Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS3673548 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación27 Jun 1972
Fecha de presentación19 Oct 1970
Fecha de prioridad19 Oct 1970
También publicado comoCA936601A, CA936601A1, DE2151479A1
Número de publicaciónUS 3673548 A, US 3673548A, US-A-3673548, US3673548 A, US3673548A
InventoresWilliam R Mattingly Jr, David S Goodman
Cesionario originalItt
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Printed circuit board connector
US 3673548 A
Resumen
A printed circuit board connector having a plurality of contacts mounted in the connector housing. The contacts are formed of a spring contact portion having a contacting surface and a terminal portion interconnected by a central mounting portion. The contact is inserted in the housing in an unstressed condition and abuts a housing inner wall member upon partial insertion, the contact being positioned adjacent the inner wall member upon full insertion into the housing with a portion of the contact abutting the inner wall member. The contact surface of the contact is normally adjacent the top end of the housing, remote from the contact portion adjacent the inner wall member. Moreover, the inner wall member may define an edge against which the printed circuit board engages to limit its movement upon insertion of the board into the housing. The contact mounting portion may be provided with means for engaging the housing so as to correctly position the contact in the housing.
Imágenes(1)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

United States Patent Mattingly, Jr. et al. 1 June 27, 1972 541 PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD Prima y Examiner-Marvin Champion ONNECT R Assistant Examiner-Lawrence .l. Staab C O Attorney-C. Cornell Remsen, Jr., Walter J, Baum, Paul W. [72] Inventors: William R. Mattingly, Jr., Santa Ana; Hemminger, Charles L. Johnson, Jr. and Thomas E. Kristof- David S. Goodman, Orange, both of Calif. fel'sol'l [73] Assignee: lntemational Telephone and Telegraph Corporation, New York, NY. 57] ABSTRACT [22] Filed: 1970 A printed circuit board connector having a plurality of con- [211 Appl No; 81 826 tacts mounted in the connector housing. The contacts are formed of a spring contact portion having a contacting surface and a terminal portion interconnected by a central mounting [52] US. Cl. ..339/ 186 M, 339/17 L, 339/221 M portion. The contact is inserted in the housing in an unstressed [51 1 Int. Cl. ..H05k 1/07, HOlr 13/64 condition an abuts a ho ing inner wall member upon partial [58] Field of Search. --339/ l 7 L, 17 LC, 176 MP, 221 M, insertion, the contact being positioned adjacent the inner wall 339/134 M 186 M member upon full insertion into the housing with a portion of the contact abutting the inner wall member. The contact sur- [56] Reerenm Cited face of the contact is normally adjacent the top end of the housing, remote from the contact portion adjacent the inner UNITED STATES PATENTS wall member. Moreover, the inner wall member may define an edge against which the printed circuit board engages to limit 2.718 3/1965 La Lon MP its movement upon insertion of the board into the housing. 3,518,610 6970 Goodman et 176 MP The contact mounting portion may be provided with means 3,405,386 10/ 1 968 McKee ..339/ l 76 MP for engaging the housing so as to correctly position the contact 3,530,422 9/1970 Goodman ..339/176 MP in the housing. 3,614,714 l0/l971 Silverstein ..339/l86 M FORElGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATlONS 4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures 1,099,355 1/1968 Great Britain ..339/l76 MP PATENTEDJum I972 U v a o w Wu M j w w P. M 50. M 'IIIIQIIA m 1 11 m W1 Il fl NNANNNAV I w 0 m l mu PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD CONNECTOR The invention relates in general to printed circuit board connectors and, more particularly, to an electrical contact mounted in a connector which is pre-loaded at the base of the connector.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Conventional printed circuit board connectors utilize contacts to electrically connect the printed circuit board connector to electrical equipment or other printed circuit board connectors. Typically, these contacts are pre-loaded at the tip of the contact near the entry in the connector housing where the printed circuit board enters the housing. However, it has been found that damage to the contact would occur if the contact is dislodged because of the exposure of the loaded portion of the contact to external forces. Alternative arrangements for loading the contact to provide the desired contacting force has utilized the insertion of the printed circuit board connector itself to position the contact by movement of the contact so that the desired contact force can be provided. Alternatively, arrangements have been provided wherein an external member acts on the contact after or during the insertion of the printed circuit board into the contact. These arrangements have been found to be complex and rather expensive. Moreover, it has been found that the resultant contacting forces were not as desired.

