Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS3870832 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación11 Mar 1975
Fecha de presentación29 Jul 1974
Fecha de prioridad18 Jul 1972
Número de publicaciónUS 3870832 A, US 3870832A, US-A-3870832, US3870832 A, US3870832A
InventoresJohn M Fredrickson
Cesionario originalJohn M Fredrickson
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Implantable electromagnetic hearing aid
US 3870832 A
Resumen
Problems of conventional hearing aids (low fidelity, poor frequency response and feedback) and of hearing aids employing implanted piezoelectric elements (high power requirements and microtrauma) are eliminated or attenuated by implanting a coil and magnet in the ear after removal of the incus, the magnet being fastened to the head of the stapes and the coil being energized by electrical signals from a sound transducer and producing a magnetic field which, interacting with the magnetic field of the magnet, causes movement of the stapes in the same manner as it normally is moved by the incus.
Imágenes(3)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

United States Patent 1191 v 1111 3,870,832 Fredrickson Mar. 11, 1975 .[54] IMPLANTABLE ELECTROMAGNETIC OTHER PUBLICATIONS EA NG AID H R! 1 Course Lecture Mater1al,p. 54, H6. 65, American [76] Inventor: John M. Fredrickson, 24 Queen Academy f opthamology and omlarynaology.

y D Toronto Ontario, Course 319, Conservative Tympanoplasty," Oct. 1, Canada 1966.

[22] Filed: July 29, 1974 [21] App]. No.: 492,675

Related [1.8. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 364,938, May 29, [57] ABSTRACT 1973 abandoned" Problems of conventional hearing aids (101v fidelity, poor frequency response and feedback) and of hearing aids employing implanted piezoelectric elements Primary Examiner-Ralph D. Blakeslee Attorney, Agent, or FirmSim 8; McBurney- [30] Foreign Application Priority Data July 18, 1972 Great Britain 33476/72 (high power requirements and microtrauma) are e1im 1 inated or attenuated by implanting a coil and magnet [52] US. Cl 179/107 E, 179/107 R in the e after removal of the incus, the magnet being [5]] IIILCI H04! 25/00 fastened to the head of the stapes and the Coil being I Field of Search 179/107 R7 107 107 BC energized by electrical signals from a sound transducer and producing a magnetic field which, interact- [56] Referen? Cited ing with the magnetic field of the magnet, causes UNITED STATES PATE S movement of the stapes in the same manner as it nor- 3,061,689 10/1962 McCarrell 179/107 E ma y s moved y the mens- 3,712,962 1/1973 Epley 179/107 R 3,764,748 10/1973 Branch 179/107 E 10 Claims 11 Drawing Figures PATENTED MAR] 1 I375 SHEET 2 0F 3 i I I IMPLANTABLE ELECTROMAGNETIC HEARING AID This' application is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 364,938 filed May 29, 1973, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to hearing aids. More particularly, this invention relates to hearing aids that operate electromagnetically and some of the components of which areimplantable.

A conventional hearing aid consists of a microphone, an amplifier, batteries and a loudspeaker. All of these components are mounted externally on the user, and various attempts have been made to disguise of hidethem, as by building them into the earpieces of eyeglasses for example.

There is a considerable number of people with severe sensorineural hearing losses who are not adequately served by the most modern hearing aids that are available. The reasons for this revolve around the distortion inherent in the individuals hearing loss as well as the superadded distortion in the hearing aid which may include low fidelity, poor lowfrequency response and feedback.

Many conventional hearing aids require an ear mould and ear tubing. These components must be custom made, which is expensive. Moreover, if they are not made perfectly, feedback and consequent distortion problems are likely to arise.

