Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUS5690269 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Número de solicitudUS 08/640,589
Fecha de publicación25 Nov 1997
Fecha de presentación1 May 1996
Fecha de prioridad20 Abr 1993
TarifaPagadas
También publicado comoUS5540375
Número de publicación08640589, 640589, US 5690269 A, US 5690269A, US-A-5690269, US5690269 A, US5690269A
InventoresHenry Bolanos, Charles R. Sherts, Thomas A. Pelletier
Cesionario originalUnited States Surgical Corporation
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Endoscopic stapler
US 5690269 A
Resumen
An endoscopic or laparoscopic surgical instrument for applying fasteners to bodily tissue is disclosed. The instrument includes a handle assembly, an endoscopic portion and a jaw portion. The instrument is configured and dimensioned to be insertable through a cannula, and is useful for applying a purse string to bodily tissue.
Imágenes(11)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones(6)
What is claimed is:
1. A surgical instrument comprising:
a handle portion having proximal and distal end portions and a longitudinal axis;
a pair of jaws extending generally longitudinally from the distal end portion, at least one of the jaws being movable relative to the longitudinal axis defined by the handle portion; and
a plurality of fasteners disposed within at least one of said pair of jaws, wherein each fastener has a pair of legs joined by a backspan, the distal-most fastener backspan being oriented substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the handle portion and wherein each fastener is ejected in a direction generally towards said longitudinal axis when the instrument is fired.
2. The instrument of claim 1, wherein each jaw is movable between an open position and a closed position and wherein both jaws are in substantial parallel alignment with the longitudinal axis of the handle portion when in the closed position.
3. The instrument of claim 2, wherein each fastener has a pair of legs joined by a backspan and the fastener legs are generally oriented toward the longitudinal axis when the jaws are in the closed position.
4. The instrument of claim 1, further comprising anvilless means for deforming the fastener legs.
5. The instrument of claim 1, further comprising means for ejecting the fasteners from each jaw.
6. The instrument of claim 1, further comprising at least one cam member disposed in each jaw for sequentially ejecting the fasteners from each jaw.
Descripción

This is a continuation of U.S. Serial application Ser. No. 08/415,776 filed Mar. 31, 1995 now U.S. Pat. No. 5,540,375 which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 08/049,881 filed Apr. 20, 1993 now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to surgical staplers and, more particularly to surgical staplers for use in endoscopic and laparoscopic procedures.

2. Discussion of the Prior Art

Laparoscopic and endoscopic surgical procedures are minimally invasive procedures in which operations are carried out within the body by means of elongated instruments inserted through small entrance openings in the body. The initial opening in the body tissue to allow passage of the endoscopic or laparoscopic instruments to the interior of the body may be a natural passageway of the body, or it can be created by a tissue piercing instrument such as a trocar. With the aid of a cannula assembly inserted into the opening, laparoscopic or endoscopic instrumentation may then be used to perform desired surgical procedures.

Laparoscopic and endoscopic surgical procedures generally require that any instrumentation inserted in the body be sealed, i.e. provisions must be made to ensure that gases do not enter or exit the body through the instrument or the entrance incision so that the surgical region of the body, e.g. the peritoneum, may be insufflated. Mechanical actuation of such instruments is for the most part constrained to the movement of the various components along a longitudinal axis with means provided to convert longitudinal movement to lateral movement where necessary. Because the endoscopic or laparoscopic tubes, instrumentation, and any required punctures or incisions are relatively narrow, endoscopic or laparoscopic surgery is less invasive and causes much less trauma to the patient as compared to procedures in which the surgeon is required to cut open large areas of body tissue.

Surgical fasteners or staples are often used to join body tissue during laparoscopic and endoscopic procedures. Such fasteners can have a pair of legs joined by a backspan and are typically set into the body by means of an elongated instrument which crimps the fastener legs to secure the fastener and tissue.

