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Número de publicaciónUS3487914 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación6 Ene 1970
Fecha de presentación3 Feb 1969
Fecha de prioridad3 Feb 1969
Número de publicaciónUS 3487914 A, US 3487914A, US-A-3487914, US3487914 A, US3487914A
InventoresAtchison Kenneth A, Weaver Doyle M
Cesionario originalWeaver Doyle M, Atchison Kenneth A
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Shipping enclosures
US 3487914 A
Resumen  disponible en
Imágenes(4)
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

jam" 1E5, 119% E). M. WEAVER ET AL 3,487,914

SHIPPING ENCLOSURES Filed Feb. 5, 1969 4 Sheets-Sheet l IINVENTORS DOYLE M- WEAVER KENNETH A. ATCHISON J lcm cz tson (Qflm 60a) ATTORNEYS M WW M. WEAVER ET AL SHIPPING ENCLOSURES 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb.

KNVENTORS DOYLE M. WEAVER ATTORNEYS Jam 1970 M. WEAVER ET AL SHIPPING ENCLOSURES 4 Sheets-Sheet w Filed Feb. 3, 1969 iNVENTORS DOYLE M WEAVER KENNETH A. ATCHISON fz heyan, J%Ma M50Q QEIQ 60w ATTORN EYS Jam mm m M. WEAVER ET AL 3,487,914

SHIPPING ENCLOSURES WilBCi Web 1969 4 Sheets-Sheet 4.

INVEWTORS DOYLE M. WEAVER KENNETH A. ATCHISON l amyan fi 04mm? @7110 600) ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,487,914 SHIPPING ENCLOSURES Doyle M. Weaver, 10500 Jackson Ave., South Gate, Calif.

90280, and Kenneth A. Atchison, 14381 Harrington St., Garden Grove, Calif. 92640 Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 657,935,

Aug. 2, 1967. This application Feb. 3, 1969, Ser.

Int. Cl. B65d 85/00 US. Cl. 206-46 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A shipping enclosure is provided for large, heavy plumbing fixtures, such as bathtubs and the like. The shipping enclosure includes a pair of tray-like, end-frames that are fitted to and enclose each end of the plumbing fixture and a wrapper that is secured to the sides of the frames and extends substantially around the top, bottom, and both sides of the fixture to provide a durable, convenient, and inexpensive shipping enclosure.

This application is a continuation-in-part of our copending application Ser. No. 657,935, filed Aug. 2, 1967, now abandoned.

This invention relates to shipping enclosures, and more particularly to shipping enclosures for large, heavy plumbing fixtures, such as bathtubs and the like.

Large, heavy plumbing fixtures require specially constructed shipping enclosures to prevent them from being damaged during shipping, storage, or other handling. Bathtubs, in particular, are difficult to package because of their large size and weight, their irregular shape, and the susceptibility of their vitreous surfaces to chips and scratches.

In the past, bathtubs have been packaged in wooden crates that are constructed of a plurality of spaced Wood slats and held together with nails, bailing wire, staples, or the like. These wooden crates, however, are expensive in terms of costs of material and labor necessary to produce them, and are cumbersome to store for future use. Further, wooden crates are difficult to assemble around the bathtub and ditficult to quickly and easily disassemble at their destination. The slatted construction of wooden crates, which presents an uneven outer surface to the enclosure, also makes them difiicult to handle during shipping and storage and exposes the vitreous surfaces of the fixture to possible damage during such handling.

Another type of shipping enclosure for bathtubs that has been provided, comprises a pair of wooden end-frames that are fitted directly to the ends of the fixture and a pair of corrugated covers that fit over opposite ends of the frames to form a carton-like package. This means of packaging bathtubs, however, has decided disadvantages.

The covers, for example, extend only partially down the sides of the bathtub, which not only exposes the vitreous coated sides of the fixture to possible damage during handling, but weakens the assembled shipping enclosure. Because of this discontinuity along the sides of the tub, the covers, even though tightly secured to the end-frames,

"ice

can shift relative to each other, thus permitting the entire shipping enclosure to twist or rack relative to the bathtub. Finally, these covers overhang the sides and ends of the frames and, therefore, present an uneven outer surface to the enclosure that makes the enclosure itself susceptible to damage and inconvenient to handle during shipping or storage.

