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Patentes

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Número de publicaciónUS3900165 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación19 Ago 1975
Fecha de presentación15 Abr 1974
Fecha de prioridad15 Abr 1974
Número de publicaciónUS 3900165 A, US 3900165A, US-A-3900165, US3900165 A, US3900165A
InventoresGerlach C Richard, Parke James G
Cesionario originalMicro Gen Equipment Corp
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Hand carried spraying apparatus
US 3900165 A
Resumen  disponible en
Imágenes(5)
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

United States Patent Parke et al.

[ 51 Aug. 19, 1975 1 HAND CARRIED SPRAYING APPARATUS [73] Assignee: Micro-Gen Equipment Corporation [22] Filed: Apr. 15, 1974 {21] Appl. No.: 460,725

Primary Examiner-Lloyd L. King Attorney, Agent, or FirmCox, Smith, Smith, Hale & Guenther Incorporated ABSTRACT This invention relates to a chemical spraying apparatus that may be hand carried while spraying. The spraying apparatus is powered by a small gasoline engine that drives a low volume compressor. The compressor pressurizes the atmosphere to a given pressure as determined by the speed of the gasoline engine. A chemical insecticide is mixed. in the spraying nozzle with pressurized air being supplied by the compressor with the mixing being at some point remote to the compressor. A metering valve controls the flow of the insecticide into the mixing chamber of the nozzle while spraying. Design of the nozzle insures that droplets of the insecticide are broken down to the proper size range to insure maximum effectiveness per unit volume of the active ingredient.

10 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEB AUG'! 9 I975 SHEET 1 BF 5 PATENTEU AUG] 9 ms SE'i-LU 2 UP 5 FIG. 2

PATENTEUAUB ems SHZU 3 OF 5 'v' Ill FIG. 4

PATENTEnAus-l 9197s 3,900,165

' saw 5 [1F 5 HAND CARRIED SPRAYllNG APPATUS BAC KGROU N D OF THE IN VENTION This invention relates to liquid chemical sprayers, and more particularly to a hand carried liquid chemical sprayer using constant pressure and ultra low volume of chemical to insure maximum effectiveness of the chemical insecticide. The present invention was devel oped in conjunction with efforts to produce a more efficient, economic and reliable insecticide spraying device.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART Prior to the present invention insecticides, pesticides, fungicides and other chemicals have been spread over large areas by being disbursed in a liquid carrier such as water or a suitable petroleum product. To aid in the breaking up of droplets into small particles whereby a fog containing the insecticide may be created, the insecticide and carrier was preheated before being dispersed through a nozzle, The preheating aided in breaking down the surface tension of the various droplets and, consequently, aided in reducing the size of the various droplets by turbulent conditions created within the nozzle immediately prior to discharge.

Many of the prior art insecticide sprayers worked on a burner and a fan principle. The burner would preheat the air into which the insecticide was introduced immediately prior to discharge. A large volume of heated air moves through the nozzle in order to create a strong turbulence therein and blow the insecticide some distance upon being ejected through the noule. One of the problems with the forced air (fan) type of sprayer was that a sufficient percentage of the insecticide would not be within the droplet size range for the maximum kill ratio per unit volume of insecticide used. Even the preheating of the insecticide and carrier would not adequately insure that the desired particle size range would be reached.

Recently a suitable device was developed wherein preheating was no longer necessary in order to break the droplets down to the desired particle size range. As reflected in US. Pat. No. 3,648,401 to George S. Stains and US. Pat. No. 3,793,762 issued Feb. 26, 1974 to George S. Stains, there is shown an apparatus for using low pressure and a particularly designed nozzle device. The nozzle device and the low pressure would insure a sufficient percentage of the insecticide would be within the desired particle size range upon using the apparatus and method described in the patent and patent application. Another patent showing a similar type of device is US. Pat. No. 3,633,825, with the nozzle shown therein creating increased turbulence before discharge of the insecticide into the atmosphere.