A number of attempts have been made to solve the aforesaid problems. Thus it is known to place a magnet on the eardrum with a coil in an externally located earpiece and energize the coil via a microphone and amplifier. A hearing aid of this type suffers from low efficiency because the coil is located too far from the magnet. In addition, such a system does not provide a permanent solution for hearing loss because the magnet on the eardrum will be displaced-in a short time by migration of the epithelium. Epithelial migration commences at the eardrum. Only about six weeks is required for the epithelium to leave the eardrum, and only about five months is required for it to come out of the ear canal. Another disadvantage of this system is its high power requirements. This is due not only to the large distance between the externally located coil and implanted magnet, but also to the large mass (eardrum and ossicles) that must be moved, taking into consideration that all that really is required is movement of the stapes, and the area ratio of eardrum to stapes footplate is about 15:1.

In U.S. Pat. No. 3,594,514 dated July 20, 1971, R- bert C. Wingrove, and U.S. Pat. No. 3,712,962 dated Jan. 23, 1973, J.M. Epley, there are described implantable hearing aids that utilize piezoelectric ceramic elements. From an electrical point of view such systems, as compared to the electromagnetic system to be disclosed herein, have a higher impedance and higher voltage requirements. In fact such systems probably will require about a volt battery, which would be ezoelectric ceramic element will, as a result of its continually striking the bone (one of the ossicles) with which it cooperates, create microtrauma and erosion of that bone.

In accordance with my invention there is provided a hearing aid which eliminates or attenuates many of the disadvantages of conventional hearing aids of the type noted previously as well as those of hearing aids of the types noted in the two preceding paragraphs.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A hearing aid embodying my invention may include a microphone, amplifier and a battery or batteries (or other suitable sound transducer), as is conventional, all of which may be located in a small housing that may be hidden behind one ear of the individual and which may plug into a receptacle and socket implated in the temporal bone behind the ear. The hearing aid further includes an implanted electromagnetic device that replaces the loudspeaker, tubing and earmould of a conventional hearing aid. This device consists of a magnet that is permanently attached to the stapes (one of the three auditory ossicles) and an implanted coil that is located in close proximity to the magnet and which receives electrical signals from the sound transducer. Also provided is a suitable support for the coil.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the appended drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing the aforesaid housing located behind the ear of an individual;

FIG. 2 is a horizontal section through a normal human ear but with the outer tissue folded over on itself;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to that of FIG. 2 but with the incus removed, a necessary step in the operative procedure for implanting certain components of a hearing aid embodying my invention;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to that of FIG. 2 but showing these components in place;

FIG. 5 is a side view of an individuals right ear with the tissue removed and showing the same components as are seen in FIG. 4;

FIGS. 6 and 7 are top and side views respectively showing the stapes and the components illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to that of FIG. 7 but with the coil and its support removed;

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8 but showing another embodiment of my invention;

FIG. 10 is an exploded view of certain components ,of a hearing aid embodying my invention; and

FIG. 11 is a schematic diagram of a hearing aid embodying my invention.

Referring to FIG. I, a hearing aid embodying my in- I vention includes a housing 10 (see also FIG. 10) in which, as shown in FIG. 11, may be located a microphone 30, an amplifier 31 and a battery 32. This housing is very small and can be located behind the ear tissue of an individual. It has three male terminals 33 (FIG. 10) projecting therefrom adapted to plug into three female terminals 34 in a receptacle 11 (FIGS. 6 and 10). As best shown in FIG. 10, receptacle ll fits into and externally threaded socket 35. The lower part 36 of socket 35 is permanently implanted by an operative procedure into the temporal bone of the patient. This procedure requires tapping a hole in the temporal bone immediately behind the ear to accommodate the lower part 36 of socket 35, this part being screwed into the tapped opening. Once housing has been plugged into receptacle 11, an internally threaded cap 37 (FIGS. 1 and 10) is threadably engaged with the upper part 38 of socket 35 to hold housing 10 and receptacle 11 in position. A cap (not shown) similar to cap 37 but with its top end closed may be provided and used in place of cap 37 when the individual is showering or swimming. lllustratively socket 35 may be about 1 cm. long and have a maximum diameter of about 1.3 cm.

