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Número de publicaciónUS3756729 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación4 Sep 1973
Fecha de presentación26 Jun 1972
Fecha de prioridad26 Jun 1972
También publicado comoDE2240912A1
Número de publicaciónUS 3756729 A, US 3756729A, US-A-3756729, US3756729 A, US3756729A
InventoresTufts W
Cesionario originalTufts W
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Dispensing applicator
US 3756729 A
Resumen
A correction device, in the general shape of a writing pen, containing a rapid drying opaque liquid of the type used to mask typing and drafting errors. The pen's structure includes a reservoir, a pump system and an applicator all having a common central axis. An actuating button causes the pump to eject a small globule of liquid thru a normally closed orifice at the center of the applicator, which is located at the bottom of the pen, for easy application to the subject error.
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United States Patent 1191 abandoned, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 12,578, Feb. 19, 1970, abandoned, which is a continuation-impart of Ser. No. 800,381, Feb. 19, 1969, abandoned.

Tufts 1451 Sept. 4, I973 DISPENSING APPLICATOR 1,457,875 0 1923 Coates 401 200 x 2,382,314 8 1945 Herb 401/150 [76] lnvemor- William Peacmree 2,425,143 8 1947 Brubaker 401 151 NW, Atlanta, 30309 2,722,702 11/1955 Carter 401 /150 x 2,896,238 7 1959 Riel 401/150 [22] June 1972 3,233,594 2/1966 Zepellm. 401/135 x 21 App], No.: 266,083 3,467,477 9 1909 Litzka 3401 2511 Related US. Application Data I [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 25,499, April 3, 1970, mm), Emmme' Lawrene Charles Attorney-Richard G. Young ABSTRACT A correction device, in the general shape of a writing pen, containing a rapid drying opaque liquid of the type used to mask typing and drafting errors. The pens structure includes a reservoir, a pump system and an applicator all having a common central axis. An actuating button causes the pump to eject a small globule of liquid thru a normally closed orifice at the center of the applicator, which is located at the bottom of the pen, for easy application to the subject error.

20 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures PmEmtu 'mm sum 1 a? 5 gal!!! FIG. 2

FIG.

DISPENSING APPLICATOR This is a continuation of my application for Dispensing Applicator Ser. No. 25,499 now abandoned which is a continuation-in-part of my application for Dispensing Applicator, Ser. No. 12,578, filed Feb. 19, 1970, now abandoned, which was a continuation-in-part of my earlier application Ser. No. 800,381 filed Feb. 19, 1969, now abandoned. The devices shown herein include features which are both refined and added to the previous constructions, and have resulted from an extensive design and testing program devoted to perfecting the device for commercial presentation.

This invention appertains to a hand-held type of applicator, equipped with means of metering a minute amount of opaque corrective liquid thru the center of its extremity from where it is applied for such purposes as masking typing and drafting errors. The opaque material, being of a fast drying nature, then forms a new fresh surface upon which to make corrections.

The applicator of this invention consists, essentially, of the following major component assemblies: the body, which is held in the hand of the user; the applicator tip, being attached to the lower end of the body; a-

reservoir, within the body for containing the liquid; and a pump system, also contained within the body and functionable with the reservoir, and by means of which the liquid is forced, in the form of a minute predetermined globule, thru a normally closed axial orifice, or valve, at the extremity of the applicator tip. Aetuation of the pump is accomplished by pressing a button at the opposite end of the central axis of the body from that of the applicator tip.

Test samples of the subject invention have been manufactured and demonstrated to numerous secretaries, who normally use corrective fluid applied by a small brush. The enthusiastic reception which this product has almost universally received, justifies directing the scope of this application to the concepts of shapes and dimensions peculiar to its purpose as such a corrective instrument as has been presented bearing the descriptive name, Correcto Pen.

In describing the details of the invention general reference will first be made to the figures where:

FIG. 1 is an external view of the pen of this invention.

FIG. 2 is the Section 1 1 of FIG. 1'.

FIG. 3 is a view of a partial section of the pen of FIG. 2, but showing a different type of check-valve-pump arrangement.

FIG. 4 is a view similar to that of FIG. 3 but showing still another type of check-valve-pump design.

FIG. 5 shows still another variation of the details of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 shows the piston, per se, of FIG. 1, but with a modification.v I

FIG. 7 shows the structure of FIG. 5, but with modified piston of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 shows a modification of the structure of FIG. 6 applied to a modification of the structure of FIG. 2.

FIG. 9 is a partially sectioned view showing the pen in FIG. 1, but with a tapered body structure accommodating an inverted conically shaped liquid containing bag.

