Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS4562306 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Número de solicitudUS 06/531,956
Fecha de publicación31 Dic 1985
Fecha de presentación14 Sep 1983
Fecha de prioridad14 Sep 1983
TarifaPagadas
Número de publicación06531956, 531956, US 4562306 A, US 4562306A, US-A-4562306, US4562306 A, US4562306A
InventoresWayne W. Chou, Richard E. Erett
Cesionario originalChou Wayne W, Erett Richard E
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for protecting computer software utilizing an active coded hardware device
US 4562306 A
Resumen
A method and apparatus are provided for protecting computer software using an active coded hardware apparatus which is adapted to be connected by an interface connector to a communications port of a computer. The computer is directed by a coded software program in which a small section of the code of the computer software interrogates the communications port periodically to determine if the active coded hardware device is present and connected. The active coded hardware device has a permanently established preset code on an active presettable counter circuit which code is transmitted when interrogated. If the active coded hardware device is present when interrogated and the correct code returned through the communications port of the computer, the program is permitted to continue insuring that the software is properly protected at all times. The active coded hardware device with its particular code and circuitry are sealed in epoxy as a deterrent against tampering. In order to violate the hardware it would be necessary to construct a duplicate of the hardware device in order to run a second copy of the software. Since the device is active containing electrical logical elements the degree in duplicating the device and its function without the benefit of circuit diagrams will be greater than the software itself. The particular hardware may be used alone or will permit daisy-chaining allowing 2, 3 or even an entire family of other elements with their own individual codes to operate simultaneously and at the same time permit computer peripherals to remain connected to the same port. A variety of time and logic elements may be added to the basic configuration in order to increase the difficulty of duplicating or violating the system.
Imágenes(3)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones(11)
What is claimed is:
1. An active coded hardware security apparatus for protecting software which is adapted to be connected by an interface connector to a communications port of a computer, said computer being directed by a coded software program which is interfaced with said hardware through said communications port, said hardware apparatus comprising:
a presettable (programmable) counter to provide a preset numerical code output which is outputted when interrogated in proper sequence,
an interface connector connected to said counter which is adapted to be plugged into a communications port of a computer whose software is to be protected,
a clock input, a reset input and an output line connected between said presettable counter and said interface connector,
said counter being active and transmitting said preset output over said output line,
whereby said counter is interrogated by said computer under control of said coded software to determine whether said hardware apparatus is installed and generating the proper response to enable the coded software program to continue.
2. The active coded hardware security apparatus as set forth in claim 1 having at least one additional hardward security device coupled to said communications port, an OR circuit having an output coupled to said communications port, means for coupling the output line of said counter and said additional hardware security device to said OR circuit whereby said additional security device and said counter operate simultaneously through the same communications port.
3. The active coded hardware security apparatus as set forth in claim 2 in which said additional security device has its own presettable code.
4. An active coded hardware security apparatus which is adapted to be connected by an interface connector to a communications port of a computer, said computer being directed by a coded software program which is interfaced with said hardware through said communication port, said hardware apparatus comprising:
a presettable counter to provide a preset mumerical code output which is outputted when interrogated in proper sequence,
an interface connector connected to said counter which is adapted to be plugged into a communications port of a computer whose software is to be protected,
a clock input, a reset input and an output line connected between said presettable counter and said interface connector,
said counter being active and transmitting said preset output over said output line,
whereby said counter is interrogated by said computer under control of said coded software to determine whether said hardware apparatus is installed and generating the proper response to enable the coded software program to continue,
at least one additional hardware security device coupled to said communications port, an OR circuit having an output coupled to said communications port, means for coupling the output line of said counter and said additional hardware security device to said OR circuit whereby said additional security device and said counter operate simultaneously through the same communications port,
a second clock input coupled to said counter, a one shot circuit coupled to said output of said counter, for generating an output signal of time duration t, an AND gate, means for coupling said reset line and said output signal from said one shot circuit to said AND gate, means for coupling the output of said AND gate to said OR circuit, whereby an output will occur only if a reset signal occurs immediately after N clock transitions within the time period "t".
5. The active coded hardware security apparatus of claim 4 in which clock and said second clock inputs are applied through an OR circuit to said presettable counter.
6. An active coded hardware security apparatus which is adapted to be connected by an interface connector to a communications port of a computer, said computer being directed by a coded software program which is interfaced with said hardware through said communications port, said hardware apparatus comprising:
a presettable counter to provide a preset numerical code output which is outputted when interrogated in proper sequence,
an interface connector connected to said counter which is adapted to be plugged into a communications port of a computer whose software is to be protected,
a clock input, a reset input and an output line connected between said presettable counter and said interface connector,
said counter being active and transmitting said preset output over said output line,
whereby said counter is interrogated by said computer under control of said coded software to determine whether said hardware apparatus is installed and generating the proper response to enable the coded software program to continue,
a second presettable counter and a second clock input connected to said second presettable counter, first and second one shot circuits coupled to said counter and said second counter,
an AND gat coupled to said counter and said second counter whereby a signal is generated by said apparatus when the outputs of said one shot circuits are high and coincident.
7. The active coded hardware security apparatus set forth in claim 6 having a low pass filter and a Schmitt trigger coupled between said reset line and said AND gate whereby a true output is produced from said AND gate only when a reset signal immediately follows the final count signal of both counters.
8. The method of protecting computer software using an active coded hardware security device in conjunction with a small section of code in the computer program comprising the steps of:
permanently establishing a preset numerical code on an active presettable counter security circuit which is transmitted when interrogated,
connecting said active presettable counter circuit into a communication port of a computer for receiving clock and reset signals from said computer,
executing the computer program in said computer,
interrogating said communications port periodically by said small section of code in said computer program to determine if said active presettable counter circuit is present, which if present and the correct numerical code returned at the time of interrogation, the program is permitted to continue.
9. The method of protecting computer software set forth in claim 8 including the steps of,
coupling additional security devices in the same communications port and,
ORing the outputs of each security device.
10. The method of protecting computer software set forth in claim 8 including the step of,
generating a time related signal and comparing that time generated signal with a reset signal to make any output dependent on the precise occurence of said time related signal.
11. The method of protecting computer software using an active coded hardware security device in conjunction with a small section of code in the computer program comprising the steps of:
permanently establishing a preset numerical code on an active presettable counter security circuit which is transmitted when interrogated,
connecting said active presettable counter circuit into a communication port of a computer for receiving clock and reset signals from said computer,
executing the computer program in said computer,
interrogating said communications port periodically by said small section of code in said computer program to determine if said active presettable counter circuit is present, which if present and the correct code returned at the time of interrogation, the program is permitted to continue,
using a second counter security circuit and controlling each security circuit separately,
comparing the outputs of each counter security circuit and,
recognizing a true signal when each of said outputs are the same polarity and coincident.
Descripción
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a security system for the protection of computer programs and more particularly to such a system which uses a plug-in action coded hardware device which is furnished with the program to be protected and is interrogated by the program.

