Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS3893448 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación8 Jul 1975
Fecha de presentación26 Nov 1973
Fecha de prioridad26 Nov 1973
Número de publicaciónUS 3893448 A, US 3893448A, US-A-3893448, US3893448 A, US3893448A
InventoresJohn W Brantigan
Cesionario originalJohn W Brantigan
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Catheter device for use in detecting gas in body fluids and tissue
US 3893448 A
Resumen
A blood or tissue gas diffusion catheter device comprising a catheter having a lumen therethrough and provided with a solid distal end portion enclosed within a membrane permeable to gases that might be found in blood or tissue, said distal end portion being shaped to provide a helical path over the outside thereof communicating with the lumen of the catheter, and said end portion being shaped to permit direct insertion of the distal end portion into the body of a patient without the use of a cannulated needle or an otherwise preformed entry.
Imágenes(1)
Previous page
Next page
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

United States Patent Brantigan July 8, 1975 [541 CATHETER DEVICE FOR USE IN 3,572,315 3/1971 Cullen 128/2 E 3,658,053 4/1972 Fergusson et a1. 128/2 E DETECTING GAS [N BODY FLUIDS AND 3,710,778 1/197 3 Cornelius 128/2 G TISSUE lnventor: John W. Brantigan, 914 Medical Plaza, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Filed: Nov. 26, 1973 Appl, No.1 419,109

US. Cl. 128/2 G; 128/2 E; 12812 L; 128/214 R; 128/348 Int. Cl A6lb 05/00 Field of Search 128/2 E, 2 G, 2 L, 2.1 E, 128/2.05 R, 348, 214

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Primary Examiner-Kyle L. Howell Attorney, Agent, or FirmHil1, Gross, Simpson, Van Santen, Steadman, Chiara 8:. Simpson [57] ABSTRACT A blood or tissue gas diffusion catheter device comprising a catheter having a lumen therethrough and provided with a solid distal end portion enclosed within a membrane permeable to gases that might be found in blood or tissue, said distal end portion being shaped to provide a helical path over the outside thereof communicating with the lumen of the catheter, and said end portion being shaped to permit direct insertion of the distal end portion into the body of a patient without the use of a cannulated needle or an otherwise preformed entry.

10 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures FIG. 7

FIG. 9

CATHETER DEVICE FOR USE IN DETECTING GAS IN BODY FLUIDS AND TISSUE BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Heretofore, catheter devices were constructed in which the catheter was a complete cannula up to a closed distal end and the distal portion of the catheter was covered by a membrane permeable to gases in body fluids such as blood, or extracellular fluid of tissue. These catheters were used to acquire samples of the gas which passed through the membrane and then through the lumen of the catheter. In most instances, holes were drilled, or otherwise provided through the wall of the catheter leading into the lumen thereof through which the gas passed into the lumen of the catheter. Catheter devices so constructed were severely limited in minimum overall diameter by virtue of the lumen in the catheter, required extreme difficulty in providing small apertures through the wall of the catheter leading into the lumen, and there was consequent weakening of the cannular tubing by virtue of those apertures. Such catheters were also objectionably expensive to manufacture.

Minimum trauma to the blood vessel or tissue in which the distal end portion of the catheter device is inserted is highly desirable. With that in mind, an optimum catheter device is one that provides a sufficient membrane diffusion area with a minimum overall diameter. By way of the instant invention, applicant has reduced that overall diameter to a minimum not heretofore reached. Also, in the instant invention the provision of apertures through the wall of the cannula has been eliminated along with its difficulty and expense, and the distal end portion of the catheter has not been weakened to an objectionable extent. Furthermore, the instant invention is so constructed that it may be directly inserted in a patients body without the aid of a preferred entry or the use of a cannulated needle.

The instant invention comprises a catheter device including an elongated catheter or cannular having a lumen therethrough with a solid distal end portion integral with the catheter or attached to the end thereof in a known manner. The solid end portion, and preferably the catheter itself, are entirely covered with a membrane of a material permeable to body gases such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, argon, helium, anesthetic agents, inter alia. The solid end portion terminates on the slant so that the lower part thereof is the equivalent of a pointed end which, notwithstanding being covered by the membrane. may be directly inserted into the body of the patient. The solid end portion is also formed to provide a helical path leading to the lumen of the catheter between the outside surface of the end portion and the membrane. Preferably, this is accomplished by providing a single or double helical groove in the solid end portion. In effect, the lumen of the cannula heretofore used, has been transferred to the outside of the solid end portion. This provides a smaller overall diameter of the device than was heretofore obtainable, and also provides ample diffusion area for the gas passing through the membrane when the opposite end of the catheter is connected to the vacuum system of a mass spectrometer or other analyzing device.