FIG. 10 is the section I 1 through the structure of FIG. 1, as is FIG. 2, except with a modified liquid reservoir and with certain internal components added.

the

FIG. 11 is also the section 1 1 thru the basic structure of FIG. 1, but with additional modifications over that of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is an end view of the piston-needle assembly of FIG. 11.

Referring now to the figures separately, the details of the invention will be described.

In FIG. 1 the instrument, referred to in this description as the pen, is shown with the applicator tip 1 and the actuating button 2 at the opposite ends of its central axis. It is noted that the lower end of the pen tapers to a narrow dimension to conform to that of the applicator tip which should not exceed 0.125 of an inch in diameter when circular or across its narrow dimension.

The Section 1 1 of FIG. 1 is shown in FIG. 2 and reveals the more important details of the invention. Here the body element 3 is affixed to the nose member 4, at the lower end, and to the cap member 5, at the upper end of the common central axis. The nozzle compump cylinder 7, the applicator tip 1 and the checkvalve-orifice 8. This nozzle 6 engages in the nose portion 4 with a series of mating dimensional steps, as at 9 and 10, which prevent its miss-location when under pressure from action of the piston tip 11. The reversed directional step 12 prevents the nozzle from being forced into the nose member when pressed down upon a surface. A further vital function of this step in dimension will be discussed in the course of this description.

The element 13 serves as both a guide bushing for the prismatic piston rod 14 and as a retainer for the resilient nozzle element 6 in order to prevent distortion of the cylinder diameter at 7 when under pressure from engages the actuating rod at 17 and is secured to the nozzle body at 19, is such that, in conjunction with the normally closed orifice at 8, a structure is provided which is capable of being fully charged with the correction fluid as well as being efficiently sealed against the entry of air as the liquid is ejected. Such feature is of paramount importance to" prevent air-locking of the pump system.

. globule only of sufficient size to make a single typing character correction. This globule, being so small, clings to the surface of the applicator tip 1 from where it can be precisely applied for error coverage.

Upon release of the button, pressure is reduced within the cavity channel of 6 allowing relaxation of the pliable material, of which 6 is composed, and as the piston is returned to its normal position, a vacuum is created within the channel which assists in the closure of the orifice at 8 and causes the liquid to pass between the cylindrical surface of the piston 11 and the wall of the pliable, relaxed cylinder cavity resulting in refilling of the cavity 7. The liquid is able to flow from the collapsible container 16, through the passages afforded between the faces of the prismatic piston rod and the upper end of the nose portion, through the passages between the prismatic lower end of the piston rod and the guide bushing, and then into the pump cylinder 7. To allow for this displacement of the liquid into the cylinder cavity, the collapsible container 16 does just that. It collapses slightly. It is important, however, that the container 16 have a certain amount of wall resistance to collapsing in order that the resulting force of reduced pressure will assist in the rapid and complete closure of the orifice, therefore allowing for the rapid refilling of the cylinder cavity.

If the orifice 8 fails to close completely, a residual column of liquid will remain within the orifice. Now the liquid being of a fast drying nature, this residual fiber of dried material will have a strong tendency to block the free passage of liquid upon later use. Also, over a prolonged period, the contents within the channel of the nozzle, and even up into the container, will be communicated thru this small solid fiber to the air ultimately resulting in the passage of the solvents from the liquid.

To provide against such condition, the reversed step at 12, which was mentioned previously, is designed into the structure. In proper use, at the time the liquid is applied to the error, a slight pressure is applied so that the resulting squeezing action closes the orifice completely and forces out all residual liquid. The correction is then rendered smooth by a light gentle circular stroke. Or, if preferable, after the correction is completed, the pen is pressed on another sheet of paper. This secondary operation will serve to clean the pen, as well as, to close the orifice.

The above description of FIG. 2 presents a complete workable rendition of this invention. However, it is felt that there are variations of the details which could be substituted to produce the same product. Thus, FIGS. 3, 4 and are considered examples of the orifice-valve design.

In FIG. 3 the cylinder cavity 7 is contained within the secondary piston 20. An extension of the piston is the needle valve stem 21 which engages the small open orifice at 22 providing a closure therefore. Now the compression spring 18 is interposed between the piston 20 and the prismatic piston body cap 23. Thus, it is seen that the normal position of the needle 21 is that of closing the orifice 22 under pressure of the spring 18. It is also seen that the cylinder cavity 7 is communicated with the nozzle channel by the port 25 in the piston head 20. Thus, it is evident that upon entry of the piston 11 into cavity 7, the pressure on the upper surface of the piston 20 remains unchanged while pressure is built up beneath the piston head 20 causing it to lift against the spring 18. Now, as the piston 20 is so lifted, the needle 21 is also lifted rendering the orifice 22 open for the passage of the liquid. As the liquid is discharged the piston 20 is lowered and the orifice is reclosed by the needle 21. This closure occurs when the piston 11 has entered its full length into the cavity 7 and the prisleased the piston 11 withdraws from the cavity 7, the force of the spring 18 retaining the needle in its closed position. Additional liquid then flows past the faces of the prismatic piston body cap 23 and into the vicinity of the cylinder 7 and piston 11.

