Búsqueda Imágenes Maps Play YouTube Noticias Gmail Drive Más »
Iniciar sesión
Usuarios de lectores de pantalla: deben hacer clic en este enlace para utilizar el modo de accesibilidad. Este modo tiene las mismas funciones esenciales pero funciona mejor con el lector.

Patentes

  1. Búsqueda avanzada de patentes
Número de publicaciónUSRE40365 E1
Tipo de publicaciónConcesión
Número de solicitudUS 10/727,328
Fecha de publicación10 Jun 2008
Fecha de presentación3 Dic 2003
Fecha de prioridad11 Sep 1998
TarifaPagadas
También publicado comoUSRE38533
Número de publicación10727328, 727328, US RE40365 E1, US RE40365E1, US-E1-RE40365, USRE40365 E1, USRE40365E1
InventoresJohn Kirchgeorg, Richard C. Turner
Cesionario originalLife Corporation
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos: USPTO, Cesión de USPTO, Espacenet
Portable emergency oxygen and automatic external defibrillator (AED) therapy system
US RE40365 E1
Resumen
This invention provides a medical diagnosis and therapy system particularly adapted for the combined uses of emergency cardiac defibrillation and pulmonary oxygen administration, including automated patient cardiopulmonary assessment and voice prompted therapy and resuscitation: electrocardio diagnosis/monitoring/defibrillation and electropulmonary blood oximetry/oxygen administration. The system has a case having access opening(s) and clear cover(s) to view the apparatus and contents, to dispel all doubt as to know how to open the case and to make it easy for a user to quickly find and use the various components.
Imágenes(5)
Previous page
Next page
Reclamaciones(31)
1. A hand-held multi-component emergency medical system, comprising:
a breathable oxygen delivery system;
a defibrillation system; and
a unitary casing for housing said oxygen delivery system and said defibrillation system.
2. A hand-held multi-component emergency medical system, comprising:
a breathable oxygen delivery system;
a oximetry system;
a defibrillation system; and
a unitary casing for housing said oxygen delivery system, said oximetry system and said defibrillation system.
3. A system as claimed in claim 1 or 2, further comprising a voice prompting system for directing a user through a protocol employing said defibrillation system.
4. A system as claimed in claim 1 or 2, further comprising a voice prompting system for directing a user through a protocol employing said defibrillation system and said oxygen delivery system.
5. A system as claimed in claim 2, further comprising a voice prompting system for directing a user through a protocol employing said defibrillation system, said oxygen delivery system and said oximetry system.
6. A system as claimed in claim 5, further comprising a control processor for controlling operations of at least said defibrillation system, said voice prompting system and said oximetry system.
7. A system as claimed in claim 6, wherein said control processor further controls said oxygen delivery system.
8. A system as claimed in claim 7, further comprising a feedback control from said oximetry system to said oxygen delivery system to regulate oxygen delivery.
9. A system as claimed in claim 8, further including a display system coupled to said oximetry system.
10. A system as claimed in claim 8, further including means for modal control of said oxygen delivery system, for switching or prompting a user to switch said oxygen delivery system between a variable flow rate/pressure cyclic ventilator mode and a fixed flow rate mode.
11. A multi-component emergency medical system of a size and weight which can easily be carried by a single hand comprising:
a breathable oxygen delivery system;
a prompting system for directing a user through a protocol employing said oxygen delivery system; and
a unitary casing for housing said oxygen delivery system and said prompting system; the cumulative size and weight of the unitary casing, oxygen delivery system, and prompting system such that the unitary casing, when housing the oxygen delivery system and the prompting system, can easily be carried by a single hand.
12. A multi-component emergency medical system of a size and weight which can easily be carried by a single hand comprising:
a breathable oxygen delivery system;
a capnometer;
and a unitary casing for housing said oxygen delivery system and said capnometer; the cumulative size and weight of the unitary casing, oxygen delivery system, and capnometer such that the unitary casing, when housing the oxygen delivery system and the capnometer, can easily be carried by a single hand.
13. A system as claimed in claim 12, further comprising a control processor for controlling the operation of said oxygen delivery system on the basis of feedback from the capnometer.