There is one other way of providing the instant invention by way of connecting a rectangular piece of material to the end of the catheter and then twisting that rectangular piece of material to form the helical path. This method requires the attachment of a sloping end to the twisted rectangular member so that the device may be placed in the body of a patient directly and without the use of a needle or a preformed entry.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from the following description of certain preferred embodiments thereof, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, although variations and modifications may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of the novel concepts of the disclosure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING All figures in the drawing are extremely enlarged for purposes of clarity in illustration.

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view, with parts shown in elevation, of a catheter device having a solid distal end portion with a helical groove therein;

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line IIII of FIG. I, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view of the structure of FIG. I showing the same from a different angle;

FIG. 4 is a view similar in character to FIG. 1, but illustrating the solid distal end portion on the catheter device as having a double helical groove in the surface thereof;

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line VV of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a view similar in character to FIG. 3, but showing the connection of the double helical groove with the lumen of the catheter;

FIG. 7 is a view similar in character to FIGS. 1 and 4, but illustrating the solid portion at the distal end of the catheter as being a rectangular piece of material twisted to provide the helical path for gas;

FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line VIIIVII[ of FIG. 7; and

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating the connection of the helical path with the lumen in the catheter or cannula.

DETAIL DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL EMBODIMENTS In the first embodiment of the invention, illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, there is shown a catheter device including a catheter in the form of a cannula 1 having a lumen 2 extending therethrough. The cannula l carries a solid distal end portion 3 having no lumen. Both the cannula I and end portion 3 are preferably made of stainless steel, but a suitable plastic material might also be utilized, if desired. Stainless steel is preferred because of its strength, the diameter of both the cannula l and solid end portion 3 are the same and quite small.

Over both the solid end portion 3 and the cannula l is a tubular membrane 4 which may well be of polytetrafluoroethylene, silicone rubber, a silicone polymer substance, or equivalent material that is permeable to gases found in the body and which are to be sampled and analyzed. The solid end portion 3 is provided with a helical groove 5 forming a helical path between the outer surface of the groove and the membrane 4 leading to the lumen 2 in the cannula l, and the cannula I is beveled at a point 6 in order to establish good communication between the helical groove and the lumen.

It should also be noted that the groove starts rearwardly of the distal end of the portion 3 which distal end remains fully solid as shown at 7 to entirely fill the end of the membrane 4 and is cut off on the slant to provide a lower sharp point 8. The monofilament 9 of the same material as the membrane 4 may be placed over the end 7 of the portion 3 to prevent contact of the stainless steel or other material forming the portion 3 with the blood or tissue of the patient, and the membrane 4 extends a material distance or fully over the surface of the cannula l for the same reason. The monofilament 9 is so thin and sufficiently strong as not to interfere with the direct insertion of the distal end portion of the catheter into the body of the patient without the aid of a cannulated needle or any other preformed entry. The groove 5 as represented in FIG. 2 may be shaped in the form a 60 to approximately 90 angle and of a depth equal to or less than the radius of the solid portion 3. The angle between the sides of the groove is not critical but 60 to 90 appears a satisfactory angle. The entire length of the catheter device including the cannula l and end portion 3 is rather arbitrary, and depends upon how far the attending surgeon wishes to insert the device into the blood vessel or tissue of a patient. The end portion 3 may be attached to the distal end of the cannula I in a known manner, held in position by the structural integrity of the tubular membrane 4, or in certain instances might possibly be formed integral with the cannula.

In use, the catheter device is entered into the body of a patient to a desired location, and gases contained in the body permeate through the membrane 4 and enter the helical groove 5 which provides ample diffusion area. The gas then travels along the groove 5 into the lumen of the cannula l which is connected to a mass spectrometer or other analyzing device. Usually the analyzing device has a source of suction to assist the flow of gas to the device.

As stated above, an optimum catheter device is one that provides a sufficient membrane diffusion area for gases with a minimum overall diameter. With a small diameter catheter device that may be placed in the body of a patient without the use of something else to establish an entry point some structural strength is required. By providing a cannula with a solid distal end portion and giving that end portion a configuration so as to establish a path of travel for the gas between the outer surface of the end portion and the diffusion membrane surrounding it results in sufficient structural strength and a desirable small diameter. The sufficient strength is obtained by eliminating a lumen through the solid end portion and boring holes or providing slots leading from the outside of the end portion to the lumen, as was heretofore done. For example, if the distance between the sides of the groove 5, as seen in FIG. 2, is 60 it would be a solid cross sectional area of 5/6 'rrR throughout the length of the end portion 3. If the distance between the sides of the groove 5 at the circumference of the element 3 was 90, it would be 34 nr of solid material throughout the end portion. Either of these amounts is far greater than can be obtained by an end portion of the same diameter with a lumen therethrough and apertures or slots leading to that lumen. The membrane tube 4 and monofilament 9 can be 6 reduced to approximately 0.002 inch and the overall outside diameter of the entire catheter device may be reduced to approximately 0.020 inch, considerably less than any gas sampling catheter device made heretofore, insofar as I am aware. While the showing in the drawings may not be to the proper scale, the above stated figures are possible.

