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Número de publicaciónUS5186165 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Número de solicitudUS 07/710,812
Fecha de publicación16 Feb 1993
Fecha de presentación5 Jun 1991
Fecha de prioridad5 Jun 1991
TarifaPagadas
También publicado comoCA2084765A1, CA2084765C, DE69227470D1, DE69227470T2, EP0678048A1, EP0678048B1, US5315987, WO1992021408A1
Número de publicación07710812, 710812, US 5186165 A, US 5186165A, US-A-5186165, US5186165 A, US5186165A
InventoresLinsey J. Swann
Cesionario originalBrookdale International Systems Inc.
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Filtering canister with deployable hood and mouthpiece
US 5186165 A
Resumen
The breathing system comprises a canister carrying layered filtering material, including activated carbon granules, a desiccant, a catalyst for the catalyzation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide, and electrostatically charged filters between the layers of filtering material. A mouthpiece carrying a noseclip, and inhalation and exhalation check valves and a whistle is disposed within a flexible, substantially completely transparent hear-through hood, both the mouthpiece and hood being disposed in the canister between the filtering material and a cover for the canister. In use, the cover is removed, air inlet apertures are uncovered, and the hood is drawn about an individual's head and substantially sealed about the neck. With the mouthpiece in the individual's mouth, and noseclip closing off the user's nose, inhalation causes air to flow through the filtering material and the inhalation check valve and past the exhalation check valves. When exhaling, the exhalation check valves open to permit exhaled air to flow into the hood. The inhalation valve closes during exhalation to prevent backflow of air through the filtering material. By exhaling into the hood, a slight positive pressure within the hood is established to prevent noxious gases, smoke particles and the like from entering the hood through the neck opening.
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Reclamaciones(36)
What is claimed is:
1. A personal emergency breathing system comprising:
a canister having a body with an opening and a cover releasably secured to said canister body for closing said opening;
an air filtration unit disposed within the body of said canister for filtering ambient air and having an air inlet for receiving ambient air and an air outlet, the ambient air passing through said air inlet into said filtration unit where it is filtered an passed through said air outlet;
a mouthpiece carried by said canister body for receiving filtered air from the outlet of said filtration unit;
a hood carried by said canister body and enveloping said mouthpiece, said mouthpiece and said hood being disposed in a collapsed condition in said canister adjacent said opening and between said cover and said filtration unit whereby, upon removable of said cover, said hood and mouthpiece are deployable from said canister body to a location external to said canister body, said hood having an opening for receiving an individual's head and neck;
means for connecting said hood and said mouthpiece to said canister body in said collapsed condition and when deployed, said connecting means, when said hood and said mouthpiece are deployed, enabling flow of filtered air from said filtration unit air outlet to said mouthpiece and preventing flow of filtered air from said filtration unit air outlet into said hood; and
first and second one-way valves disposed between said mouthpiece and said filtration unit, said first valve enabling flow of filtered air from said filtration unit air outlet into said mouthpiece and preventing backflow of exhaled air into said filtration unit, said second valve enabling air exhaled into said mouthpiece for flow into said hood and preventing backflow of air from said hood through said second valve to said mouthpiece.
2. A system according to claim 1 wherein said filtration unit includes filtering material comprising activated charcoal.
3. A system according to claim 1 wherein said filtration unit includes filtering material comprising activated charcoal, a dessicant and a catalyst for the catalyzation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide.
4. A system according to claim 3 wherein said filtering material includes a material for converting carbon dioxide to oxygen.
5. A system according to claim 1 wherein said filtration unit includes filtering material comprising layered activated charcoal, a dessicant and a catalyst for the catalyzation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide.
6. A system according to claim 1 wherein said canister is elongated and said cover lies at one end thereof, said canister having an inlet comprising at least one aperture at the end of said canister opposite said covered end for receiving ambient air and in communication with said filtration unit air inlet, said filtration unit having filtering material, and means for releasably sealing said one aperture to prevent ingress of air into said filtration unit and through the filtering material, said filtering material being comprised of activated charcoal and at least one electrostatically charged filter.
7. A system according to claim 1 wherein substantially the entirety of said hood is formed of transparent material.
8. A system according to claim 1 wherein said filtration unit includes layered activated charcoal, a dessicant, a catalyst for the catalyzation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and lithium peroxide to convert carbon dioxide to oxygen.
9. A system according to claim 1 including a whistle for receiving exhaled air whereby the whistle may be sounded to facilitate locating an individual using the emergency breathing system.
10. A system according to claim 1 including a noseclip attached to said mouthpiece for application to a user's nose.
11. A system according to claim 1 wherein said hood is formed of a thin-walled plastic material enabling the transmission of the user's voice to pass through the hood to be heard externally thereof.
12. A system according to claim 1 wherein said mouthpiece is formed of a flexible resilient material, said connecting means including a plenum having a collar, and sealing means including a sealing ring about said collar and hood portion.
13. A system according to claim 1 wherein said hood is formed of a thin-walled plastic material enabling the transmission of sound and signals to and from the user with minimal resistance.
14. A system according to claim 1 wherein said canister is elongated and said cover lies at one end thereof, said canister having at least one aperture at the end of said canister opposite said covered end for communicating air into the filtration unit air inlet, and means for releasably sealing said one aperture to prevent ingress of air through said aperture and into the filtration unit.
15. A system according to claim 1 wherein said filtration unit includes filter material comprised of activated charcoal and at least one electrostatically charged filter.
16. A system according to claim 1 including means for substantially closing said hood opening about the individual's neck whereby the hood completely envelopes the individual's head, and the air exhaled by the individual through said second valve into said hood affords a positive pressure in said hood relative to ambient pressure, thus preventing ingress of non-filtered air into the hood through said hood opening.
17. A system according to claim 1 wherein said connecting means and said mouthpiece enable said canister body and said filtration unit to be supported from said mouthpiece upon placement of the mouthpiece in the individual's mouth.
18. A personal emergency breathing system comprising:
a canister having a body with an opening and a cover releasably secured to said canister body for closing said opening;
an air filtration unit disposed within the body of said canister for filtering ambient air and having an air inlet for receiving ambient air and an air outlet, the ambient air passing through said air inlet into said filtration unit where it is filtered and passed through said air outlet;
a mouthpiece carried by said canister body for receiving filtered air from the outlet of said filtration unit;