Various types of stapling instruments have been known for fixing staples to body tissue. Generally, the staples have been applied by using instruments having an anvil and an ejector mechanism for driving the legs of a staple through the tissue and against the anvil for deforming the legs into a "B" shape or the like. An example of such a stapler having an anvil is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,665,916. An example of a surgical stapler having an anvil and adapted for endoscopic use is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,040,715. Although these and other various types of instruments are useful for driving the legs of the staple through tissue, there are times when it is not desirable, necessary or practical to drive the legs of the staple through the body tissue in order to affix a staple. For example, when applying a purse string to tissue, as in an end to end anastomosis procedure, it is not desirable or necessary to staple through tissue, but to affix the staples to the tissue.

In cases where a purse string is to be applied to a tubular section of tissue, known stapling instruments have been rather cumbersome and complex in order to provide an anvil against which the staples can be deformed. See, for example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,749,114 and 4,773,420. An anvilless surgical stapler for use in open surgery and a method of affixing a staple to tissue without completely piercing the tissue is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,821,939 and is incorporated herein by reference. While this anvilless stapler has found success in applying purse strings in open surgery, such a stapler is not properly configured and dimensioned to be used in endoscopic or laparoscopic procedures.

Accordingly, there is a need for an endoscopic surgical stapler adapted for use in confined areas. There is also a need for an anvilless surgical stapler capable of endoscopically applying staples to body tissue. There is also a need for an endoscopic surgical stapler for applying a purse string to body tissue. Additionally, there is a need for an endoscopic surgical stapling instrument capable of applying a purse string to body tissue, wherein the staples secure the string element to body tissue without piercing the tissue with the legs of the staples.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a novel anvilless endoscopic or laparoscopic surgical instrument having an endoscopic portion with proximal and distal end portions. In one embodiment, the instrument has a pair of jaws positioned at the distal end portion, each adapted to carry a fastener cartridge. The fastener cartridge has a tissue contacting surface and a plurality of fasteners slidably disposed therein. Both the endoscopic portion and the jaws are adapted to be insertable into a cannula. Each fastener has a pair of deformable legs joined by a backspan and are disposed within and ejected from the cartridge in a manner substantially similar to that disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,821,939 and 5,158,567. Means for ejecting the fasteners may include at least one fastener firing cam member for contacting pushers disposed within the cartridge, the pushers being designed to contact and eject the fasteners from the cartridge. Means remote from the distal portion of the endoscopic instrument are adapted to cause the firing cam member to be drawn across the pusher members. This operation may be accomplished, for example, by having a slidable member disposed at the proximal end of the instrument which is attached to the cam member by means of a wire, a rod, or the like.

The purse string suture portion can be positioned adjacent the jaws and/or the tissue contacting surface of the fastener cartridge such that upon ejection of the fasteners, the suture will be held between the fastener backspans and tissue. A handle assembly having a stationary handle and a movable handle is also provided to open and close the fastener jaws.

In operation, a cannula is inserted into the abdominal cavity. The surgical instrument of the present invention is inserted through the cannula with the jaws in a substantially closed position. After insertion, the movable handle is moved away from the stationary handle thereby causing the jaws at the distal end of the instrument to open. The organ or tissue to which the purse string is to be applied is then oriented between the jaws. The movable handle is then brought into approximation with the stationary handle to cause the jaws to close about the organ or tissue. The purse string may then be applied by causing the fasteners to be ejected from the jaws, such as by causing a cam member to sequentially eject the fasteners from the cartridge, which thereby secures the suture in a purse string configuration about the organ or tissue. After firing, the jaws may then be opened to release the tissue or organ by moving the movable handle away from the stationary handle. After re-closing the jaws, the instrument may be withdrawn from the cannula. Finally, the purse string may be tightened about the organ or tissue by manipulating the suture as desired.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing objects and other features of the invention will become more readily apparent and may be understood by referring to the following detailed description of illustrative embodiments of the endoscopic or laparoscopic surgical apparatus for applying a purse string, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 illustrates an exploded view of the handle assembly of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 illustrates an exploded view of the endoscopic and distal portions assembly of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 illustrates a cut away plan view showing the jaws of FIG. 1 in an articulated position.

FIG. 5 illustrates a sectional view taken along lines 5--5 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 illustrates a side elevation cut away of the jaws of FIG. 1 in an open position.

FIG. 7 illustrates the jaws of FIG. 6 in a closed position.