The structure of FIG. 4 is a variation of that of FIG.

3. Here 27 is not a piston member but a fixed block to which is attached the tension stem 28. At the lower end of this stem is upset a ball shape 29 which provides an external closure to the orifice opening in the nose applicator 30. As in FIG. 3, the cylinder cavity 7 communicates thru the port 25 to the nozzle channel 24. It is thus seen that when the piston 11 enters the cylinder cavity 7 pressure is built up in the channel 24 causing the tension member 28 to elongate and to allow fluid to pass thru the orifice opening and around the ball seal 29. As explained in the case of FIG. 2, the complete sealing of this structure can be affected by pressure, during, or after, the application operation.

The structure of FIG. 5 is similar to that of FIG. 2, except that the applicator nozzle and nose member are combined as one unit. This is allowed for by the channel 31 being of sufficient diameter so that the section between its bottom extremity and the external applicatorsurface at 32 is relatively thin.

The section 32, in which the closed orifice is rendered, then acts as a diaphragm when under pressure from the pump 11. It is also noted that the wall 33 of the nose is relatively thick, and so being, although the material of which the applicator-nose unit is made is semi-flexible, when under pressure effective flexing is limited to the diaphragm resulting in opening of the orifice.

As explained for the orifice of FIG. 2, closure of the orifice is here assisted by a slight pressure on the applicator end, but in this case, by virtue of the fact that the end 32 is slightly convex. Thus any force against the end will serve to close the expanded orifice.

Tests of the pen have revealed that, depending upon the type of liquid and upon the nature of the materials of which the applicator nozzle, containing the closed orifice, is constructed, there exists, to a variable degree, a tendency for any residual liquid left inthe orifice to form a bonding seal to the orifice walls. I

When of sufficient effectiveness, an excessive amount of pressure is required within the nozzle channel in order to break such bond. This results in Spitting of pen. A solution to this condition is shown in FIG. 6, 7 and 8.

Referring first to FIG. 6, the piston body 14, of FIG. 2, is equipped with a projecting needle 34 as an extension of its axis from the lower end of the piston. Now, reference is made to FIG. 7 where this piston, with the needle extension, is installed on the nozzle applicator of FIG. 5. It is evident that when the actuating knob is depressed the needle will be caused to pierce the ori fice forcing it open just as the pressure is initiated by the piston 11 entering the cylinder cavity 7. This pilot action of the needle breaks the bond of the hardened residual liquid and the flexibility of the diaphram 32 will allow the passage of the liquid around the needle. This can be further facilitated by making the crosssectional shape of the needle prismatic, or splined, in order that the walls of the orifice will not completely conform to it as the needle enters. This same application can be made to the structure of FIG. 2.

In FIG. 8 the piston-needle structure of FIG. 6 is shown installed in an applicator nozzle somewhat modified from that of FIG. 2. Here the bushing 35 serves primarily as a guide for the piston shaft 14. In this structure the cylinder cavity is located at the lower end of the nozzle 37, and the tip end of the needle is a straight section comprising the piston at 36. Now, assuming that the orifice 8 is sealed, as described above, the actuating knob is depressed and the piston enters the cavity 37. If the bond of the seal of the orifice is sufficiently tight, due to the resiliancy of the walls of the cavity 37, leakage will occur past the piston, and on the first stroke no liquid will be ejected. However, the stroke of the piston is such that it pierces the orifice at 8, and thus frees it for proper function on the next stroke. In the closing operation this nozzle functions the same as that of FIG. 2.

In FIG. 9 the pen of FIG. 1 is shown with a tapered shape in order to accommodate a conically shaped liquid containing bag 38. In additionto having a greater volume capacity, this conical shape is intended to serve a very vital function. As has been described above, as the liquid is ejected from the pen of this invention, the reservoir bag collapses under the resulting vacuum effect and the atmospheric pressure. Such collapsing will first occur at the section of least resistance. Unless the wall thickness is modified, which can be done to predetermine such location, the mid-section between top and bottom will be the normal area of initial and complete collapse. When the latter occurs the liquid remaining in the upper half will be choked off from the pump half of the pen. However, it is seen that the top end of the conical structure at 39, being of a longer periphery, will be less resistant to the atmospheric pressure, when under vacuum, and, consequently, will be the first area to experience complete collapsing as the liquid is displaced. Further collapsing will then be progressive toward the pump end. In this manner a more complete use of the liquid, contained in the bag, is attained.

