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Número de publicaciónUS3495594 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación17 Feb 1970
Fecha de presentación22 Nov 1966
Fecha de prioridad22 Nov 1966
Número de publicaciónUS 3495594 A, US 3495594A, US-A-3495594, US3495594 A, US3495594A
InventoresReinold E Swanson
Cesionario originalDavol Inc
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Inflating valve for catheters
US 3495594 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

- Feb. 17, 1970 v y R. E. SWANSON INFLATING VALVE FOR CATHETERS Filed Nov. 22, 1966 AWI' pill/fill, 71"3 mlil,

INVENTOR. REINOLD E. SWANSON l BY 2 aw 7746M.

ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,495,594 INFLATING VALVE FOR CATHETERS Reinold E. Swanson, Rehoboth, Mass., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Dave] Inc., a corporation of Delaware Filed Nov. 22, 1966, Ser. No. 596,196 Int. Cl. A61m 25/00; B65b l /04; F16k 31/20 US. Cl. 128349 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The present invention relates generally to the surgical art, and is more particularly concerned with the provision of a novel and improved inflating valve for catheters and the like. More specifically, this invention is concerned with the provision of an inflating valve that is secured to the device that is to be inflated, such as a catheter or the like, so as to form an integrated part thereof. This valve is designed for use with inflating needles wherein, when it is desired to inflate a catheter or the like having the valve of the instant invention associated therewith, the valve may be punctured by the inflating needle so as to permit introduction of the inflating fluid. Upon removal of the needle, however, the valve is self-sealing so as to maintain the catheter or similar device in its inflated state.

This invention is in many respects somewhat similar to the invention disclosed in my copending application Ser. No. 444,867, filed Apr. 1, 1965. The valve disclosed in my copending case, however, is primarily designed for use with an inflating syringe not comprising a needle. The instant valve, on the other hand, is specifically designed for use with an inflating needle.

The conventional technique for inflating the sac or balloon of a catheter or any other similar inflatable device is to introduce an inflating syringe to the proximal end of the inflating lumen that is in communication With the balloon or sac to be distended. By use of the syringe, air or other fluid is forced through the inflating lumen until the sac or balloon is inflated. Once the sac has been inflated, the syringe is removed, and it is then necessary to provide means for maintaining the sac inflated. This has been done by a variety of ways, such as by providing a physical clamp that pinches the inflating lumen so as to block the flow of fluid therethrough, thus maintaining the sac in its inflated state. This technique has sometimes proven undesirable since it first of all is necessary that such a clamp be available, which is not always the case, and, secondly, it is sometimes difiicult to apply the clamp without losing some of the pressure from the inflated sac. Even when the inflating lumen is properly clamped, there is always the danger that the clamp is not a completely secure one and that the sac will slowly deflate. Since the sac, during catheterization, is inside the patient, it is not possible to visually ascertain that the sac is slowly deflating and thus creating a highly undesirable situation.

Another technique frequently used in this art is to block the proximal end of the inflating lumen with a resilient plug which must then he punctured by a hypodermic needle provided on the syringe, the plug being self-sealing when the needle and syringe are withdrawn. This technique has the disadvantage that there is always the danger that when the needle is inserted, the operator may inadvertently puncture the wall of the inflating lumen and/ or his own fingers.

It is therefore a primary object of the instant invention to provide a valve adapted to be integrated with an inflating tube, such as the inflating lumen of a catheter, said valve being adapted to be punctured by an inflating 3,495,594 Patented Feb. 17, 1970 needle, but being self-sealing after the needle has been withdrawn.

Another important object of this invention is the provision of a valve of the character above described wherein means are provided for rendering it virtually impossible for the operator to either puncture the wall of the inflating tube and/or his fingers when the inflating needle is inserted into the valve.

A further object is the provision of novel and improved means for integrating a self-sealing valve with the proximal end of an inflating lumen of the type normally found in catheters and the like.

Another object is the provision of a self-sealing valve of the character described which may be easily and effectively integrated with the proximal end of the inflating lumen of catheters and the like, and which, although economically feasible to manufacture and assemble, is nevertheless highly effective and durable in use.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the description thereof proceeds when considered in connection with the accompanying illustrative drawings.