FIG. 8 illustrates a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9 illustrates a further alternative embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10 illustrates the embodiment shown in FIG. 9 with the handle down and jaws closed.

FIG. 11 illustrates the instrument of FIG. 10 after actuation of the fastener firing mechanism.

FIG. 12 illustrates a cut away plan view showing jaw articulation via a push rod.

FIG. 13 illustrates a sectional view taken along lines 13--13 of FIG. 12.

FIG. 14 illustrates a tubular section of tissue having a purse string applied thereto by the instrument of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now in specific detail to the drawings, in which like reference numerals identify similar or identical elements, FIG. 1 illustrates a first embodiment of the endoscopic or laparoscopic surgical apparatus 10 for applying surgical fasteners. Apparatus 10 comprises endoscopic portion 14, handle assembly 12 and fastener applying assembly 20. Endoscopic portion 14 and assembly 20 are configured and dimensioned to be inserted into a cannula. Handle assembly 12 is positioned at the proximal end of endoscopic portion 14 and is shown with stationary handle 30 and movable handle 60 in an open position. Handle assembly 12 functions to open and close assembly 20, which is positioned at the distal end of endoscopic portion 14. As shown by arrows A and B, and as will be described in further detail below, endoscopic portion 14 can be articulated at articulation joint 16 by manipulating articulation knob 90. Proximal movement of knob 90 will cause the distal end of endoscopic portion 14 and assembly 20, shown in phantom, to deflect at joint 16 away from the instrument's central axis X--X. Arrows C and D depict rotational movement of the endoscopic and distal portions of instrument 10 which can be achieved by rotating knob 76.

Turning to handle assembly 12 with reference to FIG. 2, stationary handle housing 30 is shown in two halves. Halves 30 can be secured together by mating protrusions 32a with corresponding recesses 32b. When joined, the stationary housing defines recess 39 wherein proximal plate 38 is longitudinally movable. Plate 38 includes firing slot 40, pin opening 46, distal slot 42 and center rod opening 74. Firing slot 40 permits tongue 41 of firing button 36 to be slidably received therein. Tongue 41 is further connected to firing wires 37, the purpose of which will be described in greater detail below.

Link 48 serves to connect the proximal end of movable handle 60 with plate 38. Plate pin 44 is insertable through pin opening 46 in plate 38 and lower pin opening 50 in link 48. Movable handle pin 54 is insertable through upper pin opening 52 in link 48 and pin opening 56 in movable handle link connector plate 58. The distal end of movable handle 60 is pivotally secured to rear cover tube 68 by handle pivot pin 66. Handle pivot pin 66 passes through pivot pin openings 64 in pivot plates 62 and pin openings 69 in rear cover tube 68. The distal end of plate 38 is insertable into rear cover tube 68 and is slidable therein by means of slot 42 through which pin 66 passes. The proximal end of endoscopic portion 14 is rotatably secured to rear cover tube 68 and inner rod 70 (shown in phantom) of endoscopic portion 14 has axial groove 72 which is insertable into slot 74 of plate 38. When assembled, inner rod 70 will be disposed distal of pin 66.

In operation, when movable handle 60 is urged towards stationary handle 30, the distal end of movable handle 60 pivots about pin 66, causing link 48 to urge plate 38 in a distal direction. When closed, movable handle 60 remains adjacent stationary handle 30 due to over centering of pin 54. Distal movement of plate 38, causes inner rod 70 to move distally as well. Spring 78, disposed adjacent plate 38 is secured to stationary handle protrusion 81 (see FIG. 9) by distal spring hook 80 and secured to cam pin 44 by proximal spring hook 82. Spring 78 serves to provide resistance to the closing of the movable handle and to facilitate the opening of the movable handle.

Turning to the endoscopic and distal portions of the surgical device of the present invention, with reference to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the endoscopic portion includes cover tube 102 (shown in two halves), inner rod 70, firing wires 37, articulation rod 96, and optional inner rod sheath 200. Proximal rotation knob 76 has an irregular outer surface to facilitate grasping and serves to allow the surgeon to rotate cover tube 102. Rotation knob 76 has inner circular disks 106 and 108 which define circular channel 110. Flange 112 of cover tube 68 is received within channel 110 in a manner which permits cover tube 102 to rotate with respect to rear cover tube 68 and, therefore, handle assembly 12.