a hood carried by said canister body and enveloping said mouthpiece, said mouthpiece and said hood being disposed in said canister in a collapsed condition adjacent said opening and between said cover and said filtration unit whereby, upon removal of said cover, said hood and mouthpiece are deployable from said canister body to a location external to said canister body, said hood having an opening for receiving an individual's head and neck;
means for connecting said hood and said mouthpiece to said canister body in said collapsed condition and when deployed, said connecting means, when said hood and said mouthpiece are deployed, enabling flow of filtered air from said filtration unit air outlet to said mouthpiece and preventing flow of filtered air through said filtration unit into said hood; and
first and second one-way valves disposed between said mouthpiece and said filtration unit, said first valve enabling flow of filtered air from said filtration unit air outlet into said mouthpiece and preventing backflow of exhaled air into said filtration unit, said second valve enabling air exhaled into said mouthpiece for flow into said hood and preventing backflow of air from said hood through said second valve to said mouthpiece;
said canister body including a lower portion, and a portion intermediate said canister cover and said lower portion, said filtration unit being disposed in said lower body portion, said connecting means connecting said hood and said mouthpiece to said intermediate portion and means for securing said lower portion of said canister body and said intermediate portion one to the other.
19. A system according to claim 18 including means for substantially closing said opening about the individual's neck whereby the hood completely envelopes the individual's head and the air exhaled by the individual through said second valve into said hood affords a positive pressure in said hood relative to ambient pressure, thus preventing ingress of non-filtered air into the hood through said hood opening.
20. A system according to claim 19 wherein said closing means for said hood includes an elastic band about said opening.
21. A system according to claim 19 wherein said closing means for said hood includes a draw band about said opening.
22. A system according to claim 18 wherein said filtration unit includes activated charcoal.
23. A system according to claim 18 wherein said filtration unit includes activated charcoal, a dessicant and a catalyst for the catalyzation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide.
24. A system according to claim 18 wherein said filtration unit includes layered activated charcoal, a dessicant and a catalyst for the catalyzation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide.
25. A system according to claim 24 including electrostatically charged filters disposed between adjacent layers of filtering material for collecting particulate matter.
26. A system according to claim 18 including means for substantially closing said opening about the individual's neck whereby the hood completely envelops the individual's head and the air exhaled by the individual through said second valve into said hood affords a positive pressure in said hood relative to ambient pressure, thus preventing ingress of non-filtered air into the hood through said hood opening, said filtration unit including activated charcoal granules and at least one electrostatically charged fabric filter.
27. A system according to claim 26 wherein said closing means for said hood includes an elastic band about said opening.
28. A system according to claim 26 wherein said closing means for said hood includes a draw band about said opening.
29. A system according to claim 18 wherein said hood is formed of a thin-walled plastic material enabling the transmission of the user's voice to pass through the hood to be heard externally thereof.
30. A system according to claim 18 including a whistle for receiving exhaled air whereby the whistle may be sounded to facilitate locating an individual using the emergency breathing system.
31. A system according to claim 18 wherein said hood is formed of a thin-walled plastic material enabling the transmission of sound and signals to and from the user with minimal resistance.
32. A system according to claim 18 wherein said filtration unit includes layered activated charcoal, a dessicant, a catalyst for the catalyzation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide, and electrostatically charged filters disposed between layers for collecting particulate matter.
33. A personal emergency breathing system comprising:
a canister having a body with an opening and a cover releasably secured to said canister body for closing said opening;
an air filtration unit disposed within the body of said canister for filtering ambient air and having an air inlet for receiving ambient air and an air outlet, the ambient air passing through said air inlet into said filtration unit where it is filtered and passed through said air outlet;
a mouthpiece carried by said canister body for receiving filtered air from the outlet of said filtration unit;
a hood carried by said canister body and enveloping said mouthpiece, said mouthpiece and said hood being disposed in a collapsed condition in said canister adjacent said opening and between said cover and said filtration unit whereby, upon removable of said cover, said hood and mouthpiece are deployable from said canister body to a location external to said canister body, said hood having an opening for receiving an individual's head and neck;
means for connecting said hood and said mouthpiece to said canister body in said collapsed condition and when deployed;
means establishing an air flow path from said air outlet to said mouthpiece when said hood and said mouthpiece are deployed from said canister body for enabling flow of filtered air from said filtration unit air outlet to said mouthpiece and preventing flow of filtered air from said filtration unit air outlet into said hood;
a one-way valve disposed in said air flow path means enabling flow of filtered air from said filtration unit air outlet into said mouthpiece and preventing backflow of exhaled air into said filtration unit; and
said canister body including a lower portion, and a portion intermediate said canister cover and said lower portion, said filtration unit being disposed in said lower body portion, said connecting means connecting said hood and said mouthpiece to said intermediate portion and means for securing said lower portion of said canister body and said intermediate portion one to the other.
34. A personal emergency breathing system according to claim 33 including a second valve in communication with said mouthpiece enabling air exhaled into said mouthpiece for flow into said hood and preventing backflow of air from said hood through said second valve to said mouthpiece.
35. A system according to claim 34 including means for substantially closing said hood opening about the individual's neck whereby the hood completely envelops the individual's head and the air exhaled by the individual through said second valve into said hood affords a positive pressure in said hood relative to ambient pressure, thus preventing ingress of non-filtered air into the hood through said hood opening.
36. A system according to claim 33 wherein said canister is elongated and said cover lies at one end thereof, said canister having at least one aperture at the end of said canister opposite said covered end for communication air into the filtration unit air inlet, and means for releasably sealing said one aperture to prevent ingress of air through said aperture and into the filtration unit.
Descripción
BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a compact, self-contained, low-cost, integrated disposable emergency breathing system. Briefly, the invention provides a single canister containing a protective hood, a multi-stage air purifying chemical filter attached to the hood and a valved mouthpiece complete with attached noseclip, within the hood, all sealed within the canister until opened for use. When opened, the hood is drawn about an individual's head and breathing is effected through the mouthpiece. The multi-stage filter is designed to filter toxic polar organic gases, convert carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and, as an alternative, oxygen, and provide filtered breathable air for life support for a period of time, for example, in excess of 10 minutes.