14. A system as claimed in claim 12, further comprising a control processor for controlling the operation of said oxygen delivery system on the basis of feedback from the capnometer.
15. A system as claimed in claim 12, further including a display system coupled to said capnometer for at least one of assessing, diagnosing and monitoring.
16. A system as claimed in claim 12, further comprising a prompting system.
17. A system as claimed in claim 16, further comprising a control processor for controlling the prompting system to direct the user through a protocol of operation of the oxygen en delivery system on the basis of feedback from the capnometer.
18. A system as claimed in claim 12, further comprising an oximeter.
19. A system as claimed in claim 18, further comprising a control processor for controlling the operation of said oxygen delivery system on the basis of feedback from both the oximeter and the capnometer.
20. A system as claimed in claim 18, further comprising a control processor for controlling the operation of said oxygen delivery system on the basis of feedback from both the oximeter and the capnometer.
21. A system as claimed in claim 18, further including a display system coupled to said oximeter and capnometer for at least one of assessing, diagnosing and monitoring.
22. A system as claimed in claim 18, further comprising a prompting system.
23. A system as claimed in claim 22, further comprising a control processor for controlling the prompting system to direct the user through a protocol of operation of the oxygen delivery system based on feedback from both the oximeter and the capnometer.
24. A multi-component emergency medical system of a size and weight which can easily be carried by a single hand comprising:
a breathable oxygen delivery system;
an oximeter;
a prompting system;
and a unitary casing for housing said oxygen delivery system and said oximeter and said prompting system; the cumulative size and weight of the unitary casing, oxygen delivery system, oximeter, and prompting system such that the unitary casing, when housing the oxygen delivery system, the oximeter, and the prompting system, can easily be carried by a single hand.
25. A system as claimed in claim 24, further comprising a control processor for controlling the prompting system to direct a user through a protocol of operation of the oxygen delivery system based on feedback from the oximeter.
26. A multi-component emergency medical system of a size and weight which can easily be carried by a single hand comprising:
a breathable oxygen delivery system;
an oximeter;
a display system coupled to said oximeter for at least one of assessing, diagnosing and monitoring;
and a unitary casing for housing said oxygen delivery system and said oximeter and said display system; the cumulative size and weight of the unitary casing, oxygen delivery system, oximeter, and display system such that the unitary casing, when housing the oxygen delivery system, the oximeter, and the display system, can easily be carried by a single hand.
27. A system as claimed in claim 26, further comprising a prompting system.
28. A system as claimed in claim 24 or 26, further comprising a control processor for controlling the operation of said oxygen delivery system on the basis of feedback from the oximeter.
29. A system as claimed in claims 11, 12, 24, or 26, of a size and weight which can be hand-held.
30. A system as claimed in claims 11, 12, 24, or 26, of a size and weight which can be wearable.
31. A system as claimed in claim 25, 17, or 23 further including means for modal control of said oxygen delivery system, for switching or prompting a user to switch said oxygen delivery system between a variable flow rate/pressure cyclic ventilator mode and a fixed flow rate mode.
Descripción
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This reissue application is a continuation of Reissue Application Ser. No. 10/457,958, which is an application for reissue of U.S. Pat. No. 6,327,497, which reissue application has now issued as Reissue Pat. No. 38,533. In addition, two other continuation of Reissue Application Ser. No. 10/457,958 were also filed with the subject application on Dec. 3, 2003. U.S. Reissue Application Ser. No. 10/727,325 has recently been allowed to lapse, while U.S. Reissue Application Ser. No. 10/727,327 remains pending.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to an emergency medical diagnosis and therapy system integrating several emergency medical equipment components into a single multi-functional unit within a convenient unitary casing, so that medical personnel can easily handle, access and implement a variety of important emergency tools and therapies.