The articulating mechanism includes articulating knob 90, rod 96 and articulating joint 16. Rod 96 has distal end 100 and proximal hook 98. Distal end 100 of articulating rod 96 is secured to articulating portion 116 by pin 101. The proximal end of rod 96 terminates in hook 98 which passes through slot 104 of lower tube 102 and is received within recess 94 of articulating knob 90. Articulating knob 90 is assembled about tube 102 by joining protrusions 91 and corresponding recesses 92. Hook 98, secured to the articulating knob at recess 94 and being slidable within slot 104 of tube 102, permits movement of the articulating knob along longitudinal axis X--X of endoscopic portion 14. Articulating portion 116 of endoscopic portion 14 is joined to cover tube 102 at joint 16. Opposing pins 120 are received within pin openings 118 of articulating portion 116 and pin openings 119 formed in articulating joint members 114. By moving articulating knob 90 longitudinally, articulating rod 96 is also moved longitudinally, thereby causing articulating portion 116 to pivot about pins 120 of articulation joint 16 in a direction away from the longitudinal axis X--X of endoscopic portion 14.

With reference to FIGS. 3, 6 and 7, fastener carrying cartridges 125a and 125b are disposed within jaws 124a and 124b and have tissue contacting surfaces 127a and 127b. Jaws 124 can be adapted to slidably receive cartridges 125 so as to provide means for reloading the instrument for multiple firings. Alternatively, the fasteners can be disposed directly into the jaws without the use of cartridges. Jaws 124 are secured to articulating portion 116 by pin 122. Pin 122 is received through pin openings 121 of articulating portion 116, pin openings 132a and 132b of jaw cam plates 128a and 128b and through pin opening 140 of jaw spacer 136. Jaw cam pin 134 passes through jaw cam slots 130a and 130b of jaw cam plates 128a and 128b, spacer slot 138 of jaw spacer 136 and pin opening 144 of articulating jaw cam plate 142. The proximal end of jaw cam plate 142 is secured to center rod 70 at recess 71 by pin 73 which passes through plate 142 at pin opening 75. Cam plate 142 is made of a flexible material to permit articulation and enable manipulation of the jaw camming mechanisms while the instrument is articulated.

Firing wires 37 are also disposed in endoscopic portion 14 and have firing cams 146a and 146b which are disposed within jaws 124a and 124b, respectively. Suture 300 is positioned adjacent tissue contacting surfaces 127 and jaws 124 (see FIGS. 6 and 7). Operation of the firing mechanism will be discussed in greater detail below. Optionally, inner rod sheath 200 can be provided to facilitate an alternate method of rotating the distal end of the instrument (see discussion of FIGS. 12 and 13 below).

Turning to the jaw manipulation mechanism of the present invention, with reference to FIGS. 3, 4, 6 and 7, when the jaws are in the open position, jaw pin 134 is disposed at the distal end of slots 130a and 130b. In this position, inner rod 70 is in a forward or distal position and movable handle 60 is in its open position. By closing the handle assembly, i.e. moving movable handle 60 toward stationary handle 30, inner rod 70 and jaw cam pin 134 are drawn in a proximal direction. When jaw cam pin 134 travels through jaw cam slots 130a and 130b, jaws 124a and 124b are caused to pivot about jaw pin 122 and are urged towards each other. When the instrument is not articulated, the jaws will move towards the longitudinal axis X--X of the instrument. If the instrument is articulated, the jaws will move towards articulated jaw axis X'--X'. As shown in FIG. 7, when the jaws are fully closed, jaw stops 148a, 148b, 149a and 149b are in contact and tissue contacting surfaces 127 of cartridges 125 are in substantial parallel alignment.