Housing 10, receptacle 11 and socket 35 are fabricated of a material that is non tissue toxic. One suitable material is TEFLON (trade mark). Cap 37 also may be fabricated of this material or stainless steel, for example.

Two of the three terminals 33 are, in fact, the output terminals of amplifier 31, the latter being powered by battery 32 and serving to amplify sounds picked up by microphone 30. The third terminal is for stability and locating. The microphone, amplifier and battery may be of a conventional type. A suitable microphone is a condensor microphone model No. BL1680 made by Knowles Electronics Inc., Franklin Park, Illinois. Amplifier 31 preferably is a logarithmic amplifier. Two suitable amplifiers both manufactured by Robert Bosch Electronic Company of Berlin, West Germany are STAR 6 (trade mark) dynamic range compression (DRC) amplifier and OMNITRON 11" (trade mark) DRC amplifier. The battery may be an EVEREADY (trade mark) model E675 1.4 volt mercury battery.

Terminals 33 and 34 preferably are gold plated.

It should be understood, of course, that microphone 30, amplifier 31 and battery 32 individually or in total may be located elsewhere than behind the ear.

The other part of a hearing aid embodying my invention consists of a magnet 12 (FIGS. 5, 6, 8 and 12), which, in the embodiment shown, is cylindrical in con figuration, and which is secured to the stapes 13; a coil 14 located in close proximity to magnet 12; a support or holder 15 for the coil; and two lead-in conductors 16 connected between terminals 34 of receptacle 11 and coil 14. All of these components are surgically implanted.

As shown in FIGS. 4, 6, 7 and 8, a holder 17 for magnet 12 is provided. This holder may be fabricated of TEFLON" (trade mark), for example, and is designed so as to be readily attached to stapes 13. Magnet 12 may be encased in the material of the holder. In another embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 9 magnet 12 is firmly secured to the head of stapes 13 by a non tissue toxic cement such as SILASTIC (trade mark) or CRANIOPLAST (trade mark). In this embodiment, unless magnet 12 is encapsulated in a non tissue toxic material, it itself must be non tissue toxic. Thus, it may be made ofVITALLIUM" (trade mark), for example. However, a superior magnet is one made of cobalt symareum and available from the General Electric Company, Schenectady, New York. Such a magnet requires encapsulation in a non tissue toxic material.

Regardless of how magnet 12 is secured to stapes 13, it must be firmly fastened thereto so that the magnet and stapes move as a unit without relative movement there-between in order to avoid microtrauma. This poses no problem where cement is used. Where holder 17 is mechanically secured to the stapes without cement, the inherent springiness of the holder material may be relied upon to provide the required connection or, depending on the holder material, it may be crimped in position.

Magnet 12 is very small, typically about 1 mm. in diameter and 1 mm. long. Coil 14 must be sufficiently small to fit in the middle ear space and should have an input impedance that matches the output impedance of amplifier 31. Strictly by way of example, coil 14 may consist of 1,600 turns of insulated 50 gauge copper wire embedded in a suitable non tissue toxic material such as SILASTIC (trade mark). It may be about 1.5 mm. internal diameter (core), 4 mm. outside diameter and 1 mm. long.

In order to implant components 12 and 15 to 17 a maistoidectomy is performed, the facial triangle bone is removed from the posterior bony ear canal wall and the incus 18 (FIG. 2) is removed. Magnet 12 then is firmly secured to stapes 13. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 4, 7 and 8 this is accomplished by fastening holder 17 to stapes 13, but it also may be accomplished by cementing the magnet or its encapsulating material to the stapes using a suitable cement as shown in FIG. 9. By means of a tool 19 (FIG. 4) which threadably engages a connector 20 (FIG. 4) secured to holder 15, coil 14 and holder 15 are positioned in place and holder 15 is permanently cemented in position using a suitable non tissue toxic cement 40 (FIG. 4) such as CRANIOPLAST" (trade mark). This operation is performed using a suitable micromanipulator. Tool 19 then is removed.