In order to overcome the attendant disadvantages of prior art printed circuit board connectors, the present invention provides an electrical contact which, upon insertion into the connector, provides the desired pre-load at the base of the contact so that when a printed circuit board is inserted into the connector, deflection of the contact by the board will provide the desired force between the contact and the circuit board conductors. Moreover, the contact can be easily inserted into the connector to the correct desired position with a minimum of effort and skill.

The advantages of this invention, both as to its construction and mode of operation will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings which are to be regarded as merely illustrative:

FIG. 1 depicts an exploded perspective view of a preferred embodiment of an electrical contact prior to insertion of the contact into the connector body;

FIG. 2 shows a cross sectional view of the electrical connector body utilizing the contact of FIG. 1 with the contact partially inserted into the connector body;

FIG. 3 depicts the electrical contact of FIG. 2 fully inserted into the electrical body;

FIG. 4 illustrates the cross sectional view of the connector body and contact as positioned in FIG. 3 taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 shows the connector body of FIGS. 1-4 with a printed circuit board inserted therein.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, there is shown in FIG. 1 a preferred embodiment of the electrical connector housing 12 having a plurality of electrical contacts 14 which are to be mounted therein. The contacts 14 are formed of a terminal portion 16 and a spring contact portion 18 which are interconnected by a central mounting portion 22. The contacts 14 are preferably stamped from suitable metal stock to provide the desired strength for the metallic contacts. The temiinal portion 16 is generally square in cross-section and may be tapered as at 24 to facilitate insertion of the contact into the connector housing 12.

The spring contact portion 18 is shown as bifurcated by means of a slot 26 which opens at the top end of the contact to provide redundant contact points to the printed circuit board conductor as well as multiple frequency of vibrations since each portion is not identical. Normally, the spring portion contains a shank end 28 which interconnects the mounting portion 22 to the bifurcated end of the contact. As shown in the drawing, the spring portion is tapered from the shank portion 28 to the outer end 32 of the contact. By tapering the spring contact portion in thickness upwardly a predetermined spring rate can be provided within the spring portion. The spring portion 18 is bent in a first direction at the shank 28 and then reverse bent in the opposite direction as at 34 in the vicinity of the slot 26 until finally the tip portion terminates at outer end 32. The portion 28 and portion 34 both may be curved along a predetermined radius with the junction of the two portions tangential. The inner side surface of the contact forms the initial point of pre load with the insulator housing at point 36 on the contact surface, as shown in FIG. 2. Further, the final point of contact, as will be explained hereinafter, is the point 37.

The central mounting portion 22 is of approximately equal thickness as the shank 28 at its junction with the shank, but is of reduced width, thus forming downwardly facing shoulders 38. Further, the sides of the mounting portion contain barbs 42 which extend outwardly and are utilized to affix the contact to the connector housing. Further, directly below the barbs, a slight bulge 43 in the contact provides the desired stability of the contact terminal area when moving the terminal area of the contact through the insulator housing to assure that the terminal area is inserted straight in the housing.

The housing 12 further contains U-shaped openings 52 at the raised top ends of the housing. The openings 52 may have a slight taper as shown at 54 to fonn a guide for proper insertion of a printed circuit board into the opening. The insulator housing is further formed of a pair of sidewalls 56 and a pair of end walls 62. Positioned along the sidewalls are a plurality of pairs of diametrically opposed U-shaped openings 66. Further, spaced between adjacent U-shaped openings 66 are diametrically opposed slot portions 68. The remainder of the sidewall 62 formed between the U-shaped passageway 66 and the slot portions 68 are wall divider members 72, the U-shaped configurations 66 terminating at a rounded shoulder section 74 with coaxial square formed recesses 76 forming a continuation of the U-shaped passageways 66. The side wall 56 may be tapered as at 77 as it forms part of the passageway 66 so as to provide a lead-in for the contacts 14 during their insertion.

