Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS3579941 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación25 May 1971
Fecha de presentación19 Nov 1968
Fecha de prioridad19 Nov 1968
Número de publicaciónUS 3579941 A, US 3579941A, US-A-3579941, US3579941 A, US3579941A
InventoresHoward C Tibbals
Cesionario originalHoward C Tibbals
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Wood parquet block flooring unit
US 3579941 A
Imágenes(1)
Previous page
Next page
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Howard C. Tibbals P.O. Drawer A, Oneida, Tenn. 37841 [21] Appl. No. 777,070 [22] Filed Nov. 19, 1968 [45] Patented May 25, 1971 [54] WOOD PARQUET BLOCK FLOORING UNIT 6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. Cl 52/384, 52/390, 52/436, 52/593 [51] Int. Cl 1304b 5/00,

E041 15/04, E041 15/16 v [50] Field of Search 52/384, 388, 390, 391, 595,593, 436

[ 56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,027,292 1/1936 Rockwell 52/595 Primary Examiner-Henry C. Sutherland Attorney-Beveridge & De Grandi ABSTRACT: Wooden parquet block flooring incorporating cellular foam in multiple parquet block units having rubberlike flexible adhesive joining tongue and groove formations within the multiple block unit.

.PATENIEU m 2 5 ml INVENTOR .TIBBALS 3 ATTURNEYS HOWARD C W!) LARQUET BILGCK FLGOWG UNIT The present invention relates to parquet flooring and more particularly to multiple parquet floor block units.

Prefmished relatively thin, slatted parquet flooring block units as disclosed in Tibbals U.S. Pat. No. 3,128,511 have been successfully used for many years in various types of structures. In the past, such individual block units have been layed in mastic directly on wood or concrete slab subfloors. Such individual blocks as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,128,51 l have usually been in 6X6 inch squares whereby in the laying of a floor, each individual block is handled and fitted into place separately by the workmen. A similar block is disclosed in Tibbals US. Pat. No. 3,118,804 in which the slats making up the block are held in assembly by a paper-felt strip adhesively secured to the nonwear surfaces of the slats.

It is known to secure such blocks in parquet fashion by staples having legs driven into the adjacent block edges to form multiple block units for accelerated installation of a floor. It is also known to secure such blocks in parquet pattern by adhering the blocks to some form of semirigid underlayment such as Celotex for sound deadening and like purposes. Use of a flexible material to join square edged individual slats into subblock units and subblocks into larger assembly is likewise known. Furthermore, in the installation of conventional strip floors it is a known practice to cover the subfloor with felt, building paper, cork, etc. to act as a dust, sound, air moisture barrier. There is also known vinyl tile and carpet floor covering materials incorporating foam cushioning. It is also known to provide foam as insulation in wood structures including floormg.

Objects of the present invention include the provision of an improved wood parquet block floor system, multiple wood parquet flooring block units for accelerated laying of a floor, a foam cushioned wooden parquet floor block assembly having a built-in dust, sound, air and moisture barrier and an improved cushioned parquet block floor which is relatively inexpensive.

The invention features a plurality of individual parquet block units, each individual block having tongue and groove formations on the perimetrical edges thereof which cooperate with tongue and groove formations, respectively, on adjacent blocks within a multiblock unit. A flexible, nonbrittle adhesive bead, applied to the tongue and groove of the block, holds the block units in assembly at least prior to laying. The flexible, rubbery, adhesive bead maintains the edges between adjacent blocks spaced apart a short distance to permit thermal and moisture expansion and flexibility of the multiple block structure so as to conform to uneven subfloor system. A compressible foam cushioning material, preferably a closed cell foam, as for example a closed cell polyethylene foam, is adhesively secured to the under or nonwear surfaces of all blocks in a unit which foam cooperates with the adhesive joint at the tongue and groove connections to maintain the blocks in assembly and afford a built-in dust, sound, air and moisture barrier. After installation the adhesive joint between tongue and grooves tends to fail in shear because of relative movement between tongue and groove surfaces caused by walking on the floor. However, since the adhesive is nonbrittle and flexible, noise, as for example squeaking, is diminished or absent. While in locations where moisture or extremely heavy traffic conditions are likely to develop or in unusually long run areas of floor, such units usually will be laid in a mastic or other adhesive, the blocks may also be laid dry with only the perimeter blocks of a floor being secured to the subfloor. For piecing out at walls, transitions to other flooring, etc. the units may be sawed or otherwise dimensioned in the usual manner.