Of all the previously mentioned commercial type of insecticide Sprayers, none of them had the ease and the portability of the present design. All of the prior insecticide sprayers were quite bulky and either had to be rolled around on a cart, operated on the back of a motor vehicle, such as a pickup truck, or moved by some other means that would only allow a limited access to all of the desired areas. Of the few insecticide sprayers that would possibly break a sufficient percentage of the insecticide by volume down to the desired particle range, none of these insecticide sprayers have the portability of the present design, and certainly none could be carried by hand. Also, of these prior insecticide Sprayers that could meet the parameters set forth in this application for droplet size for the maximum kill ratio, none of these prior sprayers allow for the mixing of the pressurized air and insecticide at some point remote to the rest of the spraying apparatus. By using the remote mixing not only is the spraying apparatus portable, but the nozzle which contains the remote mixing is independently movable with respect to the main body of the spraying apparatus.

One of the reasons why the prior devices that could reach the desired percentage of particles within the proper size range did not have the portability as the present invention was due to the compressor and motor required to drive the compressor. The present invention helps to overcome the problem of bulkiness and weight by having a uniquely designed compressor that may be driven by an extremely light weight engine. As reference to a somewhat similar type of compressor, attention is directed to Ser. No. 377,567 filed July 9, 1973 by C, Richard Gerlach and having the same assignee as the present invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to have a hand carried insecticide spraying apparatus.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a liquid chemical spraying apparatus with the mixing of the insecticide and air at some point remote from, and independently movable withrespect to, the spraying apparatus. I

It is even another object of the present invention to provide an ultra low volume chemical spraying apparatus having an internal power unit which may be carried during the spraying operation.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a spraying apparatus with a uniquely designed ultra low volume air compressor for providing a constant pressure output. 3

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a hand carried chemical spraying apparatus wherein the discharge nozzle is independently movable with respect to the main body of the apparatus with the chemical insecticide being mixed in the discharge nozzle.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide a chemical spraying apparatus wherein a metering stem that controls the flow of the insecticide is contained within the nozzle housing and is movable therewith.

It is another object of the present invention to combine a nozzle capable of producing ninety-five percent of the mixture of insecticide and carrier liquid in droplets between the range of five microns to fifteen microns in diameter with a hand carried liquid chemical spraying apparatus.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. l is a perspective exploded drawing of the hand carried spraying apparatus.

FIG. 2 is a perspective drawing of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 taken from the opposite side with the belt cover plate removed.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of the discharge nozzle, nozzle housing and metering stem assembly shown in l and 2.

FIG. 4 is a front view of the discharge nozzle and metering stem assembly shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view of the compressor shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 6 is an elevated view of the left side of the compressor shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a perspective exploded view of an alternative embodiment for the hand carried liquid chemical spraying apparatus.

FIG. 8 is an elevated view of the rotating component in the compressor showing the design of the rotating vanes.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawings, there is shown a perspective exploded view of the hand carried liquid chemical spraying apparatus designated generally by the reference numeral 10. Generally, the spraying apparatus 10 consists of the carrying plate 12 to which are attached the major components including a gasoline engine 14, a centrifugal compressor 16, drive linkage 18 and spraying head 20.

The power source which consists of the gasoline engine 14 is a conventional one cylinder engine that should be very light weight in design. The carburetor 22 is located on the top of the gasoline engine 14 with an air filter 24 being attached thereto. The spark for the gasoline in cylinder block 26 is provided by spark plug wire 28 upon pulling hand crank 29. Cover plate 30 covers the outside portion of the gasoline engine. The gasoline tank 32 is secured to the nearest adjacent side of the gasoline engine 14 by appropriate mounting means such'as screws, clamps or any other suitable means. A gasoline engine similar to the one just described is manufactured by O and R Engines, Inc. and has a manufacturing number designation of Series -A. However, it should be realized that any other type of engine with suitable characteristics that is very light weight and having approximately the same horse power output rating would be very suitable for use with the present invention, with minor alterations being made for mounting.

The gasoline engine 14 is attached to carrying plate 12 by means of screws (not shown) that fit through holes 34. The holes 34 are raised from the carrying plate 12 by means of bosses 36. Within the center of the holes 34 is located a hole 38 through which the drive pulley 40 will connect to the drive shaft (not shown) of the gasoline engine 14. Throttle lever 42 is connected to the carburetor 22 to control the speed of the gasoline engine 14 by means of linkage 44. The throttle lever is attached to the carrying plate 12 by means of a screw 45 through hole 46 and into threaded hole 48 and boss 50 of the carrying plate 12. A spring 52 holds tension on the throttle lever 42 to maintain the engine at a given speed.