In the drawings which illustrate the best mode presently contemplated for carrying out the present invention:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a catheter having a self-sealing valve integrated therewith in accordance with the instant invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational section, on an enlarged scale, taken through the valve per se, and showing the valve with an inflating needle inserted therein;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 after the inflating needle has been withdrawn; and

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the separate elements that make up the instant valve, with portions broken away and shown in section for purposes of illustration.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to FIG. 1 thereof, there is shown generally at 10 a conventional catheter having a self-sealing valve constructed in accordance with the instant invention and shown generally at 12. As stated, the catheter 10 is of completely conventional construction and comprises an elongated flexible shaft 14 of any suitable material, such as rub ber or plastic, having a drainage eye 16 located adjacent the distal end 18 of the catheter. A drainage lumen 20 extends longitudinally through the catheter shaft and communicates with the eye 16. Drainage lumen 20 is provided with an enlarged proximal portion 22 which in use is adapted to interconnect with a suitable drainage tube (not shown), as is well known in the art. The shaft 14 further comprises an inflating lumen 24 which also extends longitudinally through the catheter shaft in side-by-side relation with drainage lumen 20. The inflating lumen 24 terminates at its distal end in an opening 26 formed in the catheter wall, said opening permitting communication between the inflating lumen and an inflatable sac 28 secured to the exterior of the catheter, adjacent the distal end thereof, but spaced proximally from the eye 16. At its proximal end, inflating lumen 24 separates from the catheter shaft 14 as at 30 to facilitate the introduction of pressurized fluid to the inflating lumen. It will be obvious that the introduction of pressurized fluid into and through inflating lumen 24 will cause the sac 28to distend until the sac becomes inflated. It will be understood that when a patient is catheterized, the sac 28 is inflated for retention and/or pressure purposes.

The valve 12, which is secured to the proximal end of inflating lumen 24, comprises three separate parts, i.e., a housing 32, a resilient plug 34, and a retaining member 36. The housing 32 and the retaining member 36 may be made of any suitable nontoxic material, although in accordance with the instant invention it 'is'preferred to injection mold each of these parts, using a material such as Delrin. The plug 34 is made of a resilient, self-sealing material, such asgum rubber. v

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 3, it will be seen that the housing 32 is of cylindrical configuration and has a bore 38 extending longitudinally therethrough. The cylindrical wall 40 of housing 32, which defines the bore 38, has at its upper or entrance end an inwardly extending flange 42 terminating in an inwardly extending peripheral lip 44. The. peripheral lip 44 defies a reduced bore portion 46, and at the same time coperates with the inner surface 48 of wall 40 to define an annular space 50.

I The resilient plug 34 is also of generally cylindrical configuration and has a bore 52 extending longitudinally therethrough, said bore being closed at its upper end by solid portion 54 of plug 34. Extending axially from the marginal edge .of solid portion 54 is a peripheral skirt 56, it being noted that when the plug 34 is assembled in bore 38, the peripheral skirt 56 extends into annular space 50 so as to effect a snug interengagement between plug 34 and housing 32. Preferably, skirt 56 and lip 44 have complementary beveled surfaces 58 and 50, respectively, in order to enhance the seal made between these parts.

Adjacent the exit end of bore 38, there is provided an integral, inwardly extending annular rib 62, said rib being designed to snap-receive retaining member 36. More specifically, it will be noted that retaining member 36 comprises a generally cylindrical body 64 having a bore 66 extending therethrough. As will be noted more clearly in FIG. 3, bore 66, bore 52 and bore 46 are all of substantially the same diameter. An annular groove 68 extends circumferentially around the outer surface of body 64, said grove being adapted to interengage with rib 62 in order to secure retaining member 34 within housing 32 adjacent the exit end thereof. As hereinbefore stated, the housing 32 and the retaining member 36 are both preferably constructed of a plastic material, and even though the plastic material is preferably a relatively hard and rigid one, these members still have suflicient flexibility to enable the retaining member 36 to be forced into bore 38 until groove 68 and rib 62 interengage. When the retaining member 36 is secured within housing 32, it maintains plug 34 compressed against flange 42 and lip 44 so that solid portion 54 functions to tightly seal off bore 46. Expressed differently, the distance between end surface 70 and bottom edge 72 of plug 34 is normally longer than the distance between the upper edge of retaining member 36 and the botton edge of lip 44, thus insuring that the plug 34 is under compression when mounted in housing 32.