The above and other objects, advantages and features of the invention will become more apparent taken in conjunctionwith the attached drawings in which:

FIG. I is an isometric perspective cutaway view of a floor consisting of multiunit parquet blocks constructed in accordance with the invention,

FIG. 2 is a bottom perspective view of a multiple parquet block unit constructed in accordance with the invention with the foam cushioning partially removed to expose the under surface of the individual blocks, and

FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken on lines 3-3 of FIG. 1.

Multiple unit parquet flooring blocks 10 illustrated in FIG. 2 are composed of a plurality of individual parquet flooring blocks 11 as manufactured by the process and apparatus disclosed in US. Pat. No. 2,983,295, for example. The individual slats 12 of a group of slats forming a parquet block may be formed from otherwise scrap material left over from the manufacturer of conventional hardwood flooring strips. Typically, such slats have a wear surface length of about 6 inches, a width of about twenty-eight thirty-seconds inch (the end or terminal slats being somewhat less) and a thickness of about five-sixteenths inch. The slats 12 in each individual block 11 are held in assembly by a pair of small gauge ductile wires which have a low inherent resiliency. Typically, such wires may be aluminum or soft steel with a diameter of about 0.050 inch. However, other forms of slat binding elements or means may be used, as for example adhesive, paper, metal foil, plastic or cloth strips, webs, etc. and the binding elements may be located in grooves in the edge of the block. As shown in FIG. 2, the wires terminate short of the outside edges of the block where deformed or deflected ends 19 of the wire binding elements form an elongated staple and effectively maintain a group of slats in assembly while maintaining a desired spacing 30 between adjacent slats in the assembly sufficient to accommodate normal expansion and contraction of the slats (for slats having a wear surface dimension of about twenty-eight thirty-seconds inch a spacing of about 0.008 inch is generally sufficient.) The finishing material (not shown) applied to the upper block surfaces bridges the interstices formed by spacing 30 so as to conceal the same while still accommodating slat expansion. The individual slats 12 of each individual block 11 is, in a preferred embodiment, approximately 6 inches long (wear surface) twenty-eight thirty-seconds inch wide and approximately frve-sixteenths of an inch thick. As shown, seven (more or less, larger or smaller, slats may be used) slats in assembly form a block having a wear surface 12 which is approximately 6 inches by 6 inches (after the tongue and grooves have been cut) so that four such blocks form a multiple block unit having a 12 inch by 12 inch wear surface. This size is easily handled by workmen for accelerated installation of a floor. As disclosed in Tibbals U.S. Pat. No. 2,983,295, individual slats 12 of parquet blocks 11 are assembled on an arcuate sur face or drum (not shown) with the nonwear surfaces 28 being outward and wires 14 are urged into grooves 15 so that when the blocks having the wires in groove 15 are removed from the drum, the expansion space 30 between adjacent slats is formed to accommodate thermal and moisture expansion and contraction in the individual slats.

Each block 11 has tongue and groove formations on the edges thereof. Thus, transverse to the longitudinal dimension of the individual slats is tongue element 16 and longitudinal to the length of the terminal slats is groove 17 cooperating, respectively, with tongue and groove formations on an adjacent similar block.

As shown in FIG. 3, the tongue and groove connection between adjacent blocks is of the taper lock type in that the tongue and groove have complementary sloping surfaces. Furthermore, the wear surface edge extends slightly beyond the lower or nonwear surface edges. A flexible, rubbery, nonbrittle adhesive or glue bead 40, preferably a hot melt adhesive, is applied to the lower (FIG. 3) surface 41 of tongue 16 which, preferably has been preheated to permit hot melt adhesive to better penetrate the grain of the wood. In application of flexible adhesive bead 40, it is preferred that no adhesive be pennitted to reach edge 47 of tongue 16. For this reason, in the assembly process, two adjacent blocks may be moved along the assembly line (not shown), nonwear surfaces 28 up, tongue and groove in interfltting relation and at a first glue station they are tented upwardly to partially withdraw the tongues 16 from grooves 17 along one pairof aligned tongue and groove joints. At that time, the joint is preheated and a line or bead of adhesive is layed along the tongue surface 41, the edge 48 serving as a dam or stop to the adhesive during application thereof. After the adhesive bead 40 is applied, the blocks are urged to approximately a common plane to cause the tongue 16 to assume interfitting relation in groove 17 in the adjacent block. The adhesive is cooled or caused to set when the adjacent blocks are in approximately a common plane to produce the space 55 as described more fully hereafter. In this way, a line of flexible adhesive is formed between the edge 48 and the upper surface 49 of the grooved slot and the lower surface 41 of tongue 16. A similar flexible adhesive bead is formed along each tongue and groove connection between blocks within the multiple block assembly. Adhesive bead M) is a high grade hot melt adhesive which after cooling or curing is relatively soft, flexible and pliant and its purpose is to main tain the blocks in assembly prior to installation in a floor. These four adhesive beads 40 are sufiicient to hold the four blocks in assembly, even in the absence of foam layer 20, to permit workmen to lay four blocks at a time. Advantageously, the glue bead 40 is cooled in the manner described so that when the multiblock unit is flat, small space 55 is produced between the edges of adjacent blocks comprising a multiblock unit. In addition to accommodating the cushioning effect, this crack or space permits the unit to have the necessary flexibility so that the multiblock unit will conform to uneven subfloors and also accommodate additional expansion in the plane of the floor. However, space 55 is about 0.0l inch and is not large enough to be unsightly.

