direction of arrows from the line 44 of FIG. 3, further showing two wooden beams which are used while the interior of the skeleton frame is being filled with a liquid plastic which is to form a foamed layer;

FIG. 5 is a vertical section substantially as seen in the direction of arrows from the line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a vertical section through a portion of a fully assembled roof which is shown in position on top of a prefabricated side wall and is connected to a gutter; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modified roof which is shown in partly assembled condition.

Referring to the drawings, and first to FIG. 1, there is shown a rectangular skeleton frame 10 which is composed of two longitudinal frame members 11, 12 and two transverse frame members 13, 14. These frame members are metallic U-bars whose webs are located in vertical planes. The width of webs on the longitudinal frame members 11, 12 exceeds the width of webs on the transverse frame members 13, 14 so that the ends of the members 13, 14 may be fitted into the spaces between the upper and lower flanges of the members 11, 12. The lower flanges of the longitudinal frame members 11, 12 support a series of equidistant ceiling joists which are parallel to and are located between the transverse frame members 13, 14. Of those lower flanges, only the flanges 11a are shown in FIGS. 2, 4 and 5. Each ceiling joist 15 is a metallic I-bar. For example, the frame members 11-14 and the joists 15 may consist of aluminum and the ends of the members 13, 14 and joists 15 are welded to the members 11, 12 to thus form a rigid skeleton frame. It will be noted that the flanges of the frame members 11, 13 face the frame members 12, 14 and vice versa, i.e., the flanges of all frame members extend into the space surrounded by their webs.

The flanges 13a, 14a and 15a on the transverse frame members 13, 14 and ceiling joists 15 are provided with longitudinally extending T-grooves 16. The grooves 16 in the upper flanges extend downwardly so that their enlarged portions are spaced from the upper sides of such upper flanges. The grooves 16 in the lower flanges extend upwardly and their enlarged portions are located above the undersides of such lower flanges. The lower flanges 13a, 14a, 15a are located in a common plane just above the common plane of the lower flanges of the frame members 11, 12. The lower grooves 16 accommodate T-shaped beads 17a at the upper ends of substantially L-shaped (profiled) connectors 17, best shown in FIG. 4, which are located at a level below the frame 10 and preferably consists of corrosion-resistant synthetic plastic material which is a poor conductor of heat. The connectors 17 serve as retainers and/ or spacer elements for a ceiling panel shown in FIG. 2. The lower flanges of the connectors 17 on a common lower flange 15a face away from each other, see FIG. 2, and it will be noted that the grooves 16 on the lower flanges 15a are provided along the respective edges of such lower flanges whereby the edges may be reinforced to insure that they may support considerable weight. The enlarged portions of the beads 17a fill or nearly fill the corresponding lengths of enlarged portions of the lower grooves 16 to insure that they are free to slide but will be held without undue wobbling. The connectors 17 may be inserted from one end of the respective ceiling joist 15 before the latter is welded to the longitudinal frame members 11, 12. The lower flange 13a, 14a of each transverse frame member is provided with a single T- groove 16, and such grooves also receive the beads 17a of a requisite number of properly spaced connectors 17. This is best shown in FIG. 1 wherein the lower flange 14a of the frame member 14 carries six equidistant connectors 17. The operators resort to suitable rulers or the like to insure that the aligned connectors are properly spaced from each other, i.e., that the connectors may properly support a one-piece ceiling panel 30 or a composite ceiling panel which consists of several coplanar sections or sheets. The connectors 17 on one of the joists 15 may but need not be aligned with the connectors of one or more additional joists and/or with the connectors of one or both transverse frame members. It is up to the operators to decide upon the optimum distribution of connectors on the skeleton frame 10 of FIG. 1.