Many micro-computer products are based on one of a relatively small group of microprocessors making it technically as well as economically feasible to copy computer programs, and to move them from one hardware environment to another. Much of the computer software or programs are written and distributed in a form easily duplicated, for example, floppy disks or diskettes. By agreement, when the programs are sold, copies may be made for back-up purposes but not for redistribution. However, when such products become popular, unauthorized use and copying become a problem.

Many attempts have been made to thwart unauthorized use of any copies of the software programs. One such approach is to design the recording medium such that it will erase or become useless when an attempt is made to copy it, or the recording medium is designed to have physical or timing anomalies in specific locations such that an attempt to copy it will normally not produce usable results. In either of the aforesaid cases, legitimate back-up copies cannot be produced which could result in a permanent loss of important data in the event of a system failure, or at least would be a considerable inconvenience for the user.

Another approach is to supply the computer with the means to add a programmable read-only memory (PROM) into which a serial number is embedded. The software is then written to interrogate the PROM and if the serial number matches that which is written into the software, then the program is allowed to run. The disadvantage to this approach is that each piece of software must be individually serialized to each PROM and accordingly to each computer which makes the process awkward and cumbersome. Furthermore, the computer industry would have to universally agree on this approach to adapt PROMs for this purpose in order for it to succeed. Furthermore, the PROMs or modules are devices which can easily be removed and decoded and duplicated without difficulty.

Another method to protect software that is commonly used is within the software itself in which the author prepares the program to contain a control file. The control file is generally customized for a particular end user and usually contains perameters which refer to the specifics such as computer type, company name, etc. Since the source code for this file is generally not given, it would take an expert programmer to determine how to alter the file for use with other computers and for other companies. Although such an idea serves to limit unauthorized distribution, by way of difficulty in finding a programmer capable of the task, the system is not fool proof, and it is likely that there will be several computers of the same type at several other locations with the company name remaining the same. In such a case, there would be absolutely no protection against illegitimate copies. Secondly, once a particular control file has been formulated, the software will be able to be executed on any machine with a compatable operating system. Accordingly, the ohly remaining deterrent would be some other aspect of the customized version, for example, the original company name to appear on an invoice on a stolen copy. In relative terms the degree of difficulty to alter these variables is minor, the result being that this method of protection cannot be totally relied upon.

Still another method to protect software to which the present invention is directed is some type of hardware device which is supplied with each package of software sold to the user which is intended to be plugged in to a communications port in the computer in which the package is to be employed. A communications port (such as an RS-232C or similar) of a computer is an external connection between the computer and various peripheral equipments such as printers, modems, interactive game controls, etc. The port is interrogated via the software supplied to determine the presence of the hardware which if present permits the software program to proceed. If not, several options are available to the author, the simplest of which might be a display on the terminal which states that the program cannot proceed without the device being connected. Such hardware attachment devices in the past have been passive networks and/or jumpered connections which a semi-skilled technician would have little difficulty in duplicating. More sophisticated devices have revolved around the implementation of a PROM in a manner cited above, but the execution of the decoding process with its attendent circuitry outside the computer body poses problems and complexity, and excess hardware such as providing timing, register storage, addressing means and external power requirements not normally in a communications port make such a system fairly costly and impractical.

SUMMARY

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved method and apparatus for protecting computer software which uses an active coded hardware device which is connected to a communications port of a computer and used in conjunction with a small section of code embedded in various areas of the author's program in order to prevent unauthorized duplication and use of the particular program protected by the active coded hardware device.

A further object of this invention is to provide an external plug-in device for protecting computer software which requires no additional hardware or logic and quickly responds to the code in the software when interrogated.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved method and apparatus for protecting computer software which is extremely flexible and permits a variety of incription and interrogation sequences making it more difficult to find and decipher the code involved and thereby copy the software.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved method and apparatus for protecting computer software which represents a level of sophistication many orders of magnitude greater than other protection devices available in the past which is limited only by the ingenuity of the software engineer.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved method and apparatus for protecting computer software which permits legitimate back-up copies to be made and the program transferred to a hard recording disk and other operations performed normally without any additional effort on the part of the user.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide a new and improved method and apparatus for protecting computer software which is active thereby containing logical elements consisting of circuitry in which the degree of difficulty in duplicating the circuitry and/or its function would cost many times the price of the development of the software itself.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide a new and improved method and apparatus which will allow 2, 3 or even more or an entire family of software to operate simultaneously in the same computer port.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an apparatus for protecting computer software which has great flexibility in changing or varying the incription, timing and interrogating functions utilizing various combinations of time and logic making duplication expensive, time consuming and frustrating.

In carrying out this invention in one illustrative embodiment thereof, a method and apparatus of protecting computer software are provided using an active coded hardware device in conjunction with a small section of code in the computer program comprising the steps of permanently establishing a preset code on an active presettable counter circuit which preset code is transmitted and interrogated. The presettable counter is connected into a communications port of the computer by an interface connector and then the computer program is executed by the computer. This step interrogates the communications port periodically using the small section of code in the computer program to determine if the active presettable counter is present, which if present and the correct code is returned from the counter at the time of the interrogation, the program is permitted to continue.

Preferrably, the code and circuitry of the active coded hardware device are sealed in epoxy as a deterrent against tampering. Duplicating such hardware would be difficult without the benefit of the circuit diagrams for such an active preset device. The system also may be made available in customized configurations with individual codes assigned to each protected software product. The active coded hardware device may be interfaced with a computer by itself or in a multiple connector version to permit daisy-chaining thereby allowing 2, 3 or even an entire family of software each with its own individual code to operate simultaneously. Daisy-chain versions would allow peripherals to remain connected to the same port.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention, together with further objects, features, advantages and aspects thereof will be more fully understood from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which like elements bear the same reference characters throughout the several drawings.

FIG. 1 illustrates the basic diagram of the security system for computer software embodying the present invention.

FIG. 2 illustrates another embodiment of the security system shown in FIG. 1 illustrating a daisy-chain connection utilizing a single communications port.

FIG. 3 illustrates an additional embodiment of the present invention implementing the use of time in conjunction with logic.

FIG. 4 shows still a further modification of the embodiment of FIG. 3 of the security system.