Foam layer or sheet 20 is adhesively secured to all blocks by a layer of adhesive 21 which may be a hot melt adhesive. However, this adhesive may be of lower quality adhesive or glue and is much less expensive than that used to form flexible adhesive bead 40 and need not be flexible. Adhesive layer 21 may be a low grade byproduct-type hot melt adhesive which is relatively inexpensive. Foam layer 20 has a thickness of about one-third of the thickness of the blocks. This thickness is sufficient to provide the cushioning and sound deadening properties desired and, at the same time, it is not thick enough in relation to thin blocks to permit wood failure or disengagement of the tongue and groove connection between adjacent blocks as when the foam is compressed at the joint between blocks by a heavy concentrated load. Nevertheless, foam layer 20 is thick enough and of sufi'rcient density to provide insulation, reduce air infiltration from below, retard moisture from rising through the floor to the wood slats, and a quieter, softer walking floor. In the case of concrete subfloors the foam spaces the wood members from the subfloor so that moisture forming on or coming through the concrete does not directly reach the wood members.

Preferably, the slats are predominately quarter grain to take advantage of the lower expansion factor thereof and the aesthetic appearance of such slats. Prior to being assembled into multiple parquet block units, the individual blocks are finished by application of penetrating sealers, tinting coats and a top coat such as wax, all of which are preferably infrared baked on. Although preferable, the individual slats need not be of the same kind of wood, for example, mixed slats of red and white oak may be used as well as hard maple, white ash, black walnut, etc. all of which may be finished to reveal individual grain patterns and grain variety. Preferably, the number of individual prefinished blocks 12 is four although smaller or larger units may be formed in accordance with the invention. As disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,128,51 l slats 12 are held in assemby by knurled wires clinched into the terminal slats of the blocks. However, as indicated above any other slat securement means may be utilized for purposes of this invention.

It is preferred that the individual blocks 12 be prefinished prior to having the foam layer 20 applied thereto. The reason for this is the difficulty in sanding and finishing blocks where grains run in different directions as when the blocks are assembled in parquet fashion. Further, because of the vigorous finishing steps such as sanding, tongue and grooving etc. required as well as the buffing and polishing and infrared baking of the surface finishing, these steps can best be done prior to assembling the individual blocks into a multiple block unit and prior to application of the flexible foam layer 20.

While in the preferred form of the invention the individual blocks 11 are constituted by a plurality of slats held in assembly by slat binding or connecting elements, the invention is not limited thereto. For example, in place of multislat blocks lll, laminated or plywood blocks as well as other wood block materials may be used.

The addition of a layer of foam 20 makes the blocks more expensive. However, in the case of the dry-type installation described herein this increase in cost is offset by a decrease in the amount of time to lay a floor and elimination of mastic or other such adhesive so that in general the cost of a dry installed floor may be about the same as without the foam.

In contrast to thick blocks, there is an important relationship between the thickness of thin blocks and the thickness of the foam and foam density. Since it is important that the blocks have tongue and groove connections in order to minimize or eliminate over wood between blocks, if the foam layer is too thick or too easily compressed, wood failure tends to occur in thin blocks. For example, with a 5/16-inch thick block having conventional tongue and groove formations on the edges thereof a 3/ l 6-inch thick foam layer would present too much compression or give under such concentrated loading tending to wood over stress or failure. In the preferred practice of the invention there is provided a %-inch thick layer of closed cell foam (having relatively small cells and a relative density of about moderate density) for blocks having a 5/16-inch thickness.