In FIG. 10 the flexible bag reservoir, of the previous figures, is eliminated. Instead the piston 40 is rigidly attached to the rod just above the pump assembly and normally displaced from the pump piston body cap by the spring 43. One or more small ports are provided through the piston at 40. A suitable seal is shown as at 41.

At the upper end of the reservoir cavity is located an upper seal member 44 which prevents the contained liquid from leaking past the actuating button 2. Integral with the seal 44 is the air check valve 45 which allows entrance of air as the liquid is discharged from pump end of the pen.

Now, in the operation of this structure, the actuating button 2 is depressed causing the piston 40 to be displaced downward. It is noted that the piston rod 15 is not normally engaged with the piston cap 23. Thus a small amount of displacement of the piston 40 occurs before the displacement of the pump piston 11 is initiated. During this interval of motion some of the liquid beneath the piston 40 is ejected as small jets through the ports 42 and serves to agitate the liquid contained above the piston in the reservoir. In this manner a satisfactory dispersion of the pigment portion of the liquid the i is re-established each time the pen is used. Upon the engagement by the rod 15 with the pump piston cap 23 the structure works as has already been described for the previous figures.

Release of the button allows the rod 15 and the piston 40 to return to the up position under force from the spring 43 and in so doing liquid is caused to be drawn into the chamber below 40 thru the ports 42. It is also noted that the flexibility of 44 allows for this motion and the check valve 45, as already stated, allows for the entrance of air to replace the liquid ejected through the applicator end.

In that the ports 42 are displaced in location from the periphery of the piston 40 toward the center axis, it is evident that when the pen is in a horizontal position the.

liquid contained below the piston 40 will not be able to leave the chamber 46 because of the fact that air is unable to enter 46 to replace any liquid that would otherwise drain through the ports 42. Thus 46 also serves as a priming chamber, as it were, for the pump below, always maintaining a small charge of liquid ready to enter the pump as the liquid is discharged from the applicator end.

' Like FIG. 10, the cross-section shown in FIG. 11, reveals still additional important details and variations from those presented in the previous figures.

In addition to the secondary piston 47, which is a variation of the jet-action mixing piston 40 0f FIG. 10, an additional mixing or recirculating piston 'is provided by '48 for the purpose of flushing and mixing that portion of the liquid contained within the nozzle prior to the ejection action of the primary piston 11.

' In order to accomplish such mixing, the prismatic structure, as shown in FIG. 6, here is embodied with two primary modifications. First, in the head portion 23, the cylinder cavity 49 is incorporated for the purpose of functioning with the piston 48. Second, the channel 50 is provided to communicate the cylinder 49 with the lower portion of the channel contained central within the nozzle 9. This is done by a small tube member 51 at the lower end of which the needle 34 is inserted and secured in such a manner as to provide the small jet ports 52, as seen more clearly in FIG. 12, which is a lower end view of the assembly 34 51.

It is also noted that the rod 15 extends to 52 within the cavity of the cylinder 49 where it terminates a suitable distance above the bottom of the cylinder cavity.

It is by the contact of 52' at the bottom of 49 and the force thus applied, that the piston 11 is actuated and ejection is accomplished as described for the previous structures. i t

However, in order to assure a properly dispersed mixture of the fluid about to be ejected, just prior to the actuation of l 1, the piston 48 engages the cylinder 49 and forces fluid thru the channel50 and out of the ports 52, as small jets which flush down into the central channel all the way to the lower extremety at 53, thus, forcing any sedimented pigment particles back up thru the central nozzle channel and through the. return channel located around the peripheral surfaces of the assembly 34-51%23 into the cavity 46 where it passes either thru the jet ports 42 of FIG. 10 or around the flexed periphery of 47. In this manneneach time the pen is used, a sufficient replacement and agitation of the fluid within the nozzle is assured prior to that portion of the stroke of the actuating button 2 which results in the ejection of the globule thru the orifice 8.