2. Description of the Related Art

Conventional emergency medial equipment has been improved over the years to advance the ability of emergency medical personnel to administer vital care to patients. Such advancements include voice prompting, automated and individualized patient assessments and self-maintenance of the equipment.

For example, a variety of small, portable on-site devices are available for administering electric pulse therapy in emergency situations of myocardial infarcation and to defibrillate and restart regular heart pump rhythms necessary for sustaining the life of the patient. Most of these Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) devices include electro-cardio diagnosis and monitoring of the patient, and many include voice prompting for the user. There are also known O2 and CO2 oximetry and capnography devices for measuring arterial oxygenation, perfusion, O2Hb dissociation, tissue O2 affinity, O2 content, PO2, pulse oximetry saturation (SPO2), or calculated oxygen saturation (%SO2), because oxygen supplementation is critical in many emergency cardiopulmonary trauma situations. For this latter purpose, there exist a wide variety of oxygen resuscitators, inhalators, or ventilators.

Often, first responder medical personnel have arrived on site to attend the victim with an AED defibrillator, but have been unable to resuscitate and keep alive the victim without supplemental oxygen on hand. In many instances the victim was successfully defibrillated, but poor cell perfusion and toxic gases due to hypoxia prevented successful recovery. In many other instances, the first responder arrived when the vital signs of the victim were declining but could do little until after the victim had begun defibrillation or expired. In the first instances, supplemental oxygen administration may have insured successful survival of the defibrillated victim. In the second instances, supplemental oxygen administration may have even precluded the need for the defibrillator. In both instances, emergency oxygen may have saved the victim by restoring the proper oxygenation and cell perfusion necessary for survival.

Heretofore, each piece of emergency equipment has typically been contained in its own housing or carrying case and used independently, as a stand-alone unit. Handling each piece of equipment separately, however, is inconvenient and cumbersome for medical personnel, who are often situated in awkward conditions and dangerous circumstances, such as at automobile accident sites. Moreover, the use of separate units ignores the interdependence of administration among the several emergency systems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, the present invention improves upon conventional arrangements by providing a medical care system comprising a plurality of interdependent emergency medical systems in one convenient unit.

An object of the invention is to provide a multifunctional emergency medical care system which places a plurality of interdependent emergency therapy devices in a single unit, and which is capable of guiding emergency medical personnel through emergency procedures which employ these devices simultaneously.

A further object of the invention is to provide an emergency medical therapy system having various devices which may be needed in a medical emergency, arranged in a housing unit in a manner allowing easy and convenient simultaneous access to each piece of equipment so that the user can utilize the equipment easily, quickly and efficiently.

Additional features and advantages of the invention will be set forth in the description which follows, and in part will be apparent from the description, or may be learned by practice of the invention. The objectives and other advantages of the invention will be realized and attained by the structure particularly pointed out in the written description and claims hereof as well as the appended drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are included to provide a further understanding of the invention and are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate embodiments of the invention and together with the description serve to explain the principles of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating a first embodiment of the system;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are perspective views illustrating variations of the embodiment of the system, and

FIG. 4 is a system diagram of a fully integrated emergency medial system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Reference will now be made in detail to the preferred embodiments of the present invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

Referring to FIG. 1, the first embodiment illustrates a housing 1 having two access openings for accessing two compartments 20, 30. Two clear or opaque covers 10, 12 cover the openings, respectively.

Handle 40 provides a means for carrying the unit to a victim or patient. This allows the user to have a free hand for other equipment, handling a patient or other important tasks. Moreover, with multiple pieces of equipment housed in the same unit, the user needs to only look at the face of the unit to view the various displays for the different systems.

Thus, consolidating multiple medical devices into one unit provides easier handling and convenience for the user.

A convenient variation is illustrated in FIG. 2. Instead of having two covers, this embodiment has one cover 14 for covering the openings of compartments 20, 30. In this embodiment, only a single cover 14 is removed to access the various compartments of the housing 1.

This provides an advantage over the first embodiment since the user only needs to remove a single cover to access all the equipment. During an emergency, when time is of the essence, this provides an important advantage for the user of saving time. The rest of this variation is similar to the first embodiment and thus, the features are represented by the same reference numerals and a detailed description is omitted.

FIG. 3 illustrates another variant of the invention. A single cover 16 covers the entire front face of the housing 1. Thus, all the equipment pieces, including the displays and controls are covered with a preferably clear cover 16.

This variation provides an advantage over the first and second described in units in that the displays 80, speaker 50, and other various controls 60 are protected by the cover 16. Thus, during use the operator only needs to remove a single cover piece to access all components in the housing. After use, the single cover protects all the controls and displays, as well as the other equipment housed in the compartments from damage during storage or transport.

As noted above, each compartment 20, 30 holds one or more emergency medical devices. Several component variations are possible. For instance, the housing may combine a small-sized emergency oxygen unit (gas dispensing device) with an oximeter, a pulse display and electrode lead. As another alternative, either or both of the emergency oxygen unit and oximetry system may be combined with an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED), corresponding controls and paddle electrodes. In either case, the system may include a voice prompt system, selection controls and a speaker. Many other combinations are possible, as will be evident to those of skill in the art.

FIG. 1 shows housing 1 having a gas dispensing device 70 and an electrocardio defibrillation device 75, the former comprising an oxygen cylinder with a mechanical or electromechanically controlled regulator, gauge, mask and hose in one compartment 20.