5 Should more diffusion area be desired, it is a simple expedient to provide the same without objectionably sacrificing a portion of the structural strength throughout the distal end portion 3, as shown in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6. This is accomplished by double helical grooving of 0 the end portion 3. In this instance, the structure is the same as that above described in connection with FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, with the exception that the cannula I is provided with an additional inward bevel 10 directly opposite the bevel 6; and the solid end portion 3 is provided 5 with a pair of helical grooves 11 and 12 one communicating with the lumen 2 of the cannula l at the bevel portion 6 and the other on the opposite side at the bevel portion I0. If the space between the grooves 11 and 12, in each case, is 60 at the outer circumference of the cannula 1, then the solid area remaining entirely through the end portion 3 up to the solid end 7 thereof is 1r R in cross sectional area, and that is more than has heretofore been obtained by way of a cannulated end portion with slots or holes drilled through the wall of the cannula. There need be no sacrifice in smallness of diameter. The device of FIGS. 4-6 functions the same as above described in connection with FIGS. 1-3

with the exception that there is more room to accommodate gas diffusing through the membrane 4.

A structure highly economical to manufacture, and embodying the instant invention, is shown in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9. Here the membrane 4, monofilament 9, and cannula l are the same as illustrated in FIGS. 4-6. The only difference is the provision of a solid distal end portion 13 which is simply a strip or rod of material rectangular in cross-section and twisted as seen clearly in FIG. 7 to provide a helical path for gas or gases diffusing through the membrane 4. In this instance, it is necessary to attach a closed end portion 14 to the twisted rod in any suitable manner to close the end of the tubular membrane 4 and provide a sharp point 15 whereby the device itself may be entered into the body of a patient. The twisted bar 13 is secured at its proximal end to the cannula I in a known manner. This bar 13 has a greater solid cross-sectional area than has heretofore been obtained by utilizing a cannulated end portion with slots or holes through the wall thereof leading to the lumen.

Accordingly, it will be noted that the instant invention comprises a catheter device for sampling gases in the blood or tissue of a patient, and which is of a diameter smaller than heretofore utilized, which provides ample diffusion area, and which is itself insertable into the body of a patient without aid from some other instrument to provide an entryway.

I claim:

I. A catheter device for use with analyzing apparatus to obtain samples of gases from the blood or tissue of 60 a patient, said device including a cannula carrying a distal end portion covered by a tubular membrane per meable to body gases and insertable into a blood vessel or tissue of a patient, wherein the improvement comprises:

said distal end portion being solid throughout its length, and

said solid end portion being shaped to provide a path for gases between its external surface and said membrane covering it leading to the lumen of said cannula.

2. The catheter device in claim I, wherein said solid end portion is grooved externally to provide the path for gases.

3. The catheter device of claim 1, wherein said solid end portion is provided with a helical groove in its external surface to provide the path for gases.

4. The catheter device of claim 1, wherein said solid end portion contains a plurality of helical grooves in its external surface to provide the path for gases.

5. The catheter device of claim 1, wherein said distal end portion comprises a solid bar of material polygonal in cross section and of less size than the inside diameter of said tubular membrane,

said bar being twisted to contact said membrane at spaced intervals.

6. The catheter of claim 1, wherein said solid distal end portion terminates in an end of sufficient size to close the end of said tubular membrane, and which end slopes at its distal face to proall outside diameter less than 0.035 inch.

9. The catheter device of claim 5, including an end member attached to said solid twisted bar of a size to close the end of said tubular membrane and having a sloping distal face terminating in a sharp point.

