Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS3368881 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación13 Feb 1968
Fecha de presentación12 Abr 1965
Fecha de prioridad12 Abr 1965
Número de publicaciónUS 3368881 A, US 3368881A, US-A-3368881, US3368881 A, US3368881A
InventoresKaufmann Albert R, Stanley Abkowitz, Wolff Alan K
Cesionario originalNuclear Metals Division Of Tex
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Titanium bi-alloy composites and manufacture thereof
US 3368881 A
Resumen  disponible en
Imágenes(3)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

I I F 3, 1968 s. ABKOWITZ ETAL TITANIUM BI-ALLOY COMPOSITES AND MANUFACTURE THEREOF I 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 12, 1965 Y-Alloy Ti-ZO Cb 7.5 AI,

Y m. MA .6 X T F O 0 w w 8 6 m o. x 5 8 2 :5

Tesr Tempermure INVENTORS.

STANLEY ABKOWITZ ALBERT R. KAUFMANN &

BY ALAN K. WOLFF 6 51524414, W

ATTORNEYS Feb. 13, 1968 owrrz ETAL- 3,368,881

' TITANIUM BI-ALLOY COMPOSITES AND MANUFACTURE THEREOF Filed April 12, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 IBOIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Y-AHoy Ti-2O Cb-7.5 Al

loo

Offse? Yieid STrengfh m 0 200 400 600 800 I000 I200 I400 I600 Tesr Tempercnure F Fig. 2

1 INVENTORS. v STANLEY ABKOWITZ.

ALBERT R. KAUFMANN & BY ALAN K. WOLFF ATTORNEYS Mass.

Filed Apr. 12, 1965, Ser. No. 447,119 3 Claims. (Cl. 29192) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A composite of at least two titanium base alloy components, for example, two-thirds by weight of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy component, and one-third of a Ti-20Cb- 7.5Al alloy component, in which the Ti-6Al-4V alloy component is ductile at room temperature and drops off rapidly in strength as its temperature is increased above 900 F., in which the Ti-20Cb-7.5Al alloy component is brittle at room temperature but has high strength at 1200 F and in which the composite is characterized by having a desired combination of a high strength property at 1200 F. originating from one component and a ductile property originating from the other component.

The invention relates to titanium base bi-alloy composites mill products and their manufacture, and more particularly to composites of a plurality of different alloys of the same base metal wherein each alloy in the composite has one or more desired properties but is deficient at least in one other property exhibited by another alloy in the composite, thus providing a product having a 'desired combination of properties heretofore unknown or unobtainable in any known alloy of such base metal.

For example, developments and uses of titanium alloys and mill products for some time have been limited in attempts to obtain a titanium base metal mill product having ductility and also having high temperature strength at, say, 1200= F. equivalent to that presently obtainable in ductile titanium alloys at 900 F. The lack of such a product practically has imposed a 900 F.l000 F. elevated temperature limitation on the use of titanium alloys.

Known titanium alloys have desired ductility but are deficient in elevated temperature strength, such for example as the Ti-6Al-4V alloy which has desired ductility but its strength at 900 F. drops off rapidly as its temperature is increased above 900 F. Other known titanium alloys have desired strength characteristics at 1200 F. but are brittle.

Thus, a problem has existed in the art of how to overcome the 900 F.l000 F. elevated temperature limitation on the practical use of titanium alloys.

We have discovered a solution to this problem which eliminates the 900 F.-1000 F. limitation imposed on the use of titanium alloys and satisfies the existing need for a titanium base mill product which is ductile and has high temperature strength at, say, 1200 F. equivalent to that now obtained in ductile titanium alloys at 900 F. but whose strength drops off rapidly when heated above such temperature.

In accordance with the invention two or more different titanium alloys, each having one or more of the desired properties, are converted separately to high purity powder form and then are blended in the desired proportions to obtain the desired combination of properties. The mixed particles then are heated, compacted and consolidated by plastic deformation reduction and working to the necessary extent or degree to produce a wrought mill bi-alloy composite product. During the heating and hot working nited States Patent the temperature is controlled such as to avoid or minimize substantial or harmful diffusion of any one of the component alloys into another.

Another facet of the problem involves the necessity on the one hand of maintaining the identity of each alloy component of the composite (so as .to retain the desired property or properties of each component), and on the other hand of securing a necessary bond between the particles of each of the components without interditfusion or alloying of the components with one another.