Although the blocks may be laid directly in a mastic or other adhesive it may be desirable in some situations (as for example suspended slabs in high rise apartment buildings) to lay the blocks dry, e.g., directly on the subfloor for relatively small floor areas. A dry installation does have an advantage in that foam cells near the surface fill with mastic and the foam may lose a small amount of its softness or cushioning effect. If desired, the foam may be provided with a well-known pressure sensitive adhesive layer on the exterior surface. in a dry installation the only place adhesive or other block securement is used is at the lateral edges of a floor constructed with block units of this invention. The reason for this is that even though the blocks are compensated for slat expansion by built-in expansion joints 30 and interblock spaces 55, there may be an overall expansion of a floor in the plane thereof. Accordingly, it is conventional practice to leave a 1-inch expansion joint 50 at walls (such as wall 51) and like structures or abutments which are subsequently covered by a baseboard and/or molding, finish wood work, etc. (not shown). Hence, in dry installation it is preferred to secure the block units laid at the perimeter of a floor to the subfloor so as to prevent block migration. Accordingly, a securement means 60 which may be a tape having pressure sensitive adhesive on both sides, or conventional mastic, is applied to the perimeter of the floor next to the walls and like structures where an expansion joint 50 may be provided. This securement is soft and permanently pliant to accommodate expansion into the expansion joint 50.

While a preferred embodiment of the invention has been described in detail, it will be understood that modifications might be made without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.

lclaim:-

1. In a multiple block parquet flooring block assembly composed of a plurality of individual parquet blocks, each block having tongue and groove formations on the perimetrical edges thereof interfitted with and cooperating, respectively, with groove and tongue formations on an adjacent parquet flooring block of said unit, the improvements which comprise, in combination,

a cured adhesive bead between the under horizontal surface portions of each cooperating tongue and lower horizontal groove surface only of individual blocks in said multiple block parquet flooring block assembly,

said adhesive bead being a hot melt applied adhesive having a permanently relatively soft, permanently flexible character and maintaining the edges between and adjacent blocks in said unit spaced a short distance apart to permit expansion or contraction and flexibility of the said multiple block structure so as to conform to an uneven subfloor system in the plane of the block, and

a single thin sheet of closed cell flexible foam commonly secured to the nonwear surfaces of all of said individual blocks,

whereby individual parquet flooring blocks in said multiple block parquet flooring block structure prior to being laid on a subfloor surface are held in a semirigid parquet block oriented pattern by said adhesiveand said flexible foam sheet and said sheet of flexible foam providing an air, moisture, heat and sound barrier and cushioning for said blocks and permitting use of said block assembly on an uneven subfloor surface.

2. A multiple block parquet flooring block assembly consisting of a plurality of individual parquet blocks, each individual block having tongue and groove formations on the perimetrical edges thereof interfitted with and cooperating, respectively, with groove and tongue formations on an adjacent parquet flooring block of said multiple block assembly a cured adhesive bead between the under horizontal surface portions of each interfitted cooperating tongue and lower horizontal groove surfaces only of individual blocks in said multiple block structure,

said cured adhesive bead being a hot melt applied adhesive which is permanently flexible and soft and maintaining the edges between adjacent blocks in said unit spaced a short distance apart to permit contraction or expansion and flexibility of the said multiple block assembly so as to conform to an uneven subfloor surface in the plane of the block, and

whereby individual parquet flooring blocks in said multiblock parquet flooring block assembly are held in a semirigid, parquet oriented pattern by said flexible adhesive beads.

3. The invention defined in claim 2, including a layer of foam secured to the nonwear surfaces of said blocks and forming a built-in dust, sound, air and moisture barrier for said blocks and cooperating with said flexible adhesive bead to maintain said blocks in said parquet oriented pattern prior to installation of same on a subfloor and permitting use of said multiple block unit on an uneven subfloor said foam being of the closed cell type having relatively small cells.

4. The invention defined in claim 3 wherein said blocks are about 5/ 16-inch thick and said foam layer is about Aa-inch thick.

5. The invention defined in claim 3, wherein said foam layer is secured to the nonwear surfaces of said blocks by a cured, low grade, hot melt adhesive film between the nonwear surfaces of all of the blocks in said multiple block parquet flooring block unit and the opposing surfaces of said foam layer.