FIG. 5 illustrates a block diagram utilizing two presettable counters in the security system of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a block diagram illustrating the use of a low pass filter with the two presettable counters illustrated in FIG. 5 to place an additional requirement on the system.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In the following description and circuit diagrams positive logic is assumed for purposes of explanation and simplicity. However, positive logic is not essential to the present invention. Furthermore, the block diagrams illustrate the principles involved and should not be considered as limiting, since portions may be omitted or added to create other variations which fall within the scope of the present invention.

Referring now to FIG. 1, a security device, referred to generally with the reference character 10, includes a presettable counter 12 whose output value is controlled by jam inputs 14 which establish a numeric value by selecting high or low values in combination at the jam inputs 14. Once the code and circuitry of the preset counter are set and determined by hard wiring, the counter along with its code and circuitry are sealed in epoxy which preserve the functionality of the counter 12 as well as being a deterrent against tampering. To duplicate the software involved, it would be necessary to construct a duplicate counter 12 with its preset code to run a second copy of the software which is to be protected. The security device 10 is plugged in via an interface connector 16, represented by the dashed line 16 in FIG. 1, to communications port 18 illustrated as a plurality of lines 18 to a computer, referred to generally with the reference character 20. The computer 20 contains a form of UART, USRT, or USART (universal synchronous/asynchronous receiver/transmitter, etc.), or any parallel connection 22 which allows the central processing unit(CPU) 24 to communicate with external peripheral equipment, for example, the security device 10 through the interface connector 16. The interface connector is simply a standard computer plug containing a plurality of male (female) prongs which connect the lines 18 in the plurality of complementary cooperating female (male) receiving sockets of the UART 22. The UART or any of the aforementioned units 22, whichever is employed, is under the control of the CPU (central processing unit) 24. The unit 22 has several lines 18 emanating therefrom some of which are transmitting and others of which are receiving lines which permit the CPU 24 through software to transmit and/or receive through the various lines 18 available via its UART 22 digital information at various times as determined by the program. These lines include a clock input 26, a reset line 28, and an output line 30 all of which are coupled by the interface 16 to the UART 22 and the presettable counter 12.

Accordingly, the clock in line 26 may be utilized to increment or decrement the presettable counter 12 and at the Nth clock transition, the output 32 from the counter 12 appears at the input of the UART 22. Thus, the CPU 24 may be programmed to test if a true condition existed after N clock transitions, and if the tests were given before or after the N clock transitions, the conditions would be false, and the program could be written to void itself. Similarly, the interrogating of security device 10 if not connected during the test period would result in a false condition, even if a test is made exactly after N clock transitions. Thus, only a device with the proper code connected to the computer interface 16 would be able to return a true condition when tested after N clock transitions. In addition, the reset line 28 is available to further confuse a would-be copier. By utilizing the reset line along with the clock line alternately or on a more or less random basis, it would be more difficult to determine the function of the lines as well as the numeric value of the count especially without the benefit of schematic diagrams. As previously pointed out, the use or the testing over the reset line 28 along with the clock line 26 is under control of the CPU 24 and the computer software applied to that unit.

As described in the basic block diagram of FIG. 1 the security device 10 is an active coded hardware device which must be plugged into the computer 20 and which transmits its own code in accordance with the interrogation from the CPU 24 of the computer. It will be apparent that the more sophisticated that the security device 10 becomes, the more difficult it will be to determine not only the function of each of its lines, but also the function of the device as a whole merely by attempting to measure the electrical perimeters on its external connections. There are no instruments that can characterize a complex active circuit solely through the measurement of its unknown terminals without the benefit of schematic diagrams. By hard wiring the presettable counter 12 and embedding or encapsulating the device 12 in a suitable medium such as epoxy, the device 10 may actually be destroyed in trying to determine its characteristics.

FIG. 2 illustrates a modification of the security device 10 in FIG. 1 which illustrates how additional security or peripheral devices may be serially interconnected to the same communications, port, which is referred to as "daisy-chaining". This is accomplished in FIG. 2 by the use of a logical OR circuit 32. An additional mating connector 34 (illustrated diagramatically by dashed line 34) may be provided so that either another security device or some other piece of peripheral equipment may be added which would normally have been connected to the same or into the same communications port. In this configuration, all of the lines are carried from one connector to the other much like an extension cord with the exception that of output lines which has been ORed by OR circuit 32. Input signals to the counter 12 are merely tapped off as required. In operation with either another or several security devices, the UART 22 receives signals from the combined security devices. Individual devices are assigned different numerical codes, and the condition at the appropriate terminal of the UART 22 is tested for a true condition after Nx clock cycles, then the program which is assigned the value of Nx will be allowed to run. In the case where a peripheral is connected, the security device 10 remains transparent, since all lines which were normally available to it are still available and uninterrupted by the presence of a peripheral or additional peripheral devices.

Accordingly, the present security device 10 may interface with the communications port of the computer 10 either as a stand alone item or in a multiple connector version to permit daisy-chaining thereby allowing 2, 3 or even an entire family of software each with its own individual code to operate simultaneously. Furthermore, the daisy-chain embodiment will allow the peripherals to remain connected to the same port of the computer.

FIG. 3 shows another embodiment illustrating the implementation of the two additional variations. First, if a third line 36 is available as an input, it could be used to further conceal the purpose of the first two lines. Thus, the input to counter 12 could be clocked by either a clock A or a clock B input through an input OR circuit 38 to the counter 12. Instead of the clocking of the input, it would be just as feasible to OR two lines to the reset instead (not illustrated).

A second and more important variation is the use of time as a variable in conjunction with logic. A one shot circuit (SS) 40 is connected to the output of the counter 12 such that when the output of the counter 12 is true or high, the output 44 of the one shot goes high. However, the counter 12 may remain high statistically, the duration of the output 44 of the SS 40 is only t by design which is just long enough that the reset 28 appears immediately after the counter goes high and when in the time frame t a true output would not appear at the output of an AND gate 46.

It should be noted that two things are taking place simultaneously. The SS 40 allows a short glimpse of the output with a maximum time t and the use of AND 46 prevents the output 44 from appearing just after the N clock transitions. In order to detect the output it is necessary to provide a reset almost immediately after the Nth clock and within the time "t". In so doing static testing of the security device 10 to determine its code would be virtually impossible.