This, in accordance with the invention, is accomplished by preparing the components of the composite to be made in but not limited to the manner set forth in the Kaufmann Patent No. 3,099,041 for Method and Apparatus for Making Powder. By these means and procedures suitably fine, uncontaminated particles of the component alloys may be prepared for mixing. Suitable interface bonding between the particles of the components cannot be obtained unless the particles are clean, that is free of contamination as by oxidation. On the'other hand preparation of the particles of the components by prior grinding or attrition procedures results in oxidation contamination which would prevent bonding the component particles without diffusion.

Accordingly, it is a fundamental object of the present invention to provide new titanium bi-alloy composites having a new combination of propertiesductility and strength at 1200 F. equivalent to that known in ductile titanium alloys only at 900 F., to thereby eliminate the present 900 F .l000 F. elevated temperature limitation existing in the practical use of titanium alloys.

Furthermore, it is an object of the present invention to provide a new procedure for making as wrought mill products the new titanium bi-alloy composites described.

Also, it is an object of the present invention to provide a new concept of a metal and metal composite formed of components which would alloy with one another if melted together or if diffusion were permitted, but in which no interalloying exists and the identities of the components in the composite are retained to the extent that desired properties or characteristics of each component are present in the composite.

Furthermore, it is an object of the present invention to provide new bi-alloy composites in which the degree in which a desired property is present in the composite may be predicted reasonably in accordance with the arithmetic proportion of the component from which the property is derived is present in the composite.

Finally, it is an object of the present invention to provide new bi-alloy composites and procedures for making such products which have the indicated advantages, characteristics, properties, etc., which solve problems and satisfy needs existing in the art, which provide a new and heretofore unknown combination of properties, and which eliminate difiiculties heretofore encountered in the art and obtain the new results indicated.

These and other objects and advantages apparent to those skilled in the art from the following description and claims may be obtained, the stated results achieved, and the described difficulties overcome by the concepts, dis-- coveries, principles, procedures, methods, steps, compositions, composites, products and combined properties which comprise the present invention, the nature of which is set forth in the following general statements, preferred embodiments of whichillustrative of the best modes in which applicants have contemplated applying the principles-are set forth in the following description and illustrated in the drawings, and which are particularly and distinctly pointed out and set forth in the appended claims forming part hereof.

The nature of the concepts and discoveries of the present invention relating to wrought titanium base mill products may be stated in general terms as comprising a wrought titanium base bi-alloy composite mill product having ductility of about 9% room temperature elongation and 0.2% offset yield strength of about 50,000 p.s.i. and ultimate strength of about 69,000 p.s.i. at 1200 F. and containing one alloy component which is brittle at room temperature and another which has 60,000 p.s.i. yield strength at 1000 F. and only 25,000 p.s.i. yield strength at 1200 F.

The nature of the concepts and discoveries of the present invention from another aspect relating to 'bi-alloy composites may be stated in general terms as comprising a composite formed by a plurality of different alloys of the same base metal which upon heating together to melting or diffusion temperature will alloy with or diffuse into one another; which are bonded together but free of diffusion to an extent that characteristic properties of one or more of the component alloys deficient in at least one other alloy component are present in the composite, to

the extent that each component alloy retains its identity in the composite, and to the extent that the composite is characterized by absence of deficient properties of its components; and in which the strength of the composite may be calculated as being at least equal to the arithmetic means of the relative volume percents of the components involved.

The nature of the concepts and discoveries of the present invention relating to procedures for manufacturing .bi-alloy composites of the characteristic described may be stated in general terms as including the steps of providing commercially pure alloys of the same metal which alloys are to form components of the composite desired; separately converting said commercially pure alloys to suitably fine uncontaminated particle form in the manner set forth in Patent No. 3,099,041; blending the separate alloy particles in the desired proportions to obtain the desired properties in the composite to be formed; heating, compacting and consolidating by plastic deformation, reduction and working the uncontaminated blended particles preferably at least to to 1 area reduction to produce a ductile wrought mill bi-alloy composite product; and controlling the temperature of the alloy components during heating and hot working to a temperature 'below that at which harmful diffusion of the components with one another can occur.

By way of example, characteristics of the improved bialloy composites of the present invention are shown in the accompanying drawings forming part hereof in which:

FIGURES 1 and 2 are graphs showing the room and elevated temperature tensile properties of one example of a bi-alloy composite of the present invention as well as comparative properties of the component alloys; and

FIGS. 3, 4, 5, and 6 are reproductions of a photograph and photomicrographs of the new bi-alloy composite.

Similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the various figures of the drawings.

In accordance with the invention and illustrative of the new concepts, two titanium alloys are employed as components of the resultant bi-alloy composite formed, in which the two alloys are compositionally and physically similar but represent two extremes of mechanical properties as a function of temperature. For example the alloys may be a Ti-6Al-4V alloy and a Ti-Cb-7.5Al alloy.