While conventional personal emergency breathing systems have been designed for use in fires and have addressed the problem of removing carbon monoxide and other toxic gases, i.e., cyanides, benzines and the like, they fail to provide a low-cost, one-piece system that integrates a protective hood, mouthpiece and filter in a single compact canister. In such conventional systems, the hood has been either an incidential independent feature of the filter system or has been attached in a separate package to be used or not used by choice. Such hoods have invariably been of a bulky design generally incorporating a solid heat-resistant material forming the main part of the body of the hood, severely restricting two-way communication, and provided with a transparent window of a size which substantially restricts vision and is subject, as a consequence of its limited area, to fogging. Such a design requires the hood to be packed and carried separately.

Prior art emergency breathing systems typically exhaust exhaled gases via a one-way valve to the atmosphere, or back into the filter via the mouth or mouth/nose piece. Consequently, prior art systems have required a rubber/plastic face forming a nose/mouth cover or a mouthpiece and noseclip. These devices are not efficient, particularly when used on bearded or children's faces. Similarly, mouthpieces with a separate noseclip are inconvenient and, unless placed properly on the nose, are subject to being easily dislodged and lost

Prior art systems are often bulky, sometimes require sizing for fitting particular individuals, and generally are not conducive to easy or practical day-to-day carriage or storage. Prior art systems also have employed a variety of fitting methods generally relying on multiple or single-strap arrangements requiring individual adjustment to ensure a proper airtight fit to the individual user. In an emergency or panic situation, such methods are time-consuming and sometimes confusing to use, especially in the case of multiple-strap arrangements. Certain prior art systems do not provide a protective hood or face mask and are complicated in design or use or both. Additionally, such systems are expensive to manufacture, do not lend themselves to a low retail cost, and hence are effectively precluded from a cost standpoint from prepositioning in the necessary numbers in populated areas.

In light of the failings of conventional systems as described above, and according to the present invention, there is provided a simple to use, one-time use, low-cost, compact personal emergency breathing system complete with an integral transparent hood, mouthpiece and passive chemical filter, all housed in a single, easy to carry, compact, unobtrusive canister and able to provide, when used, life support for a period of time sufficient to enable the user to escape from an area containing toxic or noxious gases, such as smoke from a fire.

Generally, the disposable emergency breathing system of the present invention provides a canister comprised of a body housing a filtration unit or stage containing filtering material, a hood and a mouthpiece complete with an attached noseclip, the housing being closed at one end by a cover. The end of the body opposite the cover has at least one air inlet aperture normally sealed by a plastic air-tight push fit seal or a removable adhesive metallic foil, whereby the air inlet to the canister and filtering material is normally closed when the system is not in use. The filtering material is preferably disposed in layered form within the body of the canister and preferably comprises a layer each of activated charcoal granules, a dessicant and a catalyst for the catalyzation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide, each layer being separated by an electrostatically charged fabric filter for collecting particulate matter. Also, a layer of lithium peroxide may comprise a fourth layer for converting carbon dioxide to oxygen. Thus, the layered filtering material is disposed within the body of the canister in a manner such that, when the air inlet aperture or apertures are uncovered, air will flow through the apertures and through the charcoal granules, dessicant and catalyst, preferably in that order, and also through the electrostatically charged filters.

Between the filtering material and the cover for the canister, there is provided a mouthpiece connected to a plenum sealingly secured about the margins of the canister body for receiving filtered air from the filtration stage for transmission to the mouthpiece. The mouthpiece contains a one-way inhalation check valve and at least one one-way exhalation check valve, preferably complete with a small integral whistle. Additionally, the mouthpiece preferably carries a noseclip pivotal between a stored position within the canister and a use position pivoted away from the mouthpiece. The mouthpiece and noseclip are enclosed within a wholly transparent hood, likewise sealingly secured about its margins to the canister body. Thus, the mouthpiece, noseclip and hood are secured within the canister body between the filtration stage and the cover when the system is stored and not in use.