FIG. 4 illustrates another embodiment utilizing a second single or one shot circuit 48 and also illustrates the use of a third one shot circuit 50. In operation, as in the example illustrated in FIG. 3, one shot 40 is triggered on the rise of the output at the resettable counter 12 and its output duration is time t1. At the end of the time period t1 a positive transition appears at the input of SS 48 through the inversion of an inverting amplifier 47 which causes a second time period t2 to occur. Accordingly, a sample or equivalent reset signal to the third one shot 50 with a time period t3 must be coincident with the output of one shot 48 at the input of the AND gate 46 to have an output occur at OR gate 36. The circuit just described will be better understood from the timing diagrams accompanying FIG. 4. The circuit requires that a sample reset level occur within the time period t2. If that time period is too early, the time period t3 may elapse before t2 begins. Conversely, if the sample occurs after the duration of t2, coincidence at the AND gate 46 will not occur.

As a variation over the operation of FIG. 3, instead of using two clock inputs which are ORed, an up-down counter could be utilized with two lines controlling the up and down counts, respectively, as illustrated in FIG. 4. FIG. 4 also illustrates how the state of the counter 12 may be altered if the sampling does not occur when the counter 12 has reached the Nth count. The output of counter 12 may be inverted by an amplifier 15 and fed into an input at the AND gate 52, and accordingly before or after the Nth count the output of the counter is low. Consequently, the output of the inverter 15 is high and any attempt to sample the device at any counter state other than at the Nth count will cause the counter to reset to zero, foiling any attempt to discover the code in the counter 12.

FIG. 5 illustrates the use of two counters 54 and 56 in conjunction with two clock lines each controlling a counter independently. The output of each counter 54 and 56 is fed into their respective one shot circuits 58 and 60, and the outputs of both one shots are fed into the inputs of an AND gate 62. A true condition exists at the output of an OR gate 64 which occurs only when the outputs of the one shots 58 and 60 are high and coincident. Accordingly, by design both counters 54 and 56 must finish their respective counts simultaneously if they are clocked in in serial fashion one before the other. The time value of each one shot could be programmed such that one would be longer than the other. If the values are chosen correctly one time will eclipse the other but not visa versa which would require that the counters finish their respective counts in a given sequence and not in the reverse of such sequence.

The merits of the approach in FIG. 5 are that it is not possible to step one counter and then the other through its sequence, step the first again and repeat the second to obtain the true output. The time requirement precludes any static test. Although the total number of combinations is the product of the maximum presettable counts in each counter as it would be if the same two counters had been cascaded together instead, the degree of difficulty in determining the code given in FIG. 5 is far greater. Not only are two numerical values required, but a true output is additionally time dependent on the occurrence of the individual counter outputs. The ability to alter the time value of the one shots relative to each other adds to the requirement that the counters come to their respective values in a particular predetermined sequence.

FIG. 6 illustrates another embodiment which is similar to the embodiment of FIG. 5, but in addition includes a low pass filter 66 off the reset line. The output of the filter 66 is shaped by a Schmitt trigger 68 and then fed to one of three inputs of an AND gate 70 along with the outputs of the two one shot circuits 58 and 60. The purpose of this addition is to place a requirement on the reset line in order for a true output at the AND gate 70. The condition requires that the reset must immediately follow the final counts of both counters 54 and 56. If the reset is too soon, the counters will be reset, and if the duration is too short there will be an insufficient signal at the input of the Schmitt trigger 66 and no output will be present.

The method and system illustrated illustrating an active coded hardware plug-in device which must be present before an encoded software program can be utilized in a computer whose software is desired to be protected has been described with a level of sophistication many orders of magnitude greater than other protection devices which have been available in the past without their drawbacks and which are limited only by the ingenuity of the software engineer. Unlike many other less sophisticated software protective schemes, the particular method and apparatus of this security device remains transparent such that legitimate back-up copies may be made, the program transferred to a hard disk and other operations are capable of being performed normally without any additional effort on the part of the user. The present system even if the functions of the security device were to be able to be determined, namely its code and circuitry which are sealed in epoxy, it would be necessary to construct a duplicate in order to run a second copy of the software. Because the system employs an active device containing logical elements e.g. transistor circuits, the degree of difficulty in duplicating the active device and its function without the benefit of circuit diagrams may well cost the copier more in time and energy than the value of the software thus inhibiting such attempts. The security system of the present invention can be made available in customized configurations with individual codes assigned to each protected software product and can be included in a package with the software product. The security device may interface with a communications port either as a stand alone item or in a two connector version to permit daisy-chaining thereby allowing two, three or even an entire family of software each having its own individual code to operate simultaneously. Such daisy-chaining arrangements in accordance with the present system would allow peripherals to remain connected to the same port. This has a particular advantage because other types of security systems, for example PROM related devices, would require a separate microprocessor just to keep individual PROM's or software programs identified.

It should be noted that, in most cases, a communications port as previously described does not provide power sources to operate peripheral equipment connected to it. Thus power is provided to the circuitry of the security device by rectifying and storing the energy derived from the varying signals from the UART or USRT at the port.