The term Ti-6Al-4V is an accepted mode of expression in the art identifying a titanium base alloy containing 6% aluminum and 4% vanadium by weight. Similarly, the term Ti-20Cb-7.5Al identifies a titanium base alloy containing 20% columbium and 7.5% aluminum by weight. Similarly, the term Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V used below identifies a titanium base alloy containing 8% aluminum, 1% molybdenum and 1% vanadium by weight.

The Ti-6Al-4V alloy is a ductile titanium alloy but its strength, though about 75,000 p.s.i. yield strength at 900 F., drops off rapidly as temperature is increased (FIG. 2). This alloy, which may be termed the X alloy, is intended to serve as the matrix of the composite.

The Ti-20Cb-7.5Al alloy is a high temperature, high strength alloy having limited low temperature formability and ductility. It may be termed the Y alloy and supplies the high temperature strength to the composite.

The X and Y alloys in commercial rod or ingot form, such as 1%" rods of the X-alloy and 3" ingots of triple consumable arc melted Y-alloy material, are machined to form consumable electrodes for the manufacture of high purity or uncontaminated powders or particles of the X and Y alloys in the manner set forth in Patent No. 3,099,041. The high purity particles so produced may be termed fine, shot particles. These shot particles of the X and Y alloys are then blended in the desired ratio, for example, two parts of the X-alloy to one part of the Y- alloy by weight. Based on density measurements, this represents a volume percent of about 68% Ti-6Al-4V and 32% Ti-20Cb-7.5Al.

The blended shot particles are then compacted in a mild steel can, which is evacuated in a usual manner at 900 F. and then the can and compacted blended material therein is extruded through a 10:1 reduction ratio at about 1600 F. to produce, say, a /2 rod of the composite material.

Metallographic examination indicates that both phases or alloys undergo (see FIGS. .3 and 4 for lateral and longitudinal photomicrographs at 50X) good uniform reduction under the described fabrication conditions and resulted in a fully densified rod with well bonded interfaces between the particles of the two component alloys with no harmful interparticle diffusion.

The importance of the preparation of the particles or powders of the alloy components by the shotting procedures indicated, is again stressed. This enables high purity powder to be provided. Oxide coatings on the particle surfaces of either the X or Y alloys would cause poor interparticle bonds.

Further, since each of the X and Y alloys are exceptionally sluggish in diffusion reaction at temperatures as high as 1600 F., the lack of any harmful diffusion when hot working the blended particles at 1600 F. to obtain the interface bond is evident.

It is believed that a number of factors contribute to the formation of a strong, nonbrittle interface bond between the particles of the component X and Y alloys. The alloys are compatible, being alloys of the same base metaltitaniumand each including aluminum as an alloying element. In addition these metal alloys permit a metal-to-metal bond to occur. Next, the similarity of the alloy systems seems to contribute to the high degree of physical compatibility between the two alloys. Also, the particular compositions of the Xand Y alloys minimize the possibility of any brittle interface formation or any localized embrittlement in the matrix of either component alloy due to diffusion.

At this point, comment is warranted regarding the use of the term composite herein. This term has been used in the prior art in connection with combining a metal and a ceramic, or a metal and a compound, or two metals which do not alloy one with another. Such prior art composites are of a different character than the composite characterizing the concept of the invention.

In the present instance the component X and Y alloys if melted together or if permitted to diffuse would form a new alloy such as a Ti-Al-Cb-V alloy which would not have any outstanding properties. In such resultant alloy the identity of the component X and Y alloys of titanium would be lost. That is to say, that the composites of the present invention are composites of alloys of the same base metal in which the identity and favorable properties of each component survive in the composite.

As stated, this is achieved in part by hot working at a temperature lower than the conventional Working temperatures for titanium and its alloys in order to minimize difiusion. For example, the normal extrusion temperature for titanium is about 1800 F., yet in preparing the bialloy composites of the present invention, an extrusion temperature of about 1600 F. is used.

The longitudinal tensile test samples from which the photomicrographs (FIGS. 3, 4 and 5) were made, were annealed at 1500 F. to insure the removal of any residual cold work, at least in the X-alloy component. In FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 the white areas are the X-alloy ductile material component and the dark areas are the Y-alloy high temperature strength material component of the composite product.

The tensile samples were tested at room temperature, 1000 F. and 1200 F. The results are tabulated below in Table I which also lists representative tensile values for the individual components. Also shown in Table I are calculated values based on an arithmetic mean for relative volume percents of the two components. Strength data also is shown graphically in FIGS. 1 and 2.