To use the system, the mouthpiece carrying the noseclip and the hood are deployed by removing the cover of the canister. The hood and mouthpiece with noseclip are then automatically extended from the canister body. The plastic push fit seal or adhesive-backed metallic foil is also removed to expose the air inlet aperture or apertures and hence the filtration stage to ambient air. The hood has an opening for drawing it about a user's head, the opening preferably having an elastic closure or draw band for drawing and substantially sealing the opening about the individual's neck. With the mouthpiece inside the hood, the individual may then place the mouthpiece in his/her mouth and swing the noseclip from its stored position into a use position about the nose whereby normal breathing may be maintained. Upon inhalation, air entering the canister through the air inlet aperture flows through the filtering material into the plenum and passes through the one-way inhalation check valve to the mouthpiece. Upon exhalation, air flows from the individual's mouth into the mouthpiece and through the exhalation check valve(s), one of which preferably supports an integral whistle, into the hood, the inhalation valve being closed, by virtue of its design, during exhalation. By flowing exhalation air into the hood, a positive pressure within the hood is established. Consequently, the noxious and toxic air, smoke particles and the like cannot enter the hood through the draw band or elasticized hood opening, notwithstanding that a complete seal is not formed between the hood opening and the individual's neck.

The filter stage of the invention is designed to remove toxic/organic gases, thereby affording life support and protection against asphyxiation in order to allow a panic-free evacuation from a typical fire. The transparent hood and mouthpiece of the invention are provided in one size which fits all individuals. Particularly, the transparent hood envelops the individual's entire head and is substantially sealed around the neck, thereby protecting the individual's eyes against the effects of smoke and preventing inhalation of toxic gases. In doing so, the hood also provides unrestricted visibility.

As aforementioned, the mouthpiece is provided with one-way inhalation and exhalation valves. The valves are arranged so that air drawn through the filtration stage and inhaled through the mouthpiece does not, upon exhalation, flow back through the filter. Rather, exhaled air is exhausted from the mouthpiece through the exhalation valve or valves into the interior of the above-described hood. In this way, the hood has a slight positive pressure whereby external noxious and toxic gases at ambient pressure are unable to enter the hood even if the neck seal is incomplete or the hood is damaged. Exhaled gases within the hood are thus released at a natural rate through the neck seal. Conversely, the exhalation valve or valves close upon inhalation, thus preventing backflow of exhaled air within the hood into the mouthpiece or filtration stage.

In a preferred embodiment according to the present invention, there is provided a personal emergency breathing system comprising a canister having a body with an opening and a cover releasably secured to the canister body for closing the opening, material within the body of the canister for filtering air, the body having an air inlet for directing air through the filtering material, a mouthpiece connected to the canister for receiving filtered air from the filtering material, a hood connected to the canister and enveloping the mouthpiece, the mouthpiece and hood being disposed in the canister adjacent the opening and between the cover and the filtering material whereby, upon removal of the cover, the hood and mouthpiece are deployable from the canister, the hood having an opening for receiving an individual's head and neck. First and second one-way valves are disposed between the mouthpiece and the filtering material, the first valve enabling filtered air to be drawn from the filtering material into the mouthpiece and preventing backflow of exhaled air into the filtering material, the second valve enabling exhaled air for flow into the hood and preventing backflow thereof through the second valve to the mouthpiece.

In a further preferred embodiment according to the present invention, there is provided a personal emergency breathing system comprising a canister having a body with an opening and a cover releasably secured to the canister body for closing the opening, an air filtration unit disposed within the body of the canister, the body having an air inlet for directing air through the filtration unit and means for sealing the air inlet to prevent ingress of air into the filtration unit during non-usage of the system and enabling air to flow through the air inlet and the filtration unit during usage of the system. A mouthpiece is provided connected to the canister for receiving filtered air from the filtering material. A hood is connected to the canister and envelops the mouthpiece, the hood having an opening for receiving an individual's head and neck. The mouthpiece and hood are disposed in the canister adjacent the canister opening and between the cover and the filtration unit whereby, upon removal of the cover, the hood and mouthpiece are deployable from the canister. Also provided are means including portions of the mouthpiece and the hood for hermetically sealing the mouthpiece and hood portions about the body opening thereby hermetically sealing the filtration unit within the canister body during non-use of the system and enabling only air flowing into the air inlet and through the filtration unit to flow to the mouthpiece during use thereof.

Some of the unique features of the invention and its objects include: (1) in its unused form, the multi-stage filter chemicals are protected and their purity maintained within the sealed airtight lower section of the canister; (2) the aforedescribed transparent hood and mouthpiece complete with the described valve system and, preferably also a noseclip, are disposed within the upper section of the canister which is normally closed by means of a "twist-off" cap/lid; (3) when in use, multiple small apertures or, in the case of a single plastic push-type seal, a large single aperture in the lower bottom of the canister are provided to allow polluted air to be drawn into and through the filter section and when not in use, are covered and made airtight by a removable adhesive metal foil seal or a single plastic-type seal which maintains the airtight integrity of the canister body and particularly the filtration stage; (4) the "twist-off" lid is designed to ensure positive removal when twisted or turned in either direction by a sloped ramp at the extremities of the retaining groove thereby ensuring that the lid will separate/eject cleanly from the container when fully twisted in either direction without the risk of becoming jammed; (5) the hood material is heat-resistant up to 900° F. and is light, fully transparent, does not restrict the passage of voice communications or sound, and is readily amenable to folding and packing into the upper section of the canister; (6) the neck aperture of the hood is elasticized or provided with a "draw tape" and clearly marked by a highly visible strip of color; (7) by providing a "one-size-fits-all" hood design, children, adults, bearded or beardless individuals, or individuals wearing optical glasses can be accommodated; (8) the casing material is impregnated with a luminescent material, thus providing a means of easy location and identification in the dark; (9) the system has an extended shelf life, is disposable, extremely low-cost, of unitized construction and has sufficient air filtration capacity, e.g., in excess of ten minutes, to enable individuals to escape areas containing polar or non-polar noxious or toxic gases; and (10) an exhaust valve is provided with a whistle to alert potential rescuers to the location of the individual using the present system and which whistle may be activated by sharp exhalation.