The drive pulley 40 is connected to the drive shaft (not shown) of engine 14 through hole 38 and is keyed by slot 54 to prevent slippage with respect thereto. The hole 38 should be large enough so that the center hub 56 of pulley 40 does not rub against the carrying plate 12. The outer surface 58 of the pulley 40 is crowned in the center so that a flat belt pulley 60 will automatically center itself on outer surface 58.

A centrifugal compressor 16 which also is shown in a perspective assembly view in FIG. 1 is attached to the carrying plate 12 by means of bolts in threaded holes 64 on raised bosses 62. A centrifugal compressor 16 is driven by a shaft 66 extending through hole 68 in carrying plate 12. Cylindrical surface 70 of shaft 66 has a crowned center portion so that as flat belt 60 turns shaft 66, it will continually center itself on cylindrical surface 70. The shaft 66, which extends through the stationary main housing 72, is attached to the rotating impeller 74 by means of nut 76 and washer 78. The compressor cover 80 fits over the rotating impeller 74 and bolts to the stationary main housing 72 by bolts 228. Air drawn in by the centrifugal compressor 16 and pressurized by the rotating impeller 74 (as will be explained in more detail subsequently) is discharged through a semi-spiral duct 82. A stretchable foam rubber filter 84 that will stretch over mounting flange 86 insures that dust and dirt particles will not be received in the compressor 16 by air that is being compressed.

The air being discharged by duct 82 is transmitted through a flexible hose 88 to the spraying head 20. The hose 88 is attached to the end of duct 82 by means of a clamp 90 and to a spraying component 20 by means of a clamp 92.

The spraying head 20 consists of a nozzle housing 94 that receives the compressed air from flexible hose 88 through the handle 96 having a conduit 98 running therethrough. In the front portion of the nozzle housing 94 is contained a discharge nozzle 100 for discharging insecticide contained within bottle 102 into the atmosphere. The insecticide contained within bottle 102 is drawn to nozzle 100 by means of a vacuum, as will be explained in more detail subsequently, through flexible tubing 104. Cap 106 secures the bottle 102 to nozzle housing 94 via a metering stem assembly 108. Inside the discharge nozzle 100 a vacuum is created by a venturi to draw the insecticide from bottle 102 through flexible tubing 104 and metering stem assembly 108 to be discharged into the atmosphere.

A hook 110 is bolted to carrying plate 12 through holes 112. While using the spraying apparatus 10, hook 110 is flipped back out of the way by pivoting on bolt 111 that fits through holes 112. When the spraying head 10 is not in use, the hook 110 will pivot forward and rest against stop 114 to support the spraying head 20. Stop 114 will butt against the end of carrying plate 12.

Since the most practical way of manufacturing the carrying plate is by casting. Legs 116 and handles 118 are cast as an integral part of the carrying plate. Only two of four legs are shown in FIG. 1. The legs 116 have rubber grommets 120 to prevent the scarring of any surface on which the spraying apparatus 10 may be set. The handles 118 have a hand grip 122 extending therebetween and being retained in place by eye bolts 124 that may be used to attach a carrying strap (not shown) to aid in the carrying of the spraying apparatus 10 while using for a continuous period of time.

Referring now to FIG. 2, there is shown an assembly drawing of the hand carried liquid chemical spraying apparatus 10 as shown in FIG. 1 with the belt cover plate 126 removed. A portion of the many components described and numbered in FIG. 1 will be likewise numbered in FIG. 2 without further description or comment thereon. The belt cover plate 126 is attached to the carrying plate 12 by means of bolts 128 extending through holes 130 into threaded spacers 132 that are formed as an integral part of the casting for carrying plate 12. The threaded spacers 132 should be long enough to hold the belt cover plate 126 off of flat belt 60, pulley 40 and shaft 66.