TABLE I any discrete interface between the components, indicating that a small, though not harmful, amount of diffusion had occurred and that a good metallurgical bond was achieved.

During elevated temperature testing, several small cracks were generated in the surfaces of the tensiles as shown in FIG. 6 which is taken at five magnifications. Subsequent sectioning did not reveal any sub-surface cracking. The fact that ,these cracks shown in FIG. 6 did not propagate to cause rapid failure is believed to be due to the presence of the X-alloy which acted as a crackarrestor. This appears to be confirmed by the showing of FIG. 5 (250 magnifications). The section shown is slightly below the surface of the tensile sample and indicates that the crack (the black transverse pod shape) initiated in the Y-alloy, the darker component, with its progress being arrested in the more plastic adjacent X-alloy material. Such resistance to crack propagation suggests the possibility of improved impact strength for the bi-alloy composite.

Tensile properties of bi-alloy composite 68% Ti-6A1-4V plus 32% Ti-200b-7.5A1by volume Property Test Temp. T1-6Al-4V Ti-Cb-7.5Al Bi-Alloy Calculated X-Alloy Y-Alloy Composite Values Ultimate Tensile Strength (p.s.i.) Room Temp--- 135, 000 177,000 155, 600 145, 000 1,000 F 75, 000 144, 000 107, 500 97, 000 1,200 F 40, 000 136, 000 68, 200 71, 000 0.2% Offset Yield Stress (p.s.i.) Room Temp- 125, 000 177, 000 147, 100 137, 700 60, 000 132, 000 91, 500 83, 000 l,200 F 30, 000 124, 000 49, 800 60, 000 Percent Elong Room Temp 15 0-2 9. 1 10 1,000 F 6 7. 7 22 1,200 F 30 11 16. 2 24 Analyzing these data indicates that the bi-alloy composite not only has developed strengths equal to the arithmetic mean of the components involved but at lower temperatures actually has exceeded calculated values. This discovery is important since it indicates that approximate strength values of composites of the character comprehended may be calculated in advance in order to determine the proportions of the materials to be blended to achieve particular desired strength levels.

The explanation of why the actual'strength values exceed the calculated values is not entirely clear. It is possible that the preparation of the particles by the shotting procedure indicated to produce high purity uncontaminated material may have a beneficial effect on the strength of the individual component alloys. If such is the case calculated values based on properties of material produced by common processing procedures would be too low.

The fact that the calculated values are slightly higher than actual values for the bi-alloy composite at 1200' F. is probably due, at least in part, to the use of excessively high values for the strength of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy at 1200 F. There is no known data available for this alloy at this temperature, the values being extrapolated as shown by the dotted line portions of the graphs for the X-alloy in FIGS. 1 and 2.

Regardless of the explanation it is clear that substantial gains have been made over the tensile properties of the X-alloy while maintaining reasonable room temperature ductility and adequate formability at moderate temperatures.

Metallographic examination of the fractured tensile samples revealed that the two components were well blended as shown in the transverse and longitudinal sections of FIGS. 3 and 4, respectively. It is of special interest to note in FIG. 4 that the Y-alloy (Ti-20Cb-7.5Al), the darker component, underwent a substantial amount of deformation during extrusion despite its greater stifiness. Examination at high magnifications did not reveal for the particular alloys discussed. For example, the Ti-8Al-lMo-1V alloy may replace the Ti-6Al-4V alloy as the X-alloy for forming the ductile matrix component of the composite to be made. The Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V has a higher high temperature operating range and should impart slightly higher high temperature strengths to the composite. The ductile component of the composite it is believed should always be present in a substantial amount to insure reasonable ductility. Thus, it is desirable that its mechanical properties, with respect to temperature, should be maximized to achieve a composite having the highest high temperature strength or high strength at the highest possible temperature.

In selecting a high temperature alloy for the Y-alloy, requirements for compatibility with the X-alloy used are important. Thus, the Y-alloy should have good high temperature strength and stability at temperatures up to 1200 F. It should have alloying elements which do not form brittle intermetallios with the X-alloy used. It should have substitutional alpha stabilizing additions which do not exceed the thermal instability level of either component. It should have a density which does not greatly exceed that of titanium and thermal coefficients which do not differ substantially from those of the X-alloy used. It must have some degree of castability, machineability or other type of formability which permits fabrication into an electrode for preparing the shot particles. It must have a minimal degree of room temperature ductility at least sufiicient to prevent premature failure under stress. The

Furthermore, other titanium alloys may be substituted Ti-20Cb-7.5Al alloy satisfies all of these requirements for use in making a bi-alloy composite with the Ti-8Al-lMo-1V alloy.