These and further objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent upon reference to the following specification, appended claims and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a personal disposable emergency breathing system according to the present invention and illustrating a canister containing various elements of the system prior to use;

FIG. 2 is a schematic side elevational view of the breathing system in use by a individual;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary exploded perspective view with parts broken out and in cross-section of various elements of the breathing system hereof;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged vertical cross-sectional view of the breathing system illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of a portion of a breathing system, including the mouthpiece, attached noseclip, exhalation and inhalation check valves and the plenum:

FIGS. 6A and 6B are respective cross-sectional and plan views of a fixed valve seat forming part of the inhalation valve;

FIGS. 7A and 7B are respective side elevation and bottom plan views of a flexible valve member for the inhalation valve illustrated in FIG. 5;

FIGS. 8A and 8B are plan and vertical cross-sectional views of a fixed valve seat forming part of each exhalation valve on opposite sides of the plenum as illustrated in FIG. 5;

FIGS. 9A, 9B and 9C are schematic representations of the deployment of the mouthpiece and hood from the canister, the flow of inhalation gas and the flow of exhalation gas, respectively, of the emergency breathing system hereof;

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 1 illustrating another embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged exploded cross-sectional view of a portion of the breathing system of FIG. 10 including the mouthpiece, exhalation and inhalation check valves and the plenum;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged side elevational view with parts broken out and in cross-section of the breathing system of FIG. 10 in a stored and unused condition;

FIG. 13A is a fragmentary cross-sectional view illustrating, in a further embodiment hereof, the connection between the various parts of the canister body;

FIG. 13B is a view similar to FIG. 13A illustrating a further embodiment of that connection; and

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating a pull tab recessed into the body of the canister for opening the air inlet aperture.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGURES

Reference will now be made in detail to a present preferred embodiment of the invention, an example of which is illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

Referring now to the drawing figures, particularly to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a personal disposable emergency breathing system, generally designated 10, and illustrated in a non-used or stored condition and including a canister 12. Canister 12 includes a body 14 having an intermediate securing ring 16 and a cover 18. Canister 12 is preferably formed of a color-impregnated plastic material such as ABS. Canister body 14 is closed at its lower end, except for one or more apertures 20 (FIG. 3), which serve as an air inlet for the emergency breathing system as detailed hereinafter. In this embodiment, apertures 20 are normally closed by a metallic foil 22 releasably adhesively secured to the bottom of canister body 14, sealing the apertures 20. A pull tab 23 is provided for removing the sealing foil 22. A plastic push-type seal 122, as illustrated in FIG. 10, may also be used in lieu of the foil seal.

Referring to FIG. 3, breathing system 10 basically includes the canister 12, a filtration section 24, a mouthpiece 28 including a plenum 26 for conveying inhalation gas from filtration section 24 to mouthpiece 28, the latter carrying inhalation and exhalation check valves 30 and 32, respectively (FIG. 4), and a noseclip 33. A transparent hood 34 is also provided. These components of the system are disposed within canister 12 when the open end of the canister is closed by cover 18 whereby the elements are substantially sealed from the atmosphere. More specifically, the hood 34 and mouthpiece 28 are folded into ring 16 which is attached to canister 12. When the cover 18 is removed, the plenum 26, mouthpiece 28 and hood 34 may be automatically deployed from (but remain connected to) canister 12.

In this first embodiment, canister body 14 has stepped reduced diameter portions 11 and 13 adjacent its upper end. First reduced section 11 includes a plurality of vertically spaced, interrupted, downwardly tapered portions for securing complementary interrupted downwardly tapered portions formed along the inside surface of ring 16. The second reduced step portion 13 includes a pair of grooves 15 for receiving the annular portion of a collar 50 described hereinafter. The upper end of ring 16 includes interrupted radially outwardly projecting flanges 17 which facilitate releasable connection with complementary flanges on the inside of cover 18 upon rotation of cover 18 in either rotary direction.

Turning now to FIGS. 3 and 4, the filtration section 24 preferably comprises layers of air-filtering material. Particularly, the filtering materials are preferably arranged in stages, the first stage 36 comprising activated carbon granules, e.g., Calgon-type ASC Grade III activated carbon granules (12×30 mesh). The carbon granules are provided for the purpose of removing from the air inlet to the breathing system the polar organic gases, e.g., benzenes, cyanides and the like, as found in dense smoke of a typical fire, where natural, man-made and synthetic materials are burning. The intermediate filtration stage 38 is comprised of a dessicant to remove moisture from the inhaled air or gas before it passes into the final stage of filtration section 24. The dessicant may be a zeolite type Z 3-01/3A (8×12 mesh, 1-2 mm). The final stage 40 of filtration section 24 is formed of a material which converts carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide by a catalyzation process. Such material may preferably comprise a carulite type 200, a copper manganese oxide hopkalite catalyst. A fourth step, for example, containing lithium peroxide, may be added for converting carbon dioxide to oxygen.

Separating the layers 36, 38 and 40 of filtration stage 24 and also disposed at opposite ends of the filtration stage are electrostatically charged fiber filters 42. These filters comprise a woven or unwoven fabric of synthetic fiber which has been charged with static electricity and is capable of collecting and absorbing particulate matter, for example, minute particles of smoke. Such filters are commonly referred to as electret filters. Alternatively, metal grids may be used as separators and the fiber filters used at the top and bottom of the filter stages.