Referring now to FIGS. 3 and 4 in combination, there are shown more detailed drawings of the spraying head 20. Like numerals as were used in FIG. 1 will also be used in FIGS. 3 and 4. The nozzle housing 94 is connected to conduit 98 by means of a press fit inside of cylindrical flange 134. The front portion of nozzle housing 94 has a cylindrical mounting flange 136 to which a face plate 138 is attached by means of countersunk screws 140. A sealing gasket 142 is contained between face plate 138 and cylindrical mounting flange 136. The face plate 138 which is circular has a hole 144 in the center thereof.

Around the hole 144 of face plate 138 is an annular center plate 146 having an inward flange 148. The inward flange 148 abutts the edges of hole 144 to hold the center plate 146 into position. Countersunk bolts 150 extend through the center plate 146 and the face plate 138 and screw into nozzle body 152.

The nozzle body 152, which has holes to receive countersunk screws 150, has an outer flange 154 that butts against the inside of face plate 138. Within the outer flange 154 are a series of converging spiral passages 156 that receive pressurized air from chamber 158 of nozzle housing 94 and transfers the pressurized air to the center of the nozzle body 152. The flow of pressurized air through the converging spiral passages create an air vortex at the discharge end of mixing chamber 160. The mixing chamber 160 is in direct communication with pressurized chamber 158 through orifice 162. Nozzle body 152 also has a hole that re ceives metallic conduit 164 in an airtight relationship to prevent air leakage from pressure chamber 158. Because of pressurized air flowing from pressure chamber 158 through orifice 162 a vacuum is created within me tallic conduit 164. This vacuum in metallic conduit 164 will draw insecticide therethrough into the mixing chamber 160. While in mixing chamber 160, the turbulence created by orifice 162 will mix the insecticide with the pressurized air flowing from pressure chamber 158. However, before the pressurized air and insecticide can leave mixing chamber 160 by the discharge end, it must pass through the air vortex created by converging spiral passages 156. While passing through the air vortex immediately prior to discharge through the opening surrounded by inward flange 148 of center plate 146, the air vortex created by the converging spiral passages 156 overcomes the surface tension of the insecticide and the carrier fluid, both at ambient temperature, to break the liquid particles into droplets having a diameter of between five microns and fifteen microns. Tests on this type of discharge nozzle 100 have shown that ninety-five percent of the liquid drawn through metallic conduit 164 and discharged out the nozzle 100 will be between five microns and fifteen microns in diameter.

The size range of between five and fifteen microns in diameter is extremely important because droplets that exceed fifteen microns in diameter will very quickly sink to the ground after being dispensed out nozzle 100. Droplets below the size of five microns would flow with the air current around an insect, such as a mosquito, and never come into contact with the insect. By using the size range of between five and fifteen microns in diameter the insecticide carrying particles tend to float in the atmosphere until such time as they come into Contact with an insect without rapidly sinking to the earth.

Going back to FIGS. 3 and 4 in combination, the metallic conduit 164 is connected to a flexible hose 166 that extends down into cylindrical flange 168 which is a part of metering housing 170 of metering stem assem bly 108. Control block 170 has a passage 172 extending therethrough with a positionable metering stem 174 being contained therein. Within the positionable metering stem 174 there is contained a series of orifices 176, 178, 180, 182, with each successive orifice being smaller than the previous orifice. By pushing the positionable metering stem 174 to the position where the desired orifice 176, 178, 180, 182 is in position with passage 172, the amount of insecticide flowing through metallic conduit 164 into mixing chamber can be controlled without varying the pressure of air in the pressure chamber 158. The metering stem 174 is held in the desired position relative to each orifice 176, 17 8, 180, 182 by a spring loaded ball detent 187. Notches 184 and 186 are not cut through metering stem 174. Therefore, when notch 186 is located under spring loaded ball detent 187, flow of insecticide is stopped because notch 184 is now in line with flexible tubing 104 and flexible hose 164. Also, by simply rotating the positionable metering stem by means of lever 188 the flow of the insecticide can be stopped. Lever 188 can be turned by the index finger of the hand without ever setting down the spraying head 20. Flexible tubing 104 that extends down into bottle 102 is in airtight communication with the lower portion of passage 172. It should be understood that flexible tubing 104 extends to the bottom of bottle 102 so that the entire contents thereof may be used up. Cap 106 is retained to metering housing 170 by means of flange 190. To prevent a vacuum from building up inside bottle 102 due to the removal of insecticide through tubing 104, an air passage 192 has been provided in metering housing 170. The cap 106 is of the normal screw type commonly used. The metering housing 170 has an airtight fit inside of cylindrical flange '194 of nozzle housing 94 and is stationary with respect thereto.