6. A floor system comprising, in combination,

a plurality of thin wooden floor blocks, each block having tongue and groove formations on the perimetrical edges thereof, said blocks being arranged in parquet block formation with tongues and grooves of adjacent blocks in interfitting relation and said individual blocks forming the wear surface of said floor system, saidthin wooden floor blocks being about 5/16 inch thick,

a cured adhesive bead between the under horizontal surface portions and lower horizontal surface portion only of a groove into which it is interfltted,

a layer of cellular foam adhesively secured by a hot melt adhesive to said blocks, said layer of cellular foam being thinner than said blocks and resting on the surface of the subfloor of said floor system, said foam being a closed cell foam and havin a thickness of about one-third the thickness of saidflalocks, said foam layer forming an air,

moisture, heat and sound barrier and cushioning for said blocks,

said blocks terminating short of the perimeter of said subfloor to accommodate overall expansion of said floor in the plane thereof, and

pliant means for impeding substantial lateral movement of at least the perimetrical blocks forming said floor wear surface which comprises means yieldingly securing said perimetrical blocks to. said subfloor.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US2027292 *25 Mar 19327 Ene 1936Bradley Lumber Company Of ArkaBlock flooring
US2091476 *12 Dic 193531 Ago 1937Armin ElmendorfFlexible wood flooring
US3014829 *24 Jun 195826 Dic 1961Ernest CurtinAdhesived carpet blocks
US3082488 *16 May 195726 Mar 1963Mortimer NusbaumFloor or like tile
US3121977 *8 Feb 195625 Feb 1964Bersudsky SidneyBuilding panel structure
US3200553 *6 Sep 196317 Ago 1965Forrest Ind IncComposition board flooring strip
FR63687E * Título no disponible
GB305801A * Título no disponible
GB670646A * Título no disponible
GB812671A * Título no disponible
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3720027 *22 Feb 197113 Mar 1973Bruun & SoerensenFloor structure
US3828503 *4 May 197313 Ago 1974Mero Werke KgResilient floor, especially for gymnasiums
US3908053 *11 Abr 197323 Sep 1975Karl HettichFinished parquet element
US4170859 *14 Oct 197716 Oct 1979James CounihanComposite structure and assembly joint for a floor system
US4360992 *5 Feb 198130 Nov 1982Marino Vincent JDimensionally stable wood flooring
US4388788 *31 Jul 198021 Jun 1983Penn Wood Products Co.Wood floor panel
US4512840 *16 Jul 198123 Abr 1985Marino Vincent JMethod and apparatus for wood flooring manufacture
US4567704 *2 Nov 19774 Feb 1986Tile Council Of America, Inc.Resilient ceramic tile flooring
US4799982 *7 Dic 198724 Ene 1989Charmasson & HolzMethod of molding monolithic building structure
US4807416 *23 Mar 198828 Feb 1989Council Of Forest Industries Of British Columbia Plywood Technical CentrePlywood planel
US4819932 *28 Feb 198611 Abr 1989Trotter Jr PhilCushioned
US4953335 *26 Abr 19884 Sep 1990Eidai Industry Co., Ltd.Decorative board having hot-melt resin joints
US5103614 *26 Sep 198914 Abr 1992Eidai Industry Co., Ltd.Soundproofing woody flooring
US5165816 *15 Feb 199124 Nov 1992Council Of Forest IndustriesTongue and groove profile
US5253464 *19 Abr 199119 Oct 1993Boen Bruk A/SResilient sports floor
US5303526 *21 Ene 199319 Abr 1994Robbins, Inc.Resilient portable floor system
US5361554 *6 Nov 19928 Nov 1994Robert BryanPrefabricated deck system
US5367853 *5 Mar 199329 Nov 1994Bryan; RobertPrefabricated deck system
US5403414 *11 Jun 19934 Abr 1995Corston; CharlesMethod and apparatus for construction of flooring to prevent squeaks
US5433052 *2 Mar 199218 Jul 1995Robbins, Inc.Kerfed hardwood floor system
US5566930 *28 Feb 199522 Oct 1996Robbins, Inc.Kerfed hardwood floor system
US5661937 *17 Abr 19952 Sep 1997Johnson-Doppler LumberMezzanine floor panel
US5804019 *31 Ene 19978 Sep 1998Triangle Pacific CorporationApparatus and method for applying adhesive and release paper to wooden flooring strips
US5816304 *4 Ago 19976 Oct 1998Triangle Pacific CorporationApparatus and method for increasing the flexibility of and straightening flooring strips
US5830549 *3 Nov 19953 Nov 1998Triangle Pacific CorporationGlue-down prefinished flooring product
US5894700 *4 Ago 199720 Abr 1999Triangle Pacific CorporationGlue-down prefinished wood flooring product
US5900099 *30 Ene 19984 May 1999Sweet; James C.Method of making a glue-down prefinished wood flooring product