In our copending application Ser. No. 657,935, there is described a shipping enclosure having a smooth and continuous outer wrapper in place of these covers. The wrapper is secured to the sides of the frames and extends substantially around the top, bottom, and both sides of the bathtub. While this shipping enclosure has many advantages over prior art enclosures, the wood end-frames are costly to manufacture and are a potential source of damage to the fragile vitreous surfaces and edges of the packed fixtures.

Accordingly, it is a primary object of this invention to provide a new and improved shipping enclosure for large plumbing fixtures that substantially prevents damage to the fixture, that is durable, that is inexpensive to manufacture and easy to assemble, and that is convenient to handle durin g shipping and storage.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved shipping enclosure for large plumbing fixtures that is constructed from a minimum number of parts.

Still another object of one embodiment of this invention is to provide a new and improved shipping enclosure for large plumbing fixtures, such as bathtubs, that is inexpensive, that is convenient to store for future use, and that can be quickly assembled around the bathtub and easily and quickly disassembled at its destination.

A further object of one embodiment of this invention is to provide a shipping enclosure for large plumbing fixtures, such as bathtubs, that protects them from damage during shipping and storage, and in which the enclosure includes a pair of tray-like end-frames that are fitted to and enclose each end of the fixture and a smooth outer wrapper that is secured to the frames and extends substantially around the top, bottom, and both sides of the fixture.

Additional objects and advantages will be set forth in part in the description which follows and in part will be obvious from the description, or may be learned by practice of the invention, the objects and advantages being realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

To achieve the foregoing objects and in accordance with its purpose, this invention, as embodied and broadly described provides an enclosure for large plumbing fixtures having a top, a bottom, two sides, and two ends. The enclosure includes a pair of tray-like, end-frames that are fitted to and enclose each end of the fixture.

Each frame comprises a main wall having an inner and outer face, and sides and ends and a pair of end panels foldably connected to the ends of the main wall. Each end panel is folded over itself into overlapped relation so that it forms a perpendicularly extending two-ply end wall attached to the main wall, with the free edge of the folded end panel lying adjacent the inner face of the main wall.

A pair of side panels are also foldably connected to the sides of the main wall and each side panel is folded over itself into overlapped relation so that it too forms a perpendicularly extending two-ply side wall attached to the main wall, with the free edge of the folded side panel laying adjacent the inner face of the main wall.

Locking means are provided to maintain the side and end walls in a position perpendicular to the main wall and a plurality of relatively rigid, reinforcing strips are disposed between the plies of each side and end wall to add strength and rigidity to the frames.

A wrapper having side portions is further provided that extends substantially around the top, bottom, and both sides of the fixture. The side portions of the wrapper overlie and are secured to the outer surface of the side and end walls of the frames and, preferably, the side edges of the wrapper are flush with the outer face of the frames main wall.

It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory but are not restrictive of the invention.

The accompanying drawings which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification illustrate one embodiment of the invention, and together with the description serve to explain the principles of the invention.

Of the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the assembled shipping enclosure of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 showing the construction of the inner side of one of the end-frames;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the shipping enclosure of this invention partially assembled around a bathtub, the bathtub being shown in phantom lines;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the inner side of an end-frame prior to assembly; and

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the end-frame of FIG. 4 after partial assembly.

Reference will now be made in detail to the present preferred embodiment of this invention, an example of which is illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

As shown in FIG. 1, the shipping enclosure of this invention generally indicated as includes a wrapper 12 of a foldable material and a pair of identical tray-like, end-frames 14 fitted to each end of a large plumbing fixture 16. Wrapper 12 can be of any suitable, foldable material, such as paperboard, cardboard, or the like, but preferably is corrugated jcontainer board constructed with water-resistant adhesives which give lightness, strength, and water-resistant characteristics to the shipping enclosure. Frames 14 are also constructed of similar foldable material, and a plurality of relatively rigid, reinforcing strips which may be of molded plastic, but preferably are of wood stock or plywood.

A bathtub 16 of the built-in style is shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, as an example of a large plumbing fixture that is compatible with the shipping enclosure of this invention. It will be apparent, however, to those skilled in the art that the shipping enclosure of this invention can also be used with other similarly shaped plumbing fixtures.

As best shown in FIG. 3, bathtub 16 has a skirt 22 that extends along the front side of the bathtub and includes a foot portion 24 that rests on the floor when the bathtub is installed. Braces 26, which are welded to the bottom of the tub 16 and skirt 22, brace the skirt with respect to the main body of the tub. A flange 28 extends around the periphery of the top of the tub, which together with the edges of skirt 22, are used in the shipping enclosure of this invention for fitting frames 14 to both ends of the tub.