Referring now to FIG. 5, there is shown a cross sectional view of the centrifugal compressor 16. As previously mentioned, the shaft 66 has a substantially cylindrical surface 70 with a crowned center portion to insure that the flat belt 60 stays centered thereon. The shaft 66 extends through the stationary main housing 72 of the centrifugal compressor 16. Outer bearing 196 is held against shoulder 198 of shaft 66 by bearing spacer 200. At the opposite end of bearing spacer 200 is the inner bearing 202 that is retained into position by retaining rings 204 and 206. On the end of shaft 66 is the rotating impeller 74 which is attached thereto by means of nut 76 and washer 78. The rotating impeller 74 has vanes 208 that rotate therewith. The vanes 208 can have many different types of design; however, the vanes in US. Pat. application Ser. No. 377,567 filed July 9, 1973 are related to the vanes in the present compressor and is hereby incorporated by reference. For the purposes of illustration, FIG. 8 shows one possible design of the vanes 208 with the direction of rotation being in the counterclockwise direction. Notice the vanes 208, which have a flat upper surface 209, tend to spiral inward in the counterclockwise direction. The vanes 208 have a small inner cross section 21 1 that tends to expand outward at the midpoint 213 of the vane and narrows back to a small tip 215 along the outer circumference of the rotating impeller 74.

As the air is drawn in around posts 210, which are cast as an integral part of the stationary main housing 72, it flows between vanes 208 and through stationary diffuser vanes 214 which can be seen more clearly in FIG. 1. While flowing through stationary diffuser vanes 214 and around inner plate 216 of compressor cover 80 into annular space 218 the air is pressurized. The inner plate 216 has an annular channel 220 with very little space between its inner surface and stationary diffuser vanes 214 to prevent air loss and to direct the pressurized air. The air contained within annular space 218 is at a pressure of approximately four pounds per square inch and is accurately controlled by the rotational velocity of the rotating impeller 74. From the annular space 218 the pressurized air flows out the semi-spiral duct 82 that is in fluid communication therewith.

It should be noted that the bearings 196 and 202 are self sealing to prevent dust or dirt from reaching the bearing surfaces of the shaft 66 or the inner portion of the stationary main housing 72. Also, the mounting flange 86 of stationary main housing 72 has a lower hole 222 located therein with slotted holes 224 located in the upper portion thereof. The slotted holes as can be seen in FIG. 1 allow a person to adjust the centrifugal compressor 16 for ease in tightening or loosening the flat belt 60. The slotted holes could have been just as easily provided in carrying plate 12 with the threaded holes being in mounting flange 86. The stretchable filter 84 will stretch over flange 86 and fill the space between flange 86 and annular flange 212. The stretchable filter 84 is the normal porous type to allow the flow of air therthrough and at the same time remove the particles contained therein.

Referring to FIG. 6, the construction of the compressor cover 80 can be more easily shown. The semi-spiral duct 82 extends a part of the way around the compressor cover 80 for better communication with annular space 218. The outer wall 226 of the compressor cover 80 is secured to annular flange 212 by means of bolts 228. As many bolts as are necessary for a good connection therebetween will be used.

METHOD OF OPERATION For the proper operation of the device shown in FIG. 1 the bottle 102 is filled with a suitable insecticide and the gasoline tank 32 of the engine 14 is filled. Engine 14 is then cranked and throttle lever 42 adjusted until the pressure indicated by the pressure meter 230 is approximately four psi. Normal operation of the engine 14 and subsequent driving of the centrifugal compressor 16 by means of flat belt 60 will cause a pressure in the semi-spiral duct 82 of approximately four psi. Adjustment of the throttle lever 42 will give the fine tuning desired for either a slight increase or slight decrease in pressure. Anywhere from three to five psi may be used with five psi insuring that more droplets will be toward the five micron range and the three psi insuring that more droplets will be toward the fifteen micron range.