Also the composite to be formed need not necessarily be limited to two alloy components since a plurality of alloys of the same base metal, each of which have one or more properties desired to be established in the composite to supply or mask a deficiency in such property in the other components, are contemplated. Thus, in using the term bi-alloy composite herein, the term is intended to include a composite containing more than one component and is not limited to a composite containing only two components. The essential is that the composite provide a combination of properties derived from the components not present in combination in any one component nor in an alloy or diffusion of the components.

Finally the concept includes bi-alloy composites of a plurality of alloys of the same base metal without being limited necessarily to alloys of titanium, since the principles of the invention can be realized with alloys of other base metals.

The new products and procedures of the invention, accordingly provide for the manufacture of titanium base mill products having a combination of properties heretofore unknown in the art; provide for overcoming the existing 900 FH1000 F. elevated temperature limitation on the practical use of titanium alloys; provide new composite products having the advantages, characteristics, properties, combination of properties and uses indicated; solve problems and satisfy needs existing in the art; eliminate difliculties heretofore encountered in the art; and obtain the new results described in a simple manner.

In the foregoing description certain terms have been used for brevity, clearness and understanding; but no unnecessary limitations are to be implied therefrom beyond the requirements of the prior art, because such terms are used for descriptive purposes herein and are intended to be broadly construed.

Moreover, the description and illustration of the invention and the new procedure and products are by way of example and the scope of the invention is not limited to exact details described, because various products may be made without departing from the fundamental concepts and principles of the invention.

Having now described the features, concepts, discoveries and principles of the invention, the characteristics,

properties and manufacture of the new bi-alloy composite wrought mill products, and the advantageous, new and useful results obtained; the new concepts, discoveries, principles, procedures, methods, steps, compositions, composites, products and combined products characterizing properties, and mechanical equivalents obvious to those skilled in the art are set forth in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A wrought mill product composite consisting twothirds by weight of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy component, and one-third of a Ii-20Cb-7.5Al alloy components; in which said alloy components comprise blended, high-purity, shot-formed particles consolidated by plastic deformation with a metallurgical interparticle bond; in which the composite has ductility of about 9% room temperature elongation, and 0.2% offset yield strength of about 50,000 p.s.i. and ultimate strength of about 69,000 p.s.i. at 1200 F.; in which the Ti-6Al-4V alloy component has only 25,000 p.s.i. yield strength at 1200 F.; and in which the Ti-20Cb-7.5Al alloy component is brittle at room temperature.

2. A wrought mill product composite consisting twothirds by weight of a titanium base alloy first component selected from the group consisting of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy and a Ti-8Al-lMo-1V alloy, and one-third of a Ti-20Cb- 7.5Al alloy second component; in which said alloy components comprise blended, high-purity, shot-formed particles consolidated by plastic deformation with a metallurgical interparticle bond.