An alternative method for closing the jaws is illustrated in FIG. 9. In this embodiment, articulating cam plate 190 has pin 192 which travels in slot 198 of jaw 204. Jaw 206 has pin 196 which is configured to travel along slot 194 of cam plate 190. When movable handle 60 is urged towards stationary handle 30, inner rod 70 is drawn in a distal direction, causing cam plate 190 to move distally as well. As plate 190 moves distally, pin 192 causes jaw 204 to move towards jaw 206 and slot 194 causes pin 196 on jaw 206 to move jaw 206 towards jaw 204. When handle 60 is in a fully closed position, jaws 206 and 204 will have moved into substantial parallel alignment and be ready for firing.

Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, articulation is achieved by pulling articulating knob 90 in a proximal direction (arrow H). This proximal movement causes articulating rod 96 to pull on articulating portion 116 at pin 101. When articulated, axis X'--X' of jaws 124 and articulated portion 116 moves away from axis X--X of the non articulating endoscopic portion of the instrument. At any jaw position the distal end of the instrument can be articulated and the jaws will open and close towards longitudinal jaw axis X'--X' of the instrument.

An alternative embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 8, 12 and 13. In this embodiment, rotation knob 150 causes the rotation of endoscopic articulation portion 186 and jaws 124, illustrated by arrows E and F, respectively, relative to endoscopic portions 184 and 185. This embodiment includes center rod cover sheath 200 (see FIG. 3) which provides means to translate rotation movement from knob 150 to the distal portion of the instrument. Referring to FIGS. 8 and 13, rotation of knob 150 causes sheath 200 to rotate, further causing distal articulating portion 186 and jaws 124 to rotate. Articulating portions 185 and 186 are rotatable with respect to each other by means of rotation joint 202. Both jaw cam pin 134 and jaw pivot pin 122 are located in rotatable articulation section 186. With sheath 200 secured to the proximal end of section 186, rotational movement bypasses the entire endoscopic portion proximal of joint 202. FIGS. 12 and 13 also show an alternative method of articulation. Here, distal movement of articulating knob 90 causes articulation rod 96 to push against portion 185, causing the distal end of the instrument to deflect away from axis X--X.

The firing mechanism of the present invention is best illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11. Once the movable handle 60 and stationary handle 30 are brought in the closed position, the firing mechanism can be actuated. Firing button 36 can be drawn in a proximal direction (arrow G) thereby causing firing wires 37 and attached staple pusher cams 146 to be drawn proximally. Proximal movement of cams 146 causes staple pushers 208 to sequentially fire staples 210 from the jaws. Providing separate means for firing staples 210 from each jaw, such as a firing button secured to each firing wire (not shown), is considered within the scope of the invention.

Staples 210 are slidably mounted within the jaws or jaw cartridges and deformed without the use of an anvil upon ejection therefrom as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,821,939, which is incorporated herein by reference. Staples 210 are aligned such that their backspans are in substantial perpendicular alignment to the longitudinal axis X--X of the instrument when in the unarticulated position. As cams 146 are drawn across pushers 208, staples 210 are ejected towards axis X--X. It will be appreciated that when the instrument is in an articulated position, the staple backspans are in substantial perpendicular alignment to longitudinal axis X'--X' of the articulated jaws and are capable of being fired toward that longitudinal axis while articulated.

Referring to FIGS. 3, 6, 7 and 13, Suture 300 has two end portions, a body portion and is partially disposed adjacent tissue contacting surfaces 127 of fastener cartridges 125. Suture 300 is held in place by means of jaw stops 148 and 149 in a manner similar to that disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,821,939. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, suture 300 loops back along jaws 124 with the two end portions terminating proximal of jaws 124. When applied, suture 300 is secured between the backspans of fasteners 210 (See FIGS. 10 and 11) and the tissue or organ to which the fasteners are applied (See FIG. 14). Any suture placement which allows the suture to be secured to body tissue by at least one fastener is considered to be within the scope of the present invention.

In operation, the instrument of the present invention is inserted through cannula with the handles and jaws in the closed position. Once within the abdominal cavity, movable handle 60 may be moved away from stationary handle 30, aided by spring 78, thereby causing center rod 70 to move in a distal direction, causing the jaws to open. Using the articulating and rotating mechanisms if desired, the organ or tissue to which the purse string is to be applied will be positioned between the jaws. The jaws may then be closed by bringing movable handle 60 towards stationary handle 30. With the tissue or organ disposed adjacent tissue contacting surfaces 125, the surgeon may then slide firing button 36 proximally to eject the staples into the tissue, thereby securing the suture. After firing, the surgeon will then open the handles and jaws as previously described to release the organ or tissue. Finally, by closing the handles and jaws, the surgeon may remove the instrument through the cannula.