Coil 14 is located in close proximity to magnet 12. In the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 4, 6 and 7 it is positioned just above magnet 12 with the core of the coil and the magnet arranged coaxially. The coil could be arranged to surround holder 17 if desired. In other words, magnet 12 then would be in the core of the coil. The important thing, however, is that coil 14 and magnet 12 are so arranged that the interaction of the magnetic field of the magnet and that of the coil when energized results in movement of the stapes in the same manner as it normally would be moved by the incus.

Holder 15 performs the important function of supporting coil 14 in a fixed position in the middle ear space. It may be a silver wire approximately 0.2 mm. in diameter. It may be flattened at one end and this fiattened end then wrapped around coil 14, the flattening being for the purpose of providing a greater surface area of contact. The other end of holder 15 is cemented to bone within the mastoid bowl.

After tool 19 has been removed, wires 16, which preferably are made of gold, are led into socket 35 through a small opening in the bottom wall thereof, are passed through and out of the socket and then are soldered to terminals 34. Socket 35 than may be screwed into the previously tapped opening in the mastoid tip of the temporal bone behind the patients ear and components l1, l0 and 37 located in position as previously explained herein.

When coil 14 is energized by electrical signals from amplifier 31, the interaction of the magnetic field of coil 14 thereby created and the magnetic field of magnet 12 causes stapes 13 to function in its normal way like a piston causing vibration of the inner ear fluids in response to sound pick up by microphone 30.

It should be understood that my invention also may be practised using an implanted receiver and an external microphone and transmitter as'disclosed in aforementioned U.S. Pat. No. 3,712,962, the piezoelectric element disclosed in this patent being replaced with the electromagnetic system disclosed herein.

What I claim as my invention is:

l. A hearing aid having certain components thereof that are implanted in the ear of the user, said hearing aid comprising sound transducer means for converting audio signals to electrical signals and electromagnetic transducer means for receiving said electrical signals and converting said electrical signals into mechanical movement of the stapes bone of the ear of the user, said electromagnetic transducer means being implantable in the ear of the user and comprising a magnet, means for firmly securing said magnet to the head of the stapes bone of the user such that said magnet and said stapes bone move as a unit without relative movement there between when said magnet is attracted by a magnetic field and a coil of a size that permits it to be implanted in the middle ear space of the ear of the user, said coil being adapted to be implanted in the middle ear space .of the ear of the user in close proximity to said magnet,

said coil when energized by said electrical signals producing a magnetic field in which said magnet is located, said coil and said magnet being positioned with respect to each other such that upon energization of said coil said stapes bone moves as a result of the interaction between the magnetic field of said magnet and said magnetic field of said coil in the same manner as said stapes bone normally is moved by the incus bone, said hearing aid also including implantable support means for said coil, said support means being adapted to be secured to a bone that holds said coil in a fixed position in said middle ear space.

2. A hearing aid according to claim 1 wherein said sound transducer means comprises a microphone, an amplifier and a battery.

3. A hearing aid according to claim 2 further including a socket having electrical terminals therein, means electrically connecting said sound transducer means and said coil, said means electrically connecting said sound transducer means and said coil including implantable conductors connected to said terminals and to said coil for supplying said electrical signals to said coil, said socket being adapted to be located behind the ear of the user and secured to bone of the user thereat, a housing for said microphone, amplifier and battery, said housing having output terminals for said electrical signals, said housing being adapted for reception by said socket with said terminals of said socket electrically contacting said output terminals of said housing.

4. A hearing aid according to claim 3 wherein said socket is externally threaded to threadablyengage in a stapes bone of the user comprises a non tissue toxic cement.

6. A hearing aid according to claim 1 wherein said means for securing said magnet to the head of the stapes bones comprises a holder for said magnet, said holder being adapted for attachment to the head of the stapes bone of the user.