The bottom wall of the insulator housing 78 has extending therefrom a plurality of pairs of cylindrical portions 80 which allow the rectangular recesses 76 to extend beyond the bottom wall portion 78 of the insulating housing. An inner wall member 82 formed above the shoulders74 forms an integral part of the connector housing and defines an edge against which the printed circuit board engages to limit its movement within the opening 52. The corners 84 of the inner edge 82 define the inner end of the coaxial recess 76.

A polarization key 92 is formed of a generally rectangular central section 94 and a pair of side flanges 96, 98 whose thickness is such that the members 96, 98 may be inserted into the slot 68 so as to provide the correct polarization mating with the printed circuit board. Upon insertion of the polarization key 92 the bottom surface of the central section 94 will rest on the edge 82 at which position the top surface of key will be flush with the top of the connector housing.

The housing 12 has been depicted as being seated on a plane member which may be a ground plane or other support device. Ifthe member 100 is a ground plane, metallic bushings could be provided by removing hub portion 80 and replacing it with a grounding bushing which would electrically connect the terminal portions of the contact to the ground plane.

The contacts are mounted in the connector housing by inserting the contacts with the terminal end 16 being inserted from the top of the connector housing and the edge 32 facing the sidewall of the connector housing. As shown in FIG. 2, the temtinal member extends through the recess 76 until the point 36 on the contact surface abuts the comer 84 of the insulator housing. Then the terminal end of the contact is grasped by a suitable tool and the contact further inserted into the connector housing until the shoulder 38 abuts the shoulder section 74 of the insulator housing, thus securely positioning the contact in the insulator housing. During this final insertion of the contact the barbs 42 tend to penetrate the insulator housing and form a tight fit thereon with the insulator housing material flowing around the barbs. The insulator housing is normally made of a thermoplastic material such as Noryl or similar polyprophelene type materials. Moreover, during this final insertion period, the surface 36 is forced against the edge 84 with the accompanying pre-loading of the contact. This preloading not only produces the desired given force with which the contact will mate with adjacent conductive surfaces of a printed circuit board 101 as shown in FIG. 5, but also provides the desired and consistent dynamic gap between the diametrically opposed contacts in the housing of the connector.

What is claimed is:

l. A printed circuit board connector formed of a housing having a top end and a bottom end having a plurality of electrical contacts mounted therein, said housing having openings into which said contacts are inserted and an inner wall member formed in said housing intermediate said housing ends;

each of said contacts being formed of a spring contact portion and a terminal portion interconnected by a central mounting portion, said contacts upon partial insertion contacting said housing inner wall member, and said contacts upon full insertion into said housing contacting an edge of said inner wall member to pro-load said contacts; and

each of said spring contact portions having a shank portion curved along a radius in a first direction and a contacting surface portion extending from said shank portion and curved along a radius in a second direction with the junction of said curved portions being tangential, said contacts being fully inserted in said housing and having said shank portion contacting said edge of said inner wall member, said edge being defined by a pair of perpendicular surfaces and forming a contact pre-loading point.

2. A printed circuit board connector in accordance with claim 1 wherein when each of said contacts is fully inserted in said housing the contacting surface portion of said contact is positioned adjacent the top end of the housing and remote from said contact pre-loading point.

3. A printed circuit board connector in accordance with claim 2 wherein the spring contact portion of each of said contacts between the inner wall member and the top end of the housing is free standing.