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to the preferred embodiments, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various modifications in form and detail may be made therein without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention. For example, various elements, such as the jaw closing mechanism, the stapling firing mechanism and the articulation mechanism, can be modified while still performing the same or similar function. Accordingly, such modifications are to be considered within the scope of the invention as defined by the claims.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US4122989 *18 Nov 197631 Oct 1978Kapitanov Nikolai NInstrument for suturing with metal staples
US4127227 *8 Oct 197628 Nov 1978United States Surgical CorporationWide fascia staple cartridge
US4206863 *26 Mar 197910 Jun 1980Savino Dominick JStaple and anviless stapling apparatus therefor
US4232810 *10 Oct 197811 Nov 1980Carlson Stapler And Shippers Supply, Inc.String stapler
US4305539 *15 Ene 198015 Dic 1981Korolkov Ivan ASurgical suturing instrument for application of a staple suture
US4345600 *4 Ago 198024 Ago 1982Senco Products, Inc.Purse-stringer
US4520817 *8 Mar 19824 Jun 1985United States Surgical CorporationSurgical instruments
US4665916 *9 Ago 198519 May 1987United States Surgical CorporationSurgical stapler apparatus
US4749114 *10 Nov 19867 Jun 1988United States Surgical CorporationPurse string applicator and method of affixing a purse string
US4773420 *22 Jun 198727 Sep 1988U.S. Surgical CorporationPurse string applicator
US4821939 *2 Sep 198718 Abr 1989United States Surgical CorporationStaple cartridge and an anvilless surgical stapler
US4978049 *26 May 198918 Dic 1990United States Surgical CorporationThree staple drive member
US5030226 *27 Dic 19909 Jul 1991United States Surgical CorporationSurgical clip applicator
US5040715 *26 May 198920 Ago 1991United States Surgical CorporationApparatus and method for placing staples in laparoscopic or endoscopic procedures
US5059201 *22 Ene 199122 Oct 1991Asnis Stanley ESuture threading, stitching and wrapping device for use in open and closed surgical procedures
US5071430 *13 Nov 198910 Dic 1991United States Surgical CorporationDriving surgical fasteners
US5084057 *30 May 199028 Ene 1992United States Surgical CorporationApparatus and method for applying surgical clips in laparoscopic or endoscopic procedures
US5100420 *18 Jul 198931 Mar 1992United States Surgical CorporationApparatus and method for applying surgical clips in laparoscopic or endoscopic procedures
US5116349 *23 May 199026 May 1992United States Surgical CorporationSurgical fastener apparatus
US5158567 *23 May 199127 Oct 1992United States Surgical CorporationOne-piece surgical staple
US5188636 *7 May 199223 Feb 1993Ethicon, Inc.Purse string suture instrument
US5242457 *8 May 19927 Sep 1993Ethicon, Inc.Surgical instrument and staples for applying purse string sutures
US5364003 *5 May 199315 Nov 1994Ethicon Endo-SurgeryStaple cartridge for a surgical stapler
US5425737 *9 Jul 199320 Jun 1995American Cyanamid Co.Surgical purse string suturing instrument and method
US5540375 *31 Mar 199530 Jul 1996United States Surgical CorporationSurgical instrument
USRE28932 *8 May 197517 Ago 1976United States Surgical CorporationSurgical stapling instrument
EP0327325A1 *1 Feb 19899 Ago 1989Farmagen A/SAnastomotic device
EP0541987A1 *16 Oct 199219 May 1993United States Surgical CorporationApparatus for applying surgical staples to attach an object to body tissue
GB885898A * Título no disponible
SU728848A1 * Título no disponible
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US6032849 *20 Jul 19987 Mar 2000United States SurgicalSurgical stapler
US666907310 Dic 200130 Dic 2003United States Surgical CorporationSurgical stapling apparatus
US675533831 May 200229 Jun 2004Cerebral Vascular Applications, Inc.Medical instrument
US683017429 Ago 200114 Dic 2004Cerebral Vascular Applications, Inc.Medical instrument
US69531395 Nov 200411 Oct 2005United States Surgical CorporationSurgical stapling apparatus
US6986451 *26 Jul 200017 Ene 2006United States Surgical CorporationSurgical stapler
US700081820 May 200321 Feb 2006Ethicon, Endo-Surger, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument having separate distinct closing and firing systems
US714392320 May 20035 Dic 2006Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument having a firing lockout for an unclosed anvil
US7182775 *27 Feb 200327 Feb 2007Microline Pentax, Inc.Super atraumatic grasper apparatus
US727856325 Abr 20069 Oct 2007Green David TSurgical instrument for progressively stapling and incising tissue
