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Número de publicaciónUS3347735 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación17 Oct 1967
Fecha de presentación2 Nov 1964
Número de publicaciónUS 3347735 A, US 3347735A, US-A-3347735, US3347735 A, US3347735A
InventoresAra T. Dildilian
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Double backed pile carpets of glass-plastic backings
US 3347735 A
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Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

Oct. 17, 1967 A. T. DILDILIAN 3,347,735

DOUBLE BACKED FILE CARPETS OF GLASS-PLASTIC BACKINGS Filed Nov. 2, 1964 Polypropylene Gloss Polypropylene Glass Glass Polypropylene INVENTOR. ARA T. DILDILIAN 4 ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,347,735 DOUBLE BACKED PILE CARPETS 0F GLASS-PLASTIC BACKINGS Ara T. Dildilian, Fonda, N.Y., assignor to Fiber Glass Industries, Inc., Amsterdam, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Nov. 2, 1964, Ser. No. 408,208 4 Claims. (Cl. 161-66) This invention consists in a novel tufted pile fabric, particularly in carpeting composed of a backing through which pile yarns have been tufted.

A recent improvement in the construction of tufted pile fabrics has been the use of a backing formed of woven strands of synthetic plastic ribbons or yarns, in place of jute and similar natural yarns theretofore used. The synthetic yarns are far more uniform and provide for a more uniform pile pattern. They are also capable of being Woven so closely spaced together that there are substantially no interstices between them, and accordingly provide better anchorage for the piles.

Synthetic yarns are however somewhat elastic, and also possess a plastic memory, which makes carpets formed on them relatively unstable dimensionally in that stresses created during the manufacturing process can relax over a period of time. Heretofore, efforts to overcome stress relieving relaxation has involved tentering and heat treatment operations aimed at removing trapped strains. However, it is still common for such carpeting to either shrink or expand by as much as /2 to 'l% under the stresses of manufacturing. Such a carpeting will not be dimensionally stable in service and will require power stretching and tacking down.

I have now discovered that a dimensionally stable carpet having all the advantages of a synthetic yarn backing can be produced by forming the carpet initially on a primary backing and then adhesively applying a secondary backing. The two backings in combination provide synthetic strands which securely hold the pile, and also provide a crossed array of fiber glass strands which may also hold the piles and additionally serve to render the carpet substantially incapable of stretching or shrinkmg.

Preferably, the synthetic strands are polypropylene, but others known to the art are also satisfactory, as pointed out by Rhodes US. Patent No. 3,110,905. The primary backing may be formed entirely of synthetic plastic yarns or ribbons, in which case the secondary backing will consist entirely of fiber glass yarns.

Alternatively, both the primary and secondary backings may consist of synthetic plastic yarns in one direction only, and have fiber glass yarns only in the other direction, and be combined in the carpet so that the fiber glass yarns in the secondary backing are at right angles to the fiber glass yarns in the primary backing.

In this construction it is preferable in the primary backing to have the fiber glass yarns in the warp so that the synthetic yarns which form the fill are not stretched during the weaving operation. The Warp may be entirely of fiber glass yarn or a mixture of fiber glass and other synthetics.

Suitable yarns from which the primary and secondary backings are constructed are described in the pending application of Dildilian and Nicholas, Serial No. 360,523, filed April 17, 1964 (fiber glass) and in the above identified Rhodes Patent No. 3,110,905 (synthetic plastic). Both the fiber glass and synthetic strands may be either continuous filament yarns or staple yarns, or a mixture of the two, and all or part of the synthetic strands may also be in the form of ribbons.

Carpet constructions embodying this invention are shown in the accompanying drawings in which:

3,347,735 Patented Oct. 17, 1967 backing consisting entirely of polypropylene strands. In

a preferred embodiment the strands are in the form of 1080 denier ribbons, which may be between li and inch in width of polypropylene.

The piles may be of any conventional natural or synthetic material; their nature does not per se form any part of this invention.

After the piles have been tufted to the backing an adhesive is applied to the back side and the secondary backing consisting entirely of interwoven fiber glass strands is applied. Typically, this fabric will be made out of 18 warp strands per inch, each having four hundred K filaments, and 9 fill strands per inch, each having 800 K filaments.