3. A wrought mill product composite as defined in claim 2 in which the first component is ductile at room temperature and has only 25,000 p.s.i. yield strength at 1200 F.; in which the second component is brittle at room temperature; and in which the mill product composite has ductility of about 9% room temperature elongation, and 0.2% offset yield strength of about 50,000 p.s.i. and ultimate strength of about 69,000 p.s.i. at 1200 F.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,220,808 11/1965 Davies 29l98 3,235,346 2/1966 Hucke 29l9l.2 3,293,006 12/1966 Bartz 29182 HY LAND BIZOT, Primary Examiner.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3220808 *28 Jun 196330 Nov 1965Bristol Siddeley Engines LtdAlloys
US3235346 *22 Nov 196015 Feb 1966Valley Co IncComposite bodies comprising a continuous framework and an impregnated metallic material and methods of their production
US3293006 *9 Mar 196120 Dic 1966Bliss E W CoPowdered copper metal part and method of manufacture thereof
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3527044 *20 May 19688 Sep 1970Milton A NationInertial concept for cable dynamics
US751332016 Dic 20047 Abr 2009Tdy Industries, Inc.Cemented carbide inserts for earth-boring bits
US75971599 Sep 20056 Oct 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedDrill bits and drilling tools including abrasive wear-resistant materials
US768715618 Ago 200530 Mar 2010Tdy Industries, Inc.Composite cutting inserts and methods of making the same
US770355530 Ago 200627 Abr 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedDrilling tools having hardfacing with nickel-based matrix materials and hard particles
US77035564 Jun 200827 Abr 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of attaching a shank to a body of an earth-boring tool including a load-bearing joint and tools formed by such methods
US777528712 Dic 200617 Ago 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of attaching a shank to a body of an earth-boring drilling tool, and tools formed by such methods
US777625610 Nov 200517 Ago 2010Baker Huges IncorporatedEarth-boring rotary drill bits and methods of manufacturing earth-boring rotary drill bits having particle-matrix composite bit bodies
US77845676 Nov 200631 Ago 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring rotary drill bits including bit bodies comprising reinforced titanium or titanium-based alloy matrix materials, and methods for forming such bits
US780249510 Nov 200528 Sep 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming earth-boring rotary drill bits
US784125927 Dic 200630 Nov 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming bit bodies
US784655116 Mar 20077 Dic 2010Tdy Industries, Inc.Composite articles
US791377929 Sep 200629 Mar 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring rotary drill bits including bit bodies having boron carbide particles in aluminum or aluminum-based alloy matrix materials, and methods for forming such bits
US795456928 Abr 20057 Jun 2011Tdy Industries, Inc.Earth-boring bits
US799735927 Sep 200716 Ago 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedAbrasive wear-resistant hardfacing materials, drill bits and drilling tools including abrasive wear-resistant hardfacing materials
US800205227 Jun 200723 Ago 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedParticle-matrix composite drill bits with hardfacing
US800771420 Feb 200830 Ago 2011Tdy Industries, Inc.Earth-boring bits
US800792225 Oct 200730 Ago 2011Tdy Industries, IncArticles having improved resistance to thermal cracking
US802511222 Ago 200827 Sep 2011Tdy Industries, Inc.Earth-boring bits and other parts including cemented carbide
US80747503 Sep 201013 Dic 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring tools comprising silicon carbide composite materials, and methods of forming same
US808732420 Abr 20103 Ene 2012Tdy Industries, Inc.Cast cones and other components for earth-boring tools and related methods
US810455028 Sep 200731 Ene 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods for applying wear-resistant material to exterior surfaces of earth-boring tools and resulting structures
US81378164 Ago 201020 Mar 2012Tdy Industries, Inc.Composite articles
US817291415 Ago 20088 May 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedInfiltration of hard particles with molten liquid binders including melting point reducing constituents, and methods of casting bodies of earth-boring tools
US817681227 Ago 201015 May 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming bodies of earth-boring tools
US82016105 Jun 200919 Jun 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods for manufacturing downhole tools and downhole tool parts
US82215172 Jun 200917 Jul 2012TDY Industries, LLCCemented carbide—metallic alloy composites
US822588611 Ago 201124 Jul 2012TDY Industries, LLCEarth-boring bits and other parts including cemented carbide
US82307627 Feb 201131 Jul 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming earth-boring rotary drill bits including bit bodies having boron carbide particles in aluminum or aluminum-based alloy matrix materials
US82616329 Jul 200811 Sep 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming earth-boring drill bits
US827281612 May 200925 Sep 2012TDY Industries, LLCComposite cemented carbide rotary cutting tools and rotary cutting tool blanks
US830809614 Jul 200913 Nov 2012TDY Industries, LLCReinforced roll and method of making same
US830901830 Jun 201013 Nov 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring rotary drill bits and methods of manufacturing earth-boring rotary drill bits having particle-matrix composite bit bodies
US831294120 Abr 200720 Nov 2012TDY Industries, LLCModular fixed cutter earth-boring bits, modular fixed cutter earth-boring bit bodies, and related methods