The desired amount of insecticide flow is controlled by I adjusting the positionable metering stem 174 of the metering stem assembly 108. The smaller the orifice used in the metering stem 174, the less the amount of insecticide that will flow. If for some reason while the engine 14 is running no insecticide flow is desired, by simply flipping the lever 188 to the horizontal position the flow of insecticide will be stopped. Because of the flexible nature of theflexible hose 88 and the lightness of the overall design, an operator of the spraying apparatus may simply pick up the unit with one hand and control the spraying operation with the other hand by gripping handle 96 therein. The index finger can control the Operation of the lever 188. The mixing of the insecticide with the pressurized air to break down the particles to the desired range is movable with respect to the main body of the spraying apparatus attached to carrying plate 12. Previously this was impossible in commercial insecticide sprayers.

Because of the specially designed spraying head 20 and centrifugal compressor 80, both the body of the spraying apparatus and the power source may be hand carried in one hand with the spraying operation taking place in the other hand. Previous commercial units were so bulky and heavy that the main unit of the spraying apparatus could not be carried, and the spraying head 20 was not movable with respect thereto with the insecticide being broken down to the desired particle range immediately prior to discharge.

Referring now to FIG. 7, there is shown an alternative embodiment of the hand carried liquid chemical spraying apparatus as shown in FIG. 1. The engine 232 has a direct drive coupling with lobe compressor 234. Between coupling elements 236 and 238 of engine 232 and lobe compressor 234, respectively, is located a rubber spider that has notched outer flanges 242 and 244. Notched outer flange 242 fits in a mating notched flange 246 of coupling element 236. Correspondingly, notched outer flange 244 mates with notched flange 248 of coupling element 238. It should be understood that the rubber spider 240 allows for a direct drive means between the engine 232 and the lobe compressor 234 without the vibrations being transmitted therebetween. The engine 232 is attached to structure box 250 by means of screws or any other suitable attachment. Likewise lobe compressor 234 has a structure mount 252 for attachment with structure box 250.

Air for the lobe compressor 234 is drawn in through opening 254 by means of filter 256 contained between mounting plate 258 and washer 260. The compressed air from the lobe compressor 234 is discharged through flange cylinder 262. A washer 264 is located between flange cylinder 262 and lobe compressor 234. From one side of flange cylinder 262 the pressurized air flowing therethrough is connected by means of coupling 266, rubber hose 267 and screw conduit 268 into insecticide tank 270. The insecticide tank 270 is formed from the structure box 250 by having a sealing plate 272 blocking Off an end portion. The connection between coupling 266, rubber hose 267, screw conduit 268 and insecticide tank 270 must be airtight, with the pressurized air being discharged immediately inside the insecticide tank 270.

Also inside the insecticide tank 270 is located a conduit 274 that extends to the bottom thereof. Coupling 276 connects the conduit 274 to a rubber hose 278 and, subsequently, to flange cylinder 262. Inside of flange cylinder 262 there is a flexible conduit 280 that is in fluid communication with conduit 274 for receiving insecticide from insecticide tank 270.

On the end of flange cylinder 262 is attached a flexible hose 282 by means of a clamp 284. The air pressurized by the lobe compressor 234 flows through flange cylinder 262 and flexible hose 282 plus creating pressure in insecticide tank 270 through coupling 266, rub ber hose 267 and screw conduit 268.

The flexible hose 282 is connected to nozzle housing 286 via handle 288 in a manner similar to the previous description with respect to FIGS. 3 and 4. It should be realized that the flexible conduit 280 is contained within flexible hose 282 and handle 288, and continues into nozzle housing 286. After flexible conduit 280 reaches the inside of nozzle housing 286, flow therethrough is controlled by a knob 292 of an internal metering valve. Afterwards, it is connected to the nozzle 290 in a manner similar to the connection of flexible hose 166 as described in conjunction with FIGS. 3 and 4. Only because the vacuum pressure created within the nozzle may not be sufficient to draw the insecticide through flexible conduit 280 all the way to the nozzle 290 was the pressure connected to the insecticide tank made via coupling 266.