Since other changes and modifications varied to fit particular operating requirements and environments will be apparent to those skilled in the art, the invention is not considered limited to the examples chosen for purposes of illustration, and includes all changes and modifications which do not constitute a departure from the true spirit and scope of this invention as claimed in the following claims and equivalents thereto.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3609697 *21 Oct 196828 Sep 1971IbmProgram security device
US3806882 *13 Nov 197223 Abr 1974A ClarkeSecurity for computer systems
US3984637 *29 Nov 19745 Oct 1976The Singer CompanyComputer terminal security system
US4271512 *30 Mar 19792 Jun 1981Lyhus Arlan JInformation collection and storage system with memory test circuit
US4446519 *26 May 19811 May 1984Corban International, Ltd.Method and apparatus for providing security for computer software
US4458315 *25 Feb 19823 Jul 1984Penta, Inc.Apparatus and method for preventing unauthorized use of computer programs
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US4791565 *20 Jun 198413 Dic 1988Effective Security Systems, Inc.Apparatus for controlling the use of computer software
US4796181 *24 Oct 19863 Ene 1989Wiedemer John DBilling system for computer software
US4796220 *15 Dic 19863 Ene 1989Pride Software Development Corp.Method of controlling the copying of software
US4799635 *23 Dic 198524 Ene 1989Nintendo Co., Ltd.System for determining authenticity of an external memory used in an information processing apparatus
US4817140 *5 Nov 198628 Mar 1989International Business Machines Corp.Software protection system using a single-key cryptosystem, a hardware-based authorization system and a secure coprocessor
US4868736 *10 Ago 198719 Sep 1989Runtime Innovations LimitedCode operated access control system for electronic data store
US4926372 *5 May 198715 May 1990Nintendo Company LimitedMemory cartridge bank selecting
US4932054 *16 Sep 19885 Jun 1990Chou Wayne WMethod and apparatus for protecting computer software utilizing coded filter network in conjunction with an active coded hardware device
US4949298 *12 Nov 198714 Ago 1990Nintendo Company LimitedMemory cartridge having a multi-memory controller with memory bank switching capabilities and data processing apparatus
US4959861 *13 Jul 198825 Sep 1990Howlette Edward LSecurity system for computer software
US4977594 *16 Feb 198911 Dic 1990Electronic Publishing Resources, Inc.Database usage metering and protection system and method
US4980818 *1 Ago 198625 Dic 1990Hitachi, Ltd.Method and apparatus for common resource status management in a computer system including a plurality of computers coupled to a common resource
US4984193 *29 Dic 19898 Ene 1991Nintendo Co., Ltd.Memory cartridge
US4999806 *4 Sep 198712 Mar 1991Fred ChernowSoftware distribution system
US5014234 *25 Ago 19867 May 1991Ncr CorporationSystem with software usage timer and counter for allowing limited use but preventing continued unauthorized use of protected software
US5014982 *24 Ago 198814 May 1991Nintendo Company LimitedMemory cartridge and game apparatus using the same
US5022077 *25 Ago 19894 Jun 1991International Business Machines Corp.Apparatus and method for preventing unauthorized access to BIOS in a personal computer system
US5024495 *20 Abr 199018 Jun 1991Anderson David BComputer software protection, by optical effects
US5047928 *3 Ene 198910 Sep 1991Wiedemer John DBilling system for computer software
US5050213 *6 Ago 199017 Sep 1991Electronic Publishing Resources, Inc.Database usage metering and protection system and method
US5070479 *13 Ene 19893 Dic 1991Nintendo Company LimitedExternal memory having an authenticating processor and method of operating same
US5081676 *4 Oct 199014 Ene 1992Chou Wayne WMethod and apparatus for protecting multiple copies of computer software from unauthorized use
US5099516 *12 Jun 198924 Mar 1992Dell Corporate Services CorporationDigital computer code word identification system
US5109413 *28 Nov 198928 Abr 1992International Business Machines CorporationManipulating rights-to-execute in connection with a software copy protection mechanism
US5117457 *24 Ene 199026 May 1992International Business Machines Corp.Tamper resistant packaging for information protection in electronic circuitry
US5136713 *25 Ago 19894 Ago 1992International Business Machines CorporationApparatus and method for decreasing the memory requirements for bios in a personal computer system
US5146575 *5 Nov 19868 Sep 1992International Business Machines Corp.Implementing privilege on microprocessor systems for use in software asset protection
US5148534 *3 Abr 199115 Sep 1992International Business Machines Corp.Hardware cartridge representing verifiable, use-once authorization
US5155680 *27 Abr 198913 Oct 1992Signal Security TechnologiesBilling system for computing software
US5185692 *30 May 19919 Feb 1993Smith James DComputer security device having connector with spring loaded contact members
US5199066 *18 Abr 198930 Mar 1993Special Effects Software, Inc.Method and apparatus for protecting software
US5210875 *25 Ago 198911 May 1993International Business Machines CorporationInitial bios load for a personal computer system
US5226136 *5 Nov 19906 Jul 1993Nintendo Company LimitedMemory cartridge bank selecting apparatus
US5230052 *1 Oct 199020 Jul 1993International Business Machines Corp.Apparatus and method for loading bios into a computer system from a remote storage location
US5276831 *24 May 19904 Ene 1994Nintendo Co. LimitedMemory cartridge having a multi-memory controller with memory bank switching capabilities and data processing apparatus
US5379433 *16 Mar 19933 Ene 1995Victor Company Of Japan, Ltd.Protection against unauthorized use of software recorded on recording medium
US5410598 *27 Sep 199425 Abr 1995Electronic Publishing Resources, Inc.Database usage metering and protection system and method
US5410699 *2 Nov 199025 Abr 1995International Business Machines Corp.Apparatus and method for loading BIOS from a diskette in a personal computer system
US5426762 *7 Abr 199320 Jun 1995Nintendo Co., Ltd.System for determining a truth of software in an information processing apparatus
US5455378 *17 Jun 19943 Oct 1995Coda Music Technologies, Inc.Intelligent accompaniment apparatus and method
US5491751 *5 Jun 199513 Feb 1996Coda Music Technology, Inc.Intelligent accompaniment apparatus and method
US5495411 *22 Dic 199327 Feb 1996Ananda; MohanSecure software rental system using continuous asynchronous password verification
US5521323 *21 May 199328 May 1996Coda Music Technologies, Inc.Real-time performance score matching
US5585585 *6 Feb 199517 Dic 1996Coda Music Technology, Inc.Automated accompaniment apparatus and method
US5638513 *7 Jun 199510 Jun 1997Ananda; MohanSecure software rental system using continuous asynchronous password verification
US5693903 *4 Abr 19962 Dic 1997Coda Music Technology, Inc.Apparatus and method for analyzing vocal audio data to provide accompaniment to a vocalist
US5774651 *28 May 199630 Jun 1998Fujitsu LimitedFalse statement detection system
US5892900 *30 Ago 19966 Abr 1999Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US5908996 *24 Oct 19971 Jun 1999Timewarp Technologies LtdDevice for controlling a musical performance
US5910987 *4 Dic 19968 Jun 1999Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US5915019 *8 Ene 199722 Jun 1999Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US5917912 *8 Ene 199729 Jun 1999Intertrust Technologies CorporationSystem and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US5920861 *25 Feb 19976 Jul 1999Intertrust Technologies Corp.Techniques for defining using and manipulating rights management data structures
US5943422 *12 Ago 199624 Ago 1999Intertrust Technologies Corp.Steganographic techniques for securely delivering electronic digital rights management control information over insecure communication channels
US5952597 *19 Jun 199714 Sep 1999Timewarp Technologies, Ltd.Method and apparatus for real-time correlation of a performance to a musical score
US5982891 *4 Nov 19979 Nov 1999Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US6044469 *29 Ago 199728 Mar 2000Preview SoftwareSoftware publisher or distributor configurable software security mechanism
US6071191 *2 May 19976 Jun 2000Nintendo Co., Ltd.Systems and methods for providing security in a video game system