7. A hearing aid according to claim 1 including meansfor securing said support means to a bone that holds said coil in a fixed position in said middle ear space.

8. A hearing aid according to claim 7 wherein said means for securing said support means comprises a non tissue toxic cement.

9. A hearing aid having certain components thereof implanted in an ear of the user from which the incus has been removed, said hearing aid comprising sound transducer means for converting audio signals to electrical signals and electromechanical transducer means adapted to receive said electrical signals and convert said electrical signals into mechanical movement of the stapes bone of said ear of said user, said electromechanical transducer means being implanted in said ear of said user and comprising a magnet, means for firmly securing said magnet to the head of said stapes bone such that said magnet and said stapes bone move as a unit without relative movement therebetween when said magnet is attracted by a magnetic field and a coil implanted in the middle ear space of said ear in close proximity to said magnet, said coil when energized by said electrical signals producing a magnetic field in which said magnet is located, said coil and said magnet being positioned with respect to each other such that upon energization of said coil said stapes bone is moved as a result of the interaction between the magnetic field of said magnet and said magnetic field of said coil in the same manner as said stapes bone normally is moved by the incus bone, said hearing aid also including implanted support means for said coil for holding said coil in a fixed position .in said middle ear space, and means for securing said support means to a bone of said user that holds said coil in a fixed position in said middle ear space. a

10. A hearing aid according to claim 9 further including a socket having electrical terminals therein, said socket being implanted in' bone behind the ear of said user, implanted conductors connected to said terminals and to said coil for supplying said electrical signals to said coil, and a housing for said sound transducer, said housing having output terminals for said electrical signals and being received by said socket with said terminals of said socket electrically connecting said output