The oxygen dispensing device may be functional in two modes: manual mode, in which an on/off switch or lever simply controls on/off supply of oxygen, generally delivered at a fixed or variable low flow rate, or automatic mode, where the flow rate is variable and may be controlled either according to program control or via feedback from the oximetry unit. Included within the variable flow rate mode may be a ventilation mode for non-breathing victims, wherein liter flow and pressure are subjected to time sequencing according to a cycle corresponding closely to requirements the victim needs to return to a normal breathing pattern. Compartment 30 stores defibrillator shock paddle electrodes 121 and oximeter electrode 107. Several other component variations are also possible.

The defibrillation device and associated controls are contained entirely within the housing 1, and may be of a form known in the art, as represented by U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,797,969, 5,792,190, 5,749,902, 5,700,281, 5,716,380, 5,605,150, 5,549,659, 5,529,063, 5,243,975, 5,785,043, 5,782,878, 5,749,913 and 5,662,690, each of which is incorporated by reference herein. Several of these known defibrillators include voice prompting; the invention deviates from the known voice prompting scheme in that it also includes timely prompts for oximetry measurement and the administration of oxygen. The protocols for the coordination of oximetry, oxygen administration and defibrillation are known generally in the medical arts, and therefore will not be explained in detail here.

Housing 1 holds power source 90 (battery), and the known controls 110, 103 and displays 116, 118 for the defibrillator and oximeter. A speaker 50 is also housed in the housing 1, to be used in conjunction with voice prompting tools and controls 113.

An example of the use of the invention will now be described, in order to better explain the functionality of the invention.

At an accident scene, for example, it is determined that a victim is currently in cardiac arrest. Upon enabling the unit of the invention, controls 113 may be activated to enable the voice prompt system, which will guide the user through the steps necessary to operate the oxygen delivery, oximetry and defibrillation systems. Such voice prompt systems are known in the portable defibrillation arts, however, according to the invention the prior art system may be modified to include prompts for effecting oxygen administration and oximetry measurements.

For example, in this example of a non-breathing victim in cardiac arrest, the voice prompt system may guide the user through the following protocols:

    • initiate and deploy defibrillation system and paddles
    • administer electroshock treatment
    • initiate oxygen delivery in ventilator mode
    • deploy oximetry measuring electrode.

If the defibrillation is successful, as determined by a pulse reading, the voice prompt system may subsequently guide the user through switching of the ventilator mode to a regulated constant volume oxygen delivery mode which is more suitable for a breathing patient, and/or make other variations in oxygen delivery via program control or in response to oximetry readings. Naturally, many variations are possible as will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art.

In its most simple form, the integrated emergency medical systems of the invention may be substantially without interdependent control. For example, an emergency oxygen device can be combined with a defibrillation system, without any electromechanical connection therebetween. In such a case, if voice prompting is added, the system may prompt only for defibrillation, or both defibrillation and oxygen delivery, for example.

A more integrated and sophisticated system is illustrated in FIG. 4. In this system, a control processor controls operation of the various emergency medical units (oxygen delivery, defibrillation and oximetry), accepts feedback from each of these units, interfaces with and controls the voice prompt system, and drives the various displays 116, 118. When the operator selects AED or oximetry functions by operating inputs 103, 110, the processor controls defibrillator control 111 to generate an output waveform of a selected type in accordance with operator selection, and controls oximetry control section 102 in accordance with operator selection to perform various measurements and drives display 116 to display these measurements, e.g., pulse rate and blood O2 related measurements, to the operator in real time. Similarly, processor 101 drives LCD screen 118 to display user instructions and prompts, respiratory monitoring and diagnosis, and cardio diagnosis and monitoring data.

Processor 101 also interfaces with voice prompt system 112 to cause the latter to deliver a selected sequence of voice prompts via speaker 114 according to predetermined protocols, operator input and the condition of the patient as measured by the system, including sensor 107, in a manner generally similar to that known in the art.

As noted previously, the oxygen delivery system 105 can be controlled either manually or by automatic control. In a manual mode, for example, the system 105 may deliver oxygen at a fixed liter flow and pressure, or at a plurality of flow rates. In automatic mode, the system 105 may, in response to a control signal from processor 101 (or user input), deliver a time sequenced flow rate and pressure to operate as a ventilator. In response to user input, a control signal from processor 101 or feedback from oximetry control 102, the system 105 can be switched from ventilator mode to fixed flow rate mode, the latter being more suitable for patients capable of breathing on their own. Other fixed or variable flow rates may be elected via control signals from processor 101 or feedback from oximetry control 102.