US6112181 *6 Nov 199729 Ago 2000Intertrust Technologies CorporationSystems and methods for matching, selecting, narrowcasting, and/or classifying based on rights management and/or other information
US6138119 *27 Abr 199924 Oct 2000Intertrust Technologies Corp.Techniques for defining, using and manipulating rights management data structures
US6157721 *12 Ago 19965 Dic 2000Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods using cryptography to protect secure computing environments
US6157966 *29 Jun 19985 Dic 2000Schlumberger Malco, Inc.System and method for an ISO7816 complaint smart card to become master over a terminal
US6166314 *28 Ene 199826 Dic 2000Time Warp Technologies, Ltd.Method and apparatus for real-time correlation of a performance to a musical score
US618568328 Dic 19986 Feb 2001Intertrust Technologies Corp.Trusted and secure techniques, systems and methods for item delivery and execution
US619025723 Ago 199920 Feb 2001Nintendo Co., Ltd.Systems and method for providing security in a video game system
US623778617 Jun 199929 May 2001Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US624018510 Feb 199929 May 2001Intertrust Technologies CorporationSteganographic techniques for securely delivering electronic digital rights management control information over insecure communication channels
US62531939 Dic 199826 Jun 2001Intertrust Technologies CorporationSystems and methods for the secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US62925694 Oct 200018 Sep 2001Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods using cryptography to protect secure computing environments
US630827013 Feb 199823 Oct 2001Schlumberger Technologies, Inc.Validating and certifying execution of a software program with a smart card
US63334556 Sep 200025 Dic 2001Roland CorporationElectronic score tracking musical instrument
US63634887 Jun 199926 Mar 2002Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US637675827 Oct 200023 Abr 2002Roland CorporationElectronic score tracking musical instrument
US63894029 Jun 199914 May 2002Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US639490512 Sep 200028 May 2002Nintendo Co., Ltd.Systems and methods for providing security in a video game system
US6408387 *22 Ene 199918 Jun 2002Intel CorporationPreventing unauthorized updates to a non-volatile memory
US64271403 Sep 199930 Jul 2002Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US644936723 Feb 200110 Sep 2002Intertrust Technologies Corp.Steganographic techniques for securely delivering electronic digital rights management control information over insecure communication channels
US645333416 Jun 199817 Sep 2002Streamtheory, Inc.Method and apparatus to allow remotely located computer programs and/or data to be accessed on a local computer in a secure, time-limited manner, with persistent caching
US656499517 Sep 199820 May 2003Schlumberger Malco, Inc.Smart card application-selection
US65912299 Oct 19988 Jul 2003Schlumberger Industries, SaMetrology device with programmable smart card
US66184845 Jul 20029 Sep 2003Intertrust Technologies CorporationSteganographic techniques for securely delivering electronic digital rights management control information over insecure communication channels
US6643775 *20 Nov 19984 Nov 2003Jamama, LlcUse of code obfuscation to inhibit generation of non-use-restricted versions of copy protected software applications
US665856826 Oct 19992 Dic 2003Intertrust Technologies CorporationTrusted infrastructure support system, methods and techniques for secure electronic commerce transaction and rights management
US6687325 *23 Jun 19993 Feb 2004Intel CorporationCounter with non-uniform digit base
US6725205 *2 Dic 199920 Abr 2004Ulysses Esd, Inc.System and method for secure software installation
US683685331 Dic 199928 Dic 2004Intel CorporationNon-volatile memory based monotonic counter
US693802118 Oct 200230 Ago 2005Intertrust Technologies CorporationMethods for matching, selecting, narrowcasting, and/or classifying based on rights management and/or other information
US694807030 Oct 200020 Sep 2005Intertrust Technologies CorporationSystems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US703224014 Feb 200018 Abr 2006Pace Anti-Piracy, Inc.Portable authorization device for authorizing use of protected information and associated method
US7043581 *11 May 20019 May 2006Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.Resource sequester mechanism
US705121230 May 200223 May 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US706250028 Sep 200013 Jun 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Techniques for defining, using and manipulating rights management data structures
US70694393 Mar 200027 Jun 2006Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Computing apparatus and methods using secure authentication arrangements
US706945129 Jun 199927 Jun 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US707665219 Ene 200111 Jul 2006Intertrust Technologies CorporationSystems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US70929144 Feb 200015 Ago 2006Intertrust Technologies CorporationMethods for matching, selecting, narrowcasting, and/or classifying based on rights management and/or other information
US70958543 Oct 200022 Ago 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US710019928 Oct 200329 Ago 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US711098318 Oct 200219 Sep 2006Intertrust Technologies CorporationMethods for matching, selecting, narrowcasting, and/or classifying based on rights management and/or other information
US71208001 Jun 200110 Oct 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US71208026 Ago 200110 Oct 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for using cryptography to protect secure computing environments
US712430210 Sep 200117 Oct 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US71338459 Jun 19997 Nov 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.System and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US713384617 Sep 19997 Nov 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Digital certificate support system, methods and techniques for secure electronic commerce transaction and rights management
US714306618 Oct 200228 Nov 2006Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for matching, selecting, narrowcasting, and/or classifying based on rights management and/or other information
US71432904 Ago 200028 Nov 2006Intertrust Technologies CorporationTrusted and secure techniques, systems and methods for item delivery and execution
US716517417 Dic 199916 Ene 2007Intertrust Technologies Corp.Trusted infrastructure support systems, methods and techniques for secure electronic commerce transaction and rights management
US723394825 Mar 199919 Jun 2007Intertrust Technologies Corp.Methods and apparatus for persistent control and protection of content
US724323628 Jul 200010 Jul 2007Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods for using cryptography to protect secure and insecure computing environments
US72811337 Abr 20059 Oct 2007Intertrust Technologies Corp.Trusted and secure techniques, systems and methods for item delivery and execution
US735008329 Dic 200025 Mar 2008Intel CorporationIntegrated circuit chip having firmware and hardware security primitive device(s)
US73923957 Abr 200524 Jun 2008Intertrust Technologies Corp.Trusted and secure techniques, systems and methods for item delivery and execution
US741561722 Jul 200419 Ago 2008Intertrust Technologies Corp.Trusted infrastructure support systems, methods and techniques for secure electronic commerce, electronic transactions, commerce process control and automation, distributed computing, and rights management
US743067031 Jul 200030 Sep 2008Intertrust Technologies Corp.Software self-defense systems and methods
US746124911 Ago 20002 Dic 2008Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Computer platforms and their methods of operation
US752678525 Sep 200028 Abr 2009Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Trusted computing platform for restricting use of data
US77342516 Jun 19958 Jun 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US775264924 May 19956 Jul 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US77526502 Jun 19956 Jul 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US77618907 Jun 199520 Jul 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US77646852 Jun 199527 Jul 2010Personalized Media Communications, L.L.C.Signal processing apparatus and methods