In accordance with an important feature of my invention, the number of connectors on any given joist 15 or transverse frame member 13, 14 may be changed at any time, not only before the parts 13, 14, 15 are welded to the frame members 11, 12. As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the grooves 16 comprise enlarged zones or cutouts 16b which are wide and long enough to allow for insertion or removal of a bead 17a. The width of each cutout 16b at least equals, the maximum width of the respective grooves 16, i.e., it exceeds at least slightly the width of a bead 17a, and its length exceeds the length of a bead 17a. All that an operator has to do in order to remove a connector 17 is to slide it to the nearest cutout 16b and to simply withdraw the bead 17a therethrough. It is clear that each groove 16 may be provided with two or more cutouts, depending on the length of the joists 15 and transverse frame members 13, 14, and it is equally clear that such cutouts are also provided in the lower grooves 16, see FIG. 3. As a rule, the cutouts 16b will be provided near the ends of the respective flange 13a, 14a, 15a and it normally suffices to provide each groove 16 with a single cutout. If the operator desires to insert an additional connector 17 into one of the lower grooves 16, he merely pushes the bead 17a upwardly and into the cutout 16b of the respective groove; the head is thereupon slipped into that portion of the groove which is adjacent to the cutout and the connector is safely attached to the respective joist or transverse frame member.

FIG. 2 shows that the vertical flanges of some or all connectors 17 may be provided with one or more circular apertures 17c which serve to accommodate portions of electric cables 18 (shown by phantom lines), tubular sheaths for electric cables, conduits for a fluid medium or other solid rod-like or tubular bodies which might be necessary in the electric, hydraulic or pneumatic circuitry of a building constrcution. If the cables 18 are sufliciently flexible, they may be laid in any desired pattern, i.e., they may form bodies of zig-zag, undulate or any other desired shape. It is clear that the apertures 170 may be replaced by apertures in the form of semicircular slots which are then provided in the vertical end faces of the connectors 17 so that the cables 18 need not be threaded through the apertures 17c but are simply pushed laterally to enter the corresponding slots.

The frame members 11-14 are provided with downwardly extending extensions or skirts 11c, 12c, 13c, which are coplanar with the respective webs and may be received in complementary recesses provided in the top faces of side Walls in a prefabricated building wherein the improved roof is put to use. The lower end faces of the skirts 11c14c are located in a common horizontal plane which is closely adjacent to or coincides with the common plane of the undersides of the bottom flanges on the connectors 17.

As shown in FIG. 6, the upper T-grooves may receive special types of connectors 19 (hereinafter called coupling elements to diflerentiate from the connectors 17) which serve to retain an upper panel or roof skin 20. Each coupling element 19 comprises a downwardly extending T-shaped bead 19a corresponding to a bead 17a and accommodated in the respective upper T-groove to insure that the coupling element may be shifted in the longitudinal direction of the respective joist 15 or transverse frame member 13 or 14. In FIG. 6, the coupling element 19 is mounted in the upper T-groove of the transverse frame member 14, and this element further comprises two mirror symmetrical elastic tongues 19b which are received in a depression 20a of the roof skin 20. The side walls of the depression 20a are located at such a distance from each other that the tongues 19!) are deformed and their inverted hook-shaped end portion 19c engage the inner sides of such side walls and thereby anchor the coupling element 19 in the roof skin. The marginal portions 20b of the roof skin 20 extend "vertically downwardly and overlie portions of specifically configurated brackets 21 (only one shown) which in turn overlie the upper flanges of the transverse frame members 13, 14. The bracket 21 shown in FIG. 6 serves as a gutter and collects water which overflows the edges of the roof skin 20. The outer portion of the bracket 21 carries a detachable shield 22 which serves as an adornment for the roof construction and forms no part of the present invention.

FIG. 6 also shows the upper portion of a side wall 24 which supports the transverse frame member 14. The uppermost portion of the side wall 24 consists of a hollow horizontal box-shaped carrier 25 (also called plate) whose top wall is provided with a recess 25a to receive the skirt 140. The wall 24 is a prefabricated body comprising an outer skin 23 which overlies and adheres to the outer side of the carrier 25 and an insulating layer 26 of foamed plastic material or the like. The inner side of this insulating layer is coated with a layer 27 of plaster. It Will be noted that the width of the recess 25a exceeds the thickness of the skirt 14c so that this recess may receive a second skirt, for example, when the side wall 24 constitutes a partition in a prefabricated building. Thus, a second prefabricated roof may be placed end-to-end with the roof of FIG. 6 to have one of its skirts supported by the wall 24. Of course, the bracket 21 is then removed to provide room for a transverse frame member which is placed next to the frame member 14 of FIG. 6. When the recess 25a receives a single skirt, it is shielded from snow, rain or dust by the bracket 21 which is located above the carrier 25 and is sealingly secured to the transverse frame member 14 by the downwardly extending marginal portion 20b of the roof skin 20.