With the present invention, a single therapy unit can combine emergency cardiac defibrillation and pulmonary oxygen administration in one convenient casing. An electrocardio diagnosis/monitoring/defibrillation device can be combined with electropulmonary blood oximetry/oxygen administration, including automated patient cardiopulmonary oxygen assessment and voice prompted therapy and resuscitation.

Although described herein as an interactive combination of oxygen delivery, oximetry and defibrillation systems, it will be apparent that the invention could be comprised of a combination of any two of these systems, with associated modification of the control mechanisms and voice prompts, as will be evident to those of skill in the art.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US3613677 *7 Dic 196419 Oct 1971Abbott LabPortable resuscitator
US4109828 *24 Ene 197729 Ago 1978Oxygen Therapy Institute, Inc.Inhalation apparatus
US4197842 *7 Mar 197815 Abr 1980Anderson Edmund MPortable pulmonary respirator, intermittent positive pressure breathing machine and emergency oxygen equipment
US4198963 *19 Oct 197822 Abr 1980Michigan Instruments, Inc.Cardiopulmonary resuscitator, defibrillator and monitor
US4241833 *20 Ago 197930 Dic 1980Luebcke Dean EParamedic kit
US4257415 *7 May 197924 Mar 1981Howard RubinPortable nebulizer treatment apparatus
US4359048 *26 Ene 197916 Nov 1982Banyaszati Aknamelyito VallalatAutomatically startable oxygen rescue device
US4438764 *31 Ago 198227 Mar 1984Salvatore EppolitoOxygen caddy
US4685456 *2 Dic 198511 Ago 1987Mary SmartSelf-retracting oxygen tubing
US4739913 *24 Abr 198626 Abr 1988Michael C. MooreBackpack type carrier for portable oxygen dispensers
US4788973 *13 May 19866 Dic 1988John KirchgeorgGas dispensing system and case therefor
US4889116 *17 Nov 198726 Dic 1989Phospho Energetics, Inc.Adaptive control of neonatal fractional inspired oxygen
US4932402 *16 Oct 198712 Jun 1990Puritan-Bennett CorporationPulse translation apparatus
US4944292 *31 Mar 198731 Jul 1990Louise M. GaekeMobile resuscitating apparatus
US5207303 *15 Jul 19914 May 1993Oswalt Brenda KMedical emergency carrying case
US5243975 *31 Jul 199114 Sep 1993Physio-Control CorporationFor the relief of pain and inflammation
US5308320 *28 Dic 19903 May 1994University Of Pittsburgh Of The Commonwealth System Of Higher EducationPortable and modular cardiopulmonary bypass apparatus and associated aortic balloon catheter and associated method
US5494051 *14 Sep 199427 Feb 1996Cardi-Act, L.L.C.Patient-transport apparatus
US5529063 *8 Mar 199425 Jun 1996Physio-Control CorporationModular system for controlling the function of a medical electronic device
US5549659 *4 Nov 199427 Ago 1996Physio-Control CorporationCommunication interface for transmitting and receiving serial data between medical instruments
US5605150 *4 Nov 199425 Feb 1997Physio-Control CorporationElectrical interface for a portable electronic physiological instrument having separable components
US5626131 *7 Jun 19956 May 1997Salter LabsMethod for intermittent gas-insufflation
US5626151 *7 Mar 19966 May 1997The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyTransportable life support system
US5653685 *28 Mar 19955 Ago 1997Lrt, Inc.Method of providing circulation via lung expansion and deflation
US5662690 *28 Jun 19962 Sep 1997Heartstream, Inc.Defibrillator with training features and pause actuator
US5682877 *15 Abr 19944 Nov 1997Mondry; Adolph J.System and method for automatically maintaining a blood oxygen saturation level
US5700281 *17 Jun 199623 Dic 1997Survivalink CorporationStage and state monitoring automated external defibrillator
US5706801 *28 Jul 199513 Ene 1998Caire Inc.Sensing and communications system for use with oxygen delivery apparatus
US5716380 *15 Abr 199610 Feb 1998Physio-Control CorporationCommon therapy/data port for a portable defibrillator