US5935668 *4 Ago 199710 Ago 1999Triangle Pacific CorporationWooden flooring strip with enhanced flexibility and straightness
US6156402 *30 Abr 19995 Dic 2000Triangle Pacific Corp.Wooden flooring strip with enhanced flexibility and straightness
US6182413 *27 Jul 19996 Feb 2001Award Hardwood Floors, L.L.P.Engineered hardwood flooring system having acoustic attenuation characteristics
US62132528 Nov 199610 Abr 2001Royal Mat International Inc.Sound absorbing substrate
US6383322 *12 May 20007 May 2002Wen Ping WangConveying; compression; drying
US6408584 *29 Nov 199925 Jun 2002Rhonda Annette RodriguezPre-fabricated wood underlayment and tile system
US6550206 *12 Jul 200122 Abr 2003Chiu-Ying LeeWood floor assembly
US6652184 *21 Jun 200125 Nov 2003Keith KnafelcApparatus for roadways and the like
US6766622 *20 Jul 199927 Jul 2004Unilin Beheer B.V.Floor panel for floor covering and method for making the floor panel
US679400125 Jul 200221 Sep 2004Mannington Mills, Inc.Flooring with a 2-part adhesive
US6804926 *30 Jun 200019 Oct 2004Akzenta Paneele + Profile GmbhMethod for laying and interlocking panels
US692072316 Ago 200126 Jul 2005Dodge-Regupol, IncorporatedImpact sound insulation
US69229635 Jun 20012 Ago 2005Bondo CorporationMoisture and condensation barrier for building structures
US692296525 Jul 20032 Ago 2005Ilinois Tool Works Inc.Bonded interlocking flooring
US70659354 Ago 200427 Jun 2006Akzenta Paneele & Profile GmbhMethod for laying and interlocking panels
US7185469 *14 Mar 20036 Mar 2007Advantage Architectural Products, Ltd.Modular raised wall paneling system
US73869633 Feb 200517 Jun 2008Valinge Innovation AbLocking system and flooring board
US739862530 Ene 200615 Jul 2008Valinge Innovation AbLocking system for floorboards
US744138414 Ago 200228 Oct 2008Columbia Insurance CompanyPre-glued tongue and groove flooring
US744479117 Nov 20004 Nov 2008Valinge Innovation AbLocking system and flooring board
US74515784 Jul 200218 Nov 2008Akzenta Paneele + Profile GmbhPanel and fastening system for such a panel
US745243312 May 200418 Nov 2008Lauren Agrisystems, Ltd.Cushioned flooring system and methods for making and installing the same
US745487522 Oct 200425 Nov 2008Valinge Aluminium AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US748433818 Sep 20013 Feb 2009Valinge Innovation AbLocking system, floorboard comprising such a locking system, as well as method for making floorboards
US751658813 Ene 200514 Abr 2009Valinge Aluminium AbFloor covering and locking systems
US75845839 Jul 20078 Sep 2009Valinge Innovation AbResilient groove
US7603824 *14 Feb 200620 Oct 2009Pamasia, Inc.Flooring construction
US763488419 Mar 200822 Dic 2009Valinge Innovation AGMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US76370682 Feb 200429 Dic 2009Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floorboards
US76445544 May 200612 Ene 2010Unilin Beheer B.V. Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7644556 *15 Nov 200712 Ene 2010Correct Building Products, L.L.C.Planking system and method
US764455731 Ago 200512 Ene 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapMethod of making floor panels with edge connectors
US766123831 Ago 200516 Feb 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., besloten, vennootshapFloor panels with edge connectors
US767700129 Oct 200416 Mar 2010Valinge Innovation AbFlooring systems and methods for installation
US77215039 Jul 200725 May 2010Valinge Innovation AbLocking system comprising a combination lock for panels
US775745231 Mar 200320 Jul 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floorboards
US77574539 Jun 200620 Jul 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US777500725 Jul 200217 Ago 2010Valinge Innovation AbSystem for joining building panels
US777959626 Ago 200424 Ago 2010Valinge Innovation AbLocking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US779828720 Ene 200521 Sep 2010Serious Materials, Inc.Acoustical ceiling panels
US779941031 Ago 200721 Sep 2010Serious Materials, Inc.Acoustical sound proofing material with improved damping at select frequencies and methods for manufacturing same
US78024119 Jul 200728 Sep 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US7810297 *16 Jun 200612 Oct 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US782335925 Ago 20062 Nov 2010Valinge Innovation AbFloor panel with a tongue, groove and a strip
US784114430 Mar 200530 Nov 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US784114510 Ago 200730 Nov 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US78411509 Jul 200730 Nov 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floorboards