It will be understood that in order to assemble housing 32, plug 34, and retaining member 36, it is simply necessary to slide the resilient plug into bore 38 so that the peripheral skirt 56 enters into the annular space 50, and then retaining member 36 is snapped into position to maintain the parts assembled. Once these members have been so assembled, the valve 12 is ready for securement to the catheter 10. This securement is accomplished by sliding the proximal end portion 30 of lumen 24 into an annular channel 74 provided in wall 40 of housing 32 for that purpose. As soon as the proximal end of the inflating lumen has been slid into channel 74, as clearly illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, it may be maintained therein by any suitable means, although in accordance with the instant invention it is preferred to effect this integration of these parts by crimping the beveled edge 76 of housing 32 inwardly as at 78 was to securely grip or clamp the tubular wall of the lumen between the inner and outer walls of channel 74. Beveled edge 76 facilitates this crimping operation since it provides a relatively sharp edge that will bite into and bet-" ter grip the lumen wall. I

In operation and use, and with valve 12 secured to lumen 24 as above described, an inflating needle 80 is forced through solid portion 54 of plug 34, as illustrated in FIG. 2, whereupon pressurized fluid may be introduced via the needle 80 through lumen 24 to sac 28 in order to inflate the latter. When the sac 28 is properly inflated, the needle 80 is withdrawn, whereupon the resilience of solid portion 54 self-seals the puncture 82 previously made byneedle 80'. In order to enable better centering of needle 80 when it is brought into engagement with plug 34, there may be, provided on the upper surface 70 a central depression '84. It will be understood that, due to the fact that resilient plug 34 is surrounded for its entire length by the relatively hard and rigid housing 32, it is not possible for needle 80, when. it is forced through solid portion 54, to inadvertently puncture the lumen wall and/or the finger of the operator. Expressed differently, housing 32 acts as a protective shield for that portion of the lumen wall that might normallybe inadvertently punctured by needle 80. This insures maintenance of the desired pressure-tight characteristics of catheter 10. i i

While there is shown an described herein certain specific structures embodying the invention, it will be manifest to those skilled in the art that various modifications and rearrangements of the parts may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the underlying inventive concept and that the same is not limited to the particular forms herein shown and described except insofar as indicated by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A self-sealing valve for use in the inflation of catheters and the like by inflating needles, said valve comprising a housing having a bore extending therethrough, a plug constructed of resilient, self-sealing material located in said bore, said plug normally blocking passage of fluid flow through said bore but being penetratable by an inflating needle when it is desired to introduce fluid, said plug being self-sealing upon removal of the needle, means in said housing at opposite ends of said plug preventing longitudinal movement of said plug in said how, said last-mentioned means comprising an inwardly extending flange adjacent the entrance end of said bore defining a reduced bore portion,,and a retaining member secured within said bore at the opposite end thereof, said retaining member bein spaced from said flange a distance less than the length of said plug, whereby said plug is compressed against said flange, said flange having an inwardly depending marginal lip defining an annular space between said lip and the inner surface of said housing, said plughaving a peripheral skirt at its closed end interengaging within said annular space.

2. A self-sealing valve for use in the inflation of catheters and the like by inflating needles, said valve comprising a housing having a bore extendingtherethrough, a plug constructed of resilient, self-sealing material located in said bore, said plug normally blocking passageof fluid flow through said bore but being penetratable by an inflating needle when it is desired to introduce fluid, said plug being self-sealing upon removal of the needle, means in said housing at opposite ends of saidplug preventinglongitudinal movement of said plug in said bore, said last-mentioned means comprising an inwardly extending flange adjacent the entrance end of said bore defining a reduced bore portion,- and a retaining member secured within said bore at the opposite.end thereof, said retaining member being spaced from said flange a distance less than the length of said plug, whereby said plugis compressed against said flange, said plug comprising a. hollow cylinder closed at one end, said closedend being .inengagement with'said flange, the bore of said plug having substantially the samedi ameter as that of the aforesaid reduced bore portion, said retaining member comprising an-annular collar hav-' ing an opening therein of substantially the same diameter as that of the aforesaid reduced bore portion.

3. A self-sealing valve ior use in the inflation of catheters and the like by inflating needles, said valve comprising a housing having a bore extending therethrough, a plug constructed of resilient, self-sealing material located in said bore, said plug normally blocking passage of fluid flow through said bore but being penetratable by an inflating needle when it is desired to introduce fluid, said plug being self-sealing upon removal of the needle, means in said housing at opposite ends of said plug preventing longitudinal movement of said plug in said bore, said last-mentioned means comprising an inwardly extending flange adjacent the entrance end of said bore defining a reduced bore portion, and a retaining member secured within said bore at the opposite end thereof, said retaining member being spaced from said flange a distance less than the length of said plug, whereby said plug is compressed against said flange, said housing being of cylindrical configuration, the cylindrical wall of said housing having an annular channel therein open adjacent said opposite bore end.

