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Patentes

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Número de publicaciónUS592822 A
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Fecha de publicación2 Nov 1897
Fecha de presentación6 Mar 1897
Número de publicaciónUS 592822 A, US 592822A, US-A-592822, US592822 A, US592822A
InventoresHenry F. Parker
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
parker
US 592822 A
Resumen  disponible en
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Reclamaciones  disponible en
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

(No Model.) 2 lSheets--Sheet 1.

- H. F. PARKER. VBNTILATING CUSHION PoR SHOES, am.

No. 592,822. Patented Nov. 2, 1897.

1H: Nonms PETERS w.. Pnomuso., wAsHlNaYoN, cV

2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

(No Model.)

H. I'. PARKER.. i VBNTILATING CUSHION FOR SHOES, am.

Patented Nov.. 2, 1897i INVEN 70H UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HENRY F. PARKER, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO THE JAMES-BEAM COMPANY, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

VENTILATING-CUSHION-FOR SHOES, 84C.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 592,822, dated November 2, 189'7.

Apphcation led March 6, 1897. Serial'lil'o.V 626,248. (No model.)

To a/ZZ whom it may concern.-

Beit known that I, HENRY F. PARKER, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and State f New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Ventilating- Cushions for Shoes, &c., of which the following is a specification.

rlhis invention relates to an improved article of manufacture adapted as aventilatingcushion for shoes and other purposes, and said invention also relates to a certain novel combination of said cushion with other materials and with other features of construction in a shoe, as will be hereinafter described and claimed.

The object of the invention in the adaptation of the improved article to a shoe is to form a cushion of india-rubber or other elastic material which will extend across the entire width of the foot between the welts, but form air-ducts when interposed between contiguous surfaces, which will conduct the air both lengthwise and crosswise of the shoe and distribute it universally and uniformly, avoiding the necessity of reducing the area of the cushion to form longitudinal channels, as heretofore, which reduction is liable to present an uneven insole.

The object is, moreover, to obtain a cushion structure which willoffer ai r-passages at rightangular directions without interrupting the continuous ridges of the corrugations which are necessary to support the yielding contiguous surfaces so that they `will not lill up the air-spaces when the sole is subjected to the pressure of the foot in walking. Felt insoles may thereby be used in conjunction with the improved cushion, which will insure supply of air to all parts of the felt.

The object is alsoto produce a Ventilatingcushion which will bend with equal elasticity in all directions and in which the numerous air-channels will not weaken the structure.

Referring to the accompanying drawings,

,Figure l is a bottom plan view of the shoe with the sole removed, showing the welt, the

cushion, and the'insole. Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section at ww, Fig. l; and Fig. 3 is a cross-section at y y, Fig. 2. Fig. 4 is a surface view, partly reversed, of the improved in the formation of the surfaces whereon cor- 'rugations 2 on one side run at right angles l(or at other suitable angles) to corrugations 3 on the other side, and perforations 4 are provided at the intersections of the grooves, so adapted that when the sheet is interposed between contiguous surfaces each groove running in one direction will communicate with the grooves running in the other direction, forming distributing passage-ways universally connecting all parts of the surfaces with any given source or point of air-supply. This is accomplished without interrupting the continuity of the ridges of the corrugations at 5 5 and 6 6, which support the contiguous surfaces, as-could not be effectually done were the two angular series of channels formed on one side of the cushion.

The series of ridges 5 5, running crosswise of the ridges 6 6, connect and brace each other securely, forming a grating which cannot be readily broken, but which will yield easily to fleXure in all directions.

The sheet may be reinforced with a canvas layer 7, interposed intermediately, as indicated at the left-hand portions of Figs. 5 and 6, if desired.

The sheet may be molded to any convenient marketable size and cut by means of dies or otherwise to the shapes required.

In its application to a shoe-cushion the elastic material A is interposed between the sole B and the insole O, Figs. l, 2, and 3, and the material A is cut to iit and abut against the inner edge of the welt D, so as to extend as nearly as possible the entire width of the shoe, thus cushioning the full tread of the foot.

The air is supplied and allowed to circulate freely in and out through the tube E by the movement of the foot in walking, and it is desired to secure proper communication of the air from said tube or source of supply to all parts of the perforated insole C, which has perforations 8 generally distributed throughout its surface.

The first feature essential loo to this distribution is the formation of longitudinal channels whereby the air is conveyed from the tube E at the counter to the toe. For this purpose the cushion A and also the cushion A are inserted so that the corrugated channels 3 3 run lengthwise of the sole B contiguous thereto and form ducts for the passage of the air along the length of the shoe, and the corrugated channels 2 2 extend cross- Wise of the insole C contiguous thereto and form distributing-ducts communicating with the ducts 3 by means ofA the perforations 4.

At the shank of the sole the cushion may of course be omitted, channels F F being left at each side of the shank-strip G between the sole and insole. The ducts 3 3 therefore serve as conduits for pumping the air through the length of the shoe, and the duets 2 2 serve to distribute the air crosswise and equally to all parts of the shoe.

The cushion thus formed for universal distribution of air is especially adapted for combination with a felt insole C, which is porous and will pass the air fed to it and keep the feet dry, and the continuity of the ridges 5 5 will keep the felt from sinking into the channels 2 2, so as to obstruct them.

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

l. As an article of manufacture, a sheet of elastic material having corrugations on one side running at angles to corrugations on the other side and having perforations at the intersections of the grooves.

2. As an article of manufacture, an elastic ven tilating-sheet of rubber having a series of corrugations on each surface, the one series extending in a direction at right angles or substantially so to the other, and having perforations at the crossings of the grooves bctween the corrugations, so adapted that when the sheet is interposed between contiguous surfaces, each groove running in one direction will communicate with grooves running in the other direction, forming universally-communicating ducts.

3. In a shoe, the combination with a sole, insole, welt, and upper, of aventilating-cushion composed of elasticmaterial interposed between the sole and insole and having series of corrugations extending in different directions on its respective surfaces, and provided with perforations whereby the ducts formed by said corrugations adjacent to the sole and insole communicate with one another.

4. In a shoe, the combination with a sole, insole, Welt, and upper, of a Ventilating-cushion interposed between the sole and insole and having series of corrugations extending in different directions on its respective surfaces, and perforated as described; said cushion extending from the inner edge ofthe welt on one side of the shoe fully across to the inner edge of the opposite welt, substantially as shown.

5. In a shoe, the combination with the sole, of a Ventilating rubber cushion having longitudinal corrugations adjacent to the sole, and having closely-arranged transverse corrugations on its upper surface and perforated as described, and a felt insole resting on said upper surface of The cushion, adapted as described.

Signed at New York city, in the county of New York and State of New York, this 5th day of March, A. D. 1897.

HENRY F. PARKER.

Witnesses:

EDWIN L. KERR, HARRY F. NOAH.

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Clasificaciones
Clasificación cooperativaA43B7/06