Preferably, the layers of filtration material, including the electrostatically charged fabric filters, are disposed in the canister body 14 in the order illustrated in order to provide efficient removal of the noxious gases. In order to provide for efficient operation of the breathing system for a period of at least 10 minutes, it has been determined that a quantity of about 10 grams of activated carbon granules, about 55 grams of the zeolite dessicant, and about 80 grams of the carulite catalyst, together with at least one non-woven electrostatically charged filter is sufficient to reduce, during that period, the levels in the incoming air of carbon monoxide to 244 ppm, hydrogen chloride to 0 ppm, oxides of nitrogen to 12 ppm and hydrogen cyanide to 0.5 ppm. These reductions are achieved for air flow rates of approximately 40 liters per minute, i.e., approximately equivalent to the demand of an individual fast walking. The electrostatically charged filter also virtually removes all smoke-related particulates from the air. It will be appreciated that these filtration materials may be provided in different amounts than set forth above, may be provided in a different order, and have indefinite shelf lives, provided they are hermetically sealed within canister 10 as described hereinafter. Consequently, it is necessary that the adhesive metal foil seal 22 or plastic push-type seal 122 and connections between the body 14 and ring 16 provide effective seals a described hereinafter.

Hood 34 is formed of a clear, heat-resistant plastic material of such characteristics that it does not impede the passage of sound and thus allows two-way communication. The hood 34 has a first opening 44 sufficient to pass over an individual's head whereby hood 34 completely envelops the user's head. The opening 44 is provided with an elastic fabric or draw-type tie band 46, preferably colored, which, after hood 34 is drawn over the individual's head, forms a substantial seal about the individual's neck. The hood has a second opening 45 which is sealed to the canister during manufacture and is maintained in both storage and deployment of the system, as described hereinafter in detail.

Referring now to FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, mouthpiece 28 and plenum 26 define an air passage 48 from the filtration section 24 to the user's mouth. Plenum 26 and mouthpiece 28 are integrally formed, preferably of a flexible material, such as rubber. Plenum 26 includes a lower annular collar 50 having radially inwardly directed, axially spaced ribs 52 (FIG. 5) which mate with ribs 15 on canister body 14 when assembled. Plenum 26 tapers elliptically from annular collar 50 to form a generally elliptical mouthpiece section 54 in communication with plenum 26 through inhalation check valve 30. Mouthpiece 28 also includes an arcuate portion 56, optionally with rubber molded teeth clamps, about the elliptical opening, portion 56 being receivable within the user's mouth for breathing purposes. Adjacent the juncture of plenum 26 and elliptical section 54, there is provided an inwardly directed, integrally extending wall 58, the inner edges of which are received in a fitting 60 forming part of inhalation valve 30. Fitting 60 comprises an annulus 62, preferably formed of a plastic material, having a diametrically extending central portion 64 and a central opening 66. A flexible valve member 68 having an integral stem 70 and a disk-like flap valve 72 is provided, preferably formed of rubber. Stem 70 passes through central opening 66 and is secured by a shoulder butting the underside of element 60. Valve 72 is disposed in seat 74 of valve member 60. Consequently, the one-way inhalation valve enables air in plenum passage 48 to pass through the valve into mouthpiece 28 during inhalation in response to the negative pressure on the upper side of valve 30 in FIG. 5 but prevents exhalation through valve 30 by seating flap 72 in seat 74 in response to positive exhalation pressure on the upper side thereof.

A pair of identical exhalation valves 32 are disposed on opposite sides of the elliptical section 54 of mouthpiece 28. As illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, each valve comprises a generally rigid member 80 disposed in a flanged opening 82 in section 54. Member 80 comprises an annulus 84, a diametrically extending bridge section 86 and a central aperture 88. The movable valve member 90 has an integral stem 92 which fits through the opening 88 and a disk-like flap member 93 for disposition in valve seat 94. Consequently, exhalation pressure along the inside of valve member 90 causes the valve to open, while the pressure difference across the valve maintains the valve closed during inhalation.

A noseclip 33 is also pivotally secured to mouthpiece 28. Noseclip 33 comprises a wishbone configuration having legs 35, each terminating in nose pressure pads 37, and, at their apex, pivotally secured to mouthpiece 28 by passing through an apertured projection 39 carried thereby. Noseclip 33 is thus pivoted between a stored position against mouthpiece 28 (FIG. 4) and a use position swung away from mouthpiece 28 (FIG. 2).

When assembling canister 12, the filtration section 24 is disposed in canister body 12 by locating the fabric electrostatically charged filters in succession with the granular filtering materials disposed therebetween in the order indicated. A relatively rigid perforated plastic plate or coated metal grid 100 is interposed on top of the final fabric filter 42 underlying the shoulder in the first reduced portion of canister body 12 to maintain the filtration section 24 in body 12. The collar 50 of plenum 26 is disposed about the second stepped portion 13 of body 12, with ribs 52 engaging in grooves 15. The margin of hood 34 about its second opening 45 is disposed about collar 50 with mouthpiece 28 extending interiorly of the hood. A clamping ring 102 is disposed about this hood margin and collar 50 to clamp and seal the hood and collar about reduced diameter portion 13 of body 14. Intermediate ring 16 is then disposed on the canister body 12 with the tapered portions locking ring 16 to body 14. The rubber collar 50 is thus clamped and sealed between ring 16 and body 14 thereby, with hood 34, hermetically sealing the upper end of filtration section 24. The hood and mouthpiece are then folded within intermediate ring 16 and cover 18 is applied to the upper end of ring 16 whereby the filtration section, hood and mouthpiece are contained within canister 12 in a collapsed condition.