4. In combination, a catheter having a tubular inflating lumen at the proximal end thereof, a self-sealing valve comprising a cylindrical housing having a bore extending therethrough, inwardly extending means defining a reduced portion at the entrance end of said bore, a plug constructed of resilient, self-sealing material located in said bore, means in said housing compressing said plug against said inwardly extending means to normally block fluid flow through said bore but being penetratable by an inflating needle when it is desired to introduce fluid to said catheter, said plug being self-sealing upon removal of the needle, and means for securing said valve to said inflating lumen, said securing means comprising an annular open-ended channel in the cylindrical wall of said housing, said channel open end being located adjacent the exit end of said bore, said channel slidably receiving the free end of said inflating lumen therein, and means maintaining said inflating lumen in said channel.

5. The combination of claim 4 further characterized in that said last-mentioned means comprise an inward deflection of the free edge of the outer wall defining said channel, whereby to clamp said inflating lumen within said channel.

6. The combination of claim 4 further characterized in that said plug is a hollow cylinder closed at one end, said closed end being in engagement with said inwardly extending means, the bore of said plug having substantially the same diameter as that of said reduced bore portion.

7. The combination of claim 6 further characterized in that said inwardly extending means comprises an inwardly extending flange at the entrance end of said bore; said flange having a marginal lip extending into said bore, said lip and inner surface of said housing defining an annular space, said plug having a peripheral skirt at its closed end interengaging within said annular space.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,176,565 10/1939 Boynton 137-525.1 X 2,295,804 9/1942 Olson 137223 X 3,138,161 6/1964 Allen 128-348 3,385,301 5/1968 Harautuneian 137223 X FOREIGN PATENTS 57,515 1/1953 France. 1,078,650 8/ 1967 Great Britain.

DALTON L. TRULUCK, Primary Examiner J. D. YASKO, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US2176565 *10 Mar 193717 Oct 1939Boynton Solon DValve for inflatable articles
US2295804 *12 Nov 194015 Sep 1942C B Webb CompanyValve for inflatable articles
US3138161 *25 Feb 196323 Jun 1964Latex Ind IncNeedle plug guide for catheter
US3385301 *11 Oct 196528 May 1968American Hospital Supply CorpBalloon catheter having a deformable one-way inflation valve
FR57515E * Título no disponible
GB1078650A * Título no disponible
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US3903942 *6 Nov 19729 Sep 1975Texaco IncVapor seal for fuel tank filler tube
US3919724 *7 Jun 197418 Nov 1975Medical Eng CorpImplantable prosthesis having a self-sealing valve
US4665959 *9 Oct 198519 May 1987Terumo Kabushiki KaishaFor puncture
US4681132 *23 May 198621 Jul 1987Halkey-Roberts CorporationCheck valve with preset cracking pressure
US4752287 *30 Dic 198621 Jun 1988Bioresearch, Inc.Syringe check valve
US4760933 *27 Oct 19872 Ago 1988Christner Susan AFuel tank tube vapor/fuel seal
US4816020 *28 Sep 198728 Mar 1989Sherwood Medical CompanyRetainer device for attaching members to flexible tubes and the like to flexible tubes and the like
US4822054 *15 Ene 198818 Abr 1989Janchris CorporationVapor/fuel seal for fuel tank filler tube
US5603706 *19 Abr 199418 Feb 1997Wyatt; PhilipInfusion apparatus
US690253526 Ago 20027 Jun 2005Kansey Nash CorporationGuide-wire mounted balloon modulation device and methods of use
US70049143 Oct 200228 Feb 2006Kensey Nash CorporationCrimp and cut tool for sealing and unsealing guide wires and tubular instruments
US70486962 Jun 200523 May 2006Kensey Nash CorporationGuide-wire mounted balloon modulation device and methods of use
US722642520 Sep 20055 Jun 2007Kensey Nash CorporationCrimp and cut tool for sealing and unsealing guide wires and tubular instruments
US777137022 May 200610 Ago 2010Kensey Nash CorporationGuide-wire mounted balloon modulation device and methods of use
US780312428 Ago 200428 Sep 2010Kensey Nash CorporationGuidewire mounted balloon modulation device and methods of use
US82678716 May 200418 Sep 2012Kensey Nash CorporationGuidewire mounted balloon modulation device and methods of use
DE3736907A1 *30 Oct 198714 Jul 1988Bioresearch IncSpritzen-absperrventil
WO1999042161A2 *19 Feb 199926 Ago 1999Percusurge IncLow profile fluid delivery and sealing system for a catheter
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.604/99.2, 137/223, 604/920, 141/330, 137/843
Clasificación internacionalA61F2/958
Clasificación cooperativaA61M2025/0018, A61M25/1018
Clasificación europeaA61M25/10E