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Número de publicaciónUS445329 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación27 Ene 1891
Fecha de presentación15 Abr 1889
Número de publicaciónUS 445329 A, US 445329A, US-A-445329, US445329 A, US445329A
InventoresWilliam Ii
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Method of making bags
US 445329 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

(No Model.)

W. H. KERR.

METHOD OF MAKING BAGS.

Patented Jan. 27

Erica.

PATENT \VlLLlAhl ll. KERR, 0F DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA.

METHOD OF MAKING BAGS.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 445,329, dated January 2'7, 1891.

Application filed April 15, 1889. Serial No. 307,350. (No speoimensd T0 (Li/Z whom, it may concern:

ple it known that l, \VILLIAM II. KERR, a citizen of the llnited States, residingat Durham, in the county of Durham and State of North Carolina, have invented certain new and usefulImprovements in Methods of Making llags, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to the manufacture of bags; and it consists in a novel method of constructing the same, as hereinafter fully set forth and claimed.

The method which I employ contemplates the followingoperations: A belt or relief the fabric or material of which the bags are to be made is placed in convenient position, preferably upon a vertical shaft or spindle, which may turn freely to pay off the material, and is passed between a supporting and a printing cylinder, and thence between a pail-of rolls, which serve both to feed or advance the material and to fold it longitudinally through the middle. The folded goodsor material advances to and its free edges are passed through a stitching mechanism, which sews the goods into the form of a flat tube, which is drawn forward by feeding-rolls or equivalent means and passed between a knife orcutting device, which scvers a length sufficient to produce one bag. The length thus severed is next moved laterally and carried through a stitching mechanism, which sews the severed length across one end, thereby forming a closed bottom and completing the bag, which is then turned to bring the seam to the inside.

The drawing illustrates the way in which bags are constructed in accordance with the present invention.

A indicates the roll of goods, here represented as standing in a vertical position, although, obviously, it mayoccupy a horizontal position and be carried about guide-rollers to bring it to or give it any desired plane of travel.

B indicates a printing-cylinder, which may have a printing form of any desired character, a stereotype surface preferably, and 0 an inking-cylinder for inking the printing surface. The cylinder C may be of printers roller composition and applied from a foun' tain or fountains, with ink of one color or several colors, or, as is preferred, it may be furnished with a circumferential ink-containing pad or body for each color of ink to be used, such pads being indicated by the letters a, l), and c. The nature of the pad may vary, the important point being that it shall be capable of holding a supply of in k su fficien t for a considerable number of impressions, so that the machine may work continuously for along time without replenishing the supply. The material carried between the cylinders B and B by feed-rollers M M passes to a stitching mechanism D,which may be ofany suitable type, the Willcox A; Gibbs machine being preferred, however, because of its extreme simplicity and duralnlity. The two edges of the fabric lying one upon the other are by this mechanism stitched together, and the stitched goods move forward to pass beneath a knife or blade E, which is normally held up clear of the bed or table F, but which is caused to descend suddenly, severa length of the stitched goods, and rise quickly, so as to avoid any appreciable or material stoppage of the travel of the goods. In passing beneath the knife or cutter, and before being severed from the main body of the goods, the bag-length passes under a plate G, which is arranged to move back and forth over the bed or table at right angles to the travel of the main body of the fabric or folded sheet. Theplate G is so arranged that in receding it is held up off the bed l but that in moving forward it is thrown down upon the bed or upon the bag-length severed from the sheet, its purpose being to advance the length laterally to a second stitching mechanism ll. or into the bite of a fccd-roll I, which in turn carries the blank or length to the stitching mechanism ll. Ordinarily the roll will be used, because the bag will otherwise be liable to twist or turn andmakethe seam crooked or out of line with the edge.

The plate G may be carried by an arm or red J, pivoted to a lever K, which is connected by a rod or link L with a cam M, as shown, so that in moving toward the stitching mechanism ll the plate shall be thrown down upon the goods, but in receding it shall be lifted. be adopted to raise and lower the plate, or any equivalent means of shifting the blank may be employed.

Obviously any other means may If found expedient. the feed-rolls may be made to act intermittently, to permit the knife to act while the goods are at rest, and the plate G may also be arranged to act during the period of rest, and thus to get the severed portion started between the feed-rolls before a new length begins to move beneath the knife. By cutting away one side of the feedroll the intermittent action may be cheaply and efficiently secured, or intermittent gearing may be employed.

It will be found advantageous to so conncct the various parts by gearing, wheels, chains, or belts as to insure absolute synchronism of the parts or proper relative order of action.

Drying rolls or bodies may be employed to dry the ink,though this is not believed necessary under ordinary conditions.

No claim is made herein to the machine for carrying out the method hereinbefore described, for such machine forms the subjectmatter of aseparate application, Serial No. 315,920.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is 1. An improvement in the method of man ufacturing bags in one continuous operation, which consists in folding the strip lengthwise through its middle, moving the same forward longitudinally, sewing the edges of the folded strip, severing the folded and sewed strip and moving the severed section transversely to the line of travel of the folded strip, and finally sewing the severed section across one end.

2. Theimprovementin the method of main ing bags, consisting in severingfrom a longi tudinally folded and moving strip of cloth a length sufficient for the formation of a bag, moving the severed section transversely to the line of travel of the folded strip, and finally stitching the severed section along the line of the cut, the whole constituting a continuous operation.

3. An improvementin the method of manufacturing bags in one continuous operation, which consists in first printing upon the continuous web or sheet of bag materialgsecond, folding the printed sheet lengthwise through the middle and sewing its edges, so as to form a tube; third, severing the tube and moving the severed section'transversely to the tube, and, fourth, sewing the severed section across one end.

4. An improvement in the method of manufacturing bags at a continuous operation, which consists in first printing upon the continuous web or sheet of bag material; second, folding theweb orsheetlongitudinallythrough its middle, with the printed face inside, and subsequently sewing,cutting, and sewing the folded printed strip.

In witness whereof I hereunto set my hand in presence of two witnesses. i

WILLIAM H. KERR.

Witnesses:

E. WALTER HERRICK, FRANK E. PAGE.

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación cooperativaD05B13/00