The metering that was controlled by metering valve 108 in FIG. 3 is now controlled by a knob 292 contained on the rear of nozzle housing 286. Knob 292 controls a valve that interrupts flexible conduit 280 immediately prior to connection to the nozzle 290 with the difference between the control of knob 292 and metering valve 108 being that knob 292 controls a screw type adjustable valve.

Again the pressure generated by the lobe compressor 234 is determined by the speed of the engine 232. By increasing the engine speed, the pressure output of the lobe compressor 234 will be increased and the size of the particles discharged out nozzle 290 will be reduced. By slowing down the engine 232, the pressure of the air from lobe compressor 234 will be reduced, and the size of the insecticide particles dispersed out nozzle 290 will be increased. Again, the optimum pressure for operating this type of device is approximately four pounds per square inch. Since the insecticide tank 270 is under pressure, the cap 294 should be airtight to prevent escape of the pressure. The pressure meter 230 shown in FIG. 5 may be mounted on either the flange cylinder 262 the insecticide tank 270 or the nozzle housing 286 according to the preference of the individual. All that is necessary is that a pressure reading be available so that the engine speed can be adjusted accordingly.

Handle 296 is attached to a V type of structure 298 by means of handle bracket 300. The V type structure 298 is bolted to structure box 250 for ease of carrying the spraying apparatus.

What is claimed is:

1. A portable insecticide aerosol generator comprising:

a. a source of air;

b. a source of insecticide;

0. means for pressurizing said source of air to a substantially constant pressure;

e. chamber means remote from said pressurizing means for receiving said substantially constant pressure air, said chamber means being independently movable with respect to said pressurizing means;

f. nozzle means forming a portion of said remote chamber means and in communication therewith; and

g. conduit means connecting said insecticide source to said nozzle means for communication therewith;

h. said insecticide being drawn into said nozzle means via said conduit means by vacuum force, mixed in said nozzle means remote from said pressurizing means, and dispersed from said nozzle means in a mist created by a turbulence therein to break the insecticide into small particles.

2. The portable insecticide aerosol generator as recited in claim 1 wherein said aerosol generator is hand carriable including a source of power for driving said pressurizing means.

3. The portable insecticide aerosol generator as recited in claim 2 wherein said nozzle means includes an orifice in communication with said chamber means for creating said vacuum force and starting said turbulence, and air vanes in communication with said chamber means oriented around said nozzle to create an air vortex in said nozzle means thereby increasing said turbulence immediately prior to dispersing of said insecticide from said nozzle means.

4. The portable insecticide aerosol generator as recited in claim 3 wherein said pressurizing means includes a low volume compressor having a housing en closing an impeller, an air inlet for said source of air being between bearing means and air foil vanes for said impeller, said air foil vanes having a flat outer surface.

5. The portable insecticide aerosol generator as recited in claim 4 wherein said power source is a petroleum operated engine with a belt drive for turning said impeller, said belt being of the: flat type that self centers on a crowned center portion of pulley means for said engine and compressor.

6. The portable insecticide aerosol generator as re cited in claim 5 includes a carrying plate to which said engine and compressor are attached.

7. The portable insecticide aerosol generator as recited in claim 3 wherein said substantially constant pressure air is controlled by varying said source of power that drives said pressurizing means.

8. The portable insecticide aerosol generator as recited in claim 7 wherein said source of insecticide is attached to said chamber means and is movable therewith.

9. The portable insecticide aerosol generator as re cited in claim 7 wherein said source of insecticide is attached to support structure for holding said pressurizing means and said source of power, said conduit means being contained within said substantially constant pressure air.

10. The portable insecticide aerosol generator as recited in claim 8 wherein the quantity of insecticide flowing from said source out said nozzle means is controlled by a positionable metering valve located in said

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.239/375, 415/224.5
Clasificación internacionalB05B7/24, B05B7/02, A01M13/00, B05B7/10, B05B7/08, B05B7/04, A01M9/00
Clasificación cooperativaB05B7/24, B05B7/10, A01M9/00, A01M13/00, B05B7/2416, B05B7/0458
Clasificación europeaA01M9/00, B05B7/04C3B, B05B7/24A3B, B05B7/10, A01M13/00, B05B7/24