As best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, frames 14 are each constructed from a carton blank of foldable material, generally indicated as 30, and a plurality of relatively rigid, reinforcing strips 32. With reference to FIG. 4,

there is shown a carton blank 30 having a rectangular main wall 34, a pair of end panels 36 foldably connected to the ends of main Wall 34, and a pair of side panels 38, foldably connected to the sides of main wall 34. Preferably, carton blank 30 is cut from corrugated container board that has been manufactured with water-resistant adhesives, making it highly resistant to water and other destructive agents that normally might be encountered in the course of shipping and storage.

With reference to FIGS. 4 and 5, frames 14 are formed by folding each end panel 36 upwardly along serrated fold line 40 and then by folding it twice along lines 42 and 44 to form a perpendicularly extending two-ply end wall 46 that is attached to an end of main wall 34. End panels 36 are folded inwardly, as shown in FIG. 5, so that the free edge 48 of each end panel lies adjacent the inner face of the main wall.

Similarly, each side panel 38 is folded upwardly along serrated fold line 50 and then twice along lines 52 and 54 to form a perpendicularly extending two-ply side wall 56 that is attached to a side of main wall 34. Side panels 38 are also folded inwardly so that the free edge 58 of the folded panels lie adjacent the inner face of main wall 34.

In accordance with the invention, locking means are provided to maintain end walls 46 and side walls 56 in a position perpendicular to main wall 34. As embodied, the locking means includes a pair of locking flaps 60 foldably connected to each side panel 38. Cuts 62 in carton blank 30 that are aligned with a fold line 50 and extend to the depth of a fold line 40 permit locking flaps 60 to be folded inwardly along a serrated fold line 64, as shown in FIG. 5, whereby they are interleaved and locked between the plies of an end wall 46.

The locking means also includes a locking flap 66 foldably connected to the free edge 48 of each end wall 46 and a locking flap 68 foldably connected to the free edge 58 of each side wall 56. When frames 14 are assembled, locking flaps 66 and 68 are perpendicular to end walls 46 and side walls 56 and overlie a portion of the inner face of main wall 34, so that an edge of an end wall locking flap 66 abuts an edge of an adjacent side wall locking flap 68. Preferably, and as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the side edges 70 and 72 of locking flaps 66 and 68, respectively, are on a diagonal that extends between adjacent side and end walls of an assembled frame, so that each locking flap is locked in or held in place by two (2) adjacent flaps to maintain the side and end walls in a position perpendicular to the main wall. Thus by folding carton blank 30 in a few simple places, a traylike, end-frame is provided that retains its folded shape.

In accordance with the invention, a plurality of relatively rigid, reinforcing strips 32 are located between the plies of end and side walls 46 and 56, respectively, to add strength and rigidity to frames 14. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, strips 32 include a pair of end strips 32' of a length and width sufficient to be enclosed between the plies of an end wall 46 and a pair of side strips 32" also of a length and width suflicient to be enclosed between the plies of a side wall 56. The closely spaced fold lines 42 and 44 in each end panel 36 and lines 52 and 54 in each side panel 38 permit insertion of a reinforcing strip 32 between the plies of the walls.

Preferably, and as further shown in FIG. 5, the ends of one pair of strips (for example, the ends of end strips 32) abut an inner edge face of the other pair of strips (for example, the inner edge face 82 of side strip 32") when frames 14 are assembled, thereby further increasing the strength and rigidity of the frame structure.

As best shown in FIG. 3, both rightand left-hand frames 14 are identical in shape and therefore can be used interchangeably on either end of the shipping enclosure. The inner dimensions of the assembled frames closely fit the outer dimensions of the ends of bathtub 16.

Engagement of a frame over a tub end is limited by abutment of the inner face of main wall 34 against the edges of the tubs fiange 28, skirt 22, and its foot portion 24. Shifting or twisting of frames 14 is limited by the close fit of end and side walls 46 and 56 around the outer surfaces of the bathtub end.

The frames 14 of this invention thus retain the stability of the prior all-wood end-frames permitting stacking of the enclosures While at the same time providing the resilience and cushioning characteristics of corrugated container board to protect the fragile vitreous surfaces and edges of the packaged fixture. Further, the frames 14 of this invention are less expensive to manufacture because wood fabrications are no longer required and they can easily be assembled by unskilled or semi-skilled persons.