The dimensions of the ceiling panel 20 are selected in such a way that the edges of this panel do not extend all the way to the skirts 11c, 13c, 12c, 140, see FIG. 6. Thus, there is room for theh upper portion of the side Wall 24 whereby the right-hand edge of the panel 20 abuts against the inner side of the plaster layer 27. Depending on its composition, the panel 30 may be glued, welded or otherwise detachably or permanently secured to the connectors 17, i.e., to the horizontal bottom flanges of the connectors.

The skeleton frame 10 of FIG. 1 may be utilized in a number of ways. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, this frame may be placed onto a prefabricated ceiling panel 30 which is assumed to consist of plaster and rests on the upper side of a horizontal table. The dimensions of the panel 30 are smaller than the dimensions of the frame 10. It is clear that the panel 30 may consist of several sections or smaller panels and, if the panel 30 is a composite structure, the connectors 17 are preferably shifted and distributed in such 'a way that they overlie the edges of adjoining sections. As a rule, the edges of adjoining panel sections will be separated by narrow gaps which, if necessary, can be filled in from below when the roof is fully assembled. In order to proper- 1y locate the panel 30 with reference to the frame 10, the workmen may resort to wooden filler beams or battens 31, 32 whose upper sides are provided with recesses 31a, 32a, corresponding to the recess 25a of the carrier 25 and serving to receive the respective skirts 11c, 12c, 13c, 140. The beams 31 are parallel With the transverse frame members 13, 14 and the beams 32 are parallel with the longitudinal frame members 11, 12. The parts 1114, 15 (not shown in FIGS. 4 and 5) 30, 31 and 32 then form a hollow tray-shaped mold which is thereupon filled, or nearly rfilled, with a liquid plastic bonding material containing a suitable blowing agent. After setting, the plastic material forms a foamed layer 33 which is preferaby at least slightly elastic and constitutes an excellent insulator against heat or cold by simultaneously connecting the panel 30 with the remainder of the thus obtained prefabricated roof. Any of the various methods of producing foamed plastic bodies may be used. This layer 33 is of such thickness that it preferably surrounds all of the connectors 17 and also extends above the lower flanges 13a-15a to serve as a rigid and highly reliable support for the ceiling panel 30. In addition, the material of the layer 33 surrounds the connectors 17 which are thereby anchored in selected positions of adjustment and keep the ceiling panel 30 at a requisite distance from the lower flanges 15a of the ceiling joists 15. In other words, when the layer 33 is formed in 'a manner as illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, the connnectors 17 mainly serve as spacer elements or distancing elements to insure that the panel 30 is kept at a requisite distance from the skeleton frame 10. In addition, the connectors 17 perform the important function of preventing non-uniform expension or contraction or a prefabricated roof as Well as to interrupt the socalled cold bridge. The connectors may be severed from a length of extruded plastic material which may be of L-profile as shown in the drawings. T-shaped connectors may be used if desired.

Once the roof is fully assembled, i.e., once the layer 33 h-ardens, the fillers 31, 32 are removed and the resulting structure is ready to be placed onto four side walls 24 in a manner as shown in FIG. 6. However, if the roof is to simply rest on the top faces of four side walls, the fillers 31, 32 are dispensed with and the .panel 30 then extends 'all the way to the skirts 11c, 12c, 13c, 140. The fact that the edges of the panel 30 are not in full sealing engagement with the skirts 11c14c (when the fillers 31, 32 are not used) is of no consequence because the material of the layer 33 normally sets very rapidly so that losses in liquid plastic are negligible.

It goes without saying that the method described in connection with FIGS. 4 and 5 may be modified in a number of ways without departing from the spirit of my invention. Thus, and if one or more frame members 1114 should consist of two or more sections or if a frame member is to be provided with one or more cutouts or other forms of openings through which the liquid plastic would escape during pouring of the layer 33, the operators will resort to differently shaped and/or dimensioned fillers which will temporarily close the openings and are removed as soon as the material of the layer 33 hardens. This layer may but need not extend all the way to the upper flanges of the frame members 11-14, but it should be thick enough to insure that the panel 30 is held with requisite force and that this panel is not likely to curl. If the panel 30 consists of several coplanar sections which are separated by narrow gaps, the material of the layer 33 automatically fills such gaps so that the gaps are sealed and the underside of the panel may be finished with little expenditure in time or material. In other words, the pouring of liquid plastic is tantamount to caulking of a composite ceiling panel.