US776917022 May 19953 Ago 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US776934416 May 19953 Ago 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US77748097 Jun 199510 Ago 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and method
US777892422 Sep 200017 Ago 2010Stamps.ComSystem and method for transferring items having value
US77792674 Sep 200117 Ago 2010Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method and apparatus for using a secret in a distributed computing system
US778325223 May 199524 Ago 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US778408223 May 199524 Ago 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US77933327 Jun 19957 Sep 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US779771723 May 199514 Sep 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US780130424 May 199521 Sep 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78057386 Jun 199528 Sep 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US780574823 May 199528 Sep 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78057497 Jun 199528 Sep 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78101152 Jun 19955 Oct 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78145266 Jun 199512 Oct 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78172087 Jun 199519 Oct 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78187617 Jun 199519 Oct 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78187767 Jun 199519 Oct 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78187787 Jun 199519 Oct 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78231756 Jun 199526 Oct 2010Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78275866 Jun 19952 Nov 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78275872 Jun 19952 Nov 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US783092524 May 19959 Nov 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78312042 Mar 19959 Nov 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78364807 Jun 199516 Nov 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US784097623 May 199523 Nov 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US784483520 Sep 200530 Nov 2010Intertrust Technologies CorporationSystems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US78449957 Jun 199530 Nov 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US784947923 May 19957 Dic 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US784949319 May 19957 Dic 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US785664924 May 199521 Dic 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US785665030 Ago 199321 Dic 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78601317 Jun 199528 Dic 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78612636 Jun 199528 Dic 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US786127819 May 199528 Dic 2010Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78642487 Jun 19954 Ene 2011Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78649567 Jun 19954 Ene 2011Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US786592019 May 19954 Ene 2011Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78705817 Jun 199511 Ene 2011Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US78898657 Jun 199515 Feb 2011Personalized Media Communications, L.L.C.Signal processing apparatus and methods
US79086387 Jun 199515 Mar 2011Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US791774922 May 200629 Mar 2011Intertrust Technologies CorporationSystems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US791775218 Ago 200329 Mar 2011Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method of controlling the processing of data
US792589814 Jun 200612 Abr 2011Intertrust Technologies Corp.Systems and methods using cryptography to protect secure computing environments
US79260842 Jun 199512 Abr 2011Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US79409317 Jun 199510 May 2011Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US795322323 May 199531 May 2011Personalized Media Communications, L.L.C.Signal processing apparatus and methods
US79585277 Jun 19957 Jun 2011Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US7962416 *22 Nov 200014 Jun 2011Ge Medical Technology Services, Inc.Method and system to remotely enable software-based options for a trial period
US79666407 Jun 199521 Jun 2011Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US79921697 Jun 19952 Ago 2011Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US801618921 Dic 200913 Sep 2011Otomaku Properties Ltd., L.L.C.Electronic transaction systems and methods therefor
US80245234 Abr 200820 Sep 2011Endeavors Technologies, Inc.Opportunistic block transmission with time constraints
US80467912 Jun 199525 Oct 2011Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US806090319 May 199515 Nov 2011Personalized Media PMC Communications, L.L.C.Signal processing apparatus and methods
US81127822 Jun 19957 Feb 2012Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US818547313 Abr 200622 May 2012Intertrust Technologies CorporationTrusted infrastructure support systems, methods and techniques for secure electronic commerce, electronic transactions, commerce process control and automation, distributed computing, and rights management
US81910917 Jun 199529 May 2012Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US822508923 Feb 200117 Jul 2012Otomaku Properties Ltd., L.L.C.Electronic transaction systems utilizing a PEAD and a private key
US830721210 Jul 20036 Nov 2012Intertrust Technologies Corp.Steganographic techniques for securely delivering electronic digital rights management control information over insecure communication channels
US83957072 Jun 199512 Mar 2013Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US843829813 Jun 20067 May 2013Endeavors Technologies, Inc.Intelligent network streaming and execution system for conventionally coded applications
US850923024 Jul 200913 Ago 2013Numecent Holdings, Inc.Software streaming system and method
US851022610 Ene 200713 Ago 2013Graphon CorporationMethod for synchronous encryption between a client and a licensing agent
US852770616 Sep 20113 Sep 2013Numecent Holdings, Inc.Opportunistic block transmission with time constraints
US853385112 Abr 200610 Sep 2013Intertrust Technologies CorporationSystems and methods for secure transaction management and electronic rights protection
US854384223 May 200624 Sep 2013Intertrust Technologies CorporationSystem and methods for secure transaction management and electronics rights protection
US85553107 Jun 19958 Oct 2013Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US855895016 May 199515 Oct 2013Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US855963524 May 199515 Oct 2013Personalized Media Communications, L.L.C.Signal processing apparatus and methods
US85668682 Jun 199522 Oct 2013Personalized Media Communications, L.L.C.Signal processing apparatus and methods
US857267119 May 199529 Oct 2013Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US858416223 May 199512 Nov 2013Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US85877205 Jun 199519 Nov 2013Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US86015287 Jun 19953 Dic 2013Personalized Media Communications, L.L.C.Signal processing apparatus and methods
US86072967 Jun 199510 Dic 2013Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US86130347 Jun 199517 Dic 2013Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US862154716 May 199531 Dic 2013Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US86356446 Jun 199521 Ene 2014Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US86401847 Jun 199528 Ene 2014Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US864600119 May 19954 Feb 2014Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US86611972 May 201225 Feb 2014Numecent Holdings, Inc.Opportunistic block transmission with time constraints
US86757757 Jun 199518 Mar 2014Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US86835397 Jun 199525 Mar 2014Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US87118852 Jun 199529 Abr 2014Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US87136247 Jun 199529 Abr 2014Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US87392417 Jun 199527 May 2014Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US87517932 Dic 200310 Jun 2014Intertrust Technologies Corp.Trusted infrastructure support systems, methods and techniques for secure electronic commerce transaction and rights management