US831789310 Jun 201127 Nov 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedDownhole tool parts and compositions thereof
US831806324 Oct 200627 Nov 2012TDY Industries, LLCInjection molding fabrication method
US832246522 Ago 20084 Dic 2012TDY Industries, LLCEarth-boring bit parts including hybrid cemented carbides and methods of making the same
US83887238 Feb 20105 Mar 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedAbrasive wear-resistant materials, methods for applying such materials to earth-boring tools, and methods of securing a cutting element to an earth-boring tool using such materials
US84030801 Dic 201126 Mar 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring tools and components thereof including material having hard phase in a metallic binder, and metallic binder compositions for use in forming such tools and components
US84593808 Jun 201211 Jun 2013TDY Industries, LLCEarth-boring bits and other parts including cemented carbide
US846481410 Jun 201118 Jun 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems for manufacturing downhole tools and downhole tool parts
US849067419 May 201123 Jul 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming at least a portion of earth-boring tools
US863712727 Jun 200528 Ene 2014Kennametal Inc.Composite article with coolant channels and tool fabrication method
US864756125 Jul 200811 Feb 2014Kennametal Inc.Composite cutting inserts and methods of making the same
US869725814 Jul 201115 Abr 2014Kennametal Inc.Articles having improved resistance to thermal cracking
US87463733 Jun 200910 Jun 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of attaching a shank to a body of an earth-boring tool including a load-bearing joint and tools formed by such methods
US87584628 Ene 200924 Jun 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods for applying abrasive wear-resistant materials to earth-boring tools and methods for securing cutting elements to earth-boring tools
US877032410 Jun 20088 Jul 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring tools including sinterbonded components and partially formed tools configured to be sinterbonded
US878962516 Oct 201229 Jul 2014Kennametal Inc.Modular fixed cutter earth-boring bits, modular fixed cutter earth-boring bit bodies, and related methods
US879043926 Jul 201229 Jul 2014Kennametal Inc.Composite sintered powder metal articles
US880084831 Ago 201112 Ago 2014Kennametal Inc.Methods of forming wear resistant layers on metallic surfaces
US88085911 Oct 201219 Ago 2014Kennametal Inc.Coextrusion fabrication method
US88410051 Oct 201223 Sep 2014Kennametal Inc.Articles having improved resistance to thermal cracking
US88588708 Jun 201214 Oct 2014Kennametal Inc.Earth-boring bits and other parts including cemented carbide
US886992017 Jun 201328 Oct 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedDownhole tools and parts and methods of formation
US890511719 May 20119 Dic 2014Baker Hughes IncoporatedMethods of forming at least a portion of earth-boring tools, and articles formed by such methods
US897873419 May 201117 Mar 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming at least a portion of earth-boring tools, and articles formed by such methods
US901640630 Ago 201228 Abr 2015Kennametal Inc.Cutting inserts for earth-boring bits
US91634615 Jun 201420 Oct 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of attaching a shank to a body of an earth-boring tool including a load-bearing joint and tools formed by such methods
US91929897 Jul 201424 Nov 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming earth-boring tools including sinterbonded components
US92004859 Feb 20111 Dic 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods for applying abrasive wear-resistant materials to a surface of a drill bit
US92661718 Oct 201223 Feb 2016Kennametal Inc.Grinding roll including wear resistant working surface
US942882219 Mar 201330 Ago 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring tools and components thereof including material having hard phase in a metallic binder, and metallic binder compositions for use in forming such tools and components
US943501022 Ago 20126 Sep 2016Kennametal Inc.Composite cemented carbide rotary cutting tools and rotary cutting tool blanks
US95062974 Jun 201429 Nov 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedAbrasive wear-resistant materials and earth-boring tools comprising such materials
US964323611 Nov 20099 May 2017Landis Solutions LlcThread rolling die and method of making same
US968796310 Mar 201527 Jun 2017Baker Hughes IncorporatedArticles comprising metal, hard material, and an inoculant
US97009915 Oct 201511 Jul 2017Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming earth-boring tools including sinterbonded components
US979074524 Nov 201417 Oct 2017Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring tools comprising eutectic or near-eutectic compositions
US20050211475 *18 May 200429 Sep 2005Mirchandani Prakash KEarth-boring bits
US20050247491 *28 Abr 200510 Nov 2005Mirchandani Prakash KEarth-boring bits
US20060024140 *30 Jul 20042 Feb 2006Wolff Edward CRemovable tap chasers and tap systems including the same
US20060131081 *16 Dic 200422 Jun 2006Tdy Industries, Inc.Cemented carbide inserts for earth-boring bits
US20060288820 *27 Jun 200528 Dic 2006Mirchandani Prakash KComposite article with coolant channels and tool fabrication method
US20070056776 *9 Sep 200515 Mar 2007Overstreet James LAbrasive wear-resistant materials, drill bits and drilling tools including abrasive wear-resistant materials, methods for applying abrasive wear-resistant materials to drill bits and drilling tools, and methods for securing cutting elements to a drill bit
US20070056777 *30 Ago 200615 Mar 2007Overstreet James LComposite materials including nickel-based matrix materials and hard particles, tools including such materials, and methods of using such materials