To use the device, for example, in the event of a fire requiring immediate exit from smoke-filled areas, cover 18 is removed from the canister body by rotating it in either direction. Once removed, the hood and mouthpiece automatically deploy through the open end of canister 12. That is, the hood 34 automatically deploys as a consequence of the "zig-zag" folds of the hood unfolding when the cap 18 is removed. The integral rubber mouthpiece and plenum extends from its folded position as a consequence of its elastic memory when the cap 18 is removed. The user also removes metal foil seal 22 by grasping the tab and peeling the foil away from the bottom of canister body 12 whereby the aperture or apertures 20 may serve as an air inlet to the filtering material and user. The user then draws the hood over his/her head through opening 44 with elasticized band or draw tape 46 forming a substantial, but not air-tight, seal about the individual's neck. By virtue of the projection of the mouthpiece from the open end of canister 12, the user may readily insert mouthpiece 28 into his/her mouth, and the nose pads 37 about his/her nose, with all breathing then being conducted through the user's mouth.

In FIG. 9B, it will be appreciated that upon inhalation, ambient air passes through the aperture or apertures 20 into the canister, through each of the layers of filtering material and through the electrostatically charged fabric. The filtered air is drawn into plenum 48 and inhalation check valve 30 opens to permit air to be inhaled by the user. Upon exhalation and with reference to FIG. 9C, the positive pressure of the exhaled air causes inhalation valve 30 to close and the exhalation valves 32 to open. Consequently, exhalation air flows from the mouthpiece through the exhalation valves into the interior of hood 34. By flowing exhalation air into the interior of the hood, a positive pressure is provided within hood 34, maintaining the body of the hood away from the individual's face, as well as preventing ambient air from entering the interior of the hood through any air leakage paths between the elasticized band or draw tape 46 and the individual's neck. In short, outflow of exhalation air from the hood through the leakage paths between band 46 and the user's neck prevents inflow of noxious or toxic gases through those same leakage paths into the interior of the hood. The foregoing-described breathing cycle is continually repeated, allowing the user to evacuate and escape from the area containing the toxic or noxious gases.

In one form of the invention, the filtering stage is comprised substantially entirely of activated carbon in conjunction with one or more electrostatically charged fiber filters at the top and/or bottom of the carbon. Additional electrostatic fiber filters may be provided as needed.

To provide a compact system and, simultaneously, a system which will provide at least, and preferably more than, 10 minutes of breathable filtered air for emergency situations, it has been found that the quantities of filtration material, identified above, will satisfactorily supply such breathable air. Those quantities, together with the configuration of the hood and mouthpiece, enable the canister to be relatively small in size. For example, a canister of that configuration may have an overall height of about 47/8 inches, an approximate diameter of about 25/8 inches, with a filter section length of about 31/8 inches. The length of the retracted plenum and mouthpiece may be approximately 11/4 inches and the extended length of the plenum and mouthpiece from the canister body would be 23/4 inches. Preferably, cap 18 and ring 16 are flanged to permit removal of the cap upon a 45° turn of the cap in either direction. Additionally, the canister, being formed of ABS plastic, has a heat resistance in excess of 300° F. The heat resistance of the plastic hood is 900° F. approximately.

Referring now to the embodiment hereof illustrated in FIGS. 10-12, like numerals are applied to like parts as in the first embodiment, with the numeral prefix "1" added thereto. Thus, the personal disposable emergency breathing system, generally designated 110, includes a canister 112, comprised of a canister body 113, a pair of intermediate securing rings 115 and 117 and a cover 118. Canister body 113 is open at its upper end and has an enlarged aperture 120 at its otherwise closed lower end. Aperture 120 is normally closed by a push-pull cylindrical closure 122 having a pull tab 123 whereby the closure 122 may be removed from aperture 120 when it is desired to actuate the breathing system. Closure 122 is preferably formed of a plastic material and lies flush with the bottom surface of canister 112. Pull tab 123 is formed to normally lie within a recess 127 (FIGS. 12 and 14) formed along the side of the canister body at its lower end. In this manner, the tab 123 and closure 122 within the confines of the canister body to prevent inadvertent removal of closure 122. As best illustrated in FIG. 10, there is also provided a plurality of circumferentially spaced, upstanding ribs 125 formed on the bottom of canister 112 to elevate the filtration section 124 from the bottom of canister 112. By elevating the filtration section, the entire area below the filtration section 124 is exposed to air upon removal of closure 122. The use of the larger opening and the elevated filtration section precludes clogging of the filtration section due to build-up of soot particles and increases the efficiency of the filtering action. The enlarged opening 120 also reduces the risk of blocking the filtration section as a consequence of soot and carbon build-up. The upper end of canister 112 has a plurality of vertically spaced, interrupted, downwardly tapered portions 129 for securing the lower intermediate securing ring 115 to the top of canister body 112.

Lower intermediate ring 115 has complementary vertically spaced, interrupted, upwardly tapered portions 131 for joining with portions 129. Ring 115 also has vertically spaced, interrupted, radially outwardly directed, downwardly tapered portions 133 on the opposite side of an intermediate band 135 which lies flush with the external surface of canister body 112 and upper ring 117 and cover 118 in assembly. Radially inwardly of portion 133 and at the upper end of intermediate ring 115, there is provided a plurality of radially outwardly directed ribs 137.

Upper intermediate ring 117 includes a plurality of vertically spaced, interrupted, upwardly tapered portions 139 for complementarily engaging portions 133 of the lower intermediate ring 115 in assembly. The upper end of upper intermediate ring 117 includes interrupted, radially outwardly projecting flanges for releasable connection with complementary flanges formed on the inside of cover 118 upon rotation of cover 118 in either rotary direction.

As best illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 12, the filtration section 124 includes first, second and third stages 136, 138 and 140 formed of materials as previously described with respect to stages 36, 38 and 40 in the prior embodiment. These stages are likewise separated one from the other by electrostatically charged fiber filters 142, similar to filters 42 of the prior embodiment. As in the prior embodiment, metal grids may also be employed as separators.