Mixing within the reservoir of the body portion of the pen is here accomplished in a manner similar to that described for FIG. 10. In lieu of the jet ports 42, of FIG. 10, however, the piston 47 of FIG. 11, is of a flexible material, and the disc portion being properly thin, when under pressure, from beneath or above, sufficient flexing occurs to allow passage of the fluid between its periphery and the inner wall of the pens body. Thus, in operation, as described for FIG. 10, upon the respective depressing and releasing of the button 2, as reactive to the spring 57, both mixing with the reservoir above 47, and maintenance of liquid below 47, are accomplished each time the pen is used. Now, as the fluid is ejected by the pump system, thru the orifice 8, air is allowed to enter thru the diaphragm--type seal 53 by means of the port 54 and the clearance 55 around the rod 15. However, the lower end, or lip of the seal 56 is in normal relaxed contact with the rod and thus prevents the liquid from escaping from the reservoir when the pen is in an inclined or inverted position, notwithstanding the fact that air is allowed to enter as the pressure is reduced within the reservoir.

This description is not intended to restrict the scope of the invention to the details as set forth, there being other variations coming with the spirit hereof.

I claim:

1. A dispensing applicator in the general shape of a writing pen, comprising, a central body portion, an upper portion and a lower portion, said lower portion terminating in an applicator surface which has a normally closed central orifice and is located at the lowermost extremety of the applicator device, a fluid reservoir, an interior channel communicating between the reservoir and the orifice, a dispensing pump means for pumping fluid from the channel through the orifice, said dispensing pump means including a pump piston and a pump cylinder located on the central axis of the body portion, an actuating button and connecting rod means passing through the reservoir for operating the dispensing pump means in response to movement of the actuating button.

2. A dispensing applicator according to claim 1 wherein the reservoir is a collapsible bag.

3. A dispensing applicator according to claim 1 wherein the reservoir has a constant volume and is provided with check valve means which permits the entry of air when fluid is discharged therefrom.

4. A dispensing applicator according to claim 3 having a resilient sealing member defining the upper end, of the reservoir, said check valve means being integrally formed in said resilient sealing member.

5. A dispensing applicator according to claim 1 having a recirculating passage leading from the channel portion to the reservoir, and circulating pump means for producing flow through the passage from the channel portion to the reservoir prior to entry of the dis--- pensing pump piston into the cylinder section.

6. A dispensing applicator according to claim 5 wherein a portion of the circulating pump means is op- 8 eratively connected to the connecting rod means.

7. A dispensing applicator according to claim I having agitator means for producing high velocity movement of fluid within the reservoir, said agitator means being connected to said connecting rod.

8. A dispensing applicator according to claim 7 wherein the agitator means is radially coextensive with the reservoir.

9. A dispensing applicator according to claim 8 wherein the agitator means is provided with the plurality of axial ports.

10. A dispensing applicator according to claim 8 wherein the agitator means is made of resilient material to permit movement of fluid around its periphery upon movement of said connecting rod.

11. A dispensing applicator according to claim 1 wherein the orifice is located in a resilient member, and movable means projectable into the orifice to expand and open the orifice.

12. A dispensing applicator according to claim 11 wherein the means movable into the orifice is operatively connected to the actuating button, whereby it enters the orifice during operation of the pump means.

13. A dispensing applicator according to claim 11 wherein the movable means normally obstructs the orifice, and means responsive to increased pressure within the channel portion to withdraw the movable means.

14. A dispensing applicator according to claim 11 having a movable conduit communicating between the reservoir and the channel portion, said movable means being rigidly connected to the movable conduit.

15. A dispensing applicator according to claim 11 wherein the means movable into the orifice has a cross sectional shape which differs from that of the orifice,

whereby the walls of the orifice will not conform thereto when said means enters the orifice.

16. A dispensing applicator according to claim I having circulating pump: means (48) for pumping fluid from the reservoir into the channel, and a return passage for returning fluid to said reservoir.

17. A dispensing applicator according to claim 16 wherein said circulating pump means is operatively connected to the connecting rod means.

18. A dispensing applicator according to claim 17 wherein the circulating pump means is larger than the dispensing pump means, whereby during each movement of the connecting rod means, more fluid is furnished to the channel than is discharged therefrom by the dispensing pump means, and the excess fluid is returned to the reservoir through the return passage.

19. A dispensing applicator according to claim 1 wherein the orifice is normally closed by movable construction means which moves to open the orifice under the influence of pressure created by the, dispensing pump means.

20. A dispensing applicator according to claim 19 having a piston means (20)'for moving the obstruction

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.401/150, 401/263, 401/265, 222/92, 401/261
Clasificación internacionalB43K5/18, B43L19/00, B43K5/00, B05B11/00
Clasificación cooperativaB43K5/189, B05B11/0035, B43L19/0018
Clasificación europeaB05B11/00B4, B43L19/00B, B43K5/18V2