US5749902 *22 May 199612 May 1998Survivalink CorporationRecorded data correction method and apparatus for isolated clock systems
US5749913 *16 May 199612 May 1998Heartstream, Inc.System and method for collecting and storing electrotherapy data on a detachable memory device
US5782878 *13 Ene 199721 Jul 1998Heartstream, Inc.External defibrillator with communications network link
US5785043 *16 May 199628 Jul 1998Heartstream, Inc.Method of creating a report showing the time correlation between recorded medical events
US5792190 *17 Nov 199711 Ago 1998Survivalink CorporationAutomated external defibrillator operator interface
US5797969 *9 Ene 199725 Ago 1998Survivalink CorporationOne button lid activated automatic external defibrillator
US5895354 *25 Jun 199720 Abr 1999Simmons; Paul L.Integrated medical diagnostic center
US5918331 *7 Ago 19956 Jul 1999Buchanan Aircraft Corporation LimitedPortable intensive care unit with medical equipment
US5975081 *21 Jun 19962 Nov 1999Northrop Grumman CorporationSelf-contained transportable life support system
US6046046 *3 Abr 19984 Abr 2000Hassanein; Waleed H.Compositions, methods and devices for maintaining an organ
US6142962 *27 Ago 19977 Nov 2000Emergency Medical Systems, Inc.Resuscitation device having a motor driven belt to constrict/compress the chest
US6186977 *24 Abr 199713 Feb 2001Joseph L. Riley Anesthesia AssociatesApparatus and method for total intravenous anesthesia delivery and associated patient monitoring
US6199550 *14 Ago 199813 Mar 2001Bioasyst, L.L.C.Integrated physiologic sensor system
US6325978 *4 Ago 19984 Dic 2001Ntc Technology Inc.Oxygen monitoring and apparatus
US6532958 *25 Jul 199718 Mar 2003Minnesota Innovative Technologies & Instruments CorporationAutomated control and conservation of supplemental respiratory oxygen
US6606993 *12 Ene 200119 Ago 2003BioasystIntegrated physiologic sensor system
US20020195105 *4 Sep 200226 Dic 2002Brent BlueMethod and apparatus for providing and controlling oxygen supply
US20040074495 *24 Dic 200122 Abr 2004Wickham Peter John DeaconCharacterisation of mask systems
Otras citas
Referencia
1 *"CPR Prompt-AED/CPR Total Trainer", CPR Prompt, Inc., Jan. 1996.
2 *"First Save: The simple, safe and affordable life saving solution", Survival Ink Corporation, 1997.
3 *"It's a fire extinguisher your people can use to put out a cardiac arrest", Phisio-Control Corporation, 1998.
4 *"paraPAC is for CPR", pneuPAC, Inc., 1998.
5 *"When survival is measured in minutes", Heartstream, Inc. 1996.
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US7980244 *17 Jul 200719 Jul 2011Neoforce Group, Inc.Emergency pulmonary resuscitation device
US800251423 Oct 200723 Ago 2011Praxair Technology, Inc.Method and system for supplying portable gas cylinders
US81625876 Jul 201124 Abr 2012Praxair Technology, Inc.Method and system for supplying portable gas cylinders
US8267084 *24 Feb 200618 Sep 2012Resmed LimitedRecognition system for an apparatus that delivers breathable gas to a patient
US842875121 Sep 201023 Abr 2013Covidien LpElectrode delivery system
US869559115 Nov 201015 Abr 2014Lloyd Verner OlsonApparatus and method of monitoring and responding to respiratory depression
US20100147301 *24 Feb 200617 Jun 2010Resmed LimitedRecognition System for an Apparatus That Delivers Breathable Gas to a Patient
US20120103335 *5 Ago 20113 May 2012Danny Chagai ZeeviSmoke alarm triggered emergency portable breathing apparatus
Clasificaciones
Clasificación de EE.UU.128/205.22, 607/3, 128/204.23, 607/5, 128/205.23, 128/897, 128/204.22, 206/572
Clasificación internacionalA61N1/00, A61M16/00, A61B5/00, A61B19/00, A61B5/0205, A61B5/024, A61N1/39, A61J1/00
Clasificación cooperativaA61B5/0205, A61M16/00, A61B5/024, A61B2560/0431, A61M2230/205, A61N1/39, A61B5/1477
Clasificación europeaA61N1/39, A61M16/00, A61B5/0205
Eventos legales
FechaCódigoEventoDescripción
2 Jun 2013FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
4 Jun 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8