As shown in FIG. 3, wrapper 12 can be of a single sheet of prekcut, corrugated container board having crease lines 84 or can be unrolled from a continuous length of corrugated container board and cut to the proper length. Wrapper 12, preferably, has a width equal to the distance between the outer faces of frames 14 when the frames are fitted to the bathtub ends, and a length sufficient to extend substantially around all four sides of the tub.

In assembly, and as best shown in FIG. 3, frames 14 are fitted to each end of the inverted bathtub 16, and one end of Wrapper 12 is placed at approximately the midpoint of one of the frames end walls 46 adjacent the skirt 22 of the tub. Wrapper 12 is then folded around the frames, so that the ends of the wrapper lie substantially adjacent each other and the longitudinal side portions of the wrapper overlie the outer surfaces of the frames end walls 46 and side walls 56 to form a complete enclosure.

As shown in FIG. 1, a narrow gap 86 is provided between the ends .of the wrapper adjacent skirt 22 to permit ease in identifying the enclosures contents, particularly its color, without impairing the protection afforded the fixture by the shipping enclosure of this invention. While gap 86 is shown adjacent the skirtf22 of bathtub 16 in the shipping enclosure illustrated in the accompanying drawings, it will be appreciated that the gap can be provided on any of the four sides of the bathtub.

In accordance with the invention, fastening means are provided for securing the side portions of wrapper 12 to the walls of frames 14. The fastening means may be nails, staples, or glue, but, as shown in FIG. I, preferably are rocnd or fiat bands 88 of plastic ,or metal that tightly bind the wrapper to the frames. Both nails or staples and bands may also be used, if desired.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, a notch 90 can be provided in each end of each end panel 36 to provide a notched corner, as best shown in FIG. 3, at each of the four corners of an assembled end-frame. Thus, when bands 88 are used to secure wrapper 12 to the walls of frames 14, the bands are passed around the side portions of wrapper 12 and directly over notches 90, so that the hands, when clinched, crush or depress a portion of wrapper 12 into a notch, thereby providing a positive locking action that prevents movement of the frames relative to wrapper 12.

The side edges 92 of wrapper 12 preferably are flush with the outer face of wall 34 of frames 14 to provide a smooth outer surface to the entire shipping enclosure for ease and convenience in handling the enclosure during shipping and storage.

Hand holes 94 formed by a cut 96 in the main wall 34 of each end-frame 14 can also be provided to permit workers and handlers to easily grip and carry the enclosure of this invention.

Thus by providing end-frames 14 that are fitted to and enclose both ends of the packaged bathtub and a continuous wrapper 12 that extends around all four sides of the bathtub, all vitreous-coated surfaces .of the plumbing fixture that are especially susceptible to damage are protected and the entry of dirt or foreign matter is inhibited. Further, a smooth exterior surface is provided on all sides that permits ease in handling and shipping and on which can be placed any desired indicia to designate the enclosures contents or their source.

The invention thus provides a new and improved shipping enclosure that in costs of material and of labor involved in construction, assembly, and disassembly of the shipping enclosure is considerably less expensive than prior art shipping enclosures. Further, the invention provides a lightweight, strong, and durable shipping enclosure for packaging large plumbing fixtures that does not twist with respect to the fixture during handling and that protects the fixtures against damage, and that permits ease in handling during shipping or storage of the fixtures.

The invention inits broader aspects is not limited to the specific details shown and described, and departures may be made from such details without departing from the principles of the invention and without sacrificing its chief advantages.

What is claimed is:

1. A shipping enclosure for bathtubs, having a top, a bottom, two sides, two ends, and a flange protruding from and extending partially around the periphery of each end of the bathtub, said enclosure comprising:

(a) a pair of tray-like, end-frames fitted to each end of the bathtub, each of said frames comprising a main wall having an inner and outer face, and sides and ends; a pair of end panels, foldably connected to the ends of the main wall, each of said end panels being folded over itself into overlapped relation to form a perpendicularly extending two-ply end wall attached to the main wall, with the free edge of the folded end panel lying adjacent the inner face of the main Wall; a pair of side panels foldably connected to the sides of the main wall, each of said side panels being folded over itself into overlapped relation to form a perpendicularly extending two-ply side wall attached to the main wall, with the free edge of the folded ,side panel lying adjacent the inner face of the main wall; locking means for maintaining said end and side walls in a position perpendicular to the main wall; and a plurality of relatively rigid, reinforcing strips located between the plies of each said side and end walls; the inner faces of the main wall of each frame overlying opposite ends of the tub, with the inner corners of the frames receiving and engaging the corners of the bathtub flange;

(b) a single sheet wrapper having side portions,

said wrapper extending substantially around the top, bottom, and both sides of the bathtub, with the side portions of the wrapper overlying the outer surface of the end and side walls of the frames and the side edges of the wrapper being substantially flush with the outer face of the main wall of the frames; and

(c) fastening means for securing the wrapper to the frames.