10. The catheter device of claim 6, including a monofilament covering the sloping face of said end but made of sufficiently thin and strong material as not to interfere with the insertion of the device into the body of a patient.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3224433 *10 Abr 196121 Dic 1965Honeywell Incph electrodes
US3499435 *2 Jun 196710 Mar 1970Paul E RockwellEsophageal probe for use in monitoring
US3512517 *30 Nov 196419 May 1970Beckman Instruments IncPolarographic method and apparatus for monitoring blood glucose concentration
US3518982 *20 Feb 19687 Jul 1970Abcor IncDevice and method for monitoring of gases in the blood stream
US3572315 *26 Nov 196823 Mar 1971John S CullenIntravascular catheter with gas-permeable tip
US3658053 *28 Ago 196925 Abr 1972Scient Research Instr CorpCatheter for use in detecting dissolved gas in fluids such as blood
US3710778 *15 Mar 197116 Ene 1973Gen ElectricBlood gas sensor amplifier and testing system
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3981297 *3 Mar 197521 Sep 1976Sorenson Research Co., Inc.Gas sampling catheter assembly and method
US4016863 *27 Ago 197512 Abr 1977Brantigan John WTissue tonometer device for use in measuring gas in body tissue
US4512349 *13 May 198323 Abr 1985Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaMethod of direct tissue gas tension measurement and apparatus therefor
US4671287 *3 Feb 19869 Jun 1987Fiddian Green Richard GApparatus and method for sustaining vitality of organs of the gastrointestinal tract
US4726381 *4 Jun 198623 Feb 1988Solutech, Inc.For equilibrating dialyzable components for analysis for adding components
US4763658 *29 Jul 198716 Ago 1988Solutech, Inc.Dialysis system 2nd method
US4765339 *29 Jul 198723 Ago 1988Solutech, Inc.Closed loop dialysis system
US4774955 *29 Jul 19874 Oct 1988Solutech, Inc.Programmable dialyzer system analyzer and method of use
US4830013 *30 Ene 198716 May 1989Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Co.Intravascular blood parameter measurement system
US4834707 *16 Sep 198730 May 1989Evans Phillip HVenting apparatus and method for cardiovascular pumping application
US4901727 *5 May 198820 Feb 1990The Boc Group, Inc.Micro-probe for gas sampling
US4934369 *23 Mar 198919 Jun 1990Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyIntravascular blood parameter measurement system
US4951669 *8 Ago 198828 Ago 1990Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyBlood parameter measurement system
US4989606 *8 Ago 19885 Feb 1991Minnesota Mining And Manufactoring CompanyIntravascular blood gas sensing system
US5048525 *18 Jun 199017 Sep 1991Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyBlood parameter measurement system with compliant element
US5175016 *20 Mar 199029 Dic 1992Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMethod for making gas sensing element
US5284775 *21 Sep 19928 Feb 1994Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyBlends of sensing component, polymer precursor amd hydroxy-alkylcellulose dispersants; detecting carbon dioxIde in blood
US5335658 *29 Jun 19929 Ago 1994Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyIntravascular blood parameter sensing system
US5421328 *20 May 19946 Jun 1995Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyIntravascular blood parameter sensing system
US5462052 *27 Abr 199331 Oct 1995Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Co.Apparatus and method for use in measuring a compositional parameter of blood
US7630747 *9 Sep 20038 Dic 2009Keimar, Inc.Apparatus for ascertaining blood characteristics and probe for use therewith
US798519922 Feb 200626 Jul 2011Unomedical A/SGateway system
US801212629 Oct 20076 Sep 2011Unomedical A/SInfusion set
US806225023 Dic 200422 Nov 2011Unomedical A/SCannula device
US8142389 *1 Abr 200527 Mar 2012Roche Diagnostics International AgMicrodialysis probe and method for the production thereof
US822135521 Mar 200517 Jul 2012Unomedical A/SInjection device for infusion set
US82465883 Jul 200821 Ago 2012Unomedical A/SInsertion device with pivoting action
US8287516 *21 Mar 200516 Oct 2012Unomedical A/SInfusion set
US830354922 Dic 20066 Nov 2012Unomedical A/SInjection device
US84308502 Jul 200830 Abr 2013Unomedical A/SInserter having bistable equilibrium states
US84398387 Jun 200714 May 2013Unomedical A/SInserter for transcutaneous sensor
US84860032 Jul 200816 Jul 2013Unomedical A/SInserter having two springs
US856256716 Jul 201022 Oct 2013Unomedical A/SInserter device with horizontal moving part
US20110087267 *9 Oct 200914 Abr 2011Spivey James TMethod for exchanging end effectors in vivo
EP0089647A2 *18 Mar 198328 Sep 1983FIDDIAN-GREEN, Richard G.Hollow viscus tonometry
EP0340908A2 *3 Abr 19898 Nov 1989The Boc Group, Inc.Micro-probe for gas sampling
EP0403394A1 *15 Jun 199019 Dic 1990Zeta TechnologyProbe for microdialysis
EP0422690A2 *9 Ene 198717 Abr 1991Mountpelier Investments, S.A.Apparatus for selective monitoring/oxygenation of organs of the gastrointestinal tract
EP2501286A1 *16 Nov 201026 Sep 2012Maquet Critical Care ABSelf-flowing measuring system
WO2011059397A1 *16 Nov 201019 May 2011Cma Microdialysis AbSelf-flowing measuring system
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.600/364
Clasificación internacionalA61M25/00, A61B5/00
Clasificación cooperativaA61M25/0069, A61B5/145
Clasificación europeaA61B5/145, A61M25/00T10A