4. A printed circuit board connector in accordance with claim 1 wherein said inner wall member defines a surface against which a printed circuit board engages to limit its movement upon insertion of the board into the housing.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3172718 *20 Mar 19639 Mar 1965Electronic Fittings CorpMultiple contact receptacle for printed circuit boards and the like
US3405386 *27 May 19668 Oct 1968United Carr IncContact used with edge connector
US3518610 *3 Mar 196730 Jun 1970Elco CorpVoltage/ground plane assembly
US3530422 *25 Mar 196822 Sep 1970Elco CorpConnector and method for attaching same to printed circuit board
US3614714 *21 Nov 196919 Oct 1971Rca CorpEdge connector with polarizing member
GB1099355A * Título no disponible
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3824554 *28 Ago 197216 Jul 1974G ShoholmSpring-type press-fit
US4094573 *1 Ago 197313 Jun 1978Elfab CorporationCircuit board edge connector
US4597625 *25 Jul 19841 Jul 1986North American Specialties CorporationElectrical connector
US4639056 *31 May 198527 Ene 1987Trw Inc.Connector construction for a PC board or the like
US4776803 *26 Nov 198611 Oct 1988Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyIntegrally molded card edge cable termination assembly, contact, machine and method
US4826453 *9 Abr 19872 May 1989Siemens AktiengesellschaftBackplane wiring for electrical assemblies
US4934961 *21 Dic 198819 Jun 1990Burndy CorporationBi-level card edge connector and method of making the same
US4996766 *7 Feb 19905 Mar 1991Burndy CorporationBi-level card edge connector and method of making the same
US5041023 *16 Feb 199020 Ago 1991Burndy CorporationCard edge connector
US5387132 *9 Nov 19937 Feb 1995The Whitaker CorporationKeyed card edge connector
US5403208 *11 May 19904 Abr 1995Burndy CorporationExtended card edge connector and socket
US6159052 *21 May 199912 Dic 2000Hon Hai Precision Ind. Co., Ltd.Electrical connector
US6935899 *31 Dic 200330 Ago 2005Hon Hai Precision Ind. Co., Ltd.Electrical connector having improved contact
US706812025 Jun 200227 Jun 2006Intel CorporationElectromagnetic bus coupling having an electromagnetic coupling interposer
US7075795 *14 Feb 200211 Jul 2006Intel CorporationElectromagnetic bus coupling
US70881985 Jun 20028 Ago 2006Intel CorporationControlling coupling strength in electromagnetic bus coupling
US71264375 Jun 200224 Oct 2006Intel CorporationBus signaling through electromagnetic couplers having different coupling strengths at different locations
US74114702 Dic 200512 Ago 2008Intel CorporationControlling coupling strength in electromagnetic bus coupling
US747611029 Ene 200713 Ene 2009Fci Americas Technology, Inc.High density connector and method of manufacture
US764942930 Jun 200819 Ene 2010Intel CorporationControlling coupling strength in electromagnetic bus coupling
US781545129 Jun 200719 Oct 2010Intel CorporationElectromagnetic coupler registration and mating
US816763027 Sep 20101 May 2012Fci Americas Technology LlcHigh density connector and method of manufacture
US20030150642 *14 Feb 200214 Ago 2003Yinan WuElectromagnetic bus coupling
US20030152153 *14 Feb 200214 Ago 2003Simon Thomas D.Signaling through electromagnetic couplers
US20030227346 *5 Jun 200211 Dic 2003Simon Thomas D.Bus signaling through electromagnetic couplers
US20030227347 *5 Jun 200211 Dic 2003Simon Thomas D.Controlling coupling strength in electromagnetic bus coupling
US20030236005 *25 Jun 200225 Dic 2003Yinan WuElectromagnetic bus coupling
US20050142948 *31 Dic 200330 Jun 2005Wei-Chen LeeElectrical connector having improved contact
US20050277341 *9 Jun 200515 Dic 2005Yukio NoguchiTerminal press-fitting structure
US20060082421 *2 Dic 200520 Abr 2006Simon Thomas DControlling coupling strength in electromagnetic bus coupling
US20070287325 *29 Jun 200713 Dic 2007Intel CorporationElectromagnetic Coupler Registration and Mating
US20080266017 *30 Jun 200830 Oct 2008Intel CorporationControlling coupling strength in electromagnetic bus coupling
CN1633790B30 Ene 20037 Sep 2011英特尔公司电磁总线耦合
DE3590369C2 *18 Jul 198522 Abr 1993North American Specialties Corp., Collage Point, N.Y., UsTítulo no disponible
WO1986001040A1 *18 Jul 198513 Feb 1986North American Specialties CorporationElectrical connector
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.439/637, 439/633, 439/444, 439/572
Clasificación internacionalH01R13/64, H01R9/16, H01R13/26, H01R12/18
Clasificación cooperativaH01R12/721
Clasificación europeaH01R23/70B
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
22 Abr 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: ITT CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004389/0606
Effective date: 19831122