US20070102198 *10 Nov 200510 May 2007Oxford James AEarth-boring rotary drill bits and methods of forming earth-boring rotary drill bits
US20070102199 *10 Nov 200510 May 2007Smith Redd HEarth-boring rotary drill bits and methods of manufacturing earth-boring rotary drill bits having particle-matrix composite bit bodies
US20070102200 *29 Sep 200610 May 2007Heeman ChoeEarth-boring rotary drill bits including bit bodies having boron carbide particles in aluminum or aluminum-based alloy matrix materials, and methods for forming such bits
US20070102202 *6 Nov 200610 May 2007Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring rotary drill bits including bit bodies comprising reinforced titanium or titanium-based alloy matrix materials, and methods for forming such bits
US20070251732 *20 Abr 20071 Nov 2007Tdy Industries, Inc.Modular Fixed Cutter Earth-Boring Bits, Modular Fixed Cutter Earth-Boring Bit Bodies, and Related Methods
US20080073125 *27 Sep 200727 Mar 2008Eason Jimmy WAbrasive wear resistant hardfacing materials, drill bits and drilling tools including abrasive wear resistant hardfacing materials, and methods for applying abrasive wear resistant hardfacing materials to drill bits and drilling tools
US20080083568 *28 Sep 200710 Abr 2008Overstreet James LMethods for applying wear-resistant material to exterior surfaces of earth-boring tools and resulting structures
US20080135304 *12 Dic 200612 Jun 2008Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of attaching a shank to a body of an earth-boring drilling tool, and tools formed by such methods
US20080145686 *25 Oct 200719 Jun 2008Mirchandani Prakash KArticles Having Improved Resistance to Thermal Cracking
US20080163723 *20 Feb 200810 Jul 2008Tdy Industries Inc.Earth-boring bits
US20080202814 *23 Feb 200728 Ago 2008Lyons Nicholas JEarth-boring tools and cutter assemblies having a cutting element co-sintered with a cone structure, methods of using the same
US20080302576 *15 Ago 200811 Dic 2008Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring bits
US20090041612 *25 Jul 200812 Feb 2009Tdy Industries, Inc.Composite cutting inserts and methods of making the same
US20090113811 *8 Ene 20097 May 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedAbrasive wear-resistant materials, methods for applying such materials to earth-boring tools, and methods for securing cutting elements to earth-boring tools
US20090180915 *4 Mar 200916 Jul 2009Tdy Industries, Inc.Methods of making cemented carbide inserts for earth-boring bits
US20090293672 *2 Jun 20093 Dic 2009Tdy Industries, Inc.Cemented carbide - metallic alloy composites
US20090308662 *11 Jun 200817 Dic 2009Lyons Nicholas JMethod of selectively adapting material properties across a rock bit cone
US20100000798 *23 Jun 20097 Ene 2010Patel Suresh GMethod to reduce carbide erosion of pdc cutter
US20100006345 *9 Jul 200814 Ene 2010Stevens John HInfiltrated, machined carbide drill bit body
US20100132265 *8 Feb 20103 Jun 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedAbrasive wear-resistant materials, methods for applying such materials to earth-boring tools, and methods of securing a cutting element to an earth-boring tool using such materials
US20100193252 *20 Abr 20105 Ago 2010Tdy Industries, Inc.Cast cones and other components for earth-boring tools and related methods
US20100263935 *30 Jun 201021 Oct 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth boring rotary drill bits and methods of manufacturing earth boring rotary drill bits having particle matrix composite bit bodies
US20100276205 *7 Jul 20104 Nov 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming earth-boring rotary drill bits
US20100307838 *5 Jun 20099 Dic 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods systems and compositions for manufacturing downhole tools and downhole tool parts
US20100319492 *27 Ago 201023 Dic 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming bodies of earth-boring tools
US20100326739 *3 Sep 201030 Dic 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedEarth-boring tools comprising silicon carbide composite materials, and methods of forming same
US20110094341 *30 Ago 201028 Abr 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming earth boring rotary drill bits including bit bodies comprising reinforced titanium or titanium based alloy matrix materials
US20110107811 *11 Nov 200912 May 2011Tdy Industries, Inc.Thread Rolling Die and Method of Making Same
US20110138695 *9 Feb 201116 Jun 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods for applying abrasive wear resistant materials to a surface of a drill bit
US20110142707 *7 Feb 201116 Jun 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of forming earth boring rotary drill bits including bit bodies having boron carbide particles in aluminum or aluminum based alloy matrix materials
US20110186354 *3 Jun 20094 Ago 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods of attaching a shank to a body of an earth-boring tool including a load bearing joint and tools formed by such methods
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.75/245, 75/255, 148/421
Clasificación internacionalB22F1/00, C22C1/04
Clasificación cooperativaB22F1/0003, C22C1/0458
Clasificación europeaC22C1/04F1, B22F1/00A
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
14 Jun 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: NIUCLEAR METALS, INC, 2229 MAIN ST. ,CONCORD, MASS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:WHITTAKER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004001/0729
Effective date: 19820526
Owner name: NIUCLEAR METALS, INC, A CORP. OF MASS.,MASSACHUSET
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WHITTAKER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004001/0729