2. The shipping enclosure of claim 1, in which the locking means comprises a first pair of locking flaps foldably connected to the side edges of each side panel said locking fiaps being perpendicular to the side Walls and being located between the plies of an end wall; and a second pair of locking flaps foldably connected to the free edges of each end panel and each side panel, said second locking flaps being perpendicular to the walls of the frame and overlying a portion of the inner face of the main wall, with an edge of each said second locking flap abutting an edge of an adjacent locking flap, said first and second pairs of locking flaps maintaining the end and side walls in a position perpendicular to the main wall.

3. The shipping enclosure of claim 2, wherein the abutting edges of the second locking flaps are on a diagonal extending between adjacent end and side walls of the frames.

4. The shipping enclosure of claim 1, in which the fastening means comprises metal-encircling bands to tightly secure the wrapper to the frames.

5. The shipping enclosure of claim 4, including a notch in a wall near each outer corner of the frame, said metalencircling band crushing the wrapper into said notches to prevent movement of the wrapper relative to the frames.

6. The shipping enclosure of claim 1, wherein the reinforcing strips in the frames abut one another at the corners of the frames.

7. The enclosure of claim 1 which includes one or more hand holes in the main wall of each end frame.

8 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,893,622 7/1959 Fogel 22934 3,181,768 5/1965 Flynn et al. 20646 X 3,194,395 7/1965 Weaver et al. 20646 3,202,335 8/1965 Budd 22934 X 3,289,825 12/1966 Smith 20646 3,372,796 3/1968 Foote et al. 229-34X FOREIGN PATENTS 199,627 6/ 1923 Great Britain.

MARTHA L. RICE, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 229-23, 34

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US2893622 *14 Mar 19577 Jul 1959Samuel FogelDisplay package
US3181768 *1 Jul 19634 May 1965Weyerhaeuser CoShipping container for furniture or the like
US3194395 *15 Jul 196313 Jul 1965Flintkote CoShipping enclosures
US3202335 *3 Oct 196224 Ago 1965Pallet Devices IncCushioned packing insert
US3289825 *8 Dic 19646 Dic 1966Twin Cities Container CorpShipping wrapper for bathtubs
US3372796 *13 Ene 196712 Mar 1968Container CorpInterchangeable cap for package
GB199627A * Título no disponible
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3727826 *26 Mar 197117 Abr 1973Container CorpCross play double wall tray
US3814302 *10 Ene 19734 Jun 1974Olikraft IncBathtub container
US3845859 *17 Jul 19725 Nov 1974Dornbush RShipper package
US3954219 *12 Nov 19744 May 1976Glenco Refrigeration CorporationPackaging
US4273548 *4 Oct 197916 Jun 1981Industrial Designs & ServicesMethod and device for folding blanks to form boxes
US5183155 *20 Dic 19902 Feb 1993Vavra Paul PPackaging system for a toilet water tank and cover
US5669551 *4 Dic 199623 Sep 1997Sigloch Verlag Service GmbhPackaging for books and/or other products and method and apparatus of the production thereof
US5704486 *15 May 19956 Ene 1998Sopotyk; Mark WayneStorage and transportation container for grain testing equipment
EP1145970A1 *6 Abr 200117 Oct 2001Gosac Trading, S.L.Perfected container for fittings
WO1998031594A1 *21 Ene 199823 Jul 1998Bruggen Tom Eduard Frank V DBox from wall segments surrounded by a band
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.206/320, 229/122.26, 229/160, 229/172, 229/199.1
Clasificación internacionalB65D63/10, B65D5/20, B65D85/64
Clasificación cooperativaB65D63/109, B65D2585/644, B65D2585/681, B65D5/2009, B65D85/64
Clasificación europeaB65D63/10C, B65D5/20A1, B65D85/64