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3061689 *27 May 195730 Oct 1962Beltone Hearing Aid CompanyHearing aid
US3712962 *5 Abr 197123 Ene 1973J EpleyImplantable piezoelectric hearing aid
US3764748 *19 May 19729 Oct 1973J BranchImplanted hearing aids
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US4352960 *30 Sep 19805 Oct 1982Baptist Medical Center Of Oklahoma, Inc.Magnetic transcutaneous mount for external device of an associated implant
US4606329 *22 May 198519 Ago 1986Xomed, Inc.Implantable electromagnetic middle-ear bone-conduction hearing aid device
US4612915 *23 May 198523 Sep 1986Xomed, Inc.Direct bone conduction hearing aid device
US4628907 *22 Mar 198416 Dic 1986Epley John MDirect contact hearing aid apparatus
US4729366 *11 Ago 19868 Mar 1988Medical Devices Group, Inc.Implantable hearing aid and method of improving hearing
US4774933 *17 Nov 19874 Oct 1988Xomed, Inc.To enhance sound transmission
US4776322 *18 Ago 198611 Oct 1988Xomed, Inc.Implantable electromagnetic middle-ear bone-conduction hearing aid device
US4800884 *7 Mar 198631 Ene 1989Richards Medical CompanyMagnetic induction hearing aid
US4817607 *15 May 19874 Abr 1989Richards Medical CompanyMagnetic ossicular replacement prosthesis
US4840178 *15 May 198720 Jun 1989Richards Metal CompanyMagnet for installation in the middle ear
US4850962 *8 Mar 198825 Jul 1989Medical Devices Group, Inc.Implantable hearing aid and method of improving hearing
US4936305 *20 Jul 198826 Jun 1990Richards Medical CompanyShielded magnetic assembly for use with a hearing aid
US5015225 *17 Mar 198814 May 1991Xomed, Inc.Implantable electromagnetic middle-ear bone-conduction hearing aid device
US5085628 *12 Oct 19894 Feb 1992Storz Instrument CompanyImplantable hearing aid coupler device
US5220918 *15 May 199122 Jun 1993Smith & Nephew Richards, Inc.Trans-tympanic connector for magnetic induction hearing aid
US5239588 *18 Dic 198924 Ago 1993Davis Murray AHearing aid
US5277694 *13 Feb 199211 Ene 1994Implex GmbhElectromechanical transducer for implantable hearing aids
US5390254 *19 Abr 199314 Feb 1995Adelman; Roger A.Hearing apparatus
US5456654 *1 Jul 199310 Oct 1995Ball; Geoffrey R.Implantable magnetic hearing aid transducer
US5554096 *8 Abr 199410 Sep 1996SymphonixMethod of improving hearing in a subject
US5558618 *23 Ene 199524 Sep 1996Maniglia; Anthony J.Semi-implantable middle ear hearing device
US5562670 *26 Abr 19948 Oct 1996Medevelop AbHolding means and method of implantation thereof in osseous tissue
US5624376 *3 Ene 199529 Abr 1997Symphonix Devices, Inc.Implantable and external hearing systems having a floating mass transducer
US5772575 *22 Sep 199530 Jun 1998S. George LesinskiImplantable hearing aid
US5800336 *3 Ene 19961 Sep 1998Symphonix Devices, Inc.Advanced designs of floating mass transducers
US5857958 *23 Dic 199612 Ene 1999Symphonix Devices, Inc.Implantable and external hearing systems having a floating mass transducer
US5881158 *23 May 19979 Mar 1999United States Surgical CorporationMicrophones for an implantable hearing aid
US5897486 *11 Mar 199727 Abr 1999Symphonix Devices, Inc.Dual coil floating mass transducers
US5906635 *18 Ago 199725 May 1999Maniglia; Anthony J.Electromagnetic implantable hearing device for improvement of partial and total sensoryneural hearing loss
US5913815 *6 Dic 199522 Jun 1999Symphonix Devices, Inc.For improving hearing
US5951601 *24 Mar 199714 Sep 1999Lesinski; S. GeorgeAttaching an implantable hearing aid microactuator
US5977689 *18 Jul 19972 Nov 1999Neukermans; Armand P.Biocompatible, implantable hearing aid microactuator
US5984859 *25 Abr 199616 Nov 1999Lesinski; S. GeorgeImplantable auditory system components and system
US5993376 *7 Ago 199730 Nov 1999St. Croix Medical, Inc.Electromagnetic input transducers for middle ear sensing
US6001129 *7 Ago 199714 Dic 1999St. Croix Medical, Inc.Hearing aid transducer support
US6041129 *18 Ene 199621 Mar 2000Adelman; Roger A.Hearing apparatus