Any suitable adhesive may be employed to bond the secondary backing, e.g., a latex of polyvinyl acetate, or polybutadiene-styrene.

The construction illustrated in FIG. 2 is made in the same manner as that illustrated in FIG. I and described above, and differs only in that the primary backing is composed of fiber glass warp strands, e.g., l8 strands per inch each having 400 K filaments, and polypropylene fill strands, e.g., 6 double ends per inch, each in the form of a 1080 denier ribbon, about A inch wide and 0.002 inch thick, formed of polypropylene.

The secondary backing in the construction of FIG. 2 is formed of synthetic warp strands and fiber glass fill strands and is applied with the fiber glass fill strands running at right angles to the fiber glass Warp strands of the primary backing.

Inasmuch as the dimensional stability of the carpet construction of this invention largely depends on the presence of fiber glass strands in both longitudinal and transverse directions, it is also contemplated that each backing may have both synthetic and fiber glass in either direction, so long as one or both together provide fiber glass strands in both directions. For instance, the primary backing may very advantageously consist of warp strands of both fiber glass and polypropylene, arranged alternately, and polypropylene fill strands, and the secondary backing may then consist of polypropylene warp strands and fill strands of both fiber glass and polypropylene.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that this invention provides a carpet construction which substantially incorporates the advantages of a carpet construction featuring a backing of synthetic plastic strands while avoiding substantially entirely the disadvantageous dimensional instability characteristic of such carpet construction.

Having thus disclosed my invention and described in detail preferred embodiments thereof, I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. A tufted pile fabric comprising a primary backing woven of strands of a synthetic plastic in one direction and strands of glass in the other direction, pile projections piercing said primary backing, and a secondary backing woven of strands of glass in one direction and strands of a synthetic plastic in the other direction adhesively secured to the back nonpile side of said primary backing, the fiber glass strands in the primary backing and secondary backing being at right angles to each other, said fiber glass strands rendering the fabric substantially incapable of stretching or shrinking.

2. A tufted pile fabric comprising a primary backing Woven of strands of polyprepylene in one direction and strands of glass in the other direction, pile projections piercing said primary backing, and a secondary backing woven of strands of glass in one direction and strands of polypropylene in the other direction adhesively secured to the back nonpile side, the fiber glass strands in the primary backing and secondary backing being at right angles to each other, said fiber glass strands rendering the fabric substantially incapable of stretching or shrink- 3. A tufted pile fabric comprising a primary Woven backing having strands of a synthetic plastic in the fill direction and strands of glass in the warp direction, pile projections piercing said primary backing, and a secondary Woven backing having strands of glass in the fill direction and strands of a synthetic plastic in the Warp direction adhesively secured to the back nonpile side of the primary backing, the fiber glass strands in the primary backing and secondary backing being at right angles to each other, said fiber glass strands rendering the fabric substantially incapable of stretching or shrinking.

4. A tufted pile fabric comprising a primary woven backing having strands of a synthetic plastic in the fill direction and strands of both synthetic plastic and glass in the Warp direction, pile projections piercing said primary backing, and a secondary woven backing having strands of glass in the fill direction and strands of synthetic plastic in the warp direction adhesively secured to the back nonpile side with the Warp directions parallel, said fiber glass strands rendering the fabric substantially incapable of stretching or shrinking.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,539,301 1/1951 Foster 161 2,983,028 5/1961 Cole 161-67 XR 3,110,905 11/1963 Rhodes 161-62 XR 3,238,595 3/1966 Schwartz et a1. 3,309,259 3/1967 Schwartz 16167 MORRIS SUSSMAN, Primary Examiner. ALEXANDER WYMAN, Examiner.

R. H. CRISS, Assistant Examiner.

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.428/95, 428/96, 112/410
Clasificación internacionalD05C17/02, D03D15/00
Clasificación cooperativaD03D15/00, D10B2321/022, D03D15/08, D03D2700/0137, D05C17/02, D10B2401/061, D10B2101/06, D03D27/00, D10B2503/041, D03D15/0088, D03D15/0011
Clasificación europeaD03D15/00, D03D15/00B, D03D27/00, D03D15/00O2, D03D15/08, D05C17/02