US730310719 Jul 20064 Dic 2007United States Surgical CorporationSurgical stapling apparatus
US743471621 Dic 200614 Oct 2008Tyco Healthcare Group LpStaple driver for articulating surgical stapler
US743471711 Ene 200714 Oct 2008Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Apparatus for closing a curved anvil of a surgical stapling device
US7455208 *29 Sep 200525 Nov 2008Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with articulating shaft with rigid firing bar supports
US750347417 Nov 200417 Mar 2009Cerebral Vascular Applications, Inc.Medical instrument
US754373024 Jun 20089 Jun 2009Tyco Healthcare Group LpSegmented drive member for surgical instruments
US755945018 Feb 200514 Jul 2009Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument incorporating a fluid transfer controlled articulation mechanism
US755945223 Jun 200514 Jul 2009Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument having fluid actuated opposing jaws
US756599315 Oct 200728 Jul 2009Milliman Keith LSurgical stapling apparatus
US759770627 Jul 20046 Oct 2009Medtronic Anqiolink, Inc.Advanced wound site management systems and methods
US76006635 Jul 200713 Oct 2009Green David TApparatus for stapling and incising tissue
US7604150 *22 Jun 200720 Oct 2009Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with an anti-back up mechanism
US7624903 *8 Ene 20041 Dic 2009Green David TApparatus for applying surgical fastners to body tissue
US76410958 Oct 20085 Ene 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpStaple driver for articulating surgical stapler
US7651017 *23 Nov 200526 Ene 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler with a bendable end effector
US76544317 Abr 20052 Feb 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with guided laterally moving articulation member
US7721935 *3 Oct 200625 May 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling device
US775861029 Jun 200420 Jul 2010Medtronic Angiolink, Inc.Advanced wound site management systems and methods
US776620913 Feb 20083 Ago 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with improved firing trigger arrangement
US778005419 Jul 200524 Ago 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with laterally moved shaft actuator coupled to pivoting articulation joint
US7784662 *7 Abr 200531 Ago 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with articulating shaft with single pivot closure and double pivot frame ground
US78192994 Jun 200726 Oct 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument having a common trigger for actuating an end effector closing system and a staple firing system
US782818628 Sep 20059 Nov 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument incorporating a fluid transfer controlled articulation bladder and method of manufacture
US78324084 Jun 200716 Nov 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument having a directional switching mechanism
US783708018 Sep 200823 Nov 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with device for indicating when the instrument has cut through tissue
US790142330 Nov 20078 Mar 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Folded ultrasonic end effectors with increased active length
US79053804 Jun 200715 Mar 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument having a multiple rate directional switching mechanism
US792206121 May 200812 Abr 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with automatically reconfigurable articulating end effector
US792274225 Mar 200812 Abr 2011Hillstead Richard AMedical instrument
US8033442 *28 Nov 200711 Oct 2011Tyco Heathcare Group LpTool assembly for a surgical stapling device
US804332818 Jun 200425 Oct 2011Richard A. Hillstead, Inc.Medical instrument
US805749830 Nov 200715 Nov 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic surgical instrument blades
US805877115 Jul 200915 Nov 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic device for cutting and coagulating with stepped output
US80700333 Jun 20106 Dic 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus
US808311830 Jun 200927 Dic 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus
US808312018 Sep 200827 Dic 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.End effector for use with a surgical cutting and stapling instrument
US808756310 Jun 20113 Ene 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus
US813671210 Dic 200920 Mar 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler with discrete staple height adjustment and tactile feedback
US814246122 Mar 200727 Mar 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instruments