US6113531 *18 Nov 19985 Sep 2000Implex Aktiengesellschaft Hearing TechnologyProcess for optimization of mechanical inner ear stimulation in partially or fully implantable hearing systems
US6123660 *14 May 199926 Sep 2000Implex Aktiengesellschaft Hearing TechnologyPartially or fully implantable hearing aid
US6137889 *27 May 199824 Oct 2000Insonus Medical, Inc.Direct tympanic membrane excitation via vibrationally conductive assembly
US6139488 *1 Sep 199831 Oct 2000Symphonix Devices, Inc.Biasing device for implantable hearing devices
US6153966 *27 Sep 199928 Nov 2000Neukermans; Armand P.Biocompatible, implantable hearing aid microactuator
US6162169 *25 Mar 199919 Dic 2000Implex Aktiengesellschaft Hearing TechnologyTransducer arrangement for partially or fully implantable hearing aids
US627714811 Feb 199921 Ago 2001Soundtec, Inc.Middle ear magnet implant, attachment device and method, and test instrument and method
US631571021 Jul 199713 Nov 2001St. Croix Medical, Inc.Hearing system with middle ear transducer mount
US639871722 May 20004 Jun 2002Phonak AgDevice for mechanical coupling of an electromechanical hearing aid converter which can be implanted in a mastoid cavity
US643602828 Dic 199920 Ago 2002Soundtec, Inc.Direct drive movement of body constituent
US647513414 Ene 19995 Nov 2002Symphonix Devices, Inc.Dual coil floating mass transducers
US64821446 Oct 200019 Nov 2002Phonak AgArrangement for mechanical coupling of a driver to a coupling site of the ossicular chain
US648861618 Abr 20003 Dic 2002St. Croix Medical, Inc.Hearing aid transducer support
US6516228 *7 Feb 20004 Feb 2003Epic Biosonics Inc.Implantable microphone for use with a hearing aid or cochlear prosthesis
US653719926 Jul 200025 Mar 2003Phonak AgArrangement for mechanical coupling of a driver to a coupling site of the ossicular chain
US65406616 Oct 20001 Abr 2003Phonak AgArrangement for coupling of a driver to a coupling site of the ossicular chain
US65406625 Jul 20011 Abr 2003St. Croix Medical, Inc.Method and apparatus for reduced feedback in implantable hearing assistance systems
US654771510 Jul 200015 Abr 2003Phonak AgArrangement for mechanical coupling of a driver to a coupling site of the ossicular chain
US655476227 Ago 200129 Abr 2003Cochlear LimitedImplantable hearing system with means for measuring its coupling quality
US659251213 Ago 200115 Jul 2003Phonak AgAt least partially implantable system for rehabilitation of a hearing disorder
US66765921 Nov 200213 Ene 2004Symphonix Devices, Inc.Dual coil floating mass transducers
US668904512 Dic 200110 Feb 2004St. Croix Medical, Inc.Method and apparatus for improving signal quality in implantable hearing systems
US67300151 Jun 20014 May 2004Mike SchugtFlexible transducer supports
US675577818 Oct 200229 Jun 2004St. Croix Medical, Inc.Method and apparatus for reduced feedback in implantable hearing assistance systems
US684091917 Dic 199811 Ene 2005Osseofon AbPercutaneous bone anchored transferring device
US69149947 Sep 20015 Jul 2005Insound Medical, Inc.Canal hearing device with transparent mode
US694098825 Nov 19986 Sep 2005Insound Medical, Inc.Semi-permanent canal hearing device
US694098930 Dic 19996 Sep 2005Insound Medical, Inc.Direct tympanic drive via a floating filament assembly
US701650421 Sep 199921 Mar 2006Insonus Medical, Inc.Personal hearing evaluator
US722640627 Ago 20015 Jun 2007Cochlear LimitedAt least partially implantable hearing system
US737955526 Ene 200527 May 2008Insound Medical, Inc.Precision micro-hole for extended life batteries
US742412426 Abr 20059 Sep 2008Insound Medical, Inc.Semi-permanent canal hearing device
US748176114 Ene 200427 Ene 2009Med-El Elektromedizinische Geräte Ges.m.b.H.Implantable converter for cochlea implants and implantable hearing aids
US7651460 *18 Mar 200526 Ene 2010The Board Of Regents Of The University Of OklahomaTotally implantable hearing system
US766428227 Sep 200516 Feb 2010Insound Medical, Inc.Sealing retainer for extended wear hearing devices