US784514025 Mar 20047 Dic 2010Valinge Innovation AbFlooring and method for installation and manufacturing thereof
US7856789 *27 Jun 200628 Dic 2010Akzenta Paneele & Profile GmbhMethod for laying and interlocking panels
US786148229 Jun 20074 Ene 2011Valinge Innovation AbLocking system comprising a combination lock for panels
US78661109 Jul 200711 Ene 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US788376312 Abr 20078 Feb 2011Serious Materials, Inc.Acoustical sound proofing material with controlled water-vapor permeability and methods for manufacturing same
US78864972 Dic 200415 Feb 2011Valinge Innovation AbFloorboard, system and method for forming a flooring, and a flooring formed thereof
US7892617 *13 Jun 200622 Feb 2011Tarkett SasPanel, in particular for floor covering
US78965719 Oct 19991 Mar 2011Akzenta Paneele + Profile GmbhPanel and panel fastening system
US790881511 Jul 200722 Mar 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US79088188 May 200822 Mar 2011Serious Materials, Inc.Methods of manufacturing acoustical sound proofing materials with optimized fracture characteristics
US7913730 *24 Ene 200729 Mar 2011Advantage Architectural Products, Ltd.Modular raised wall paneling system and method of manufacture
US791491430 Jun 200729 Mar 2011Serious Materials, Inc.Low embodied energy sheathing panels with optimal water vapor permeance and methods of making same
US792196527 Oct 200412 Abr 2011Serious Materials, Inc.Soundproof assembly and methods for manufacturing same
US792623420 Mar 200319 Abr 2011Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards with decorative grooves
US792623931 Mar 200619 Abr 2011Columbia Insurance CompanyFlooring profile
US79308625 Ene 200726 Abr 2011Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards having a resilent surface layer with a decorative groove
US798004125 Ago 201019 Jul 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US798764529 Mar 20072 Ago 2011Serious Materials, Inc.Noise isolating underlayment
US801115512 Jul 20106 Sep 2011Valinge Innovation AbLocking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US802848626 Jul 20024 Oct 2011Valinge Innovation AbFloor panel with sealing means
US80298814 Nov 20054 Oct 2011Serious Energy, Inc.Radio frequency wave reducing material and methods for manufacturing same
US803307427 May 201011 Oct 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US803836322 Ene 200918 Oct 2011Akzenta Paneele+Profile GmbHPanel and panel fastening system
US80423114 Dic 200725 Oct 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US80424844 Oct 200525 Oct 2011Valinge Innovation AbAppliance and method for surface treatment of a board shaped material and floorboard
US806110420 May 200522 Nov 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US80791967 Dic 201020 Dic 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels
US811296715 May 200914 Feb 2012Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels
US81134951 Dic 200814 Feb 2012Downey Paul CVibration damper
US8181416 *13 Jun 201122 May 2012Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US818141730 Nov 200622 May 2012Serious Energy, Inc.Acoustical sound proofing material and methods for manufacturing same
US818173826 May 201022 May 2012Serious Energy, Inc.Acoustical sound proofing material with improved damping at select frequencies and methods for manufacturing same
US821507815 Feb 200510 Jul 2012Välinge Innovation Belgium BVBABuilding panel with compressed edges and method of making same
US82348303 Feb 20117 Ago 2012Välinge Innovations ABMechanical locking system for floor panels
US823483111 May 20117 Ago 2012Välinge Innovation ABLocking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US82404301 Sep 201114 Ago 2012Downey Paul CNoise and vibration mitigating mat
US82454778 Abr 200321 Ago 2012Välinge Innovation ABFloorboards for floorings
US824547811 Mar 201121 Ago 2012Välinge Innovation ABSet of floorboards with sealing arrangement
US826150712 May 200611 Sep 2012Columbia Insurance CompanyFlooring profile
US82930588 Nov 201023 Oct 2012Valinge Innovation AbFloorboard, system and method for forming a flooring, and a flooring formed thereof
US833799331 Mar 200825 Dic 2012Serious Energy, Inc.Low embodied energy wallboards and methods of making same
US834191422 Oct 20101 Ene 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US834191521 Oct 20051 Ene 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible tongue