US81825027 Feb 201122 May 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Folded ultrasonic end effectors with increased active length
US821041123 Sep 20083 Jul 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motor-driven surgical cutting instrument
US821041631 Oct 20113 Jul 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus
US822667522 Mar 200724 Jul 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instruments
US823601926 Mar 20107 Ago 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic surgical instrument and cartilage and bone shaping blades therefor
US8240538 *27 May 201014 Ago 2012Cardica, Inc.True multi-fire surgical stapler with two-sided staple deployment
US825201231 Jul 200728 Ago 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic surgical instrument with modulator
US825202116 Nov 200728 Ago 2012Microline Surgical, Inc.Fenestrated super atraumatic grasper apparatus
US825330311 Nov 201128 Ago 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic device for cutting and coagulating with stepped output
US825665614 Nov 20114 Sep 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus
US825737727 Jul 20074 Sep 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Multiple end effectors ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8262676 *18 Sep 200911 Sep 2012Usgi Medical, Inc.Apparatus and methods for forming gastrointestinal tissue approximations
US82921527 Jun 201223 Oct 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus
US83087577 Mar 201113 Nov 2012Richard A. Hillstead, Inc.Hydraulically actuated robotic medical instrument
US831940024 Jun 200927 Nov 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US833463524 Jun 200918 Dic 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Transducer arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US834237714 Ago 20121 Ene 2013Covidien LpSurgical stapling apparatus
US834459624 Jun 20091 Ene 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Transducer arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US834896727 Jul 20078 Ene 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US837210220 Abr 201212 Feb 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Folded ultrasonic end effectors with increased active length
US838278211 Feb 201026 Feb 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic surgical instruments with partially rotating blade and fixed pad arrangement
US843089831 Jul 200730 Abr 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8490851 *8 Ene 200923 Jul 2013Covidien LpSurgical stapling apparatus
US855615111 Sep 200715 Oct 2013Covidien LpArticulating joint for surgical instruments
US8647362 *10 Oct 200311 Feb 2014Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Device with deflectable distal end and related methods of use
US864736312 Sep 201211 Feb 2014Richard A. Hillstead, Inc.Robotically controlled hydraulic end effector system
US86521551 Ago 201118 Feb 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instruments
US20070251976 *26 Jun 20071 Nov 2007Medigus Ltd.Stapler for endoscopes
US20100010457 *18 Sep 200914 Ene 2010Usgi Medical, Inc.Apparatus and methods for forming gastrointestinal tissue approximations
CN101011276B31 Ene 200728 Jul 2010伊西康内外科公司Surgical fastener and cutter with single cable actuator
DE102012007648A1 *18 Abr 201224 Oct 2013Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. KgMikroinvasives medizinisches Instrument
EP1813211A2 *30 Ene 20071 Ago 2007Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical fastener and cutter with cable actuator
EP2036505A18 Sep 200818 Mar 2009Tyco Healthcare Group LPArticulating joint for surgical instruments
EP2233080A1 *26 Mar 201029 Sep 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LPSoft tissue graft preparation devices and methods
WO2005037358A1 *8 Oct 200428 Abr 2005Scimed Life Systems IncDevice with deflectable distal end and related methods of use
WO2006023165A2 *14 Jul 20052 Mar 2006Boston Scient Scimed IncSuturing instrument
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.227/176.1, 227/19, 227/178.1
Clasificación internacionalA61B17/11, A61B17/072, A61B17/10, A61B17/28, A61B17/115, A61B17/068
Clasificación cooperativaA61B2017/07214, A61B17/10, A61B17/07207, A61B2017/2927, A61B2017/1142, A61B17/1152, A61B2017/2929, A61B17/072, A61B17/0682
Clasificación europeaA61B17/072, A61B17/072B
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
26 May 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
25 May 2005FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
24 May 2001FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4