US787691929 Jun 200625 Ene 2011Insound Medical, Inc.Hearing aid microphone protective barrier
US806863026 Nov 200729 Nov 2011Insound Medical, Inc.Precision micro-hole for extended life batteries
US8075630 *12 May 200513 Dic 2011Bio-Lok International, Inc.Transcutaneous port having micro-textured surfaces for tissue and bone integration
US81052299 Abr 200731 Ene 2012Cochlear LimitedAt least partially implantable hearing system
US814754426 Oct 20023 Abr 2012Otokinetics Inc.Therapeutic appliance for cochlea
US8184840 *22 Ago 200622 May 20123Win N.V.Combined set comprising a vibrator actuator and an implantable device
US845733618 Jun 20104 Jun 2013Insound Medical, Inc.Contamination resistant ports for hearing devices
US849420015 Dic 201023 Jul 2013Insound Medical, Inc.Hearing aid microphone protective barrier
US850370723 Dic 20096 Ago 2013Insound Medical, Inc.Sealing retainer for extended wear hearing devices
US853805515 Feb 200817 Sep 2013Insound Medical, Inc.Semi-permanent canal hearing device and insertion method
US866610116 Nov 20114 Mar 2014Insound Medical, Inc.Precision micro-hole for extended life batteries
US868201623 Nov 201125 Mar 2014Insound Medical, Inc.Canal hearing devices and batteries for use with same
US8715154 *24 Jun 20106 May 2014Earlens CorporationOptically coupled cochlear actuator systems and methods
US876142323 Nov 201124 Jun 2014Insound Medical, Inc.Canal hearing devices and batteries for use with same
US880890623 Nov 201119 Ago 2014Insound Medical, Inc.Canal hearing devices and batteries for use with same
US20090141919 *22 Ago 20064 Jun 20093Win N.V.Combined set comprising a vibrator actuator and an implantable device
US20100145135 *10 Dic 200910 Jun 2010Vibrant Med-El Hearing Technology GmbhSkull Vibrational Unit
US20110152603 *24 Jun 201023 Jun 2011SoundBeam LLCOptically Coupled Cochlear Actuator Systems and Methods
USRE32947 *14 Ene 198813 Jun 1989Baptist Medical Center Of Oklahoma, Inc.Magnetic transcutaneous mount for external device of an associated implant
DE3617118A1 *22 May 19865 Feb 1987Bristol Myers CoImplantierbare elektromagnetische mittelohrhoerhilfe
DE19840212C2 *3 Sep 19982 Ago 2001Implex Hear Tech AgWandleranordnung für teil- oder vollimplantierbare Hörgeräte
EP0263254A1 *30 Jul 198713 Abr 1988Medical Devices Group, Inc.Implantable hearing aid
EP0622057A2 *26 Abr 19942 Nov 1994Medevelop AktiebolagHolding apparatus destined to be implanted into bone tissue for the controlled reception and fixation of equipment preferably usable for electrical information transmission
EP1179969A225 Jul 200113 Feb 2002Phonak AgAt least partially implantable hearing system
EP2484126A1 *1 Oct 20108 Ago 2012Ototronix LLCImproved middle ear implant and method
WO1995001710A1 *27 Jun 199412 Ene 1995Geoffrey R BallImplantable magnetic hearing aid transducer
WO1996021335A13 Ene 199611 Jul 1996Geoffrey R BallImplantable and external hearing systems having a floating mass transducer
WO1996022727A1 *26 Ene 19961 Ago 1996Pierre SabinTranscutaneous electrical connection device for medical implant apparatus
WO1998041056A1 *9 Mar 199817 Sep 1998Symphonix Devices IncImproved dual coil floating mass transducers
WO1999007436A1 *7 Ago 199818 Feb 1999St Croix Medical IncElectromagnetic input transducers for middle ear sensing
WO2001050815A128 Dic 200012 Jul 2001Insonus Medical IncDirect tympanic drive via a floating filament assembly
WO2002098506A1 *1 Jun 200112 Dic 2002St Croix Medical IncFlexible transducer suports
WO2011066295A123 Nov 20103 Jun 2011Med-El Elektromedizinische Geraete GmbhImplantable microphone for hearing systems
WO2011066306A123 Nov 20103 Jun 2011Med-El Elektromedizinische Geraete GmbhImplantable microphone for hearing systems
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.600/25, 381/326
Clasificación internacionalA61B5/07, A61F11/04, A61F2/18, H04R25/00
Clasificación cooperativaH04R2225/67, A61F2002/183, H04R25/606, A61B5/076
Clasificación europeaH04R25/60D1, A61B5/07D