US83531407 Nov 200815 Ene 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical snap folding
US83598051 Ago 201129 Ene 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US8375679 *30 Jun 200919 Feb 2013Flooring Industries Limited, SarlMethods for manufacturing and packaging floor panels, devices used thereby, as well as floor panel and packed set of floor panels
US838147711 Jul 200826 Feb 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible tongue
US83873275 Oct 20115 Mar 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US839786424 Abr 200719 Mar 2013Serious Energy, Inc.Acoustical sound proofing material with improved fire resistance and methods for manufacturing same
US8402709 *11 Jul 200626 Mar 2013Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US842425124 Sep 200923 Abr 2013Serious Energy, Inc.Sound Proofing material with improved damping and structural integrity
US844840216 Dic 201128 May 2013Välinge Innovation ABMechanical locking of building panels
US849585110 Sep 200430 Jul 2013Serious Energy, Inc.Acoustical sound proofing material and methods for manufacturing same
US84995217 Nov 20086 Ago 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical snap folding and an installation method to connect such panels
US850525730 Ene 200913 Ago 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels
US851103118 Jul 201220 Ago 2013Valinge Innovation AbSet F floorboards with overlapping edges
US852828921 Mar 201210 Sep 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US854423023 Dic 20101 Oct 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US854423425 Oct 20121 Oct 2013Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical snap folding
US855602924 Jul 201215 Oct 2013Paul C. DowneyNoise and vibration mitigating mat
US85729222 Jul 20125 Nov 2013Valinge Flooring Technology AbMechanical locking of floor panels with a glued tongue
US85960133 Abr 20133 Dic 2013Valinge Innovation AbBuilding panel with a mechanical locking system
US861382613 Sep 201224 Dic 2013Valinge Innovation AbFloorboard, system and method for forming a flooring, and a flooring formed thereof
US862786230 Ene 200914 Ene 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels, methods to install and uninstall panels, a method and an equipment to produce the locking system, a method to connect a displaceable tongue to a panel and a tongue blank
US8640424 *8 Ago 20134 Feb 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US865082611 Jul 201218 Feb 2014Valinge Flooring Technology AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US86777144 Feb 201325 Mar 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US868369811 Mar 20111 Abr 2014Valinge Innovation AbMethod for making floorboards with decorative grooves
US868951225 Oct 20078 Abr 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical folding
US870765014 Sep 201129 Abr 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US87138862 Nov 20096 May 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical lockings of floor panels and a tongue blank
US873306521 Mar 201227 May 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US876334014 Ago 20121 Jul 2014Valinge Flooring Technology AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US876334114 Nov 20131 Jul 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking of floor panels with vertical folding
US20090260748 *30 Jun 200922 Oct 2009Mark CappelleMethods for manufacturing and packaging floor panels, devices used thereby, as well as floor panel and packed set of floor panels
US20120042595 *22 Abr 201023 Feb 2012Lode De BoeFloor panel
US20120198785 *8 Feb 20129 Ago 2012Christina L. BarstowModular platform and interconnectability
USRE4194525 Jul 200723 Nov 2010Ecore International Inc.Impact sound insulation
WO1984003321A1 *24 Feb 198430 Ago 1984Edouard Georges Paul GuilminMethod for making a parquet from end grain wood blocks
WO1991013755A1 *5 Mar 199119 Sep 1991Martello Giovanni DalA paneling board with a wooden sight surface, and method of manufacturing same
WO2008078183A2 *17 Dic 20073 Jul 2008Flooring Ind Ltd SarlFloor element, locking system for floor elements, floor covering and method for composing such floor elements to a floor covering
WO2009089624A1 *19 Ene 200923 Jul 2009Kelly GibsonFloor panelling system
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.52/384, 52/390, 52/592.4, 52/436
Clasificación internacionalE04F15/16, E04F15/022
Clasificación cooperativaE04F15/022, E04F15/16
Clasificación europeaE04F15/16, E04F15/022