In this embodiment, and also in the previous embodiment, an additional fourth and final stage 141 may comprise lithium peroxide or similar material for converting carbon dioxide to oxygen. The uppermost layer of the filtration section 124 may include a grid 143 of coated Teflon™ or copper wire retaining mesh and a similar grid may be provided at the bottom of the filtration section to afford structural rigidity thereto.

As in the previous embodiment, hood 134 has an opening 144 for passing the hood over the individual's head. The hood 134 envelops the mouthpiece 128 and plenum 126 which define the air passage 148 from the filtration section 124 to the user's mouth. In this embodiment, however, an insert 151, preferably formed of a hard plastic material, is provided to form a rigid, non-flexible seat for the intake and exhalation valves 130 and 132, respectively. The generally elliptical mouthpiece section 154 will stretch over the insert 151. The inhalation and exhalation valves 130 and 132 may be formed similarly as the corresponding valves of the prior embodiment and further description thereof is not believed necessary. In this embodiment, however, one of the exhaust valves 132 is provided with an enlarged annular flange 153 having an internal groove 155. A whistle 157 (FIG. 10) having a radially projecting rib 159 seats in the enlarged annular flange 153. The whistle is employed to locate the user of the breathing system hereof in the event the user is escaping in dense smoke or the like and cannot be readily located by rescuers. Preferably, the whistle is of a type which, during normal breathing, produces only a very low intensity whistle. However, the user may exhale rapidly and sharply to produce a high pitch whistle to assist rescuers or others in locating the user. The whistle 157 may well become an integral part of 141 by sonic welding.

The embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 10-12 facilitates manufacture and assembly of the breathing system. Particularly, the employment of an intermediate securing ring enables the independent assembly of the plenum section in conjunction with the two intermediate rings and cover and the filtration section in conjunction with the canister body 112. Those sections may then be assembled by bringing the lower portion of the lower intermediate ring 135 into securement with the upper end of the canister body 112, and particularly by engaging the tapered portions 131 and 129, respectively. It will be appreciated that a seal may be employed at that juncture to ensure air tightness, although the tapered portions are sufficient. Thus, it will be appreciated that, in this second embodiment, the filtration section may be initially disposed in the canister body 112. Independently, the plenum section with the intake and exhaust valves and hood may be assembled with the intermediate rings and the cover. More specifically, the annular collar 50 may be disposed about ribs 137 and the sealing ring applied. The upper intermediate ring 117 may then be applied about the sealing ring and collar 50 and secured to the lower intermediate ring 115 by the cooperation of the tapered portions 133 and 139. The manifold and hood may then be disposed within the intermediate rings and the cover 118 applied about the top of intermediate ring 117. Deployment of the breathing system of this second embodiment is similar to that described above in connection with the first embodiment and further description thereof is not believed necessary.

Referring now to FIG. 13A and 13B, there are illustrated two additional preferred embodiments of the invention for effecting the connection between the parts of the canister body and wherein like references and wherein like reference numerals are applied to like parts followed by the letter suffixes "a" and "b", respectively. In FIG. 13A, the internal surface of intermediate ring 117a may be provided with a radially inwardly projecting annular projection 160, while the external surface of securing ring 115a may be provided with a complementary annular groove 162 extending circumferentially about ring 115a. This complementary projection and groove arrangement thus locates the parts during the course of manufacture and, after they are properly located, the parts may be ultrasonically welded to one another. The canister body 112a may likewise be secured to the lower intermediate securing ring 115a in a similar manner. For example, the internal surface of canister body 112a may be provided with an annular projection and the external surface of the intermediate ring 115a may be provided with a complementary groove. Thus, when these parts are located, the parts may be ultrasonically welded one to the other. Of course, the projections and grooves may be reversed with ring 115a carrying radially outward projections and the other parts 117a and 112a carrying the grooves.

In FIG. 13B, there is illustrated another form of connection for the parts of the canister. In this form, the intermediate ring 117b and the upper end of canister body 112b may be smooth bore along their interior surfaces. Similarly, the intermediate ring 115b may be smooth bore along its outer upper and lower connecting surfaces. By forming the smooth bores to tolerances for press-fits, a very tight fit may be provided during the manufacturing process. The parts may be subsequently ultrasonically welded one to the other.

Accordingly, the objects of the present invention are clearly met by the provision of the aforedescribed low-cost, compact, integrated hood, mouthpiece, filtration section and canister arrangement whereby an effective personal emergency breathing system for periods of time of 10 minutes or longer for emergency evacuation of smoke or toxic gas-filled areas is provided.

While the invention has been described in connection with what is presently considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiment, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the disclosed embodiment, but on the contrary, is intended to cover various modifications and equivalent arrangements included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.128/201.28, 128/201.26, 128/201.25
Clasificación internacionalA62B19/02, A62B17/04, A62B18/02
Clasificación cooperativaA62B17/04, A62B19/02
Clasificación europeaA62B17/04, A62B19/02
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
23 Abr 2012ASAssignment
Owner name: ESSEX INDUSTRIES, INC., MISSOURI
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:ESSEX P.B. & R. CORP.;REEL/FRAME:028090/0801
Effective date: 20111220
17 Ago 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: ESSEX P.B. & R. CORP., MISSOURI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BROOKDALE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEMS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019704/0706
Effective date: 20070814
28 Jul 2004FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
28 Nov 2000SULPSurcharge for late payment
Year of fee payment: 7
28 Nov 2000FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
12 Sep 2000REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
5 Ago 1996FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
5 Jun 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: BROOKDALE INTERNATIONAL SYSEMS INC.,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SWANN, LINSEY J.;REEL/FRAME:005727/0617
Effective date: 19910603