US87520887 Jun 199510 Jun 2014Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US88047272 Jun 199512 Ago 2014Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US88319956 Nov 20019 Sep 2014Numecent Holdings, Inc.Optimized server for streamed applications
US88392364 Abr 200716 Sep 2014Microsoft Corp.Virtual machine support for metered computer usage
US883929319 May 199516 Sep 2014Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US88692282 Jun 199521 Oct 2014Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US88692297 Jun 199521 Oct 2014Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US88927384 Abr 200818 Nov 2014Numecent Holdings, Inc.Deriving component statistics for a stream enabled application
US889317723 May 199518 Nov 2014{Personalized Media Communications, LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US889324926 Nov 201218 Nov 2014Numecent Holdings, Inc.Intelligent network streaming and execution system for conventionally coded applications
US88983918 Ago 201325 Nov 2014Numecent Holdings, Inc.Opportunistic block transmission with time constraints
US890955522 Abr 20029 Dic 2014Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Information security system
US891482519 May 199516 Dic 2014Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US89730349 May 19953 Mar 2015Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US903812426 May 199519 May 2015Personalized Media Communications, LlcSignal processing apparatus and methods
US90944807 Ago 201328 Jul 2015Numecent Holdings, Inc.Software streaming system and method
US913095318 Nov 20148 Sep 2015Numecent Holdings, Inc.Intelligent network streaming and execution system for conventionally coded applications
US92103702 Jun 19958 Dic 2015Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US92942057 Jun 199522 Mar 2016Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US930075225 Nov 201429 Mar 2016Numecent Holdings, Inc.Opportunistic block transmission with time constraints
US930517331 Mar 20065 Abr 2016Pace Anti-Piracy, Inc.Portable authorization device for authorizing use of protected information and associated method
US943657829 Sep 20146 Sep 2016Numecent Holdings, Inc.Deriving component statistics for a stream enabled application
US957807523 Jun 201521 Feb 2017Numecent Holdings, Inc.Software streaming system and method
US96545485 Ago 201516 May 2017Numecent Holdings, Inc.Intelligent network streaming and execution system for conventionally coded applications
US967456023 May 19956 Jun 2017Personalized Media Communications LLCSignal processing apparatus and methods
US20030110372 *22 Abr 200212 Jun 2003Proudler Graeme JohnInformation security system
US20030228911 *5 Jun 200211 Dic 2003Dernis Mitchell S.DVD-enabling code server and loader for a console-based gaming system
US20040141461 *22 Ene 200322 Jul 2004Zimmer Vincent J.Remote reset using a one-time pad
US20050076209 *18 Ago 20037 Abr 2005Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method of controlling the processing of data
US20050130745 *28 Ene 200516 Jun 2005Microsoft CorporationDVD-enabling dongle for a console-based gaming system
US20050137018 *28 Ene 200523 Jun 2005Microsoft CorporationDVD-enabling dongle for a console-based gaming system
US20050210278 *9 Ago 200422 Sep 2005Bruce ConklinMass storage apparatus for securely delivering digital content to a host computer and method for using same
US20050251489 *19 Abr 200510 Nov 2005Coley Christopher DMethod for evaluating software freely distributed over the internet
US20050251490 *19 Abr 200510 Nov 2005Coley Christopher DMethod for determining whether a client software application is licensed
US20050273436 *21 Abr 20058 Dic 2005Coley Christopher DMethod for determining by a license server whether a client software application is licensed
US20050273437 *29 Abr 20058 Dic 2005Coley Christopher DMethod for synchronous encryption between a client and a licensing agent
US20050289074 *7 Jun 200529 Dic 2005Coley Christopher DSystem for updating a licensing cache memory
US20060085356 *7 Dic 200520 Abr 2006Graphon CorporationMethod for purchasing a software license over a public network
US20060106732 *28 Dic 200518 May 2006Graphon CorporationNetwork licensing system for portable computers
US20060174349 *31 Mar 20063 Ago 2006Cronce Paul APortable authorization device for authorizing use of protected information and associated method
US20070016959 *14 Jul 200618 Ene 2007Yuichi IkedaInformation processing device and information processing system
US20070219918 *19 May 200520 Sep 2007Jonathan SchullSystem and method for controlling access to protected information
US20080250406 *4 Abr 20079 Oct 2008Microsoft CorporationVirtual Machine Support for Metered Computer Usage
US20080276086 *18 Ago 20036 Nov 2008Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method of controlling the processing of data
USRE34161 *10 Sep 199112 Ene 1993Nintendo Company LimitedMemory cartridge and information processor unit using such cartridge
DE3914233C1 *29 Abr 198926 Jul 1990Wulf 2054 Geesthacht De HarderComputer program protection device - has generator data output connected with consisting testing stage
EP0165789A2 *14 Jun 198527 Dic 1985Effective Security Systems, Inc.Device for protecting computer software
EP0165789A3 *14 Jun 19857 Ene 1988Effective Security Systems, Inc.Device for protecting computer software
EP0183608A2 *19 Nov 19854 Jun 1986Schlumberger Technology CorporationSoftware security system
EP0183608A3 *19 Nov 198522 Abr 1987Schlumberger Technology CorporationSoftware security system
EP0206704A2 *16 Jun 198630 Dic 1986Nintendo Co. LimitedSystem for determining the authenticity of software in an information processing apparatus
EP0206704A3 *16 Jun 198629 Mar 1989Nintendo Co. LimitedSystem for determining the authenticity of software in an information processing apparatus
EP0279733A1 *5 Feb 198824 Ago 1988MICROPHAR, Sàrl dite:Method and device for limiting the use of a computer programme
EP0314530A1 *27 Ene 19883 May 1989MICROPHAR, Sàrl dite:A key-type soft ware usage control device with memory
EP0359220A2 *13 Sep 198921 Mar 1990Wayne W. ChouMethod and apparatus for protecting computer software utilizing coded filter network in conjunction with an active coded hardware device
EP0359220A3 *13 Sep 198917 Oct 1990Wayne W. ChouMethod and apparatus for protecting computer software utilizing coded filter network in conjunction with an active coded hardware device
EP0417611A2 *4 Sep 199020 Mar 1991Wayne W. ChouMethod and apparatus for protecting computer software using a presettable counter in combination with an additional function
EP0417611A3 *4 Sep 19902 Sep 1992Wayne W. ChouMethod and apparatus for protecting computer software using a presettable counter in combination with an additional function
EP0770951A1 *23 Oct 19962 May 1997ActikeyApparatus for controlling the use of software, system containing several such apparatuses and corresponding control procedure
WO1995017732A1 *22 Dic 199429 Jun 1995Mohan AnandaA secure software rental system using continuous asynchronous password verification
WO1999010809A1 *31 Ago 19984 Mar 1999Preview Systems, Inc.Software publisher configurable software security mechanism
WO2001001622A2 *22 Jun 20004 Ene 2001Starpay.Com, Inc.Apparatus and method for performing secure network transactions
WO2001001622A3 *22 Jun 200026 Jul 2001Starpay Com IncApparatus and method for performing secure network transactions
WO2002015077A1 *14 Ago 200021 Feb 2002Starpay.Com, Inc.Apparatus and method for performing secure network transactions
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.726/20, 377/28, 705/55, 377/38
Clasificación internacionalG06F21/00
Clasificación cooperativaG06F2211/007, G06F21/123
Clasificación europeaG06F21/12A2
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
15 Jun 1989FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
19 Abr 1993FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
1 May 1997FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
2 Mar 1998ASAssignment
Owner name: SOFTWARE SECURITY, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CHOU, WAYNE W.;ERETT, RICHARD;REEL/FRAME:009015/0425
Effective date: 19961002