If the nature of the prefabricated building in such that the prefabricated roof should be provided with a cavity, recess or chamber, the operators will form a suitable insert of wood or the like, and this insert is then placed into the mold prior to pouring of liquid bonding material. Once the material sets to form the layer 33, the insert is removed and the roof is provided with a chamber or recess of desired shape.

The panel may consist of plaster, sheet aluminum, plywood or any other suitable material.

Referring to FIG. 7, there is shown a somewhat modified prefabricated roof structure which again comprises a rectangular skeleton frame including a longitudinal frame member 31 which corresponds to the frame member 11 of FIG. 1. The ceiling joists are shown at 35 and their lower flanges carry connectors 37 and tubular coupling elements 39 to support and/or to locate a ceiling panel Each joist 35 is provided with a single upper T-groove 36 and with a single lower T-groove (not shown), and it will be noted that these grooves are coplanar with the vertical webs of the respective joists. Each groove is provided with one or more cutouts 36b. The T-shaped beads 37a of the connectors 37 extend into the lower groove of the left-hand joist 35 and the lower groove of the right-hand joist 35 receives the beads 39a of a series of aligned tubular connectors 39. Each connector 39 comprises a lower portion 39b of polygonal cross section, e.g., of rectangular cross section, and comprises a horizontal partition 39:: which divides the interior of the respective connector 39 into an upper channel-shaped aperture 39d and a lower channel-shaped aperture 39c. The lower apertures 39s replace the apertures 17c and accommodate one or more cables 38 (shown by phantom lines) or analogous rigid or flexible conductors or conduits. Of course, the upper apertures 39d may also serve to receive one or more cables or conduits; alternatively, all conduits may be led through the apertures 39d and all conductors may be led through the apertures 39c, or vice versa.

A very important advantage of connectors 17, 19, 37 and 39 is that they do not form a continuous connecting body between the joists (and certain frame members) and the ceiling panel. Thus, the rate at which the ceiling panel may exchange heat with the skeleton frame is much less than if each row of connectors were replaced by a continuous length of metallic or plastic material. The fact that the connectors preferably consist of a material which is a poor conductor of heat also contributes to improved heat insulating characteristics of the roof. The material of the layer 33 may be at least slightly elastic so that it yields in response to twisting stresses and will keep the ceiling panel from cracking. The connectors may be made of slightly elastic synthetic plastic material. Since the ceiling panel is insulated from the skeleton frame, it is not likely to accumulate water of condensation when the temperature at the underside of the ceiling plate is much higher than the temperature of the skeleton frame. Furthermore, and since the material of the layer 30 and/or the material of the connectors 17, 19, 37, 39 is preferably at least slightly elastic, the ceiling panel is free to expand or contract with respect to the skeleton frame or vice versa. This is of particular importance when the ceiling panel is made of sheet aluminum and the building in which the prefabricated roof is put to use comprises an overhead heating system which heats the ceiling panel while the skeleton frame is exposed to much colder atmospheric air.

Owing to the fact that the connectors are readily slidable in the respective T-grooves, the skeleton frame may be assembled by welding without any danger that heat which develops in the course of a welding operation would damage or destroy the connectors. Thus, all the operators must do it to shift the connectors v17 far away from the frame member 12 (see FIG. 1) when the front ends of the joists 15 and frame members 13, 14 are welded to the frame member 12. Once the joints are sufficiently cool to avoid destruction of plastic connectors, the latter are shifted in close proximity to the member 12 and the joists 15 and frame members 13, 14 are then welded to the frame member 11. In other words, even if the cutouts 16b, 36b are omitted, so that the connectors must be secured to the respective U-bars and I-bars before the skeleton frame is assembled, the connectors are still protected from damage while the operatOrs proceed to join the ends of the members 13, 14 and joists 15 to the frame members 11, 12. The provision of cutouts 16b, 36b is of particular advantage when the skeleton frame is assembled in a plant and is transported to the locale of actual use where the operators attach as many connectors as are necessary for a prefabricated roof of desired size and/or shape. Connectors 17, 19, 37, 39 may be made of polyvinyl chloride, Bakelite or the like. The liquid used to form layer 33 may by way or conduits. Of course, the upper apertures 39d may cyanates.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the present invention that others can, by applying current knowledge, readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features which fairly constitute essential characteristics of the generic and specific aspects of this invention and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and range of equivalence of the following claims.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse frame members and a plurality of spaced joists disposed between and substantially parallel to one pair of said frame members, said one pair of frame members and said joists having undersides provided with longitudinally extending grooves having enlarged portions spaced from the respective undersides; at least one connector for at least some of said grooves, said connectors being located at a level below said undersides and having enlarged portions extending into and slidable in the enlarged portions of the corresponding grooves; a panel adjacent to said connectors; and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said panel to connect said panel to said skeleton frame.

2. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a metallic skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse U-bars and a plurality of spaced I-bars disposed between and substantially parallel with one pair of said U-bars, said one pair of U-bars and said I-bars comprising substantially horizontal lower flanges located in a common plane and having undersides provided with longitudinally extending T-grooves; at least one profiled connector for at least some of said grooves, said connectors being located at a level below said undersides and having T-shaped beads extending into and slidable in the respective T-grooves; a panel adjacent to said connectors; and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said panel to connect said panel to said skeleton frame.

3. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a metallic skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse U-bars and a plurality of spaced I-bars disposed between and substantially parallel with one pair of said U- bars, said one pair of U-bars and said I-bars comprising substantially horizontal lower flanges located in a common plane and having undersides provided with longitudinally extending T-grooves; at least one profiled connector for at least some of said grooves, said connectors being located at a level below said undersides and having T-shaped beads extending into and slidable in the respective T-grooves, each connector further having a substantially horizontal bottom flange coplanar with the bottom flanges of the other connectors; a ceiling panel adjacent to and located below said bottom flanges and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said panel to connect said panel to said skeleton frame.

4. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a metallic skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse U-bars and a plurality of spaced I-bars disposed between and substantially parallel with one pair of said U-bars, said bars comprising substantially horizontal upper and lower flanges and the lower flanges of said I-bars and said one pair of U-bars being located in a common plane and having undersides provided with longitudinally extending T-grooves, the flanges of each of said U-bars facing the other U-bar of the respective pair; at least one profiled connector for at least some of said grooves, said connectors being located at a level below said undersides and having T-shaped beads extending into and slidable in the respective T-grooves; a panel adjacent to said connectors; and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said panel to connect said panel to said skeleton frame.

5. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a metallic skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse frame members and a plurality of spaced joists disposed between and substantially parallel to one pair of said frame members, said one pair of frame members and said joists having undersides provided with longitudinally extending grooves having enlarged portions spaced from the respective undersides; at least one connector for at least some of said grooves, said connectors being located at a level below said undersides and having enlarged portions extending into and slidable in the enlarged portions of the corresponding grooves, each of said connectors consisting of synthetic plastic material which is a poor conductor of heat; a ceiling panel adjacent to and located below said connectors; and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said ceiling panel to connect said ceiling panel to said frame.

6. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse frame members and a plurality of spaced joists disposed between and substantially parallel to one pair of said frame members, said one pair of frame members and said joists having undersides provided withlongitudinally extending grooves having enlarged portions spaced from the respective undersides; at least one L-shaped connector for at least some of said grooves, said connectors being located at a level below said undersides and comprising vertical flanges having enlarged upper end portions extending into and slidable in the enlarged portions of the corresponding grooves; a ceiling panel adjacent to and located below said connectors; and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said ceiling panel to connect said ceiling panel to said frame.

7. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse frame members and a plurality of spaced ceiling joists disposed between and substantially parallel to one pair of said frame members, said one pair of frame members and said joists having undersides provided with longitudinally extending grooves having enlarged portions spaced from the respective undersides, at least some of said grooves having elongated cutouts of a width at least equal to the width of the respective enlarged portions; at least one connector for at least some of said grooves, said connectors being located at a level below said undersides and having enlarged portions extending into and slidable in the enlarged portions of the corresponding grooves, the length of the enlarged portions of said connectors being less than the length of cutouts in the corresponding grooves so that each connector may be detached once its enlarged portion is accommodated in the cutout of the corresponding groove; a panel adjacent to said connectors and spaced by the connectors from said skeleton frame; and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said panel to connect said panel to said skeleton frame.

8. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse fram members and a plurality of spaced joists disposed between and substantially parallel to one of said frame members, said frame members and said joists having verticle webs and lower flanges disposed in horizontal planes, the lower flanges of said one pair of frame members and of said joists having undersides provided with longitudinally extending T-grooves and each of said frame members having a downwardly extending skirt which is substantially coplanar with the respective web; and at least one connector for at least some of said grooves, said connectors being located at a level below said undersides and having T-shaped beads slidably extending into the corresponding grooves.

9. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a metallic skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse frame members and a plurality of spaced profiled joists disposed between and substantially parallel to one of said frame members, said one pair of frame members and said joists comprising lower flanges having undersides provided with longitudinally extending grooves having enlarged portions spaced from the respective undersides; at least one connector for each of said grooves, said connectors being located at a level below said undersides and having enlarged portions extending into and slidable in the enlarged portions of the corresponding grooves, each lower flange of each of said joists having at least one groove; a panel adjacent to said connectors; and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said panel to connect said panel to said skeleton frame.

10. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a rigid metallic skeleton frame comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse frame members and a plurality of spaced profiled joists disposed between and substantially parallel with one pair of said frame members, said one pair of frame members and each of said joists having upper and lower flanges and said flanges respectively having upper sides and undersides provided with longitudinally extending grooves, each of said grooves having an enlarged portion spaced from the respective side; at least one connector provided for at least some of said grooves, said connectors having enlarged portions extending into and slidable in the enlarged portions of the corresponding grooves; a panel adjacent to said connectors; and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said panel to connect said panel to said skeleton frame.

11. In a prefabricated roof, in combination, a skeleton frame having an upper side and an underside and comprising pairs of longitudinal and transverse frame members and a plurality of spaced joists disposed between and substantially parallel to one pair of said frame members, said joists and said one pair of frame members having flanges adjacent to one of said sides and said flanges being provided with longitudinally extending grooves having enlarged portions spaced from said one side of the frame; a plurality of connectors for at least some of said grooves, each connector being adjacent to said one side of the frame and having an enlarged portion extending into and slidable in the enlarged portion of the respective groove; 21 panel adjacent to said connectors and spaced by the connectors from said skeleton frame; and a layer of adherent foamed plastic material surrounding said connectors and adhering to said panel to connect said panel to said skeleton frame.

12. A structure as set forth in claim 11, wherein said panel and said connectors are provided with cooperating means for attaching the panel to said connectors.

13. A structure as set forth in claim 12, wherein said panel is a roof skin and is located above the upper side of said frame.

14. A prefabricated roof comprising, in combination, a skeleton frame having an upper side and an under side; a plurality of connector means arranged spaced from each other and projecting from one side of said skeleton 11- frame, said connector means having free end portions spaced from said skeleton frame; a panel adjacent to said free end portions of said connector means so as to be spaced from said skeleton frame; and a layer of adherent foam plastic material adhering to said connector means and to said panel so as to connect the panel to said skeleton frame without direct contact between said skeleton frame and said panel.

15. A prefabricated roof according to claim 14, wherein said connector means project downwardly from said underside of said skeleton frame and said panel is a ceiling panel located adjacent to the free end portions of said downwardly projecting connector means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,586,053 5/1926 Snyder 52-729 2,059,483 11/1936 Parsons 52-489 2,804,954 9/1957 Gillespie 52656 X FOREIGN PATENTS 1,276,745 11/1961 France.

567,163 1/1945 Great Britain.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

R. S. VERMUT, Assistant Examiner.

Citas de patentes
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FR1276745A * Título no disponible
GB567163A * Título no disponible
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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.52/309.5, 52/220.1, 52/309.7, 52/11, 52/656.1, 52/802.1, 52/837, 52/393, 264/46.4, 52/309.11, 52/145, 264/263
Clasificación internacionalE04F15/024, E04C3/06, E04B5/10, E04D13/15, E04B7/00, E04C2/42, E04B5/02, E04B9/30, E04D13/064
Clasificación cooperativaE04D13/15, E04B7/00, E04B9/30
Clasificación europeaE04C2/50, E04B7/00, E04D13/15, E04B9/30